Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.
Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.
Infections with bacteria of the genus LEPTOSPIRA.
Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.
The presence of parasites in food and food products. For the presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food, FOOD MICROBIOLOGY is available.
An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).
A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.
Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Bacterial, viral, or parasitic diseases transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of infected ticks. The families Ixodidae and Argasidae contain many bloodsucking species that are important pests of man and domestic birds and mammals and probably exceed all other arthropods in the number and variety of disease agents they transmit. Many of the tick-borne diseases are zoonotic.
An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.
Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
A species of hydatid tapeworm (class CESTODA) in the family Taeniidae, whose adult form infects the DIGESTIVE TRACT of DOGS, other canines, and CATS. The larval form infects SHEEP; PIGS; HORSES; and may infect humans, where it migrates to various organs and forms permanent HYDATID CYSTS.
A genus of aerobic, helical spirochetes, some species of which are pathogenic, others free-living or saprophytic.
Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
A genus of question mark-shaped bacteria spirochetes which is found in fresh water that is contaminated by animal urine. It causes LEPTOSPIROSIS.
Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.
Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.
Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.
Diseases that are underfunded and have low name recognition but are major burdens in less developed countries. The World Health Organization has designated six tropical infectious diseases as being neglected in industrialized countries that are endemic in many developing countries (HELMINTHIASIS; LEPROSY; LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS; ONCHOCERCIASIS; SCHISTOSOMIASIS; and TRACHOMA).
Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
A north temperate species of tapeworm (CESTODA) whose adult form infects FOXES and wild RODENTS. The larval form can infect humans producing HEPATIC HYDATID CYSTS.
An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.
A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are sheep and goats. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected. In general, these organisms tend to be more virulent for laboratory animals than BRUCELLA ABORTUS and may cause fatal infections.
Infections with viruses of the genus HANTAVIRUS. This is associated with at least four clinical syndromes: HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME caused by viruses of the Hantaan group; a milder form of HFRS caused by SEOUL VIRUS; nephropathia epidemica caused by PUUMALA VIRUS; and HANTAVIRUS PULMONARY SYNDROME caused by SIN NOMBRE VIRUS.
Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.
Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.
The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.
A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.
Infections with viruses of the genus HENIPAVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE.
Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.
Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.
A genus of parasitic nematodes that occurs in mammals including man. Infection in humans is either by larvae penetrating the skin or by ingestion of uncooked fish.
Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.
The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes BRUCELLOSIS. Its cells are nonmotile coccobacilli and are animal parasites and pathogens. The bacterium is transmissible to humans through contact with infected dairy products or tissue.
Living organisms or their toxic products that are used to cause disease or death of humans during WARFARE.
EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.
The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.
Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.
A genus of ascomycetous mitosporic fungi in the family Orbiliaceae. It is used for the biological control of nematodes in livestock.
An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.
A genus of very small TAPEWORMS, in the family Taeniidae. The adult form is found in various CARNIVORA but not humans. The larval form is seen in humans under certain epidemiologic circumstances.
A genus of the family RHABDOVIRIDAE that includes RABIES VIRUS and other rabies-like viruses.
A group of iron-binding proteins that tightly bind two ferrate ions along with two carbonate ions. They are found in the bodily fluids of vertebrates where they act as transport and storage molecules for iron.
A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, and containing the type species PARVOVIRUS B19, HUMAN.
A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.
A genus of parasitic nematodes that causes TRICHINELLOSIS in man and other animal.
Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.
Helminth infection of the lung caused by Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis.
Agents used to treat tapeworm infestations in man or animals.
Infection with roundworms of the genus ANISAKIS. Human infection results from the consumption of fish harboring roundworm larvae. The worms may cause acute NAUSEA; VOMITING; or penetrate into the wall of the DIGESTIVE TRACT where they give rise to EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA in the STOMACH; INTESTINES; or the OMENTUM.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.
An infection with TRICHINELLA. It is caused by eating raw or undercooked meat that is infected with larvae of nematode worms TRICHINELLA genus. All members of the TRICHINELLA genus can infect human in addition to TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS, the traditional etiological agent. It is distributed throughout much of the world and is re-emerging in some parts as a public health hazard and a food safety problem.
The MEDITERRANEAN SEA, the MEDITERRANEAN ISLANDS, and the countries bordering on the sea collectively.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).
An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.
Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.
A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.
A positive-stranded RNA virus species in the genus HEPEVIRUS, causing enterically-transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis (HEPATITIS E).
Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.
Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.
A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.
The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.
Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.
Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.
Acute INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans; caused by HEPATITIS E VIRUS, a non-enveloped single-stranded RNA virus. Similar to HEPATITIS A, its incubation period is 15-60 days and is enterically transmitted, usually by fecal-oral transmission.
A general term for diseases produced by viruses.
A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.
Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.
An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.
A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.
A plague-like disease of rodents, transmissible to man. It is caused by FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS and is characterized by fever, chills, headache, backache, and weakness.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Members of the class Arachnida, especially SPIDERS; SCORPIONS; MITES; and TICKS; which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.
Acute respiratory illness in humans caused by the Muerto Canyon virus whose primary rodent reservoir is the deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus. First identified in the southwestern United States, this syndrome is characterized most commonly by fever, myalgias, headache, cough, and rapid respiratory failure.
A species of the genus BRUCELLA whose natural hosts are cattle and other bovidae. Abortion and placentitis are frequently produced in the pregnant animal. Other mammals, including humans, may be infected.
An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.
A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE causing HANTAVIRUS INFECTIONS, first identified during the Korean war. Infection is found primarily in rodents and humans. Transmission does not appear to involve arthropods. HANTAAN VIRUS is the type species.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.
The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.
Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.
Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.
The largest genus of TICKS in the family IXODIDAE, containing over 200 species. Many infest humans and other mammals and several are vectors of diseases such as LYME DISEASE, tick-borne encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, TICK-BORNE), and KYASANUR FOREST DISEASE.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ANAPLASMA, family ANAPLASMATACEAE, formerly called Ehrlichia phagocytophila or Ehrlichia equi. This organism is tick-borne (IXODES) and causes disease in horses and sheep. In humans, it causes human granulocytic EHRLICHIOSIS.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.
Determination of parasite eggs in feces.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.
The etiologic agent of TULAREMIA in man and other warm-blooded animals.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to HELMINTH ANTIGENS.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.
The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
The acquired form of infection by Toxoplasma gondii in animals and man.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.
The status of health in urban populations.
Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A genus of protozoa parasitic to birds and mammals. T. gondii is one of the most common infectious pathogenic animal parasites of man.
The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.
Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.

Mayaro virus disease: an emerging mosquito-borne zoonosis in tropical South America. (1/1576)

This report describes the clinical, laboratory, and epidemiological findings on 27 cases of Mayaro virus (MV) disease, an emerging mosquito-borne viral illness that is endemic in rural areas of tropical South America. MV disease is a nonfatal, dengue-like illness characterized by fever, chills, headache, eye pain, generalized myalgia, arthralgia, diarrhea, vomiting, and rash of 3-5 days' duration. Severe joint pain is a prominent feature of this illness; the arthralgia sometimes persists for months and can be quite incapacitating. Cases of two visitors from the United States, who developed MV disease during visits to eastern Peru, are reported. MV disease and dengue are difficult to differentiate clinically.  (+info)

Long-term studies of hantavirus reservoir populations in the southwestern United States: rationale, potential, and methods. (2/1576)

Hantaviruses are rodent-borne zoonotic agents that cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Asia and Europe and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. The epidemiology of human diseases caused by these viruses is tied to the ecology of the rodent hosts, and effective control and prevention relies on a through understanding of host ecology. After the 1993 HPS outbreak in the southwestern United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated long-term studies of the temporal dynamics of hantavirus infection in host populations. These studies, which used mark-recapture techniques on 24 trapping webs at nine sites in the southwestern United States, were designed to monitor changes in reservoir population densities and in the prevalence and incidence of infection; quantify environmental factors associated with these changes; and when linked to surveillance databases for HPS, lead to predictive models of human risk to be used in the design and implementation of control and prevention measures for human hantavirus disease.  (+info)

Preventing zoonotic diseases in immunocompromised persons: the role of physicians and veterinarians. (3/1576)

We surveyed physicians and veterinarians in Wisconsin about the risk for and prevention of zoonotic diseases in immunocompromised persons. We found that physicians and veterinarians hold significantly different views about the risks posed by certain infectious agents and species of animals and communicate very little about zoonotic issues; moreover, physicians believe that veterinarians should be involved in many aspects of zoonotic disease prevention, including patient education.  (+info)

Natural and experimental oral infection of nonhuman primates by bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents. (4/1576)

Experimental lemurs either were infected orally with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or were maintained as uninfected control animals. Immunohistochemical examination for proteinase-resistant protein (prion protein or PrP) was performed on tissues from two infected but still asymptomatic lemurs, killed 5 months after infection, and from three uninfected control lemurs. Control tissues showed no staining, whereas PrP was detected in the infected animals in tonsil, gastrointestinal tract and associated lymphatic tissues, and spleen. In addition, PrP was detected in ventral and dorsal roots of the cervical spinal cord, and within the spinal cord PrP could be traced in nerve tracts as far as the cerebral cortex. Similar patterns of PrP immunoreactivity were seen in two symptomatic and 18 apparently healthy lemurs in three different French primate centers, all of which had been fed diets supplemented with a beef protein product manufactured by a British company that has since ceased to include beef in its veterinary nutritional products. This study of BSE-infected lemurs early in their incubation period extends previous pathogenesis studies of the distribution of infectivity and PrP in natural and experimental scrapie. The similarity of neuropathology and PrP immunostaining patterns in experimentally infected animals to those observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic animals in primate centers suggests that BSE contamination of zoo animals may have been more widespread than is generally appreciated.  (+info)

Ortho- and paramyxoviruses from migrating feral ducks: characterization of a new group of influenza A viruses. (5/1576)

Ortho- and parainfluenza viruses isolated from the cloacas of migrating feral ducks shot on the Mississippi flyway included three strains of influenza. A virus (Hav6 Nav1, Hav6 Nl, Hav7 Neq2) as well as Newcastle disease virus. One influenza virus, A/duck/Memphis/546/74, possessed Hav3 haemagglutinin, but the neuraminidase was not inhibited by any of the known influenza reference antisera. The neuraminidase on this virus was related to the neuraminidases on A/duck/GDR/72 (H2 N?), A/turkey/Ontario/7732/66 (Hav 5 N?), A/duck/Ukraine/1/60 (Hav3 N?) and A/turkey/Wisconsin/68. We therefore propose that the neuraminidase on this group of influenza viruses be designated Nav6. The A/duck/Memphis/546/74 influenza virus caused an ocular discharge in 1 of 5 ducks and was shed in faeces for 10 days; it was stable in faecal samples for up to 3 days at 20 degrees C. These results suggest that ecological studies on influenza in avian species should include attempts to isolate virus from faeces. Faecal-oral transmission is an attractive explanation for the spread of influenza virus from feral birds to other animals.  (+info)

Gnathostomosis, an emerging foodborne zoonotic disease in Acapulco, Mexico. (6/1576)

Between 1993 and 1997, 98 gnathostomosis cases were clinically identified in Acapulco, Mexico. Intermittent cutaneous migratory swellings were the commonest manifestation. Larvae were identified in 26 cases, while in 72, final diagnosis was made on the basis of epidemiologic data, food habits, and positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot results.  (+info)

Epidemiology of human fascioliasis: a review and proposed new classification. (7/1576)

The epidemiological picture of human fascioliasis has changed in recent years. The number of reports of humans infected with Fasciola hepatica has increased significantly since 1980 and several geographical areas have been described as endemic for the disease in humans, with prevalence and intensity ranging from low to very high. High prevalence of fascioliasis in humans does not necessarily occur in areas where fascioliasis is a major veterinary problem. Human fascioliasis can no longer be considered merely as a secondary zoonotic disease but must be considered to be an important human parasitic disease. Accordingly, we present in this article a proposed new classification for the epidemiology of human fascioliasis. The following situations are distinguished: imported cases; autochthonous, isolated, nonconstant cases; hypo-, meso-, hyper-, and holoendemics; epidemics in areas where fascioliasis is endemic in animals but not humans; and epidemics in human endemic areas.  (+info)

Human rabies postexposure prophylaxis during a raccoon rabies epizootic in New York, 1993 and 1994. (8/1576)

We describe the epidemiology of human rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) in four upstate New York counties during the 1st and 2nd year of a raccoon rabies epizootic. We obtained data from records of 1,173 persons whose rabies PEP was reported to local health departments in 1993 and 1994. Mean annual PEP incidence rates were highest in rural counties, in summer, and in patients 10 to 14 and 35 to 44 years of age. PEP given after bites was primarily associated with unvaccinated dogs and cats, but most (70%) was not attributable to bites. Although pet vaccination and stray animal control, which target direct exposure, remain the cornerstones of human rabies prevention, the risk for rabies by the nonbite route (e. g., raccoon saliva on pet dogs' and cats' fur) should also be considered.  (+info)

Zoonotic infections are a class of specific diseases and infections that are naturally transmitted between vertebrate animals and humans. Transmission may occur via direct contact with an infected animal or animal product, by ingestion of contaminated water or food products, by inhalation, or through arthropod vectors-most commonly ticks. Diagnosis can be challenging because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms (e.g., fever, headache, and myalgias) which overlap with the presentation of many other infectious and autoimmune diseases. Consider zoonotic infections in patients presenting with viral-like illnesses in conjunction with occupational or geographical risk factors for zoonotic disease exposure and transmission. See Table 97-1 for a list of common systemic zoonotic infections and Table 97-2 for specific treatment recommendations for tick-borne diseases. ...
Three main research products are reported in this dissertation. This research focused on estimation of the seroprevalence rates in agricultural workers with exposure to pigs and poultry, and determination of risk factors for infection. Chapter 2, Are swine workers in the United States at increased risk of infection with zoonotic influenza virus?, reports controlled, cross-sectional seroprevalence studies among farmers, meat processing workers, veterinarians, and control subjects. Using a hemagglutination inhibition assay against six influenza A virus isolates, all 3 exposed study groups demonstrated markedly elevated titers against the H1N1 and H1N2 swine influenza virus isolates, compared with control subjects. Chapter 3, Infection due to 3 avian influenza subtypes in United States veterinarians, describes a controlled, cross-sectional seroprevalence study that examined veterinarians in the United States for evidence of previous avian influenza
The HIV/AIDS pandemic is associated with a number of opportunistic infections of immunocompromised person. Some of these infections are recognized zoonoses that are naturally transmitted between animals and humans. These may be directly transmitted by, animals or indirectly by contact with contaminated food and water. Interactions between animals and humans have a complex interplay and health care providers should be aware of the potential role of animals as reservoirs of infectious diseases for HIV infected patients. The most frequent pattern of infection is characterized either by direct contact with farm or wild animals and/or ingestion of their products. Immunomodulatory antibodies that enhance the immune system to promote the function of immune cells have great promise in preventing and treating opportunistic infections of zoonotic origin in HIV/AIDS patient.
Zoonotic Diseases According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary the definition of a zoonotic disease is a disease communicable from animals to humans under natural conditions. Although rare, bacterial and fungal infections in horses, can cause a variety of illnesses in people, from minor skin infections to serious illnesses. Besides touching your horse, even our common chores such as cleaning stalls and grooming may also put us at risk.. In our world of horses, there are numerous zoonotic diseases and we should be more cautious when we come across them. Well highlight a few below but please check out the references listed for additional zoonotic diseases transmitted by horses. Well cover the topic of prevention in another blog.. There are two ways a zoonotic disease can be transmitted, direct and indirect. Ingestion, inhalation, skin contact, contact with mucous membranes or open wounds and bites are examples of a direct transmission. Examples of indirect transmission are insect bites and ...
Infectious Disease News | Find the latest zoonotic infections news articles, videos, blogs, books, Continuing Medical Education (CME), meeting coverage, and journal articles.
After a strongly successful first national Zoonosis conference last year, MIEF is proud to present the second addition of the conference on building scientific awareness on Zoonotic disease control. Here are the details of the conference: 2nd National Conference on Scientific Awareness on Zoonotic Disease Control Date: 29 March 2016 (10am-4pm) Venue: Auditorium ,KEM Hospital, Parel ,… Read More. ...
The use of animals as a source of cells, tissues, and organs for transplantation - xenotransplantation - has been of increasing interest in recent years. Transplantation of animal tissues into human patients is occurring now at various centers and the possibility of organ xenotransplants is widely discussed. This new volume presents a balanced review of recent progress in understanding the immunologic aspects of xenotransplantation and zoonotic risks. It addresses how the application of various immunosuppressive modalities might compromise the immunological competence of recipients and examines the relevant issues relating to zoonotic disease. This is the first book to deal with the issues of host defense and zoonosis in xenotransplantation and points to the critical issues that must be addressed to make the process safe from the perspective of the patient and society as well as critical questions yet to be answered Valuable reading for physicians, scientists, and those engaged in the development of
In some areas where there is a high risk of emerging zoonotic disease, maybe we shouldnt cut the forest down and have people move in and eat wildlife, he says, pointing to his groups research finding that cutting down tropical forests in Asia for palm oil is leading to workers contracting malaria and occasionally a new zoonotic disease.. Two New York-based researchers argue that the reduced diversity of animals that results from such human activity is leading to an increase in zoonotic disease and that conserving biodiversity can protect against such new diseases emerging and spreading.. The researchers, Ostfeld of the Cary Institute and Felicia Keesing, professor of science, mathematics and computing at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., say they have demonstrated this theory in their study of Lyme disease in the U.S. Northeast. (See Short Feature.) The number of ticks carrying the disease is lower in undisturbed forests - areas with more animal diversity - than in the fragmented ...
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This report provides summary data on zoonotic infections in animals and humans across the UK in 2014. Zoonoses are diseases which can be transmitted to humans from animals.
The wriggly worms your furry friend can contract could actually pose a threat to you as a pet-owner. Roundworm, hookworm and tapeworm including hydatid and flea tapeworm, are the main parasitic worms our pets are susceptible to and they do pose a zoonotic risk - the potential for the disease to be transferred from animal to human. Children are especially at risk of becoming infected, because they are more likely to be exposed to, or accidently ingest contaminated soil or animal faeces. Zoonosis is serious, as these worms wish to live inside a cat or dogs stomach, so if they are accidently consumed and develop inside the human body; the health implications for a person are shocking. Roundworm larvae for example, will hatch in the intestine before migrating upwards through abdominal organs, damaging the lungs, sometimes even reaching the brain and causing blindness. Hydatid tapeworm embryos travel through your bloodstream, causing cysts to form inside organs such as your liver or kidneys. These ...
The global veterinary software market is expected to reach USD 696.0 million by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 8.9% Increase in prevalence of zoonotic diseases is a key market driver for the growth of this market. Rising prevalence has triggered the demand for animal health diagnostics & monitoring services, which is expected to drive the market growth over the forecast period. The growing adoption of integrated software systems for diagnostics & treatment is anticipated to fuel the growth over the following years. Pet health information systems that enable real-time analysis of prevalence of diseases will help researchers develop therapeutics. The incorporation of these solutions in laboratories is another growth propeller for veterinary reference laboratories. Moreover, zoonotic diseases pose a major public health burden, especially in tropical regions due to lack of funds and healthcare infrastructure. Increase in willingness to pay for animal healthcare is expected to fuel the adoption of animal ...
The global veterinary software market is expected to reach USD 696.0 million by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 8.9%, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc. Increase in prevalence of zoonotic diseases is a key market driver for the growth of this market. Rising prevalence has triggered the demand for animal health diagnostics & monitoring services, which is expected to drive the market growth over the forecast period.. The growing adoption of integrated software systems for diagnostics & treatment is anticipated to fuel the growth over the following years. Pet health information systems that enable real-time analysis of prevalence of diseases will help researchers develop therapeutics. The incorporation of these solutions in laboratories is another growth propeller for veterinary reference laboratories.. Moreover, zoonotic diseases pose a major public health burden, especially in tropical regions due to lack of funds and healthcare infrastructure. Increase in willingness to pay for ...
About 75% of the new diseases that have affected humans over the past 10 years have been caused by pathogens originating from an animal or from products of animal origin. Even though many of the zoonotic diseases have the means to spread over long distances and to become global problems, limited reliable qualitative and quantitative information on their burden is available at the moment. Cecilia Stroe, editor of IAHI, looks into those neglected zoonotic diseases which seem to have been almost forgotten, at least in terms of allocation of funding for research and collective action for control.. ...
Zoonotic diseases account for almost 60 percent of all disease among humans. Developing a multi-disciplinary look at disease in humans and animal gives us early warning on pending issues. MERS, SARS and PEDv are all corona viruses hence they model is very similar ways. In the links below, note the studies that clearly show PEDv and SARS are airborne dangers.. A Unified Framework for the Infection Dynamics of Zoonotic Spillover and Spread says that disentangling the contribution of animal-to-human from human-to-human transmission is of crucial importance to inform appropriate control measures. The shape of the cumulative number of occurrences can provide indications of the modes of transmission. A concave, saturating profile is an expected outcome due to depletion of susceptibles. In contrast, a convex region in the profile of cumulative number of occurrences suggests that human-to-human transmission plays an important role. Alternative explanations are possible. A convex shape in the cumulative ...
To celebrate World Zoonoses Day, marked annually on 6 July, we take a look at ILRIs research on zoonoses, infectious diseases spread between animals and people.. ...
The present study was purposively conducted at Clinical Complex, VeterinaryCollege, Hebbal, Bangalore; Referral Polyclinic, IVRI, Izatnagar; Veterinary polyclinic, GBPUAT, Pantnagar and Veterinary hospital, Palam, New Delhi, India. From each clinical complex, 50 pet dog owners were selected randomly and thus having a total of 200 respondents for the study. The study showed that majority of the respondents need information regarding vaccination of the dogs followed by deworming, ectoparasitic spray, common diseases affecting dogs, common diseases affecting pups and health problems of pregnant dogs. Regarding zoonotic diseases of dog, it was observed that majority of the respondents need information regarding leptospirosis followed by rabies, tuberculosis, zoonotic parasitic diseases and zoonotic mycotic diseases. The study also depicted that majority of the respondents need information regarding price of various dog breeds followed by place of procurement and sale of pups and adult dogs, type and place
Main Article. The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.. ...
There are so many reasons to teach young children to keep their fingers out of their mouths and not to eat dirt. Add the fact that there are so many dogs and puppies using our yard for a bathroom; your.... ...
A special editorial fee discount (20% or 50% off - see details on the website) for the papers in Polish submitted to Medycyna Pracy until May 31, 2020 ...
Biology Assignment Help, Neo-zoonoses, Neo-zoonoses In recent times, some of the pre-existing low profile and less frequent zoonoses and some entirely newly recognized zoonoses are emerging with a new dimension. These zoonoses are called neo-zoonoses. The reasons for such emergence a
Zoonotic Viruses Associated with Illegally Imported Wildlife Products K. Smith et al.| PLoS ONE | January 2012  Abstract: The global trade in wil...
vector-borne and zoonotic diseases - Instruments Consumables Reagents Advanced BioMatrix,RANDOX,RANDOX ELISA,Biomedical, biochemical reagents, laboratory supplies, equipment, antibodies, ELISA kits, diagnostic reagents, methods of experimental techniques, general analytical instruments, material testing instruments and equipment, used laboratory equipment, instruments and equipment, life sciences, environmental monitoring equipment , measurement, measuring instruments, rotating wall bioreactor, three-dimensional tissue / stem cell culture system; microcapsule
Free Online Library: The nature of emerging zoonotic diseases: ecology, prediction, and prevention.(Cover Story) by Medical Laboratory Observer; Business Health care industry Communicable diseases Research
Animals can sometimes carry harmful germs that can spread to people and cause illness - these are known as zoonotic diseases or zoonoses. Such diseases may be caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites or fungi. They may be mild or serious, and in some cases may cause death. Animals can sometimes a...
Zoonotic diseases in dogs can be spread by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. However, whatever the actual cause is, they all have one thing in common; they can spread from your dog to you.
Nearly everyone is affected by the movement of and exposure to pathogens. Here are key concepts behind zoonotic disease and control.
Zoonotic Diseases information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.
Zoonoses or zoonotic diseases are those which can be transmitted directly from animals to humans, infection that can be acquired indirectly from the environment by humans from animals, and diseases which have an animal reservoir, but require an arthropod (insect, mite, or tick) to transmit the disease to humans. Zoonoses or zoonotic diseases are all the diseases collectively as described above. A single disease, such as rabies, is called a zoonosis or zoonotic disease.
Scientists have successfully edited the genetic code of piglets to remove dormant viral infections, a breakthrough that could eventually pave the way for animal-to-human organ transplants.
Roundworms, hookworms and tapeworms are parasites that can be passed from pets to people. Learn how to help protect yourself from these zoonotic infections.
Are we at greater risk now from massive disease outbreaks? Its a vital question after a wave of deadly E. coli infections in Germany has put hundreds in the hospital and killed more than 20. Disease ecologist Sadie Ryan explains how societal changes are aiding the bugs. ...
A lot of this is about H1N1 (can you tell I am cleaning through my bookmark folder?) but it had me thinking about the implications around the emergence...
A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.. 0 Comments. ...
In Chapter 3, The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection, author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.. 0 Comments. ...
A zoonotic disease is one that is spread by animals to people. Zoonotic diseases may be caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi. Some of these diseases are very common and can take a serious turn at times.
Your pet might be sharing more than just a roof with you. You may be sharing the disease they catch upon bacteria. Find out more!
Formal summative written assessment will constitute 60% of the students grade. Online discussion in both a synchronous and asynchronous environment will contribute further to the final mark. In combination with the submission of electronic course assignments, these elements will provide the remaining 40% of the final mark ...
Vector-borne diseases have long been a problem for both animals and humans, causing some of the worst plagues of mankind, such as the Black Death in Europe in the 14th century and yellow fever epidemics in the Americas (Gubler 2009). The 20th century witnessed a steady decline in vector-borne diseases through the implementation of extensive vector control programmes, but the 21st century has witnessed the re-emergence of some of these diseases. This re-emergence has been presumed to be because of new global trends in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation (Gubler 2009). Amongst the re-emerging vector-borne diseases are tick-borne diseases (Estrada-Peqa, Ayllon & De la Fuente 2012).. Ticks transmit a wide range of pathogens that include protozoa, bacteria and viruses (Kim et al. 2006). In their review on the prevalence, distribution and burden of neglected tropical diseases, Hotez and Kamath (2009) noted that there was lack of information on tick-borne zoonoses in ...
The first case of bovine chlamydial abortion was reported in canton Graubunden, Switzerland. In this region, Chlamydophila (Cp.) abortus is endemic in small ruminants. So the incidence of chlamydia-related abortions in cattle from this region was evaluated in this brandnew study - and a potential zoonotic risk was detected.
Outbreaks of deadly animal-to-human viruses such as Ebola could become more likely due to climate change and human encroachment into untouched natural habitats, a leading United Nations expert has warned. Dr. David Nabarro, the U.N. secretary-generals special envoy on Ebola, told The Independent the world should prepare for more major outbreaks of zoonotic diseases - those which can pass from animals to humans - which he said were a local and global threat to humanity… (Cooper, 4/5).. ...
Companion animals as reservoir for zoonotic diseases The European Journal of Companion Animal Practice (EJCAP) Special Issue Vol. 18 (3) December 2008 Companion animals as reservoir for zoonotic diseases (pag. 213-223) by J. Gr ndalen, B. S vik, H. S rum _______________________________________ Zoonotic diseases in companion animals (pag. 212) by E. Bjerk s
Zoonotic infections in Northern Ireland farmers - Volume 105 Issue 3 - C. F. Stanford, J. H. Connolly, W. A. Ellis, E. T. M. Smyth, P. V. Coyle, W. I. Montgomery, D. I. H. Simpson
Zoonoses are infections or diseases that can be transmitted directly or indirectly between animals and humans, for instance by consuming contaminated foodstuffs or through contact with infected animals. The severity of these diseases in humans varies from mild symptoms to life-threatening conditions.. Food-borne zoonotic diseases are caused by consuming food or drinking water contaminated by pathogenic (disease-causing) micro-organisms such as bacteria and their toxins, viruses and parasites. They enter the body through the gastrointestinal tract where the first symptoms often occur. Many of these micro-organisms are commonly found in the intestines of healthy food-producing animals. The risks of contamination are present from farm to fork and require prevention and control throughout the food chain.. Food-borne zoonotic diseases are a significant and widespread global public health threat. In the European Union (EU), over 320,000 human cases are reported each year, but the real number is likely ...
Descripción Written by an international, interdisciplinary team of physicians, veterinarians, virologists, medical microbiologists, and parasitologists, Zoonoses: Infectious Diseases Transmissible between Animals and Humans covers zoonotic pathogens as agents of emergence and reemergence of zoonotic diseases, opportunistic zoonotic infections, risks of iatrogenic transmission and xenotransplantation, imported zoonotic infections, food-borne zoonoses, and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Zoonoses is a valuable physicians reference that covers all aspects of epidemiology, diagnosis and differential diagnosis as well as therapy and prophylaxis of zoonotic diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi.. ...
For additional information on zoonotic disease, check out this link to Texas Department of State Health Services Zoonoses are diseases transmissible from animal to man, generally through direct contact with the animal or its body fluids or waste. With the exception of birds and the educational animals, most TWRC volunteers do not handle wildlife. While this minimizes the volunteers risk, it does not eliminate it. There is a limited risk of transmission for some zoonotic diseases through exposure to the animals waste or bodily fluids. It is always important to wash or sanitize your hands after such exposure. However, if a volunteer or rescuer does handle wildlife and happens to be bitten or scratched, it is important to know: What animal bit or scratched them When the event occurred And report the event to the local authorities This listing is not all inclusive of zoonotic diseases that you or your pets can be exposed to when coming in contact with wildlife. This list is intended to raise awareness
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Mar. 5, 2010) − Although it is rare for humans to pick up a disease from a horse, education on the subject is the best source of prevention, and the Saddle Up Safely campaign addresses diseases, clinical signs and professional advice in a new booklet on this topic. The five-year campaign is a unique collaboration of expertise and participation between University of Kentucky and community sponsors and partners, including the campaigns spokesperson, Kentuckys First Lady Jane Beshear. In addition to reducing the number and severity of riding injuries, it is also very important to understand how diseases of the horse can affect humans and how to prevent and respond to them, said First Lady Jane Beshear. This booklet lists potential zoonotic diseases that can be shared between horses and people and precautions that can be taken to reduce the chances of this occurring. Zoonotic diseases are defined as any disease that can be transferred from people to animal or animal to people. ...
As the director of an animal rescue, youre going to face many challenges. One of those challenges will be the fact that at least some of the animals you take in wont have been properly vaccinated and could be quite ill. If you dont have a plan for handling Zoonotic diseases, illness can quickly spread…
This guidance is for England. A disaster is an event that exceeds local capacity to deal with it, whilst an emergency is an unforeseen or sudden occurrence that demands immediate action. An outbreak of a serious animal disease such as foot-and-mouth disease, avian influenza or rabies may fit into the definitions of both a disaster and an emergency.. The effects of an outbreak can have serious implications in terms of movement restrictions and the killing of a large number of animals. There are also human impacts resulting from potential zoonotic diseases (for example, rabies) in terms of post-exposure management and supportive medical treatment.. The greater the likelihood and/or impact of a disaster or emergency, the greater the need for contingency planning.. What is contingency planning?. Contingency planning may be defined as a mechanism for anticipating and thereby proposing responses to unexpected and unintended events and emergencies. It is founded upon the risk and anticipation of ...
The mission of the Zoonotic Disease Program (ZDP) is to prevent and control diseases transmissible from animals (including mosquitoes and other vectors) to humans. ZDP staff work with our local health department partners and other agencies and organizations throughout the state to conduct surveillance of animal reservoirs and disease vectors, investigate zoonotic diseases and conditions in humans, carry out disease interventions and educational initiatives and provide consultations to animal and human health professionals.
The mission of the Zoonotic Disease Program (ZDP) is to prevent and control diseases transmissible from animals (including mosquitoes and other vectors) to humans. ZDP staff work with our local health department partners and other agencies and organizations throughout the state to conduct surveillance of animal reservoirs and disease vectors, investigate zoonotic diseases and conditions in humans, carry out disease interventions and educational initiatives and provide consultations to animal and human health professionals.
In this article, Zoran Katrinka, Councillor for Europe at the World Veterinary Association, takes a comprehensive look at zoonotic diseases; how they occur and how our rapidly changing population is affecting their prevalence. The author advocates a One Health approach in the treatment of zoonotic diseases - a collaborative, international, cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary mechanism to address threats and reduce risks of detrimental infectious diseases at the animal-human-ecosystem interface (FAO ...
Zoonoses are defined by the World Health Organization as diseases and infections which are transmitted between vertebrate animals and man. Veterinary practitioners are often the first to address questions on possible transfer of disease from pets to owners who are their clients. The practitioner is expected to be the expert on site and provide accurate detailed information and solutions to problems. This challenging duty carries a great deal of responsibility and may also be associated with legal liability. The task of being knowledgeable about zoonoses is even more difficult when considering that the number of organisms known to cause zoonotic infections is greater than 250. Moreover, there is a constant flow of new data and information about these pathogens and newly discovered disease agents. Although human physicians are an important part of the network that should advise pet owners, they are often surprisingly ignorant about zoonoses which they consider to be rare and a relatively minor ...
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vector-borne and zoonotic diseases - Instruments Consumables Reagents Advanced BioMatrix,RANDOX,RANDOX ELISA,Biomedical, biochemical reagents, laboratory supplies, equipment, antibodies, ELISA kits, diagnostic reagents, methods of experimental techniques, general analytical instruments, material testing instruments and equipment, used laboratory equipment, instruments and equipment, life sciences, environmental monitoring equipment , measurement, measuring instruments, rotating wall bioreactor, three-dimensional tissue / stem cell culture system; microcapsule
Humans and animals can easily share pathogens through our shared environments. Zoonotic disease can spread to both humans and animal species.
Zoonoses, or infectious diseases that can pass from animals to humans, are commonplace and a danger to public health; the list of zoonotic diseases includes Ebola, influenza, SARS, MARS, HIV to name only a few.. They are also the subject of David Quammens book Spillover : Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, and the series of short videos produced by The Weather Channel, called The Virus Hunters ...
Pets provide many benefits to humans. They comfort us and they give us companionship. However, some animals can also pass diseases to humans. Here is the list of zoonotic diseases provided by www.cdc.gov. ...
Tetra Tech is providing technical assistance and support to strengthen capacity to prevent the spread of zoonotic diseases from animals to humans worldwide.
British scientists say they have developed a model that can predict outbreaks of zoonotic diseases - those such as Ebola and Zika that jump from animals to humans - based on changes in climate.Describing their model as a major improvement in our understanding of the spread of diseases from animals to people, the researchers said it could help governments prepare for and respond to disease outbreaks, and to factor in their risk when making policies that might affect the environment.Our model can help decision-makers assess the likely impact (on zoonotic disease) of any interventions or change in national or international government policies, such as the conversion of grasslands to agricultural lands, said Kate Jones, a professor who co-led the study at University College Londons genetics, evolution and environment department.
Numerous novel episomal DNA-sequences related to single-stranded circular DNA viruses have been isolated from milk, bovine sera as well as from different human pathological biopsies (Funk et al.; Gunst et al.; Lamberto et al.; Whitley et al.; all Genome Announc. (2014) 2(4); Falida et al.; Genome Announc. (2017) 5(17)). The high degree of homology between isolates from milk, bovine sera and human tissue or serum points at the consumption of bovine meat or dairy products as potential route of transmission. The global epidemiology of some common cancers (e.g. colon and breast cancer) could suggest a zoonotic origin of these conditions (zur Hausen and de Villiers, 2015; zur Hausen, Bund and de Villiers, 2017 ...
In order to overcome these issues, non-human kidney transplantation is proposed as an alternative, including animal-to-human (xeno-) transplantation, 3D organ printing, organ regeneration, lab-grown organs etc. Major advancements are being achieved in these fields in preclinical context, making these futuristic approaches increasingly attractive for testing in clinical conditions.. In order to prep for the future, we need to start thinking about how these futuristic approaches will be tested and implemented as valid alternative for current human-to-human transplantation. We need to define the inclusion criteria for such clinical trials and discuss the endpoints that will need to be achieved.. Learning objectives: coming soon. Target group: Anyone interested in new technologies to solve the idea of safely and successfully expanding the organ/kidney source.. ...
Below is a press release about the Methods paper Environmental-mechanistic modelling of the impact of global change on human zoonotic disease emergence: a case study of Lassa fever taken from the University College London. A model that predicts outbreaks of zoonotic diseases - those originating in livestock or wildlife such as Ebola and Zika - based on…
Compared to the virus that caused the SARS epidemic in the early 2000s, SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, has evolved new strategies to bind to cell receptors, resulting in tighter binding. A new study identifies key mutations that potentially enabled the animal-to-human transmission of SARS-CoV-2. The study mapped out important binding sites on SARS-CoV-2 for antibody drugs to act on. If new drugs can bind to the sites on SARS-CoV-2, they will block the virus out of cells. Read More ...
2) As far as I know, there is no known virus that could infect all living things. To the contrary, vast majority of viruses are very host-specific and target cell-specific, and cannot normally cause disease in any other organisms. Some notable exceptions include viruses that cause the so-called zoonoses, which are animal diseases that can in some cases contract to humans (this can happen the other way round as well). However, viruses causing zoonoses are poorly designed to live in other organisms than their normal hosts and thus often cause too fulminant infections, sometimes even killing the new host. But considering the vast amount of virus species/strains there are, only a small fraction of them can cause cross-species infections ...
Gastrointestinal (GI) parasites include any parasites that live in the stomach or intestines of a host. A variety of GI parasites affect dogs and cats. They range from roundworms and tapeworms, which are visible with the naked eye, to microscopic organisms like coccidia and Giardia. Regardless of their size, GI parasites can cause serious illness and sometimes even death in pets. Some parasites are zoonotic, which means humans can become infected.. Read More ...
ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0007-3985, Hume, Jen C.C, Motshegwa, K., Pignatelli, Patricia, Talbert, A. and Kisinza, W. (2007) Does tick-borne relapsing fever have an animal reservoir in East Africa?. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Vol 7, Issue 4, pp. 659-666. McCall, Philip ...
Based on the proximity of their habitat to the settlement, rats were classified as domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic. Domestic rats are the most potent to transmit zoonotic diseases. Several studies report overlapping habitat on certain species as of transmission possibility between species in turn increase the number of reservoir species. This article purposes to criticize species domestication potency related to foraging and nesting behavior. The primary data were obtained from the rat survey result that was conducted in Banjarnegara district in 2017. The data were descriptively analyzed with the examination of the possibility of domestication phenomena on R. exulans, R. tiomanicus, and R. norvegicus species. The conclusion from this study is the rat domestication potency was relatively low on R. exulans and R. tiomanicus. Both species were good adapting with food resourced from humans food, however nesting behavior has become barriers to domestication. Rattus norvegicus has been long ...
This theme emphasises quantitative approaches to understanding the pathogenesis and transmission of infectious diseases and involves epidemiology, genetics and evolution, and mathematical biology. It includes the epidemiology of endemic and exotic pathogens, mathematical modelling of host-pathogen interactions, and the informatics of pathogen evolution. This themes also investigating the epidemiology, disease burden and interactions of zoonotic pathogens - those that are transmitted between animals and humans. This research is analysing emergence of zoonotic diseases, quantifying their burden on populations and designing appropriate interventions, through strong collaborative links in tropical countries, in particular with sub-Saharan Africa.. ...
A. R. Fooks, D. L. Horton, L. P. Phipps, K. L. Mansfield, F. McCracken, C. L. Jeffries, N. Johnson, S. Wrigley, R. Deuchande, B. Toth, R. Alzola ...
The Louisiana Department of Health protects and promotes health and ensures access to medical, preventive and rehabilitative services for all citizens of the State of Louisiana.
This reporting manual provides guidance to Member States (MSs) for reporting on zoonoses and zoonotic agents in animals, food and feed under the framework of Directive 2003/99/EC and also on the reporting of other pathogenic microbiological agents in food .... ...
Please see here the paper written by the WHO on the Control of Neglected Zoonotic Diseases-A route to poverty alleviation:. The control of neglected zoonotic dieseases. a[rel~=mtli_filesize140MB]:after {content: (1.40 MB)}. ...
10% states:GA,WA,MOnt, UT, CO,NM 10-14% states:All other states 15-19% states:MI,WV,LA,MS 2010- 20-24% states:AL,CA,NV,AZ,UT,CO,MI,NY,VT,RI,NJ,DE 25-29% states:WA,OR,ID,WY,ND,SD,NM,NE,KA,IA,MI.IN,IL,OH,PA,MD,VA,NC,GA,FL ,30% states: Everything else. Smoking is the single largest preventable danger to the U.S. people ...
Zoonosis[edit]. Researchers at the University of Cornell Feline Health Center believe that "most zoonotic diseases pose minimal ... Certain infectious diseases are a concern from a public health standpoint because they are a Feline zoonosis and transmittable ...
Krauss, H. (2003). Zoonoses. ASM Press. p. 45. ISBN 978-1-55581-236-2. Mackenzie, John S.; R. W. Ashford; M. W. Service (2001 ...
Zoonosis - A zoonosis (plural zoonoses, or zoonotic diseases) is an infectious disease caused by a pathogen (an infectious ... "zoonosis". Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Retrieved 29 March 2019. WHO. "Zoonoses". Archived from the original on 3 January 2015. ... Zoonoses are infectious diseases which jump from an animal host or reservoir into humans.. ...
Wild animals, domestic animals and humans share a large and increasing number of infectious diseases, known as zoonoses. The ... Lipkin, W. Ian (2015). "Zoonoses". Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases: 3554-3558. ... "Ecology of zoonoses: natural and unnatural histories". The Lancet. 380 (9857): 1936-1945. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61678-X. ...
O. Souza Lopes, Francisco P. Pinheiro, and L. B. Iversson: "Rocio Viral Encephalitis", in: Handbook of Zoonoses, Second Edition ... 34: Mosquito-Borne Arboviruses". In Palmer, S. R.; Lord Soulsby; Simpson, D. I. H. (eds.). Zoonoses; Biology, Clinical Practice ... Section B: Viral Zoonoses, George W. Beran (ed.-in-ch.), CRC Press, 1994, pp. 205-209. Leake, Colin J. (1998). "Ch. ...
Box 1. Selected neglected tropical diseases and zoonoses to be addressed within the Global Plan. p. 2. Archived (PDF) from the ... "Taeniasis/Cysticercosis". Zoonoses. World Health Organization. Archived from the original on 2008-10-09. "Relationship between ...
Bauerfeind, R. (Rolf) (December 2015). Zoonoses. Krauss, H. (Fourth ed.). Washington, D.C. ISBN 978-1-68367-332-3. OCLC ...
A zoonosis is a specific kind of cross-species infection in which diseases are transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans. ... "WHO , Zoonoses". WHO. Fooks AR, Cliquet F, Finke S, Freuling C, Hemachudha T, Mani RS, et al. (November 2017). "Rabies". Nature ... An extensive list of zoonotic infections can be found at Zoonosis. The following pathogens are examples of diseases that have ...
Baird JK (2009). "Malaria zoonoses". Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease. 7 (5): 269-277. doi:10.1016/j.tmaid.2009.06.004. ...
"Zoonoses - Brucellosis". www.who.int/en/. World Health Organization. 2016. Retrieved 2016-10-03. Fact sheet on Brucellosis from ... Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis caused by ingestion of unpasteurized milk or undercooked meat from infected animals ... Brucella Subgroup of the Northern Ireland Regional Zoonoses Group. August 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-10-13 ...
ISBN 978-0-387-28294-7. Baird JK (2009). "Malaria zoonoses". Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease. 7 (5): 269-77. doi:10.1016 ...
February 2013). "Bat rabies surveillance in Europe". Zoonoses Public Health. 60 (1): 22-34. doi:10.1111/zph.12002. PMID ...
1994). Handbook of Zoonoses. CRC Press. ISBN 9780849332067.. ...
Weese, J. Scott (2011). Companion animal zoonoses. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 282-284. ISBN 9780813819648. Oglesbee, Barbara (2011). ...
Kühl A, Pöhlmann S (September 2012). "How ebola virus counters the interferon system". Zoonoses Public Health. 59 Suppl 2: 116- ...
ISBN 0-07-144313-4. Tuomisto, Jouko (2010). Arsenic to zoonoses. One hundred questions about the environment and health. http ... en.opasnet.org/w/Arsenic_to_zoonoses ATSDR Case Studies in Environmental Medicine U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ...
Kravetz JD, Federman DG (2002). "Cat-associated zoonoses". Arch. Intern. Med. 162 (17): 1945-52. doi:10.1001/archinte.162.17. ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. Wiley. 57 (7-8): e26-e32. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2009.01283.x. ISSN 1863-1959. Tattersall GJ, ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 56 (4): 206-208. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2008.01213.x. ISSN 1863-1959. PMID 19309483. Chirico, J.; ...
Richardson, Dennis J.; Krause, Peter J. (2003). North American Parasitic Zoonoses. Volume 6. Boston: Springer Science & ...
Chinese Journal of Zoonoses". 11: 54-55. Cite journal requires ,journal= (help) Long T, Yang Z, Wang H, Jin D, Qin M (2005). " ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 59 Suppl 2 (59): 43-7. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2012.01469.x. PMID 22958249. S2CID 27063493. Yun NE ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 56 (2): 59-64. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2008.01157.x. PMID 18705659. S2CID 6480150.CS1 maint: ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 63 (8): 608-615. doi:10.1111/zph.12271. PMC 7165716. PMID 27178103. Wu, Y.; Li, Y.; Lin, L. K.; ...
It is transferred by animal-animal contact, and some dog-human zoonoses have also been reported. Transmission is done either ... an emerging zoonosis of canine origin: report of 24 cases". Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease. 85 (4): 471-6. doi: ... Zoonoses and Public Health. 58 (8): 533-9. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2011.01398.x. PMID 21824350. S2CID 36452642. Windahl U, ...
... zoonoses and public health; patho-biological sciences and ethno-pharmacology; new media and research; avian sciences; and ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 56 (6-7): 391-406. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2008.01191.x. PMID 19486321. S2CID 34171020. GGTA1 ...
Those that carry live animals and wildlife are at especially high risk of transmitting zoonoses. Because of the openness, newly ... Due to unhygienic sanitation standards and the connection to the spread of zoonoses and pandemics, critics have grouped wet ... Barnett, Tony; Fournié, Guillaume (January 2021). "Zoonoses and wet markets: beyond technical interventions". The Lancet ... was an early cluster of cases in the COVID-19 pandemic and was highlighted as a possible origin for the zoonosis, although a ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 58 (2): 119-125. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2009.01310.x. ISSN 1863-2378. PMID 20042060. S2CID ...
Zoonoses and Public Health. 57 (1): 60-73. doi:10.1111/j.1863-2378.2009.01274.x. PMID 19744305. S2CID 9228587. Weiss & Kim ( ...
Public Health Risk Associated with Botulism as Foodborne Zoonoses by Christine Rasetti-Escargueil, Emmanuel Lemichez and Michel ... Rasetti-Escargueil, C.; Lemichez, E.; Popoff, M.R. Public Health Risk Associated with Botulism as Foodborne Zoonoses. Toxins ... "Public Health Risk Associated with Botulism as Foodborne Zoonoses." Toxins 12, no. 1: 17. ... Public Health Risk Associated with Botulism as Foodborne Zoonoses. Toxins. 2020; 12(1):17. ...
The aim of this guideline is to outline the most important zoonoses that play a significant role in the epidemiology of AIDS ... Zoonoses and AIDS Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis Enteric infection due to Salmonella and Campylobacter Toxoplasmosis ...
The aim of this guideline is to outline the most important zoonoses that play a significant role in the epidemiology of AIDS ... According to this scenario cryptosporidiosis has long been considered a classical zoonosis in which the aetiological agent is ...
zoonosis infectious disease that is transmitted between species (sometimes by a vector) from animals other than humans to ... Media in category "Zoonoses". The following 6 files are in this category, out of 6 total. ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Zoonoses&oldid=309067497" ...
Acknowledging the importance of an integrated approach to investigation and control of zoonoses, including foodborne zoonoses, ... including the production of UK zoonoses reports (available at www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/zoonoses/reports.htm). ... The recent outbreak of STEC O157 in Wales12 serves as a timely reminder of the importance of foodborne zoonoses and of the ... Differentiating infection with foodborne zoonoses from other causes of acute diarrhoea is not always easy, but clinical acumen ...
The Enteric Zoonoses Activity (EZA) investigates multistate outbreaks of Salmonella and E. coli infections, as well as other ... Provides scientific direction on activities related to enteric zoonoses.. *Develops recommendations and educational materials ... Enhances collaboration and communication with regulatory & industry partners regarding enteric zoonoses infection prevention. ...
Introduction to Emerging Diseases and Zoonoses continued Part Three: Bushmeat Part Four: War and Disease ... Introduction to Emerging Diseases and Zoonoses Part Two: ... Part One: Introduction to Emerging Diseases and Zoonoses. Part ... zoonoses, pathogen Portrait of an Egyptian Rousette or Egyptian fruit bat, Rousettus aegyptiacus. Image: Wikipedia Like ...
The Anthro-Zoonoses Network is a research network for the anthropology of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases and promotes the ...
Figure 1: Emergence of zoonoses. , Nature Reviews Immunology. Figure 1: Emergence of zoonoses.. From: Studying immunity to ...
Emerging Disease and Zoonoses #16--the origins of HIV. It cant be said often enough that "nothing in biology makes sense ...
The book will cover the most important zoonoses with a public health impact and debate actual developments in this field from a ... Zoonoses in food-chain and domestic animals: Focus on antibiotic resistance. * Front Matter Pages 377-377 ... Zoonoses in food-chain animals with public health relevance. * Front Matter Pages 1-1 ... The book will cover the most important zoonoses with a public health impact and debate actual developments in this field from a ...
... of models to identify the characteristics of livestock systems which are likely to lead to the emergence of zoonoses hotspots, ...
... established the Influenza and Zoonoses Education among Youth in Agriculture (Youth in Ag) program. This program is a One Health ...
Zoonoses are diseases transmitted to humans from animals. Animals infected with bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungal ... estimates that three out of every five new human sicknesses are attributable to zoonosis. The list of zoonosis carriers is ... Zoonoses are diseases transmitted to humans from animals. Animals infected with bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungal ... Zoonosis Carriers. News-Medical, viewed 13 October 2019, https://www.news-medical.net/health/Zoonosis-Carriers.aspx. ...
Salyer SJ, Silver R, Simone K, Barton Behravesh C (December 2017). "Prioritizing Zoonoses for Global Health Capacity Building- ... of these deaths due to zoonosis related diseases. People in Africa are exposed to an increased risk of contracting and ... however they did not have a synthesized term for zoonosis and believed pathogens were not life-threatening. Researchers found ...
3. Relevance of zoonoses questions to farmers and agri-cooperatives activities •Zoonoses are diseases or infections naturally ... 4. Human zoonoses cases and notification rates in the EU (1) (115) (401) (748) (790) (1,645) (1,987) (1,259) (3,573) (7,595) ( ... There are more than 200 zoonoses caused by all types of bacteria, parasites, fungi, and viruses. •70% of human infections ... 5. Relevance of zoonoses questions to farmers and agri-cooperatives activities •Animals play an essential role in zoonotic ...
The Anthro-Zoonoses Network hosted a two-day workshop on the ethnography of emerging diseases from 17th to 18th September 2015 ... The 18th September started with a presentation about the planned website for the "Anthro-Zoonoses Network" by Andrea Kaiser- ...
Cross-species transmission Zoonosis Hubálek Z (March 2003). "Emerging human infectious diseases: anthroponoses, zoonoses, and ... This suggests a definite zoonosis and high possibility of spillback back into non-human primate bands as reverse zoonoses. ... Additionally, sapro-zoonoses can be characterized as having both a live host and a non-animal developmental site of organic ... The term zoonosis technically refers to disease transferred between any animal and another animal, human or non-human, without ...
... This is an RSS file. You can use it to subscribe to this data in your favourite RSS reader or to display this ... Agents of food-borne zoonoses confirmed to parasitise newly-recorded in Thailand snails. (Pensoft Publishers) Parasitic ... Fighting the menace of zoonoses. (Hokkaido University) Hokkaido University is pleased to announce the publication of Tackling ... 3 FIGHTING THE MENACE OF ZOONOSES, a magazine featuring the Universitys research on zoonotic and other infectious diseases. ( ...
International Symposium on Emerging Zoonoses. I thought Id do a multi-part series this week discussing some of the highlights ... International Symposium on Emerging Zoonoses. I thought Id do a multi-part series this week discussing some of the highlights ...
Zoonosis means a disease that people can get from animals. ... Zoonosis. Say: zo-oh-no-sis. Zoonosis means a disease that ... Some examples of zoonoses include ringworm, Salmonella infection, and rabies. You can prevent zoonoses by keeping your pet ... You probably saw the word "zoo" in "zoonosis" - and now you know why! ...
Las zoonosis, las enfermedades que se transmiten de animales a los seres humanos, provienen bacteriano, viral, parásito, o la ... Las zoonosis, las enfermedades que se transmiten de animales a los seres humanos, provienen bacteriano, viral, parásito, o la ... Historia de la zoonosis. News-Medical, viewed 28 November 2020, https://www.news-medical.net/health/Zoonosis-History.aspx. ... Historia de la zoonosis. News-Medical. 28 November 2020. ,https://www.news-medical.net/health/Zoonosis-History.aspx,. ...
Zoonoses in the night. Bats harbour many viruses. A large number of these are potentially zoonotic. Transmission can take place ...
Guess Whos Coming to Dinner? Emerging Foodborne Zoonoses. David N Fisman. 1 and Kevin Laupland2. 1Division of Epidemiology, ...
Zoonoses Zoonoses are diseases that are naturally transmitted between animals and humans. The following are major zoonoses that ... View list of zoonoses by species. Bacterial Enteric Diseases-Campylobacteriosis, Salmonellosis, and Shigellosis. ...
Some zoonoses can be very dangerous to humans, but many cause only mild symptoms. Treatment for zoonoses depends on the disease ... There are more than 200 different kinds of zoonoses (plural of zoonosis) caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, and ... People can get zoonoses from animals in a number of different ways. For example, animal bites can cause rabies, contaminated ... Many zoonoses can be prevented by following rules for safe food preparation, drinking only bottled or treated water, washing ...
What are zoonoses anyway?. Monday, July 11, 2011. Ten tips to give a great thesis defense. Saturday, July 9, 2011. The ... Im even fairly confident that you - yes, you, reading this post right now - will have come across a zoonosis at some point ... Well, a zoonotic disease, or zoonosis, according to the World Health Organisation is ... zoonosis is the reminder that these diseases can be transmitted both ways (remember that vice-versa bit?). ...
What are zoonoses?. The term zoonosis is derived from the Greek terms zoon (living organism) and nosos (disease). Zoonoses are ... Pathogens in food: Progress and new challenges for zoonosis control food safety , noroviruses , salmonella , zoonoses ... Assessment of Zoonoses. Two out of three pathogens which cause infectious diseases in humans can be transmitted from animals. A ... conducts research on zoonoses, both in the field of zoonotic agents as well as in the field of the spread of pathogens ( ...
... (In English: Zoonosis). Zoonosis significa "enfermedad contraída de un animal". Algunos ejemplos de ... Es posible evitar la zoonosis manteniendo a tu mascota sana, permaneciendo alejado de los animales salvajes y lavándote las ... Probablemente hayas notado la palabra "zoo" en el término "zoonosis" y ¡ahora sabes por qué! ... zoonosis incluyen la tiña, la infección por Salmonella y la rabia. ...
  • According to this scenario cryptosporidiosis has long been considered a classical zoonosis in which the aetiological agent is spread between different mammals and humans. (fao.org)
  • 3 Three of the major pathogens- Campylobacter spp, Salmonella spp, and Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157)-are zoonoses (that is, transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans).As well as causing acute symptoms including diarrhoea and vomiting, infection can have long term implications. (bmj.com)
  • Zoonoses are diseases transmitted to humans from animals. (news-medical.net)
  • Reverse zoonosis, also known as zooanthroponosis, and sometimes anthroponosis (Greek zoon "animal", anthropos "man", nosos "disease"), refers to pathogens reservoired in humans that are capable of being transmitted to non-human animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term zoonosis technically refers to disease transferred between any animal and another animal, human or non-human, without discretion, and also been defined as disease transmitted from animals to humans and vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet because of human-centered medical biases, zoonosis tends to be used in the same manner as anthropozoonosis which specifically refers to pathogens reservoired in non-human animals that are transmissible to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additional confusion due to frequency of scientists using "anthropozoonosis" and "zooanthroponosis" interchangeably was resolved during a 1967 Joint Food and Agriculture and World Health Organization committee meeting that recommended the use of "zoonosis" to describe the bidirectional interchange of infectious pathogens between animals and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zoonoses are diseases or infections naturally transmissible directly or indirectly between animals and humans. (slideshare.net)
  • The classifica- because animals are not the source of zoonoses (the source is an infectious ani- tion is either synanthropic zoonoses, infection for humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Zoonoses are diseases that are naturally transmitted between animals and humans. (rochester.edu)
  • The following are major zoonoses that can be transmitted from commonly used laboratory animals to humans. (rochester.edu)
  • Some zoonoses can be very dangerous to humans, but many cause only mild symptoms. (kidshealth.org)
  • Zoonoses are infectious diseases which are caused by bacteria, parasites, fungi, prions or viruses and can be reciprocally transmitted between animals and humans. (bund.de)
  • This report of the European Food Safety Authority and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control presents the results of zoonoses monitoring activities carried out in 2018 in 36 European countries (28 Member States (MS) and 8 non‐MS). The first and second most commonly reported zoonoses in humans were campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis, respectively. (europa.eu)
  • Shiga toxin‐producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections in humans were the third most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU and increased from 2014 to 2018. (europa.eu)
  • Yersiniosis was the fourth most frequently reported zoonosis in humans in 2018 with a stable trend in 2014-2018. (europa.eu)
  • In this Spotlight feature, we will investigate whether pathogens can travel from humans to animals in a process referred to as reverse zoonosis, or anthroponosis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • While most people have never heard of zoonoses, scientists estimate that 3 out of 5 infectious diseases in humans originate from an animal source. (floridataxwatch.org)
  • While the current list of nearly 900 diseases seems daunting, there is a constant threat of newly emerging zoonoses, which are pathogens that have just acquired the ability to affect humans, have mutated to become more virulent, or have developed drug resistance. (floridataxwatch.org)
  • In direct zoonosis the disease is directly transmitted from other animals to humans through media such as air ( influenza ) or through bites and saliva ( rabies ). (wikipedia.org)
  • When humans infect other animals, it is called reverse zoonosis or anthroponosis . (wikipedia.org)
  • Zoonoses are infectious diseases of animals (usually vertebrates ) that can naturally be transmitted to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans in a reversible way. (hindawi.com)
  • Zoonosis is an infectious disease that can naturally be transmitted through direct or indirect means from animals to humans, or vice versa. (hindawi.com)
  • World Zoonoses Day, which takes place on July 6 every year, is a day to help raise awareness of the growing risk of zoonotic diseases, which are diseases that can be spread from animals to humans. (merial.com)
  • Companion Animal Zoonoses is a comprehensive resource on diseases transmissible between animals and humans. (wiley.com)
  • Zoonoses are infectious animal diseases that can be contracted by humans. (up.ac.za)
  • EU - The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) have published their Community Zoonoses Report for 2007, which analyses the occurrence of infectious diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. (thepigsite.com)
  • Zoonoses are biological agents originating from animals or from products of animal origin which are able to cause disease in humans. (hsa.ie)
  • Some zoonoses can cause serious disease in humans but have little or no effect on animals (e.g. verocytotoxin producing Escherichia coli O157), whereas others such as Rabies virus can cause serious disease in both humans and animals. (hsa.ie)
  • Zoonoses: A bigger threat to humans or animals? (bigthink.com)
  • Zoonoses are diseases that can be spread from animals to humans, or vice versa. (bigthink.com)
  • One of their many focuses is zoonoses, which are diseases that can be spread from animals to humans, or vice versa. (bigthink.com)
  • Zoonoses pose a major threat to humans. (bigthink.com)
  • One reason zoonoses are so deadly for animals is that some mysteriously don't hurt humans, even when we contract them. (bigthink.com)
  • Infection with salmonella is one of our most common and important zoonoses (zoonosis = disease or infection that can spread between animals and humans). (sva.se)
  • The article on hedgehog zoonoses ( 1 ) reviews diseases transmitted from African and European hedgehogs to humans but does not compare their infectious potential to that of other animals and people. (cdc.gov)
  • Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog pet trade or travel abroad), but also feline cowpox and newly recognized noroviruses or rotaviruses or influenza viruses can sicken our pets and be transmitted to humans. (mdpi.com)
  • Essentially zoonoses are infectious diseases which usually affect other animals, but which can also afflict humans. (agius.com)
  • Zoonosis (transmission from animals to humans) is a concerning risk factor - since the National School Lunch Programs have recently fed processed, dying or dead, downer cattle to school children throughout the United States. (opposingviews.com)
  • The research's introduction pointed to the fact that while Scrapie had not been considered a zoonosis (transmissible from animals to humans), emergence of cases where bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) had been transmitted to humans - and also experimentally transmitted to sheep, indicates that risk exists for small ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy TSE in humans. (opposingviews.com)
  • But the fact is, about 60% of the nearly 1,500 diseases recognized in humans are classified as zoonoses, meaning they can be transmitted between species (not just canines), while about 75% of emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • This zoonoses can be transmitted from dogs to humans and vice versa. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • In contrast to the severe systemic illness this zoonoses it causes in humans, Lyme disease causes acute or sub-acute arthritis in dogs. (animalwellnessmagazine.com)
  • In humans, the situation for many of the zoonoses was also better compared to previous years. (vetinst.no)
  • This essential, authoritative handbook provides clear, accurate coverage of zoonoses - diseases that can spread from animals to humans. (elsevier.com)
  • A zoonosis is a disease of animals that can be spread to and infect humans. (cathealth.com)
  • Some examples of zoonoses include ringworm, Salmonella infection , and rabies. (kidshealth.org)
  • A char- arboviroses, wildlife rabies, Lyme dis- for anthroponoses and zoonoses, and an acteristic feature of most zoonoses and ease, and tularemia). (cdc.gov)
  • however, only diseases that routinely involve non-human to human transmission, such as rabies , are considered direct zoonosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zoonoses are viral diseases like rabies and influenza, bacterial diseases such as Lyme disease and brucellosis, or parasitic diseases such as tapeworms. (merial.com)
  • Despite detection of two «new» diseases in animals in Norway in 2015, bat rabies and atypical BSE in cattle, the overall situation in 2015 was good with respect to zoonoses in animals, food and feed. (vetinst.no)
  • Bat rabies in Europe is caused by variants of the virus that are not as dangerous zoonoses as the classic rabies known from foxes, dogs and other animals. (vetinst.no)
  • The term zoonosis is derived from the Greek terms zoon (living organism) and nosos (disease). (bund.de)
  • The meaning of the term "Zoonosis" has changed greatly over the time. (medsci.org)
  • Hence, for more than a century, the term zoonosis indicated any disorder due to infectious agents visible by microscope. (medsci.org)
  • There are more than 200 zoonoses caused by all types of bacteria, parasites, fungi, and viruses. (slideshare.net)
  • There are more than 200 different kinds of zoonoses (plural of zoonosis) caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, and other things. (kidshealth.org)
  • Food-Borne Parasitic Zoonoses: Fish and Plant-Borne Parasites provides the intellectual challenge and stimulation needed to build a more concerted international effort on prevention of these zoonoses. (springer.com)
  • The latest text (Volume 11), Food-Borne Parasitic Zoonoses: Fish and Plant-Borne Parasites, is a superb addition to this series. (springer.com)
  • The Enteric Zoonoses Activity (EZA) investigates multistate outbreaks of Salmonella and E. coli infections, as well as other pathogens, transmitted by direct and indirect animal contact. (cdc.gov)
  • Zoonoses (zoo NO seez) are infections that people can get from animals. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • There are specific tests to diagnose the various diseases and infections that can come from zoonoses. (nationwidechildrens.org)
  • The two parasitic zoonoses trichinellosis and echinococcosis were reported in 779 and 834 human infections respectively within the European Union. (thepigsite.com)
  • These are considered infections common to people and animals rather than true zoonoses. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Prevention and control of helminth parasitic zoonosis is possible, from a simple application of hygiene and sanitation to regular deworming with anthelmintic drugs. (hindawi.com)
  • While people, especially those living in developed countries, are commonly aware of meat-borne zoonoses such as trichinellosis and cysticercosis, fewer are acquainted with parasitic diseases caused by liver, lung and intestinal flukes, fish-borne tapeworms, and tissue roundworms. (springer.com)
  • The topics on epidemiology, diagnosis, and clinical aspects emphasize knowledge gaps that limit a full understanding of these zoonoses, and target where greater research investments on these parasitic diseases should be focused. (springer.com)
  • Parasitic zoonoses affect both human and animal populations and often exhibit complex life-cycle patterns, thus the transmission ecology becomes important for understanding epidemiology and in consideration of control interventions. (salford.ac.uk)
  • Zoonoses : Parasitic and Mycotic Diseases Edition by Garg, Sudhi Ranjan and Publisher Daya Publishing House. (vitalsource.com)
  • This handbook presents an overview of common zoonoses in a minimalist manner, pointing out essentially the rudiments of individual zoonotic diseases. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Algunos ejemplos de zoonosis incluyen la tiña, la infección por Salmonella y la rabia. (rchsd.org)
  • This reporting manual provides guidance to Member States (MSs) for reporting on zoonoses and zoonotic agents in animals, food and feed under the framework of Directive 2003/99/ECand of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2018/772 and also on the reporting of other pathogenic microbiological agents in food. (europa.eu)
  • The precarious position of these people who depend on their animals for survival is yet another reason why prevention and control of all animal diseases, including zoonoses, is particularly important for human health and well-being. (merial.com)
  • Papers advance the scientific knowledge of the sources, transmission, prevention and control of zoonoses and are authored by scientists with expertise in areas such as microbiology, virology, parasitology and epidemiology. (ovid.com)
  • The curriculum prepares professionals to strengthen zoonoses prevention and control programs, investigate emerging infectious diseases, enhance the public's ability to respond to bioterrorism and biosecurity emergencies, and coordinate rapid response activities among government, agriculture industries, nonprofit organizations, and academia. (k-state.edu)
  • Spearhead the coordination of zoonoses prevention and control through advocacy and strategic investments in capacity building and integrated (joint) programming. (au-ibar.org)
  • To make sure everyone is on the same page, first I'll discuss just what is meant by an "emerging infectious disease" and a "zoonosis" or "zoonotic disease. (scienceblogs.com)
  • A zoonosis (plural zoonoses, or zoonotic diseases) is an infectious disease caused by a pathogen (an infectious agent, such as a bacterium , virus , parasite or prion ) that has jumped from a non-human animal (usually a vertebrate ) to a human. (wikipedia.org)
  • The importance of a zoonosis as a human infection does not depend only on its incidence in the population, but also on its severity, as some may cause serious illnesses or have higher mortality rate, despite relatively low number of cases. (thepigsite.com)
  • What is World Zoonoses Day? (merial.com)
  • It's World Zoonoses Day! (deerbusters.com)
  • World Zoonoses Day is held annually on July 6th as a call to action to spread the word about the dangers of zoonotic diseases such as Lyme Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. (deerbusters.com)
  • ' The Anthro-Zoonoses Network' is a research network for the anthropology of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases and promotes the anthropological study of human-animal diseases. (dur.ac.uk)
  • The Anthro-Zoonoses Network hosted a two-day workshop on the ethnography of emerging diseases from 17th to 18th September 2015 at Durham University. (dur.ac.uk)
  • The 18th September started with a presentation about the planned website for the "Anthro-Zoonoses Network" by Andrea Kaiser-Grolimund and Hannah Brown, followed by a discussion. (dur.ac.uk)
  • prepares an annual report on the epidemiological situation of zoonoses in Germany. (bund.de)
  • Communities in the Mnisi Study Area, Mpumalanga, on the border of the Kruger National Park, are no strangers to the effects of zoonoses: rural farmers living at the interface with African conservation areas are in close contact with wildlife and domestic animals that sustain these diseases. (up.ac.za)
  • The effects of zoonoses on human health and economies have recently been underscored by notable outbreaks, such as the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus pandemic, which began in swine farms on the Mexico-US border. (frontiersin.org)
  • conducts research on zoonoses, both in the field of zoonotic agents as well as in the field of the spread of pathogens (epidemiology), the transmission paths and the development of diagnostic methods suitable for daily use (reference laboratories). (bund.de)
  • The Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Germany is a biosafety level 4 facility where scientists conduct dangerous research on zoonoses. (bigthink.com)
  • Figure 1: Emergence of zoonoses. (nature.com)
  • This report looks at the contribution of models to identify the characteristics of livestock systems which are likely to lead to the emergence of zoonoses hotspots, with emphasis on developing countries. (scidev.net)
  • Possible driving factors for the emergence of zoonoses are global travel, international trades, and climate change, among others. (hindawi.com)
  • Retrieved on October 13, 2019 from https://www.news-medical.net/health/Zoonosis-Carriers.aspx. (news-medical.net)
  • Provides expanded information which includes sections on historic background, current principles, and anticipated future changes, and consideration of the latest knowledge of human and veterinary medicine in the field of zoonoses. (wiley.com)
  • Differentiating infection with foodborne zoonoses from other causes of acute diarrhoea is not always easy, but clinical acumen, appropriate laboratory tests, and prompt alerts to local health protection teams allow public health professionals to assess whether an apparently sporadic case is simply that or whether it is necessary to initiate the detailed detective work required to track an outbreak to its source. (bmj.com)
  • Primary prevention of foodborne zoonoses is mainly a veterinary responsibility. (bmj.com)
  • The overall objectives for the surveillance of Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses are improving and harmonising the systems in the EU in order to tackle multi-country foodborne outbreaks and to increase the scientific knowledge regarding aetiology, risk factors and burden of food- and waterborne diseases and zoonoses. (europa.eu)
  • Promoting One Health in Europe through joint actions on foodborne zoonoses, antimicrobial resistance and emerging microbiological hazards. (europa.eu)
  • One reference laboratory from the public health / medicine domain and one reference laboratory from the food / veterinary domain are associated within a network of 41 European laboratories and research centers, distributed in 19 participating member states, with the aim to reach significant advances in the fields of foodborne zoonoses (FBZ), antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and emerging threats (ET) within a global One Health approach. (europa.eu)
  • Additionally, sapro-zoonoses can be characterized as having both a live host and a non-animal developmental site of organic matter, soil, or plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • sapro-zoonoses," defined as "having factor in epidemiology. (cdc.gov)
  • You can prevent zoonoses by keeping your pet healthy, staying away from wild animals and always washing your hands after touching animals. (kidshealth.org)
  • Chapter 3 Bacterial zoonoses. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Bacterial zoonoses include bacteria transmitted by bites or scratches, such as pasteurellosis or cat scratch disease, leading to severe clinical manifestations in people because of their age or immune status and also because of our closeness, not to say intimacy, with our pets. (mdpi.com)
  • In GMS countries, helminth zoonoses are still imposing a huge impact on human and domestic animals, particularly schistosomiasis and liver fluke diseases (clonorchiasis, opithorchiasis and fasciolasis) which are emerging or re-emerging in some areas due to environmental change in the face of socioeconomic development. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After implementation of the collaborative research project among scientists from southeast Asian countries supported by International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Canada, the socio-ecosystem-packaged strategy in GMS has been proposed in order to explore the transition approaches from control to eliminate of helminth zoonoses transmission, under a broader portfolio of eco-health research integrated with the emerging infectious diseases, climate change, food security and human health. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We do hope with more cooperative efforts and sharing the social-ecosystem-packaged strategy in GMS through this special thematic issue, the elimination program on helminth zoonosis in GMS will be accelerated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Latin ebook helminth zoonoses can enter from the other. (deadbatteries.com)
  • Zoonosis means a disease that people can get from animals. (kidshealth.org)
  • Zoonoses, and transmitted between vertebrate animals es, rickettsiae, and chlamydiae) cannot and man" (3). (cdc.gov)
  • Zoonosis (zo-OH-no-sis) means a disease that people can get from animals . (kidshealth.org)
  • People can get zoonoses from animals in a number of different ways. (kidshealth.org)
  • Many zoonoses can be prevented by following rules for safe food preparation, drinking only bottled or treated water, washing hands after touching animals, keeping pets healthy and up to date on their shots, following precautions to prevent mosquito or tick bites and staying away from wild animals. (kidshealth.org)
  • Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis caused by the obligate intracellular parasite protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, which has worldwide distribution and infects most warm-blooded animals, including pets and man. (novapublishers.com)
  • Essential information on preventing the spread of disease helps you educate clients about how to protect themselves and their animals from zoonoses. (elsevier.com)
  • The format for the sections on each of the zoonoses is readable and helpful, covering the basics of disease in animals (where relevant) and people, routes of transmission, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Reverse zoonoses are caused by human pathogens transmitted to animals. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • The occurrence of a pathogen in both people and animals does not always mean it is a significant zoonosis. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Dr. Chomel is a veterinary epidemiologist whose research is focused on the epidemiology of zoonotic diseases, especially Zoonoses transmitted by bites and scratches. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Chomel BB, Riley PY, Behr M. Hedgehog Zoonoses. (cdc.gov)
  • 1 Park employees may have prolonged exposure to wildlife and arthropods, placing them at increased risk of infection with endemic zoonoses. (gopetsamerica.com)
  • Wildlife is increasingly recognized as a reservoir for zoonoses, including some that were thought to be strictly livestock pathogens. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • It is a nasty zoonosis caused by gram-negative bacteria called Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae . (cathealth.com)
  • Major modern diseases such as Ebola virus disease and salmonellosis are zoonoses. (wikipedia.org)
  • This could be a case of zoonosis (animal to human) if the mosquito is considered the original source, or anthroponosis (human to human) if the human is considered the original source. (wikipedia.org)
  • evaluates the data and compiles them together with data which are made available by other federal agencies and the national reference laboratories for the national report about trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents, antimicrobial resistance and food-borne outbreaks. (bund.de)
  • The programme aims to support European Member States in the surveillance of food- and waterborne diseases and zoonoses and in responding to multi-country outbreaks. (europa.eu)
  • In doing so, the programme aims to improve and strengthen the surveillance of and response to multi-country outbreaks of food- and waterborne diseases and zoonoses at a European level. (europa.eu)
  • This is a case of reverse zoonosis (human to animal). (wikipedia.org)
  • If this infected mosquito instead infected a non-human primate, it could be considered a case of reverse zoonosis/zooanthroponosis (human to animal) if the human is considered the primary source, or simply zoonosis (animal to animal) if the mosquito is considered the primary source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reverse zoonosis: Can you make your pet sick? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These cases appear to be "reverse zoonoses" that are dangerous for the pet but not its human contacts. (cdc.gov)
  • World Zoonosis Day is also particularly important to us as it commemorates July 6, 1885, when Louis Pasteur successfully administered the first vaccine against, a zoonotic disease, to Joseph Meister after he had been mauled by a rabid dog. (merial.com)
  • Land use change, which prepares the ground for zoonoses like the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), should be reversed urgently, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) has said. (org.in)
  • Zoonoses have different modes of transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatise on ocular Zoonoses will be divided into two main groups A and B, according to their respective way of transmission. (medsci.org)
  • For each driver, we'll review 2-5 zoonoses or vector-borne disease influenced by that driver including: clinical disease presentation, diagnosis and treatment (human and animal), microbiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and control measures. (uvm.edu)
  • To prevent and better respond to variant influenza and other zoonotic diseases , the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Influenza and Zoonoses Education among Youth in Agriculture (Youth in Ag) program. (cdc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that three out of every five new human sicknesses are attributable to zoonosis. (news-medical.net)
  • How is Merial helping to control zoonoses and animal disease? (merial.com)
  • The increasing recognition of the public health significance of these zoonoses, their complicated links to poverty, agricultural intensification, environmental degradation, and the lack of appropriate tools for their control was the inspiration behind this book. (springer.com)
  • The Master's Degree in Zoonosis and One Health is a professionally oriented programme that responds to a need for professionals with a well-rounded, multidisciplinary training encompassing human, animal and environmental health, who can work effectively and collaboratively on the prevention, control, management and communication of biological hazards and threats. (uab.cat)
  • In addition, the role played by AU-IBAR in resource mobilization and advocacy to support the control of TADs and zoonoses have demonstrated the value of AU-IBAR in continental control and eradication programmes. (au-ibar.org)
  • Zoonoses and Public Health brings together veterinary and human health researchers and policy-makers by providing a venue for publishing integrated and global approaches to zoonoses and public health. (ovid.com)
  • Given the importance of cattle, not only in terms of human health but also to the food supply, a number of bovine zoonoses have been classified as potential bioterrorism agents. (gopetsamerica.com)
  • First, let's look at what the average human patient knows about zoonosis, according to research compiled by Dr. Ruple. (dvm360.com)
  • Zoonoses occur at the interface of human and animal health, impacting a wide range of health services and livelihoods. (frontiersin.org)
  • Overall, there is a strong desire and commitment for multi-sectoral coordination in detection and response to zoonoses across public health and veterinary sectors. (frontiersin.org)