Students in the Anthropology (PhD Thesis) program will benefit from study and research under a department that combines rigorous training with extensive field experience and lab investigations around the world. The Department of Anthropology and Archaeology embraces an integrative approach, offering innovative studies in anthropology that include the socio-cultural stream. This ranges from anthropology and militarization to medical anthropology, natural resources and environment, political economy and globalization, sustainability, and urban anthropology. The biological anthropology stream includes behavioral ecology, conservation, health and nutrition, human osteology, sex differences and reproduction, population genetics, primatology, and paleoanthropology.. ...
Founded in 1967, the Department of Anthropology at Durham is now one of the largest integrated anthropology departments in the UK carrying out innovative research on cutting edge topics spanning social anthropology, evolutionary anthropology, and the anthropology of health. Our 40 academics and over 30 postdoctoral researchers employ a wide range of social science and natural science perspectives to explore questions about human life in its evolutionary, environmental and cultural contexts. Our taught programmes offer students the opportunity to pursue general and specialist anthropology programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, while our PhD students study topics from primate behaviour to rhetoric culture and indigenous knowledge to internet technologies. With our first-class facilities, innovative programmes, and world-leading academics, Durham is setting the agenda for 21st century anthropology. ...
Cyborg anthropology is a recent subspecialty launched at the Annual Meetings of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in 1993. Within the AAA cyborg anthropology is associated with the Committee for the Anthropology of Science, Technology and Computing (CASTAC). From the start cyborg anthropologists have located themselves within the larger transdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS), attending with frequency the annual meetings of the Society for the Social Studies of Science (SSSS) and applying cyborgian perspectives to a wide research spectrum that has ranged from the culture of physicists in Japan (Traweek 1988) to organ donation in Germany (Hogle 1999) to extended work on the new reproductive technologies. Anthropology, the study of humans, has traditionally concentrated on discovering the process of evolution through which the human came to be (physical anthropology), or on understanding the beliefs, languages, and behaviors of past or present human groups ...
For over two decades I have maintained that generative anthropology is a new way of thinking that constitutes a qualitative change from traditional philosophical/metaphysical thought. I distinguish between a way of thinking and a personal doctrine of the kind elaborated by those whom Foucault called (no doubt with a touch of envy) "masters of discursivity," namely, Marx and Freud. A Marxist is one dependent on Marxs model of human action, his anthropology, just as a Freudian is dependent on Freuds anthropology. And it is curious indeed that although many in both camps are proud to claim that they have revised the doctrines of their master, it is inconceivable that any such revision could transform either doctrine into a new, more fundamental anthropology.. The source of this impossibility lies in the fact that the anthropologies of Marx and Freud are derived, or more precisely, retrodicted from the specific foci, respectively economic and psychological, of their analyses of the modern world. ...
jobs/0000859372-01. The Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington invites applications for a full-time tenure-track Assistant Professor in cultural anthropology with a teaching and research emphasis on the Theravada Buddhist regions of Mainland Southeast Asia. The topic of this search is open, but preference will be given to scholars whose research addresses the anthropology of health or environment. We are particularly interested in those whose work focuses on the transnational dimensions of these areas.. The University of Washington and the Department of Anthropology value colleagues who have a strong commitment to an academic environment that promotes diversity. The University of Washington is an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to, among other things, race, color, creed, religion, national origin, citizenship, sex, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or ...
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Anthropology is the study of humankind everywhere, throughout time. Anthropology involves the study of people, their origins, their biological variations and characteristics, their languages and cultural patterns, their social structures and institutions, and their adaptation to their environment. As stated on the American Anthropological Association website: "Anthropological study provides training particularly well suited to the 21st century. The economy will be increasingly international; workforces and markets, increasingly diverse; participatory management and decision making, increasingly important; communication skills, increasingly in demand. Anthropology is the only contemporary discipline that approaches human questions from historical, biological, linguistic, and cultural perspectives. The intellectual excitement and relevance of the wide range of information presented in anthropology assures that students are engaged and challenged. Moreover, it complements other scientific and ...
In each year of your degree you will take a number of individual modules, normally valued at 0.5 or 1.0 credits, adding up to a total of 4.0 credits for the year. Modules are assessed in the academic year in which they are taken. The balance of compulsory and optional modules varies from programme to programme and year to year. A 1.0 credit is considered equivalent to 15 credits in the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS).. In the first year, you take compulsory modules covering the three branches of the programme: biological anthropology, social anthropology and material culture. Biological anthropology focuses on contemporary human-environment interactions and human evolution. Social anthropology explores social and cultural differences and their determinants, from indigenous groups to modern western economies. Material culture studies human, social and environmental relationships through the evidence of peoples construction of their material world.. Your first year also includes a ...
Michael Alan Park (Ph.D. Indiana, 1979) is a professor of anthropology at Central Connecticut State University, where he has been on the faculty since 1973, teaching courses in general anthropology, human evolution, biocultural diversity, human ecology, forensic anthropology, and the evolution of human behavior. His interests focus on the application of evolutionary theory to the story of human evolution and on the quality of science education and the public perception and understanding of scientific matters. He is the author or co-author of four current texts in anthropology as well as technical and popular articles.. ...
Introduction: Sexualizing anthropologys fields (Jennifer Robertson). Part 1: Anthropologys Sexual Fields.. 1. "Anthropology rediscovers sexuality: A theoretical comment." (Carole Vance).. 2. "Biological determinism and homosexuality." (Bonnie Spanier).. 3. "Feminisms, queer theories, and the archaeological study of past sexualities." (Barbara Voss).. 4. "No." (Don Kulick).. 5. "Resources for lesbian ethnographic research in the lavender archives." (Alisa Klinger).. Part 2: Problems and Propositions.. 6. "Erotic anthropology: ritualized homosexuality in Melanesia and beyond." (Deborah Elliston).. 7. "Gender, genetics, and generation: reformulating biology in lesbian kinship." (Corinne Hayden).. 8. "Transsexualism: reflections on the persistence of gender and the mutability of sex." (Judith Shapiro).. 9. "Problems encountered in writing the history of sexuality: Sources, theory and interpretation." (Estelle B. Freedman and John DEmilio).. Part 3: Ethics, Erotics and Exercises .. 10. "Choosing ...
Cyborg anthropology poses a serious challenge to the human-centered foundations of anthropological discourse. The term "cyborg anthropology" is an oxymoron that draws attention to the human-centered presuppositions of anthropological discourse by posing the challenge of alternative formulations. While the skin-bound individual, autonomous bearer of identity and agency, theoretically without gender, race, class, region, or time, has served usefully and productively as the subject of culture and of cultural accounts, alternate accounts of history and subjectivity are also possible".[1] "The autonomy of individuals has already been called into question by post-structuralist and posthumanist critiques. Cyborg anthropology explores a new alternative by examining the argument that human subjects and subjectivity are crucially as much a function of machines, machine relations, and information transfers as they are machine producers and operators. From this perspective, science and technology affect ...
Are you interested in a career in health, health care, public health, or medical anthropology? Then this course is for you! Come spend 4.5 weeks in the beautiful city of Oaxaca learning about medical anthropology, providing service in community health settings, and learning medical Spanish. Live with a Oaxacan host family and experience the colonial city of Oaxaca with its delicious restaurants and great markets. Visit the archaeological site of Monte Alban, the craft village of Teotitlan del Valle, and the ecotourism community of Capulalpam. This course connects students to the health concerns of the large Oaxacan community living in New Brunswick.. For more information view our flyer: Oaxaca ISL Flyer 2015. ...
Please sign Lyndseys petition, too. Her petition is to stop funding cuts to liberal arts programs. http://www.change.org/petitions/gov-rick-scott-hands-off-higher-education-in-florida. Governor of Florida, Rick Scott has stated:. If Im going to take money from a citizen to put into education, then Im going to take money to create jobs...So I want the money to go to a degree where people can get jobs in this state...Is it a vital interest of the state to have more anthropologists? - I dont think so...Its a great degree if people want to get it. But we dont need them here.. This petition calls for more funding for Anthropology research and education in Florida.. Anthropology is vital to Floridas economic growth. Archaeology, a discipline of Anthropology, trains Floridians to curate and research historical sites that attract tourists to the state; Floridas tourism industry is worth over $57billion dollars a year. Companies such as Intel, Microsoft, and Google hire Anthropologists, because ...
A review of the social movements literature reveals that social anthropologists have generally not played a prominent role in theoretical and conceptual debates within this field of research. This article argues that the invisibility of social movements in anthropology is largely attributable to the way in which political anthropology constructs its object, and particularly to the weakness of its concepts of politics and practice. It is concluded that the development of an anthropology of social movements will depend, therefore, on a more general re-orientation of the disciplines approach to politics.
Empowering Place: Multilocality and Multivocality. In R. Darnell (ed.), American Anthropology, 1971-1995: Papers from the American Anthropologist . Series, Critical Studies in History of Anthropology. Arlington VA: AAA; Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Reprinted from 1992 article in American Anthropology 94 : 640-656 ...
Medical anthropology is founded on an epistemological openness to alternative understandings of the body, illness, disease, and healing. It explores how health is at once a biological, social, and historical fact. Anthropology assumes a body that is both biologically given as well as culturally invented and historically situated so that we can even speak of local biologies. This course introduces methods of studying and understanding how the body, health, and healing are shaped by historical processes, political struggles and cultural meanings as well as the knowledge and power of expanding global biomedicine and biotechnologies. In offering a comparative perspective on human afflictions, suffering and healing in societies, we will explore the cultural and historical specificity of what appear to be biological givens, and do so by drawing from a variety of anthropological questions, theoretical approaches, and research methods. The course introduces both the specificity of local medical ...
Our division is one particular of only a few broad primarily based anthropology departments in the UK comprised of 4 sub-sections which includes Biological Anthropology , Social Anthropology , Material Culture and Health-related Anthropology Our teaching and investigation reflects the breadth and depth of this cross and interdisciplinary approach. Archaeological anthropologists are concerned with the evolution and historical adjustments to cultural and sociopolitical configurations, the materiality of human encounter, and the stewardship and interpretation of cultural heritage. Physical anthropology, frequently named biological anthropology, is the study of the physical development of the human physique and the human species (specially compared with other primates).. Intellectual community: The anthropology department gives a wealthy curriculum of much more than 40 courses open to graduate students. In most instances, the job of a forensic anthropologist is confined in a laboratory exactly where ...
In order to do this properly, it is necessary to abandon conventional national and regional classifications of research schools. The three Scandinavian countries, and Finland could also be included, have distinct academic histories, and sociocultural anthropology has slightly different priorities and identities in each country: Contemporary Swedish anthropology grew out of global explorations, European ethnology and more recent Anglo-American influences; Danish anthropology has a strong historical connection to ethnographic studies of Greenland and has been equally shaped by American and British anthropology; while Finnish anthropology has a dual, recent heritage in sociology and ethnology. The main current of Norwegian anthropology, by contrast, has since the late 1950s virtually been a branch of British social anthropology. Most Norwegian anthropologists can be considered matrilateral nephews and nieces of British social anthropologists anyway, with Fredrik Barth playing the part of the mother ...
Forensic anthropology entails applying anthropological research and techniques to medicolegal issues. There are three subfields within the field of forensic anthropology, including osteology (study of the bones), archeology (collection of human remains), and biological anthropology (study of changes to the body after death, including decomposition). One to determine the gender of remains is by examining the pelvis, which can be identified accurately ninety percent of the time. Another precise way to determine gender is to examine the skull. There are several features that can be used to determine the race of an individual. The zygomatic arch of the maxilla can be divided into three generic shapes: hyperbolic, parabolic, and rounded. Each of the following races have their own shape: African is a hyperbolic shape, European is a parabolic shape, and Asian is a rounded shape. There are key features of the skull that can be used to determine the race of an individual. Most of these features are ...
Offered as Anthropology 10 and Sociology 10.) The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the central concepts and themes in the disciplines of anthropology and sociology. Anthropology and sociology emerged as distinct modes of inquiry in 19th-century Europe in response to several centuries of disorienting change. Monarchies were collapsing, economies were industrializing, modern science was emerging, and democratic aspirations were rising. Alongside this flux, Europes imperial reach had revealed a mind-boggling variety of cultures, each ordered and disordered in dramatically different ways. In this context, it is not surprising that two questions became urgent: Why do some societies change while others appear to be unchanging? When a society undergoes change, how does social order get re-established? These classic questions have long since been reframed to confront a fundamental challenge that we live with today: Why do people do what they do, and why do different people do things ...
SOAN 302. Anthropology and Indigenous Rights This seminar examines the relationship between culture and human rights from an anthropological perspective. By asking "who are indigenous peoples?" and "what specific rights do they have?" this course introduces students to a comparative framework for understanding cultural rights discourse. Given the history of intolerance to difference, the seminar demonstrates the need to explore the determinants of violence, ethnocide, and exploitation routinely committed against the worlds most marginalized peoples. At the same time, it also asks about the limits of tolerance, if human rights abuses are perpetrated under the banner of cultural pluralism. Students will analyze case studies drawn from Africa, Asia, and the Americas, as well as issues that cross-cut these regions. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110, 111 or permision of the instructor; upper division coursework in anthropology, sociology, history or philosophy recommended. 6 cr., SS; SI, ...
This list of 100+ anthropology essay topics provides a great variety of ideas for anthropology essays. Anthropology as a discipline is concerned with human ...READ MORE HERE
This article examines the relation between the history of anthropology and human rights. It explains that anthropology first became connected with human rights in 1947 when the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) asked the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to write an advisory opinion on human rights during the drafting of what would become the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It also contends that the history of anthropologys relationship to human enables a better understanding of how and why human rights developed as they did.
This series is sponsored by the University of California at Berkeley Department of Anthropology and The George and Mary Foster Anthropology Library and developed to support research undertaken in the Deaprtment of Anthropology and to extend the reach of the librarys archival and virtual collections of specific biotechnologies. ...
Max Fortes List: Anthropology and Islamic Radicalization - Using anthropology as a weapon against Muslim minorities and to counter the perceived threat of Islamic radicalization - anthropology as an unethical tool used in the war on terror.
Thank you for considering a gift to Anthropology. Your gift of any size makes a difference. All UWM Panthers are impacted by your generosity: our students and their families, our loyal faculty and staff, and our alumni near and far.. Please make a gift to Anthropology today and designate it to an area of your choice, such as:. ...
Scientists > Anthropologists Anthropologists On E2 This is the Anthropologists Metanode, an index of writeups about anthropologist|anthropologist...
WEDA is a searchable database of address and research information about anthropologists from around the world. This is a completely volunteer project, established to encourage and aid scholarly communication. Here, anthropology is taken in its widest sense, to include physical, earth, and social scientists, as well as their colleagues in the humanities. Students and scholars, applied anthropologists, professionals, and avocationalists are all very welcome! As of Nov 24, 1999, WEDA contained information on 2,020 institutions and 4,919 individuals and it is growing every day ...
I am a sociocultural anthropologist working at the nexus of medical anthropology, science and technology studies, and East Asian studies. My research focuses on the social and ethical aspects of transnational biomedical technologies in urban China, where a changing political, economic and moral landscape is transforming health outcomes and reorganizing social relations on local and global scales. My book Biomedical Odysseys: Fetal Cell Experiments from Cyberspace to China will be published by Princeton University Press in spring 2017 (http://press.princeton.edu/titles/11028.html). Please see my faculty website for more information about my various research projects, publications, and courses (https://pages.wustl.edu/song).. I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. I am also a faculty member of the East Asian Studies Program (http://eas.wustl.edu/people/chinese-faculty) and a faculty scholar at the Institute for Public Health ...
The anthropology of health. The second "school", that may be called anthropology of health (or anthropology of illness), is connected, above all, to a tradition that goes back to Marcel Mauss, and has in France its main place of origin and development (Augé, 1986; Augé and Herzlich, 1984; Laplantine, 1991; Le Breton, 2001). Augé (1986) argues, for this "school", that there is only one anthropology, that deals with different empirical objects (health, illness, religion, kinship) without dividing itself into "sub-disciplines" and asks if these different observation objects before the anthropological gaze, by the end of its construction effort, do not constitute a sole object of analysis.. This is a pertinent question. Following Augé, we should think not only about the contribution of anthropology to the field of health, but also how the anthropology of health and illness may help in thinking anew the object of anthropology. What is at stake is not only the ethnographic inventory of ...
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Every year, leading social anthropologists meet in Manchester to debate a motion at the heart of current theoretical developments in their subject. Key Debates in Anthropology collects together the first six of these debates, spanning the period from 1988 to 1993. For each debate there are four principal speakers: one to propose the motion, another to oppose it, and two seconders. These debates give unprecedented insight into the process of anthropological theory in the making, as the many contributors both engage with each others positions and respond to wider intellectual currents of the time. The first debate addresses the disciplinary character of social anthropology: can it be regarded as a science, and if so, is it able to establish general propositions about human culture and social life? The second examines the concept of society, in relation to such terms as individual, community, nation and state. In the third debate the spotlight is turned on the concept of culture, and on the role of ...
CAETS and the history of anthropology. Why organise a conference to mark the centenary of Cambridge Anthropology Expedition to the Torres Straits? The best reason and our main one is to explore the possibilities for a rapprochement between anthropology and psychology by looking at a period and some individuals who were more open to collaboration between the disciplines than we have since become. But my task here is to examine the significance of CAETS for the subsequent development of social anthropology in Britain. It is widely acknowledged that the expedition was a turning point in the history of the discipline. If Victorian anthropology was largely conducted from the armchair, this event, above all, marked a turn to fieldwork in Britain. But if we ask what impact its participants have made on professional anthropologists and their students today, the answer is likely to be nil or negligible.. For the conventional wisdom is that modern British social anthropology was born without significant ...
Thursday, 19 June 2014, 6.00-7.30pm, Peltz Gallery, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD. In this talk, Roger Bartra will discuss his latest book Anthropology of the Brain: Consciousness, Culture and Free Will (2014), in which he explores the mysteries of the human brain. In the book, Bartra shows that consciousness is a phenomenon that occurs not only in the mind but also in an external network, a symbolic system. He argues that the symbolic systems created by humans in art, language, in cooking or in dress, are the key to understanding human consciousness. Placing culture at the centre of his analysis, Bartra brings together findings from anthropology and cognitive science and offers an original vision of the continuity between the brain and its symbolic environment.. Roger Bartra is Professor Emeritus at the University of Mexico (UNAM) and Honorary Research Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London. An anthropologist, sociologist, and respected public intellectual, he ...
Dr. Elizabeth Weiss is a professor in the Anthropology Department who teaches physical anthropology courses. Her research expertise is in skeletal analyses of osteoarthritis, muscle markers, and bone cross-sections to reconstruct lifestyles and better understand bone biology. She completed her B.A. in anthropology from University of California, Santa Cruz in 1996 and finished her M.A. in anthropology from California State University, Sacramento in 1998. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas in Environmental Dynamics (an interdisciplinary program involving anthropology and the geosciences), which she completed in 2001. From 2002 to 2004, she was a post-doctoral research associate at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Elizabeth has presented her research at annual meetings of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Canadian Association of Physical Anthropology, Paleopathology Association, Southwestern Anthropological Association, American Anthropological Association, ...
The Master Medical Anthropology and Sociology studies health issues, illness and the body in a globalising world from a social science perspective. Study Social Sciences at the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam.
News about archaeology and anthropology. Commentary and archival information about archaeology and anthropology from The New York Times.
News about archaeology and anthropology. Commentary and archival information about archaeology and anthropology from The New York Times.
Medical anthropology is playing an increasingly important role in public health. This course builds on basic concepts introduced in ANTH 2504 with an emphasis on the contributions of medical anthropological theories and concepts towards an understanding of complex health-related behavior. This course examines why public health policies and interventions are more likely to be effective if the beliefs and behavior of people are understood and taken into account. Some examples of particular health problems are examined, such as HIV/AIDS, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, malaria and other communicable and non-communicable diseases to show how an anthropological approach can contribute to both a better understanding of health and illness and to more culturally appropriate public health measures. ...
In Chapter 4, "Treating the Family", you focus on how the West Clinic team assumptions of normative family roles relate to explanatory models behind treatment decisions. Can you expand on how other normative assumptions contributed to treatment decisions?. M.B.: I think that a lot of the decisions about restoring functioning were motivated by ideas about what defines success in adolescence, and so a lot of the decisions were oriented toward, getting kids into college. There was a lot of talk about getting [them] into college and getting them back into their high-achieving tracks. Of course, sometimes I think the clinicians helped families and patients get off that track, and that was also part of what they did. But I think sometimes they were implicitly motivated by middle class values about education and achievement and success. In Chapter 5, you begin with a quote by George Beard about American nervousness "Without civilization there can be no nervousness…". In what ways does this quote ...
At the start of 2015 Robert Bettinger published a book length account of Californian societies based on a large review of archaeological evidence (Bettinger 2015). The narrative describes a gradual reduction in social group size, linked to developments in technology and changes in the environment. Bettinger argues that these changes led to the widespread and prolonged existence of small non-hierarchical social groups he characterises as orderly anarchy. A symposium was organised at the 2015 Society for American Archaeologists conference to discuss the implications of Bettingers work and this suggests a widening interest in the archaeological use of anarchist theory.. Anarchic Archaeology in Britain and Ireland. Given the much greater separation between archaeology and anthropology that exists in Britain and Ireland than is found in America and Europe it is perhaps unsurprising that developments in anarchic anthropology have attracted little attention. Earlier this year I published a short ...
Curators in the Division of Anthropology conduct research around the world in the areas of Ethnology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology.
Preface. Acknowledgments.. General Introduction.. Part I: Kinship as Social Structure: Descent and Alliance:.. 1. Descent and Marriage:.. Introduction: Robert Parkin.. Unilateral descent groups: Robert H. Lowie (deceased 1957, formerly of University of California, Berkeley).. The Nuer of the southern Sudan: E. E. Evans-Pritchard (deceased 1973; formerly of Oxford).. Lineage Theory: a brief retrospect: Adam Kuper (Brunel).. African models in the New Guinea Highlands: J. A. Barnes (formally of The Australian National University).. The Amerindianization of Descent and Affinity: Peter Rivière (Oxford).. Inheritance, Property, and Marriage in Africa and Eurasia: Jack Goody (Cambridge).. 2. Terminology and Affinal Alliance:.. Introduction: Robert Parkin.. Kinship and Social Organization, Lecture One: W. H. R. Rivers (deceased, formerly of Cambridge ).. Structural Analysis in Linguistics and Anthropology: Claude Lévi-Strauss (Emeritus, College de France).. Concerning Trobriand Clans and the Kinship ...
Anthropology is the study of human culture. Often cross-listed and interdisciplinary, Anthropology courses at Drury stress social science methodologies, with emphasis on the contextual specifics of place and time on shaping unique societies
Welcome to the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work. We are a diverse department offering exceptional teaching, research, and service opportunities. Our department ranks consistently at or near the top in the College of Arts & Sciences in externally funded research, an achievement that makes it possible for us to fund graduate student assistantships as well as undergraduate participation in research. Community engagement is also a strength of our department. Students benefit from relationships forged by our faculty who are actively engaged in community service. We offer supervised internships and field experiences with community partners in child welfare, health care/health disparities, aging, juvenile justice, environmental advocacy, historic preservation, and many other service areas. Our degree programs include: Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, and the Bachelor of Social Work. We also offer the Master of Arts in Sociology. Centers affiliated ...
Welcome to the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work. We are a diverse department offering exceptional teaching, research, and service opportunities. Our department ranks consistently at or near the top in the College of Arts & Sciences in externally funded research, an achievement that makes it possible for us to fund graduate student assistantships as well as undergraduate participation in research. Community engagement is also a strength of our department. Students benefit from relationships forged by our faculty who are actively engaged in community service. We offer supervised internships and field experiences with community partners in child welfare, health care/health disparities, aging, juvenile justice, environmental advocacy, historic preservation, and many other service areas. Our degree programs include: Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, and the Bachelor of Social Work. We also offer the Master of Arts in Sociology. Centers affiliated ...
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Japan Anthropology Workshop (JAWS) developed out of a "growing international interest in the anthropology of Japan," and the first conference was organised in Oxford in March 1984. It is now an annual conference organised with hosts across the world. An overview of the JAWS conferences from 2005. . JSTOR 2743449. Missing or empty ,title= (help) http://www.japananthropologyworkshop.org/conferences ...
BROOKS LETCHWORTH Southern Illinois University-Carbondale (Jonathan Hill). Ribeiro, Darcy. The Culture-Historical Configurations of the American Peoples Current Anthropology, Vol.11, No. 4/5 (Oct.-Dec., 1970), 403-434. Ribeiro gives a detailed account of the historical events that have led to the present-day cultures of the people of the Americas. Ribeiro sees that as different technological revolutions occurred, these changes had dramatic affects on the people that developed them, incorporated them, or were forced to undertake these new technological advancements. The term advancement is used to signify that these revolutions were part of "civilizational processes" or steps in the evolution of humans. These advancements can alter a societies entire understanding of the world around them. The incorporation (self-inspired or forced) of new technologies and people bring about a fusion of culture, religion, and worldview, all of which occurred to the people that came across them. These people were ...
Q: What led you to a career in anthropology? A: As I was selecting courses for my first semester of college, I pored over the bulletin - which in those days took the form of a large paperback volume - looking for subjects I had not had a chance to study in high school. Anthropology spoke to me because it explores the richness and diversity of human worlds. Since I was eight years old, the power of culture to shape our understandings of ourselves and others has fascinated me.. A third grader during the Cold War, I accompanied my parents to a neighbors cocktail party in honor of a physician visiting from the USSR. To my surprise, I was terrified of the Russian doctor, not because of anything said in my family but because I had crouched during drills, hands over head, beneath my school desk. The physician must have seen fear in my face; he gently invited me to sit next to him, drew out his wallet, and showed me photos of his wife and children. Just a father, like my own, I realized. I marveled at ...
Anthropology Cultural Science Ecology: 20 assigned downloads, like The Logic of Environmentalism: Anthropology, Ecology and Postcoloniality - Vassos Argyrou from ebook-reader
Year of Establishment : 1921. History of the department : Calcutta University was established in 1857. Anthropology was introduced in the University in 1918 as a part of the curriculum of Ancient history and culture. Two years later in 1920, it was given the status of an independent subject for study in M. A., M.Sc. courses. Subsequently in 1921, a separate department of Anthropology was formed. Many eminent scholars were at the helm which brought all the fame and prosperity worthy of a department being oldest in Asia. A number of illustrious persons like R. P. Chanda, P. C. Mahalanabis, S. C. Roy, H. C. Dasgupta, B. A. Gupta, H. C. Chakladar, S. C Mitra, B. C. Mazumdar, P. Mitra, A. N. Chatterjee, T. C. Das, K. P. Chattopadhyay, B. S. Guha, T. C. Ray Chowdhury, R. M. Basu, N. K. Bose, D. Sen, S. S. Sarkar, S. C. Sinha, P. C. Biswas, S. S. Bose, J. K. Bose, H. K. Bose, M. N. Basu, G. S. Ray, A. K. Ghosh, P. K. Bhowmik, S. Sengupta, Tulika Sen, D. P. Mukherjee, A. R. Banerjee, Biswanath Banerjee, ...
AN INTERDISCIPLINARY CONSIDERATION of JOSEPH Campbells CONTRIBUTION to CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGY & PSYCHOLOGY The Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness and the Joseph Campbell Foundation have collaborated to honor the legacy of Joseph Campbell in this interdisciplinary discussion of myth and consciousness and the pivotal role they play in understanding the human condition. Joseph Campbell did…
TY - CHAP. T1 - Anthropology and ICT: experiences of a Dutch pilot project. AU - Brouwer, L.A.. AU - de Theije, M.E.M.. PY - 2004. Y1 - 2004. M3 - Chapter. SN - 1571815643. SN - 9781571815644. T3 - The EASA series. SP - 72. EP - 85. BT - Current policies and practices in European social anthropology education. A2 - Drackle, D.. A2 - Edgar, I.. PB - Berghahn Books. CY - New York/Oxford. ER - ...
A fresh approach that helps students apply scientific principles to solve real-world problems Designed for introductory courses in biological anthropology with laboratory components, Exploring Biological Anthropology can be used with any introductory text.
To subscribe to an RSS feed for the Anthropology Department Masters Theses Collection cut and paste this URL into your RSS reader: http://scholarworks.umass.edu/anthro_theses/recent.rss ...
Buy A Reader in the Anthropology of Religion (Wiley Blackwell Anthologies in Social and Cultural Anthropology 2nd Revised edition) by From WHSmith today...
Listed below are the requirements for the Anthropology major. In addition to the requirements for the major, students must also satisfy all of the university general education requirements and the College of Letters & Science breadth and other degree requirements. Degree requirements will vary depending on when you took your first college class. You are strongly advised to consult both the anthropology advisor and your L&S advisor to ensure you stay on track towards a degree. Read more about the degree requirements on the L&S Degree Requirements web pages.. ...
B.A., Anthropology, University of Minnesota, 2017. I am a first-year graduate student studying biological anthropology, specifically primatology. I have done fieldwork in Kenya and Panama. I interned at the Minnesota Zoo and have done lab work in experimental behavioral ecology and in DNA sequencing. I plan to conduct fieldwork for my masters thesis in 2018 ...
Graduates from the department of Anthropology have produced over 200 M.A. and Ph.D theses. The Ohio State University library maintains print, digital, and film copies of these documents, beginning with theses completed in 1986. A searchable list of these theses is available at this link.PhD and MA theses, 1986- present
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This book examines the critical role of anthropology in four crucial public health domains: (1) anthropological understandings of public health problems such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes; (2) the anthropological design of public health interventions in areas such as tobacco control and elder care; (3) anthropological evaluations of public health initiatives such as Safe Motherhood and polio eradication; and (4) anthropological critiques of public health policies, including neoliberal health care reforms. Anthropologists provide crucial understandings of public health problems from the perspectives of the populations in which the problems occur. On the basis of such understandings, anthropologists may develop and implement interventions to address particular public health problems, often working in collaboration with local participants. Anthropologists also work as evaluators, examining the activities of public health institutions and the successes and failures of public health programs.
NATHANIEL MARSH Oberlin College (Jack Glazier). Chance, John. The Noble House in Colonial Puebla, Mexico: Descent, Inheritance, and the Nahua Tradition. American Anthropologist. September, 2000. Vol. 102(3):485-502.. In this article John Chance utilizes historical data and records in order to examine lineage in the Puebla-Tlaxcala Valley in colonial central Mexico, specifically focusing on the Nahua teccalli, or the noble house, which was central to sociopolitical organization in pre-colonial and early colonial central Mexico. Anthropologists have traditionally used lineage theory to describe social organization within communities; this theory suggests that a group of people trace their heritage to common ancestry. Chance argues that this theory is limited because it excludes cultural variables and ideas of kinship and thus it is not applicable to all societies. As such, Chance maintains that previous accounts of the Nahua noble house are problematic and contradictory because they have examined ...
Orbital index (OI) expresses the proportion of the orbital height to the orbital width and varies with race, regions within the same race and periods in evolution. This index is useful in forensic medicine, anthropology and surgery. However, the average OI among Ghanaian adults was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the orbital index of adult Ghanaians and classify them under one of the three predetermined groups. The study design was a retrospective cross-sectional. A systematic random sampling method was used for selecting 350 adult Ghanaian head computed tomography images available from 1 January to 31 December 2015 at KBTH Hospital. The orbital height and orbital width of each orbit were measured on a 3D CT skull. Data was analysed using Microsoft Excel and Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. The study had more females than men (167, 47.71%, vs 183, 52.29%). The observed orbital index of Ghanaians in the study was 81.22 ± 4.22. The mean orbital index was 80.52 ± 4.66
SM: Welcome, Dr. Watkins. Rachel Watkins: Thank you.. SM: So, Dr. Watkins, how can we as anthropologists, start to trace the history of this concept? RW: Well, as a biological anthropologist Im connected personally to the discipline that is largely-or its noted as being-largely responsible for the concept, in that the scientists who ushered in biological anthropology as a profession, as well as a discipline, were largely anatomists and doctors who believed in this notion of essential difference between groups of people. So, in other words, the kind of surface level differences-skin color, hair texture, what have you-were attributed a level of significance that really kind of belies their biological power, in that people are not reducible to these traits that we think of as racial. They all reflect biological possibilities that we all have.. SM: Okay, and what was the time period, or the context, in which these ideas about fundamental human difference on the basis of appearance became popular? ...
This dissertation explores the lived experience of opiate substitution therapy (OST) patients in Ukraine. To complete this research, I conducted fourteen months of ethnographic research in OST programs across Ukraine between ...
Using the tools on anthropology, you will uncover how history, geography, and our own culture can affect how we treat malaria, HIV, guinea worm and other tropical diseases in the developing world, and what you can do to stop their spread.
This book collects the published articles of Dr. Marjorie Topley, who was a pioneer in the field of social anthropology in the postwar period. Her ethnographic research in Singapore and Hong Kong sets a high standard for urban anthropology. Dr. Topleys publications reflect her training in British social anthropology, with its focus on fieldwork and detailed empirical observation. She was among the first to refine and extend those methods in the 1950s, adapting them to the study of modernizing urban settings like Singapore and Hong Kong. Her ethnographic research on the Great Way of Former Heaven sectarian movement and Cantonese womens vegetarian halls in Singapore in the 1950s was an early contribution to the study of sub-cultural groups in a complex urban society, and she asked insightful questions about the relationship between religion, secularism, and modernity. She also broke new ground in the field of Chinese medical anthropology.
The working group Medical Anthropology invites for a series of lecture in the winter term. The next lecture is on November 6th 2012. It is entitled From "Crazy" to "Psychotic": The Diagnostic Term Unmada in Classical and Contemporary Ayurvedic Literature and will be held by Dr. Anand Samir Chopra. The working group Medical Anthropology is a forum for researchers, students and all those interested in the study of health and illness in different cultural and social settings. The aim of the working group is to discuss and analyze new theories and themes of Medical Anthropology and to learn more about international developments in the area of culture, health and health care. For more details of the program see the website. ...
David Begun is a paleoanthropologist whose research is on great ape and human origins. His research foci include hominoid systematics and functional anatomy and the biogeography of hominoid origins. He has carried out fieldwork projects in Spain, Hungary, Turkey and Romania.. Tracey Galloway focuses her research program on the assessment of chronic disease risk and the reduction of the impact of chronic disease through applied and health policy research to reduce health inequities and promote health system improvement in northern Indigenous populations.. Shawn Lehman is a primatologist who conducts research on the conservation biogeography and evolutionary ecology of lemurs in Madagascar and monkeys in South America. The main goal of his research program is to determine how forest loss, forest fragmentation, and edge effects influence primate ecology. He directs the Tropical Research in Edge Effects (TREE) program.. Joyce Parga is a biological anthropologist currently involved in a long-term ...
Luis Vivanco is a Cultural Anthropologist and co-director of UVMs Humanities Center. He holds an A.B. in Religion from Dartmouth College (1991), and M.A. (1995) and Ph.D. (1999) degrees in Cultural Anthropology from Princeton University. He came to UVM in 1997 as a New England Board of Higher Education Dissertation Write-up Fellow, and began as Assistant Professor in 1999. In 2005, he was awarded tenure and promoted to Associate Professor. In 2015, he was promoted to Professor.
Activity: Cranial Comparison. Topic: Comparative Osteology. Physical anthropologists rely on osteology, or the scientific study of bones, to identify individual species, learn about the lives of an individual, or even to identify ancient illnesses (aka paleopathology). The skeletal features of bones reflect the life histories of individuals, and trained osteologists can use those features to identify the age, sex, diet, and, at times, even the cause of death of a particular specimen.. However, analyzing and comparing the bones from different species can also tell us about the evolutionary history of those species and the degree to which different species are related. For example, the overall organization of dog skeletons would be very similar to those of wolves. The same could be said for different species of fish, reptiles, turtles, etc.. In anthropology, osteologists often compare human skeletons with those of other primates so that we can learn about our ancient human past. In todays ...
I am an anthropologist and specialise in the study of religion, particularly of Christianity, and its relation to other aspects of social life such as kinship, gender, political and economic relations. I have particular expertise in the study of Pentecostalism in the Republic of Benin, West Africa, and of Popular Catholicism in the Huasteca region in Mexico. I studied my first degree in Ethnohistory at the National School of Anthropology and History (ENAH) in Mexico. I completed my postgraduate education at the London School of Economics (LSE), where I did an MSc in Anthropology and Development and a PhD in Anthropology. My first ethnographic research in Mexico focused on the study of a prophetic-millenarian movement, with a female charismatic leadership, among the Nahua - an indigenous group in the Huasteca region of Veracruz. This work was published in 2008 by the Centre for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology (CIESAS). My interest in the study of religion from a ...
Being a practicing anthropologist who joined an academic teaching department mid- career, I bring a valuable perspective to evaluating applied anthropology faculty and programs. With over a decade of University Accreditation Officer experience I am very familiar with program review processes. I am now an Associate Professor in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies at Florida International University in Miami Florida. I served seven years as the Undergraduate Program Director in this Ph.D. granting interdisciplinary degree program that weaves together anthropology, geography, and sociology. I teach graduate and undergraduate courses in anthropological theories, ethnohistorical research methods, medical anthropology and an array of Indigenous Studies courses. A research specialty is Native American health and the increase of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome with the globalization of modernity. Publications include Ethnohistory: A Researchers Guide, as well as articles in Human ...
Im an anthropologist who also finds fascinating the internet, ideas, poetry, sociology, art, science, philosophy, history, music, love and life ~ as well as the anthropology of information technology & counterculture :) - scottmacleod. ...
Im an anthropologist who also finds fascinating the internet, ideas, poetry, sociology, art, science, philosophy, history, music, love and life ~ as well as the anthropology of information technology & counterculture :) - scottmacleod. ...
Examining cultures as diverse as long-house dwellers in North Borneo, African farmers, Welsh housewives, and postindustrial American workers, this volume dramatically redefines the anthropological study of menstrual customs. It challenges the widespread image of a universal "menstrual taboo" as well as the common assumption of universal female subordination which underlies it. Contributing important new material and perspectives to our understanding of comparative gender politics and symbolism, it is of particular importance to those interested in anthropology, womens studies, religion, and comparative health systems.. ...
Dr. Bludaus research program centers on the professional identity of healthcare workers, primarily nurses. The project that served as the basis of her dissertation was an examination of global healthcare migration through the recruitment and migration of Czech nurses; Saudi Arabia is their primary destination site. She uses a critical and applied approach to medical anthropology in order to examine the Czech and Saudi national healthcare systems and policies in relation to individual motivations for migration. A key element is the position of healthcare labor recruiters as a node in the migration chain. A large part of her research consisted of an organizational analysis of a Czech recruitment firm in which she was embedded for almost a year. Most recently, Dr. Bludau, along with colleagues in the Department of Nursing, have completed an interdisciplinary project analyzing nursing education programs to determine crucial elements of socialization and professional identity development. This pilot ...
Erika Friedl Loefler, emerita Meader Professor of Anthropology, has written a new book titled "Warm Hearts and Sharp Tongues: Life in 555 Proverbs from the Zagros Mountains of Iran." The book was published by New Academic Press this past spring. The collection and annotation of this large body of proverbs provides an insightful ethnography of the philosophy of life of a Lur tribe in the Zagros Mountains, a fascination Persian people. Friedl Loeffler collected the sayings over the past 50 years during many visits and observed the local way of life as it changed from "the old times" to modernity.. ...
An introduction to the study of human biological and cultural evolution using the methods and theories of biological anthropology and archaeology. The course surveys some basic principles of evolutionary theory, primatology, the hominid fossil record, origins of modern humans, their physical variation, and archaeological evidence for the evolution of symbolic behavior, agriculture, and civilization. Offered every semester. CLA-Breadth/Natural Science ...
For more than a century, the study of hunting and gathering societies has been central to the development of both archaeology and anthropology as academic disciplines, and has also generated widespread public interest and debate.
Social archaeology and cultural history of continental East Asia focusing on emergence early civilizations in Neolithic and Bronze Age China. Historical anthropology, material culture, and conceptions of the past in early modern China. Landscape archaeology, integrating systematic survey, analysis of archaeological ceramics, remote sensing imagery, traditional studies of stone inscriptions and numismatics. Subfield: Archaeology. ...
Social archaeology and cultural history of continental East Asia focusing on emergence early civilizations in Neolithic and Bronze Age China. Historical anthropology, material culture, and conceptions of the past in early modern China. Landscape archaeology, integrating systematic survey, analysis of archaeological ceramics, remote sensing imagery, traditional studies of stone inscriptions and numismatics. Subfield: Archaeology. ...
Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Vergunst. Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4. Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13 in the second half-session as AT 4511.. This course explores the connections between anthropology, archaeology, art and architecture, conceived as alternative approaches to understanding and shaping how people perceive and relate to their surroundings, in currents of space, time and movement. It focuses on: issues of perception, design and construction; the generation and reproduction of form in natural and built environments; the relation between bodily movements and lived time/space; the significance of craft and skill; activities of depiction and description, and impacts of old and new technologies. The course explores these issues through readings, practical exercises and site visits.. 1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour seminar per week.. 1st Attempt: Examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%).. ...
The Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology MSc is designed to give a broad introduction to the subject, cutting-edge research and latest methodologies.
The fact that its not in the graph means nothing. I would like to check the original research on Mungo man published by Adcock et al. both in Australian Journal of Anthropology and in PNAS. But, for now, what I remember clearly is that the most divergent ancient Australian sequence was more divergent than the sequences collected from modern Bushmen and Pygmies. It means that if youd included it into the Fig. 3 of this paper, it would have been on the same side as the Denisova and the Neandertal sequences. And geographically (thats where seriation comes in) Australians are closer to South Siberia than to Africa and most likely represent an offshoot of an originally East Eurasian population. Meanwhile, the fact that ancient modern humans showed to have DNA thats different from the DNA attested in extant modern humans weakens any claim that because Neandertal DNA is different from modern human DNA were not closely related to Neandertals. Notably, the Neandertals range has recently become more ...
books.google.comhttps://books.google.com/books/about/Yale_University_Publications_in_Anthropo.html?id=hOpKAAAAYAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareYale University Publications in Anthropology ...
A couple days ago, press release agencies like EurekAlert! and ScienceDaily ran some anthropology blips that was not picked up by major news sources. So if you dont follow them you would have missed out on this news. In a nutshell, Wu Xiujie, from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy…
The blanket terms "Asian cinema" and "East Asian cinema" tend to elide the distinctive ways individual nations, regions, and cities have represented themselves in the face of cultural domination. Jenny Kwok Wah Lau has edited a new collection of writings, Multiple Modernities: Cinemas and Popular Media in Transcultural East Asia, to combat this tendency. The concept of "multiple modernities" refers to the interdisciplinary approach of identifying specific modernities in each locality rather than assuming that Asian or East Asian modernity follows a uniform path in resistance to or in compliance with that of the West. The format of Laus book fits this thesis well: separated into 12 chapters, the anthology highlights 12 different pop culture terrains across various geographic categories from nations (South Korea, Taiwan) to cities (Beijing) and places in between (Hong Kong).. Two of the books many merits stand out especially prominently. First, it is a useful introduction to various popular ...
My background is in medical anthropology and the social anthropology of South Asia and Tibet. I have worked at Edinburgh University as co-ordinator of the programmes in the Center for South Asian Studies and as part of a team of researchers looking at access to medicines in India, Uganda and South Africa. I have also worked at Cardiff University on a research project focusing on a Tibetan medical hospital and school in west Tibet, and traditional medical practice in northeast Tibet. Before coming to Newcastle I worked in the Global Health Unit at Queen Mary University of London as senior lecturer in medical anthropology and co-ordinator of BSc in Global Health and intercalated BSc in Global Health. At Queen Mary University I led modules on: medicines and pharmaceuticals; health illness and society; and migration, culture and health.. ...
Research description: I am a bioarchaeologist with extensive academic and applied experience in dental anthropology, human osteology, and paleopathology. I also have a strong background in prehistoric archaeology, having been involved in ,35 seasons of archaeological and bioarchaeological fieldwork in the U.S., Europe, and Africa. A principal area of research involves a biocultural approach to the Upper Pleistocene through modern peopling of Africa, with a concentration on dental morphometric data to understand population origins, biological affinities, migration, and diachronic adaptation. I have assembled a large database of dental and osseous morphometric variants (313 variables in ,6,000 individuals), recorded in North and sub-Saharan African samples from institutions throughout the world. Though concentrating on Upper Pleistocene through recent groups, I also apply this approach to Plio-Pleistocene hominins including, most recently, Australopithecus sediba and the Rising Star Cave hominins ...
In Europe, the Neolithic transition (8,000-4,000 B.C.) from hunting and gathering to agricultural communities was one of the most important demographic events since the initial peopling of Europe by anatomically modern humans in the Upper Paleolithic (40,000 B.C.). However, the nature and speed of this transition is a matter of continuing scientific debate in archaeology, anthropology, and human population genetics. To date, inferences about the genetic make up of past populations have mostly been drawn from studies of modern-day Eurasian populations, but increasingly ancient DNA studies offer a direct view of the genetic past. We genetically characterized a population of the earliest farming culture in Central Europe, the Linear Pottery Culture (LBK; 5,500-4,900 calibrated B.C.) and used comprehensive phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to locate its origins within the broader Eurasian region, and to trace potential dispersal routes into Europe. We cloned and sequenced the ...
ANT 310 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3).. Examination of the human personality within cultural contexts. Topics include personality formation and child-rearing; stress and mental/physical health problems which occur with cultural change; aging, roles and communication among local and worldwide ethnic groups.. ANT 312 Language and Culture (3).. Analysis of language as an aspect of culture. Relationship between language and culture patterns, dynamics of language and cultural change; the problem of meaning.. ANT 313 Methods and Techniques of Archaeology (3).. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.. Basic procedures and techniques used by archaeologists to excavate, analyze and interpret prehistoric remains. Field and/or laboratory activities. Variable topics will include field procedures, laboratory procedures or archaeological method and theories. Six hours of activity per week.. ANT 315 Magic and Religion (3).. A comparative analysis of magico-religious systems in their ...
ANT 310 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3).. Examination of the human personality within cultural contexts. Topics include personality formation and child-rearing; stress and mental/physical health problems which occur with cultural change; aging, roles and communication among local and worldwide ethnic groups.. ANT 312 Language and Culture (3).. Analysis of language as an aspect of culture. Relationship between language and culture patterns, dynamics of language and cultural change; the problem of meaning.. ANT 313 Methods and Techniques of Archaeology (3).. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.. Basic procedures and techniques used by archaeologists to excavate, analyze and interpret prehistoric remains. Field and/or laboratory activities. Variable topics will include field procedures, laboratory procedures or archaeological method and theories. Six hours of activity per week.. ANT 315 Magic and Religion (3).. A comparative analysis of magico-religious systems in their ...
ANTH 002 INTRO CULTURAL ANTHRO. ANTH 004 THE MODERN WORLD AND ITS CULTURAL BACKGROUND (LPS). ANTH 012 GLOBALIZATION ANTH 022 WORLD MUSIC AND CULTURES. ANTH 063 EAST/WEST: MODERN WORLD HISTORY. ANTH 111 INTRODUCTION TO MEDITERRANEAN ARCHAEOLOGY. ANTH 139 ANCIENT CIVS OF THE WRLD. ANTH 190 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICA. ANTH 228 CHINESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY. ANTH 266 YOUTH AND DEMOCRACY IN AFRICA. ...
Our department supports an interdisciplinary approach to the study of global, urban, historical, and cultural experience, practices, and change. Our faculty are scholarly experts in archaeology, cultural anthropology, economics, education, folklore, history, linguistics, psychology, and sociology which represent academic disciplines dedicated to the understanding of human social life, past and present.. ...
The Anthropological Index Online provides a bibliographic reference service to scholars in all branches of anthropology and archaeology. The Anthropology Library at the British Museum receives periodicals in all branches of anthropology, from academic institutions and publishers around the world. The Librarys holdings cover all areas of cultural and social anthropology, ethnography and material culture, from mainstream theoretical journals to specialist interest publications. All geographical regions are covered, and the Library has particularly strong coverage of Eastern and Central Europe, with journals often not available elsewhere. The Anthropological Index covers articles in all languages, and provides English translations of citations from non-Roman scripts and from smaller languages
The Anthropological Index Online provides a bibliographic reference service to scholars in all branches of anthropology and archaeology. The Anthropology Library at the British Museum receives periodicals in all branches of anthropology, from academic institutions and publishers around the world. The Librarys holdings cover all areas of cultural and social anthropology, ethnography and material culture, from mainstream theoretical journals to specialist interest publications. All geographical regions are covered, and the Library has particularly strong coverage of Eastern and Central Europe, with journals often not available elsewhere. The Anthropological Index covers articles in all languages, and provides English translations of citations from non-Roman scripts and from smaller languages
Comprehensive indexing for anthropology, archaeology and related interdisciplinary research, including citations from hundreds of journals and monographic series.