Zebrafish have the capacity to regenerate several organs, including the heart and fins. Fin regeneration is epimorphic, involving the formation at the amputation plane of a mass of undifferentiated, proliferating mesenchymal progenitor-like cells, called blastema. This tissue provides all the cell types that form the fin, so that after damage or amputation the fin pattern and structure are fully restored. How blastema cells remain in this progenitor-like state is poorly understood. Here, we show that the Notch pathway plays an essential role during fin regeneration. Notch signalling is activated during blastema formation and remains active throughout the regeneration process. Chemical inhibition or morpholino-mediated knockdown of Notch signalling impairs fin regeneration via decreased proliferation accompanied by reduced expression of Notch target genes in the blastema. Conversely, overexpression of a constitutively active form of the Notch1 receptor (N1ICD) in the regenerating fin leads to ...
I have written before about the origins of shark fin soup, however it is worth re-capping slightly: The cartilage in the fins is usually shredded and used primarily to provide texture and thickening to shark fin soup, a traditional Chinese soup or broth dating back to the Song Dynasty (960-1279). The dish is considered a luxury item embodying notions of hospitality, status and good fortune.. The origin of the dish can be traced to the Emperor Taizu of the Northern Song, who reigned from 960-976. It is said that he established shark fin soup to showcase his power, wealth and generosity. The dishs popularity increased during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) as a result of an admiral of the imperial navy; Zheng He, who commanded expeditionary voyages around Asia and East Africa from 1405-1433, bringing back fins that fishermen had discarded. From this point onwards shark fin soup became an established dish and by the time of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) was in high demand.. It is not surprising that ...
Feb. 26, 1957 w. E. SAXE 2,782,926 APPARATUS FOR MEASURING FINENESS MODULUS Filed Feb. 26, 195] 8 Sheets-Shet 5 m2 /33 /94 A95 A96 /97 $202 $205 $204 .205 5206 $2 /NVNTOR. Wag-ER E. Snxa BY Hi5 ATTORNEYS. IgHRRIS, K/dcH, FOSTER &H MI?/$ Feb. 26, 1957 w. E. SAXE 2,782,926 APPARATUS FOR MEASURING FINENESS MODULUS FiledFeb. 26, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 l/y VENTOR. WALTER 5. 5H x5 B [-115 n rroklvavsl HER/PIS, K/EcH, F05 T15R69: Hmmls Feb. 26, 1957 w. E. SAXE 2,782,926 APPARATUS FOR MEASURING FINENESS MODULUS Filed Feb. 26, 1951 a Sheets-Sheet 5 BY HIS HTTORNEKS. HARRIS, K n: CH, FOSTER 3: HARRIS Feb. 26, 1957 w. E. SAXE 2,782,926 APPARATUS FOR MEASURING FINENESS MODULUS Filed Feb. 26, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 ig L4 365 66 /NVE NTOR. 376 WALTER 5.5mm: BY H15 HTTORNCKS. HARP/5, K/ECH, F05 75/? a HH ems ag. ai -fled; Feb. 26, 1957 w. E. SAXE 2,732,926 APPARATUS FOR MEASURING FINENESS MODULUS Filed Feb. 26, 1951 8 Sheets-Sheet v A L 1 L 1 1 asl 52.2 093 3914 395 390 WALTER 15.56))(5 B) HIS HTTOPNEKi- ...
Sexually dimorphic breeding tubercles (BTs) are keratinized epidermal structures that form clusters on the dorsal surface of the anterior rays of zebrafish male pectoral fins. BTs appear during sexual maturation and are maintained through regular shedding and renewal of the keratinized surface. Following pectoral fin amputation, BT clusters regenerate after the initiation of revascularization, but concomitantly with a second wave of angiogenesis. This second wave of regeneration forms a web-like blood vessel network that penetrates the supportive epidermis of BTs. Upon analyzing the effects of sex steroids and their inhibitors, we show that androgens induce and estrogens inhibit BT cluster formation in intact and regenerating pectoral fins. Androgen-induced BT formation in females is accompanied by the formation of a male-like blood vessel network. Treatment of females with both androgens and an angiogenesis inhibitor results in the formation of undersized BT clusters when compared with females ...
A fin is a thin component or appendage attached to a larger body or structure. Fins typically function as foils that produce lift or thrust, or provide the ability to steer or stabilize motion while traveling in water, air, or other fluid media. Fins are also used to increase surface areas for heat transfer purposes, or simply as ornamentation. Fins first evolved on fish as a means of locomotion. Fish fins are used to generate thrust and control the subsequent motion. Fish, and other aquatic animals such as cetaceans, actively propel and steer themselves with pectoral and tail fins. As they swim, they use other fins, such as dorsal and anal fins, to achieve stability and refine their maneuvering. Foil shaped fins generate thrust when moved, the lift of the fin sets water or air in motion and pushes the fin in the opposite direction. Aquatic animals get significant thrust by moving fins back and forth in water. Often the tail fin is used, but some aquatic animals generate thrust from pectoral ...
A dorsal fin is classified as a medial, unpaired fin that is located on the midline of the backs of some aquatic vertebrates. In development of the embryo in teleost fish, the dorsal fin arises from sections of the skin that from a caudal fin fold.[4] The larval development and formation of the skeleton that support the median fins in adults result in pterygiophores. The skeletal elements of the pterygiophore includes basals and radials. The basals are located at the base of the dorsal fin, and are closest to the body. The radials extend outward from the body to support the rest of the fin.[4] These elements serve as attachment sites for epaxial muscles.[5] The muscles contract and pull against the basals of the pterygiophores along one side of the body, which helps the fish move through water by providing greater stability.[5] In these types of fish, the fins are made of 2 main components.[5] The first component is the dermal fin rays known as lepidotrichia, and the endoskeletal base with ...
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Sharks are among the most threatened of marine species worldwide due to unsustainable overfishing. They are primarily killed for their fins alone, to fuel the growing demand for shark fin soup, which is an Asia delicacy. A new study by University of Miami (UM) scientists in the journal Marine Drugs has discovered high concentrations of BMAA in shark fins, a neurotoxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases in humans including Alzheimers and Lou Gehrig Disease (ALS). The study suggests that consumption of shark fin soup and cartilage pills may pose a significant health risk for degenerative brain diseases.. "Shark fins are primarily derived through finning, a practice where by shark fins are removed at sea and the rest of the mutilated animal is thrown back in the water to die," said co-author Dr. Neil Hammerschlag, research assistant professor of Marine Affairs & Policy and director of the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program (RJD) at UM. "Estimates suggest that fins from as many as 70 million ...
Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal soft rays: 6; Vertebrae: 31 - 32. Dorsum of head, body and paired fin bases with whitish reticulated or whitish spotted pattern; faint dark grey axial stripe covering three scale rows; skin around lateral line pores whitish; posterior part of pectoral fin with 5-7 faint annular bands; 20-21 branched pelvic fin rays; 49-54+2 lateral line scales; pelvic fin origin below dorsal fin origin; pectoral fin origin posterior to corner of mouth; pelvic fin reaching anal fin origin; small soft elevated patches of fine tubercles on first pectoral fin rays in males; tubercles on simple pectoral fin ray not enlarged; absence of cavity around mouth and absence of skin-fold between oropectoral membrane and ventral surface of head (Ref. 51729). ...
The Dlx5 and Dlx6 genes encode homeodomain transcription factors essential for the proper development of limbs in mammalian species. However, the role of their teleost counterparts in fin development has received little attention. Here, we show that dlx5a is an early marker of apical ectodermal cells of the pectoral fin buds and of the median fin fold, but also of cleithrum precursor cells during pectoral girdle development. We propose that early median fin fold establishment results from the medial convergence of dlx5a-expressing cells at the lateral edges of the neural keel. Expression analysis also shows involvement of dlx5a during appendage skeletogenesis. Using morpholino-mediated knock down, we demonstrate that disrupted dlx5a/6a function results in pectoral fin agenesis associated with misexpression of bmp4, fgf8a, and1 and msx genes. In contrast, the median fin fold presents defects in mesenchymal cell migration and actinotrichia formation, whereas the initial specification seems to occur
Sitting on the back of many fishes, in between the dorsal fin and the tail, is an enigmatic little fatty flap of skin called the adipose fin. It looks a bit like an extra dorsal fin, and though its present in eight large groups of fishes, no one knows why its there. It might help prevent flow from wrapping over the top of the fish; it might help counteract forces from the anal fin, which is in about the same place, but on the ventral side; it might be a flow sensor; or it might not do anything, persisting due to developmental constraints. Whatever the fins function, most fisheries scientists think its not terribly important, because they regularly snip it off to mark millions of hatchery fish released into the wild each year.. Thomas Reimchen and Nicola Temple at the University of Victoria in Canada devised a simple test to find out how important the adipose fin really is. They swam steelhead trout at speeds between about one and three body lengths per second, measured the tail beat ...
The anti-sharks fin campaign is crusading on in Asia Pacific as New Zealand becomes latest airline to suspend sharks fin cargo to Hong Kong.
Espinas dorsales (total): 8; Radios blandos dorsales (total): 9; Espinas anales 2; Radios blandos anales: 8. Whitish with 5 horizontal stripes (brassy to dark brown in color); dark spot at base of middle caudal fin rays; fin rays light red (Ref. 2334). Greatest depth of body 2.7-3.2 in SL (Ref. 90102). Dorsal-fin rays VII-I, 9; anal-fin rays II, 8; pectoral fin rays 14; pelvic fin rays I, 5; pored lateral line scales 24; predorsal scales 4; circumpeduncular scales 12; total gill rakers 19, developed gill rakers 14; body white colored, with five poorly defined dark brown stripes on lateral surface of body, posterior end of third stripe reaching black spot on base of caudal fin; base of caudal fin with spot subequal in size to pupil (Ref. 93839). ...
This species is the worlds longest bony fish, reaching a record length of 11 m (36 ft); however, unconfirmed specimens of up to 17 m (56 ft) have been reported.[7] It is commonly measured to 3 m (9.8 ft) in total length. The maximum recorded weight of a giant oarfish is 270 kg (600 lb).[7] Its shape is ribbonlike, narrow laterally, with a dorsal fin along its entire length from between its eyes to the tip of its tail. The fin rays are soft and may number up to 400 or more. At the head of the fish, the rays are lengthened forming a distinctive red crest. Its pectoral and pelvic fins are nearly adjacent. The pectoral fins are stubby while the pelvic fins are long, single-rayed, and reminiscent of an oar in shape, widening at the tip. Its head is small with the protrusible jaw typical of lampriformes; it has 40 to 58 gill rakers, and no teeth.[8] The organs of the giant oarfish are concentrated toward the head end of the body, possibly enabling it to survive losing large portions of its tail.[7] ...
My discus got pectoral fin stick to their body. In fact one got the left pectoral fin stick and the other the right pectoral fin. Ive also notice
1. A thick soup containing 10 gm of individual fin needles, a hint of crab meat and some thin slices of Chinese mushrooms. Quantitatively, the picture on the label is not representative of the contents.. 2. A light saline solution containing 180 gm of approximately 1.5 cm long fin needles in bundles.. 3. A thick soup containing 30 gm of long individual fin needles. Quantitatively, the picture on the label is not representative of the contents.. 4. A thick soup containing 20gm of individual fin needles, crab meat and chopped Chinese mushrooms. Quantitatively, the picture on the label is not representative of the contents.. 5. A light soup base containing 20gm of approximately 6-8 cm long fin needles in bundles. ...
14,000 pounds of shark fins were seized in Miami, Florida, after the boxes they were hidden in were intercepted by US government officials.
Shark fin soup will disappear from the Golden States menu in January 2013 under legislation signed into law on Friday by California Governor Jerry Brown.
California passed its ban on shark fins last year despite the protests that shark-fin soup was a traditional delicacy among people of Chinese descent. On Sunday, Illinois joined a growing number of
Dorsal spines (total): 10 - 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22-24; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 6 - 7. Tubed lateral line scales 55-57; outer row of teeth in jaws slightly enlarged, movable; swim bladder with 3 short anterior projections; third or fourth dorsal spine longest, 1.8-1.9 in head; first dorsal spine 1.7-2.3 in length of second; interspinous membrane of dorsal fin not incised; pelvic fins reaching vent or slightly beyond, 1.2-1.3 in head; body light yellow dorsally, shading to pale silvery grey on sides and ventrally, with numerous small dark brown spots, which are smaller and form oblique rows on body below lateral line; head light purplish grey with numerous small dark brown spots, opercular membrane black; dorsal fin and upper 3/4 of caudal fin with small dark spots; lower 1/4 of caudal fin black; anal and pelvic fins mainly black (Ref. 44143); dorsal and caudal fins mainly yellow, caudal fin with broad black lower edge margin, caudal fin may be slightly emarginate to truncate; ...
Barbel that is attached to the distal end of the maxilla and that originates on the side of the mouth. Maxillary barbel is paired. Maxillary barbel has considerable range of motion, with contraction and protraction motivated by maxillary blood sinus. The maxillary barbel integument has taste buds. Capable of regeneration. (1 ...
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Yuka Taniguchi, Thomas Kurth, Daniel Meulemans Medeiros, Akira Tazaki, Robert Ramm, Hans-Henning Epperlein].
Q: Would you describe the unique physical characteristics of Tiktaalik?. A: When we look at this creature what we see is a mosaic of fish features and those we find in land living animals. Lets look at the fish parts first. There are scales like a fish; you can see they look like chain mail here. There are even scales on the fin. But the other thing that is very fish-like is that it has a fin. There is the fin. See these little bones here; those are fin-rays that you even see in fishes like salmon and trout and so forth. So it has scales and fins like a fish. Now, like land-living animals, it has a few things that are quite different. A flat head with eyes on top. It has a neck. Fish have a situation where the head is actually physically attached to the shoulder. What we have in this creature, and you can see it in the skeleton, is that you have a head that is actually separate from the shoulder, meaning that it has a neck that can move the head around. Other interesting features are that ...
Dorsal soft rays (total): 62-70; Anal soft rays: 58 - 61; Vertebrae: 45 - 47. This species is distinguished by the following set of characters: vertebrae 11-12 + 34-35 = 45-47; D 62-70, A 58-61, pectoral-fin rays 14, caudal-fin rays 6; anterior dorsal fin ray above vertebra 7-8; anterior anal fin ray below dorsal fin ray 14-15; anterior anal fin ray below vertebra 14; small forward-curved spine at lower angle of preopercle; head with separated scale patches on cheeks, operculum and occiput; papillae on lower jaw only; posterior mandibular pores absent; no lower preopercular pores; minute palatine teeth in single row; otolith length to otolith height, 2.0, otolith length to colliculum length, 2.4; male copulatory organ with 3 small papillae at base of genital hood (Ref. 88975). ...
Dorsal soft rays (total): 11; Anal soft rays: 9 - 11; Vertebrae: 43 - 46. This species is distinguished by the following characters: no dark pigment on buccal cavity; pale body, usually with large faint dusky spots in several longitudinal series midlaterally on side; pale adipose fin; transparent caudal fin, though dusky near base of each lobe; supraocular ridges extending nearly to predorsal scales; scales above lateral line 4.5; cheek scales in 2 rows; nearly cylindrical head and body with body tapering little posteriorly in dorsal view; large eye; tiny adipose dorsal fin, its length 4.7-10.6% HL; deep anal fin in males, the posterior tip reaching nearly to posterior edge of hypurals when depressed; short pectoral fin, extending to below middle of dorsal fin base (Ref. 84674). ...
Locomotor strategies in terrestrial tetrapods have evolved from the utilisation of sinusoidal contractions of axial musculature, evident in ancestral fish species, to the reliance on powerful and complex limb muscles to provide propulsive force. Within tetrapods, a hindlimb-dominant locomotor strategy predominates, and its evolution is considered critical for the evident success of the tetrapod transition onto land. Here, we determine the developmental mechanisms of pelvic fin muscle formation in living fish species at critical points within the vertebrate phylogeny and reveal a stepwise modification from a primitive to a more derived mode of pelvic fin muscle formation. A distinct process generates pelvic fin muscle in bony fishes that incorporates both primitive and derived characteristics of vertebrate appendicular muscle formation. We propose that the adoption of the fully derived mode of hindlimb muscle formation from this bimodal character state is an evolutionary innovation that was ...
Dorsal spines (total): 7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 9-11; Anal spines: 1; Anal soft rays: 8 - 10; Vertebrae: 25 - 26. First dorsal fin distally rounded without filamentous spines. Posterior margin of caudal fin rounded. Scales small, 39-55 scales in a longitudinal row and 19-25 scales in transverse row. Color of specimens before fixation: nuchal crest with transversely alternating reddish-brown and light greenish-brown areas; body light greenish brown reticulated with brown on upper anterior part and having iridescent bluish or greenish spots surrounded by reticulation; first dorsal fin with red upper margin, submarginal row of contiguous yellow spots, grayish-red band on middle part, greenish gray on lower part, and large blackish spot with blue spots between fifth spine and fin terminus; second dorsal fin red with two or three irregular longitudinal yellow stripes on middle part, and greenish gray on basal part; anal fin proximally red and distally dark gray; pectoral fin with a red area on ...
0161]The catalyst may be supported on an assembly of one or more fins positioned within the process microchannels. Examples are illustrated in FIGS. 17-19. Referring to FIG. 17, fin assembly 290 includes fins 291 which are mounted on fin support 293 which overlies base wall 294 of process microchannel 295. The fins 291 project from the fin support 293 into the interior of the process microchannel 295. The fins 291 may extend to and contact the interior surface of upper wall 296 of process microchannel 295. Fin channels 297 between the fins 291 provide passage ways for reactant and product to flow through the process microchannel 295 parallel to its length. Each of the fins 291 has an exterior surface on each of its sides. The exterior surface provides a support base for the catalyst. The reactants may flow through the fin channels 297, contact the catalyst supported on the exterior surface of the fins 291, and react to form product. The fin assembly 290a illustrated in FIG. 18 is similar to the ...
Distinctive Characters: Dorsal fin with 10 spines and 10 (rarely 11) rays. Anal fin with 3 spines and 8 (rarely 9) rays. Pectoral fin with 16 rays. Body depth 2.6-3.1 in standard length. Body moderately deep, fusiform. Large eyes. Interorbital space convex. Maxilla with or without scales. Dorsal and anal fins scaleless. Pectoral fins long, reaching level of anus. Caudal fin deeply forked ...
Dorsal spines (total): 14-16; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8-10; Anal spines: 1-1; Anal soft rays: 17-20. Diagnosis: Dorsal fins III + XI-XIII + 8-10 (usually III + XII + 10); anal fin I,17-20 (usually 19); pectoral fin 14: 1-3, 4-6, 6-8 (usually 2, 5, 7). LL, pored scales 13-16, notched scales 21-25, starting at 2 scale rows below the end of the pored series; transverse scales 2/6; nape and abdomen scaleless, first dorsal fin base also without scales. Body depth 4.8-5.2 in SL. Head 3.4-4.0 in SL; eyes large, diameter 3.0-3.7 in head length; orbital cirrus moderate, lobate; supratemporal sensory canal U-shaped and embraces 1st dorsal spine; dentary pores 3+1+3. Male first dorsal fin slightly higher than second; slightly lower in females. Key features are: overall olive green; anal fins black and white barred. Males head black; first dorsal fin, lower pectoral-fin rays and proximal portion of the pelvic-fin rays yellow females (Ref. 57774, 88983 ...
A pretty elongated fish with a pointed snout. The body is silver-blue in colour with vertical white bands from the dorsal to the mid second of the body, with a darker mark on the top section of the body at the beginning of the dorsal fin. The caudal, anal and dorsal fins are yellow with slender black banding, while the pelvic fins are pale blue and the pectoral fins are clear ...
their action mechanical, their position, and the muscles by which they are moved, in the highest degree convenient. The following short account of some experiments upon fish, made for the purpose of ascertaining the use of their fins, will be the best confirmation of what we assert. In most fish, beside the great fin, the tail, we find two pair of fins upon the sides, two single fins upon the back, and one upon the belly, or rather between the belly and the tail. The balancing use of these organs is proved in this manner. Of the large-headed fish, if you cut off the pectoral fins, i. e. the pair which lies close behind the gills, the head falls prone to the bottom; if the right pectoral fin only be cut off, the fish leans to that side; if the ventral fin on the same side be cut away, then it loses its equilibrium entirely; if the dorsal and ventral fins be cut off, the fish reels to the right and left. When the fish dies, that is, when the fins cease to play, the belly turns upwards. The use of ...
Espinhos dorsais (total): 9; Raios dorsais (total): 14-15; Espinhos anais 3; Raios anais : 8 - 9. Color orange-red to reddish brown, usually dark posteriorly with numerous bright blue spots which are smaller than the pupil and often faintly dark-edged on head, body and median fins; distal margin of caudal fin and soft portions of dorsal and anal fins usually with a narrow blue margin and blackish submarginal line; orange-yellow pectoral fins, on some only distally; orange-red pelvic fins; it is capable of a disruptive color pattern of irregular oblique olivaceous bars; juveniles may be yellow with scattered faint blue spots. D IX, 14-16; A III, 8-9 (rarely 8); pectoral 17-18 (often 18); scales on lateral line 47-55; scales on longitudinal series 94-114; snout anterior to nostrils no scales; partially scaled maxilla; abdomen with cycloid scales; gill rakers 7-9 + 13-15; depth of body 2.65-3.05 in SL; length of head 2.4-2.65 in SL; the maxilla extends to or posterior to rear of the orbit; smooth ...
Espinas dorsales (total): 9; Radios blandos dorsales (total): 14-15; Espinas anales 3; Radios blandos anales: 8 - 9. Color orange-red to reddish brown, usually dark posteriorly with numerous bright blue spots which are smaller than the pupil and often faintly dark-edged on head, body and median fins; distal margin of caudal fin and soft portions of dorsal and anal fins usually with a narrow blue margin and blackish submarginal line; orange-yellow pectoral fins, on some only distally; orange-red pelvic fins; it is capable of a disruptive color pattern of irregular oblique olivaceous bars; juveniles may be yellow with scattered faint blue spots. D IX, 14-16; A III, 8-9 (rarely 8); pectoral 17-18 (often 18); scales on lateral line 47-55; scales on longitudinal series 94-114; snout anterior to nostrils no scales; partially scaled maxilla; abdomen with cycloid scales; gill rakers 7-9 + 13-15; depth of body 2.65-3.05 in SL; length of head 2.4-2.65 in SL; the maxilla extends to or posterior to rear of ...
Kuti9 was published in autumn 2008 with 28 pages from the Kuti team and 8 extra pages from the Finnish small press distributor Toivo. Featuring art from: Lilli Carré (USA), The Duuzers (FIN), Martin Ernstsen (NOR), Roope Eronen (FIN), Tom Gauld (UK), Matti Hagelberg (FIN), Kaltsu Kallio (FIN), Bendik Kaltenborn (NOR), Kapreles (NED), Tommi Musturi (FIN), Sami Myllyniemi (FIN), Jyrki Nissinen (FIN), Jaakko Pallasvuo (FIN), Aapo Rapi (FIN), Anna Sailamaa (FIN), Bart Schoofs (BEL), Olivier Schrauwen (BEL), Jerry Scoundrel (FRA), Walter Schifftate (USA), Petteri Tikkanen (FIN) and Jari Vaara (FIN). The issue includes an article about Yuichi Yokoyama (in Finnish) and about Extrapool (in English). Kuti9 is included in the collection of the St. Patricks Zine Library. ...
胑靣は脉椓 (吇訅): 0; 肚閅は骯 0; 膻鰴: 80. Body tapering, belly rounded before pelvic fins, with 6 + 10 or 11 = 15 or 16 keeled scutes from just behind pectoral fin base to anus. Maxilla short, not reaching to edge of gill cover. Pectoral fin with 6 long filaments; the branched fin rays much shorter than those of pelvic fin. ...
Yan et al., 2005 - A pair of Sox: distinct and overlapping functions of zebrafish sox9 co-orthologs in craniofacial and pectoral fin development. Development (Cambridge, England) 132(5):1069-1083 Full text @ Development ...
Zebrafish is increasingly used a genetic model organism in biomedical studies. This protocol provides a detailed procedure about the identification of the genotype of an adult zebrafish or a zebrafish embryo.
Dorsal spines (total): 7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8; Anal spines: 1; Anal soft rays: 8. This species is distinguished by the following set of characters: a narrow bony interorbital (< 55% pupil width), predorsal midline with 8-9 scales; cycloid scales usually along the upper border of the opercle which may be in up to 3 horizontal rows; 2 (usually cycloid) cheek scales; a very slightly elongate second dorsal spine usually reaching posteriorly to between the base of the spine and the base of the second ray of the second dorsal fin; unbranched pectoral-fin rays; fifth pelvic-fin ray which branches once dichotomously and is 64-85% the length of the fourth ray; a full basal membrane connecting the inner margins of the fifth pelvic fins rays in undamaged specimens; black posterior half of the caudal peduncle with a large white spot dorsally and ventrally just anterior to the procurrent caudal fin rays is unique within the genus (Ref. 96671). ...
The scaling relationship between the size of an appendage or organ and that of the body as a whole is tightly regulated during animal development. If a structure grows at a different rate than the rest of the body, this process is termed allometric growth. The zebrafish another longfin (alf) mutant …
Body deep and compressed; dorsal and ventral profiles of body strongly and equally convex. Scales smll and deciduous, and almost completely covering dorsal and anal fins. Mouth terminal with upper jaw unrestricted dorsally and ending below and slightly before anterior margin of eye; both jaws with a single row of small conical teeth. Gill openings unrestricted laterally and ventrally. Dorsal fin with 4-5 short spines (embedded and not apparent in adults) followed by I + 41-44 soft rays. Anal fin with 2 (embedded and not apparent in adults) followed by I + 35-39 soft rays; profile of second dorsal and anal fins nearly identical, with elevated, broadly rounded anterior lobes. Pelvic fins absent in specimens larger than about 10 cm fork and falcate. Lateral line very weakly arched anteriorly, with junction of straight and curved parts below posterior third of dorsal fin; straight part of lateral line with 8 to 19 weak scutes, forming a slight keel on caudal peduncle. Colour in life, adults ...
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Shark fin soup. Its the Louis Vuitton of Chinese dishes. A chewy meat, with virtually no taste, shark fin has, for centuries stood as a marker of affluence and power on Chinese dining tables. It symbolizes wealth and prestige in a... ...
Dorsal spines (total): 8 - 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 20 - 21. Diagnosis: body deep and strongly compressed, its anterior profile very steep up to dorsal-fin origin, and strongly compressed; head small; snout short; mouth small, terminal, strongly protrusible, with fleshy lips; teeth slender and pointed, set in bands in upper jaw; roof of mouth toothless; dorsal fin deeply notched; 1st dorsal fin spine small, forward-pointing and visible only in young individuals; pectorals falcate, very long, their tips almost reaching to caudal-fin base; hind margin of caudal fin slightly rounded; pelvic fins thoracic; scales finely ctenoid, covering body, bases of dorsal and anal fins and head, except snout and preopercle; preopercular margin denticulate; lateral line strongly arched (Ref. 81287). Coloration: silvery grey, darker on back, almost white on belly; sides with a series of 8 brown, more or less faded vertical bars, always more distinct in young individuals ...
It was nice to see that they tossed in a mention of Elpistostege. As you can see, Elpistostege is a lot like Tiktaalik, which is why Tiktaalik is dubbed an "elpistostegalian". Elpistostege is known only very incomplete remains, the limbs have been entirely unknown. However, its tetrapod affinities have been recognized since its discovery in 1938, when T.S. Westoll actually called it the earliest known tetrapod! In 1985, Hans-Peter Schultze and Marius Arsenault recognized it for what it was, a very tetrapod-like fish, similar to Panderichthys. In 1996, Schultze described a short pice of the trunk that has rhomboid-shaped schales and a few vertebrae. What little is known of its skull and trunk of Elpistostege is scarcely different from Tiktaalik. However, after decades of searching no new data on Elpistostege ever came to light. Shubin and Daeschler wanted more of this animal, but knew that the original locality wasnt going to give up its secrets. So, they went looking in similar-aged rocks ...
The sun gives you the best vitamin D with no possibility of overdose. Your body regulates the D you get from the sun, so you could be getting 80,000 iu a day from the sun, but you will never develop D toxicity. Its for this reason that I use the sun. Another problem is that people think that going in the sun at 9 am or 5 pm is going to give them D. It will NOT! It will actually deplete your D. This is because the sun exudes UVA rays, and UVB rays. UVA rays are constant, from the moment the sun is in the sky until it sets. UVB rays are not constant. They are significant at around 11 am, peak at 12:30 or 1 pm, and after 3, are mostly non-existent. Yet UVB rays are the ones that make vitamin D. UVA rays actually deplete it. So the sun has its own built-in system to regulate vitamin D. This is why to get vitamin D from the sun, it must be between 11 am and 2 or 3 pm. Im not talking get an all out tan. For most people, 10-20 minutes of unprotected exposure 3 times a week is all you need. This ...
used-lime test index (LTI). Lime test index is simply buffer pH multiplied by 10. Table 2. Recommended ... 60 mesh screens is used to compute a fineness index (FI) (the higher the mesh number, the smaller the ... effectively than materials with larger particles when applied at equivalent rates. The fineness index of .... ...
used-lime test index (LTI). Lime test index is simply buffer pH multiplied by 10. Table 2. Recommended ... 60 mesh screens is used to compute a fineness index (FI) (the higher the mesh number, the smaller the ... effectively than materials with larger particles when applied at equivalent rates. The fineness index of .... ...
The present invention provides a prosthetic implant 1 which includes a stem 2 having two lateral fins 20. The lateral fins 20 extend outwardly from the lateral side 6 of the stem 2, such that the lateral face 21 of each fin 20 is flush with the lateral side 6 of stem 2.
The invention provides a self-lock drawer which can effectively avoiding spring part of plate spring from impact, comprising a lower fin, an upper fin, a guide post connecting the upper and lower fins, a plate spring at the upper face of the upper fin, and a drawing plate whose one end is arranged between the plate spring and the upper fin. The plate spring comprises integrated a positioning claw, a spring part, and a sag element, the upper face of the upper fin is arranged with a groove in which the spring part sinks, and the upper face of the upper fin is provided with a limiter for avoiding over-deformation of spring part. The upper face of the spring part is not higher than the upper face of the upper fin. Therefore, in washing or dressing process, the spring part will not become invalid caused by the impact of external force. And the invention can be used in self-lock zip.