Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).
The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.
ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Synthetic analogs of NUCLEIC ACIDS composed of morpholine ring derivatives (MORPHOLINES) linked by phosphorodimidates. One standard DNA nucleic acid base (ADENINE; GUANINE; CYTOSINE; OR THYMINE) is bound to each morpholine ring.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.
Aquatic vertebrate sensory system in fish and amphibians. It is composed of sense organs (canal organs and pit organs) containing neuromasts (MECHANORECEPTORS) that detect water displacement caused by moving objects.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The posterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of an embryonic brain. It consists of myelencephalon, metencephalon, and isthmus rhombencephali from which develop the major BRAIN STEM components, such as MEDULLA OBLONGATA from the myelencephalon, CEREBELLUM and PONS from the metencephalon, with the expanded cavity forming the FOURTH VENTRICLE.
Paired, segmented masses of MESENCHYME located on either side of the developing spinal cord (neural tube). Somites derive from PARAXIAL MESODERM and continue to increase in number during ORGANOGENESIS. Somites give rise to SKELETON (sclerotome); MUSCLES (myotome); and DERMIS (dermatome).
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The artificial induction of GENE SILENCING by the use of RNA INTERFERENCE to reduce the expression of a specific gene. It includes the use of DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA, such as SMALL INTERFERING RNA and RNA containing HAIRPIN LOOP SEQUENCE, and ANTI-SENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.
Short fragments of DNA or RNA that are used to alter the function of target RNAs or DNAs to which they hybridize.
Members of the transforming growth factor superfamily that play a role in pattern formation and differentiation during the pregastrulation and GASTRULATION stages of chordate development. Several nodal signaling ligands are specifically involved in the genesis of left-right asymmetry during development. The protein group is named after a critical region of the vertebrate embryo PRIMITIVE STREAK referred to as HENSEN'S NODE.
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
A process of complicated morphogenetic cell movements that reorganizes a bilayer embryo into one with three GERM LAYERS and specific orientation (dorsal/ventral; anterior/posterior). Gastrulation describes the germ layer development of a non-mammalian BLASTULA or that of a mammalian BLASTOCYST.
A cartilaginous rod of mesodermal cells at the dorsal midline of all CHORDATE embryos. In lower vertebrates, notochord is the backbone of support. In the higher vertebrates, notochord is a transient structure, and segments of the vertebral column will develop around it. Notochord is also a source of midline signals that pattern surrounding tissues including the NEURAL TUBE development.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A region, of SOMITE development period, that contains a number of paired arches, each with a mesodermal core lined by ectoderm and endoderm on the two sides. In lower aquatic vertebrates, branchial arches develop into GILLS. In higher vertebrates, the arches forms outpouchings and develop into structures of the head and neck. Separating the arches are the branchial clefts or grooves.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Formation of differentiated cells and complicated tissue organization to provide specialized functions.
An early non-mammalian embryo that follows the MORULA stage. A blastula resembles a hollow ball with the layer of cells surrounding a fluid-filled cavity (blastocele). The layer of cells is called BLASTODERM.
Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.
The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Chromatophores (large pigment cells of fish, amphibia, reptiles and many invertebrates) which contain melanin. Short term color changes are brought about by an active redistribution of the melanophores pigment containing organelles (MELANOSOMES). Mammals do not have melanophores; however they have retained smaller pigment cells known as MELANOCYTES.
A family of intercellular signaling proteins that play and important role in regulating the development of many TISSUES and organs. Their name derives from the observation of a hedgehog-like appearance in DROSOPHILA embryos with genetic mutations that block their action.
A genus of pufferfish commonly used for research.
The paired caudal parts of the PROSENCEPHALON from which the THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; EPITHALAMUS; and SUBTHALAMUS are derived.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The primordial kidney that develops from the INTERMEDIATE MESODERM in the embryos of vertebrates, and is succeeded by the MESONEPHROS. In higher vertebrates and humans, the pronephros is a vestigial and transient structure.
The two longitudinal ridges along the PRIMITIVE STREAK appearing near the end of GASTRULATION during development of nervous system (NEURULATION). The ridges are formed by folding of NEURAL PLATE. Between the ridges is a neural groove which deepens as the fold become elevated. When the folds meet at midline, the groove becomes a closed tube, the NEURAL TUBE.
The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
The only genus in the family Oryziinae, order BELONIFORMES. Oryzias are egg-layers; other fish of the same order are livebearers. Oryzias are used extensively in testing carcinogens.
In anatomical terms, "tail" is not used as a medical definition to describe any part of the human body; it is however used in veterinary medicine to refer to the distal portion of the spine in animals possessing tails.
A large family of structurally-related transcription factors that were originally discovered based upon their close sequence homology to an HMG-box domain found in SEX-DETERMINING REGION Y PROTEIN. Many SOX transcription factors play important roles in regulating CELL DIFFERENTIATION. The numerous members of this family are organized in several subgroups according to structural identities found within the proteins.
An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.
The entire nerve apparatus, composed of a central part, the brain and spinal cord, and a peripheral part, the cranial and spinal nerves, autonomic ganglia, and plexuses. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Thin-walled sacs or spaces which function as a part of the respiratory system in birds, fishes, insects, and mammals.
Short fragments of DNA that are used to alter the function of target RNAs or DNAs to which they hybridize.
Used in the form of its salts as a dye and as an intermediate in manufacture of Acid Yellow, diazo dyes, and indulines.
A paired box transcription factor that is essential for ORGANOGENESIS of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and KIDNEY.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Proteins containing a region of conserved sequence, about 200 amino acids long, which encodes a particular sequence specific DNA binding domain (the T-box domain). These proteins are transcription factors that control developmental pathways. The prototype of this family is the mouse Brachyury (or T) gene product.
A family of conserved cell surface receptors that contain EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR repeats in their extracellular domain and ANKYRIN repeats in their cytoplasmic domains. The cytoplasmic domain of notch receptors is released upon ligand binding and translocates to the CELL NUCLEUS where it acts as transcription factor.
The inner of the three germ layers of an embryo.
Animals having a vertebral column, members of the phylum Chordata, subphylum Craniata comprising mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.
The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.
A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.
Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.
A fibroblast growth factor that is expressed primarily during development.
Proteins obtained from species of fish (FISHES).
The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.
A small order of primarily marine fish containing 340 species. Most have a rotund or box-like shape. TETRODOTOXIN is found in their liver and ovaries.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Alkaloids with powerful hypotensive effects isolated from American or European Hellebore (Veratrum viride Ait. Liliaceae and Veratrum album L. Liliaceae). They increase cholinergic and decrease adrenergic tone with appropriate side effects and at higher doses depress respiration and produce cardiac arrhythmias; only the ester alkaloids have been used as hypotensive agents in specific instances. They have been generally replaced by drugs with fewer adverse effects.
A family of DNA-binding transcription factors that contain a basic HELIX-LOOP-HELIX MOTIF.
A growth differentiation factor that plays a role in the neural differentiation, specifically in the retinal development of the EYE.
The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.
The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.
'Nerve tissue proteins' are specialized proteins found within the nervous system's biological tissue, including neurofilaments, neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, and neural cell adhesion molecules, which facilitate structural support, intracellular communication, and synaptic connectivity essential for proper neurological function.
The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.
Wnt proteins are a large family of secreted glycoproteins that play essential roles in EMBRYONIC AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT, and tissue maintenance. They bind to FRIZZLED RECEPTORS and act as PARACRINE PROTEIN FACTORS to initiate a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway stabilizes the transcriptional coactivator BETA CATENIN.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
The complex processes of initiating CELL DIFFERENTIATION in the embryo. The precise regulation by cell interactions leads to diversity of cell types and specific pattern of organization (EMBRYOGENESIS).
Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
A method for ordering genetic loci along CHROMOSOMES. The method involves fusing irradiated donor cells with host cells from another species. Following cell fusion, fragments of DNA from the irradiated cells become integrated into the chromosomes of the host cells. Molecular probing of DNA obtained from the fused cells is used to determine if two or more genetic loci are located within the same fragment of donor cell DNA.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).
Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.
Populations of thin, motile processes found covering the surface of ciliates (CILIOPHORA) or the free surface of the cells making up ciliated EPITHELIUM. Each cilium arises from a basic granule in the superficial layer of CYTOPLASM. The movement of cilia propels ciliates through the liquid in which they live. The movement of cilia on a ciliated epithelium serves to propel a surface layer of mucus or fluid. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
The dorsal posterior subdivision of the diencephalon. The epithalamus is generally considered to include the habenular nuclei (HABENULA) and associated fiber bundles, the PINEAL BODY, and the epithelial roof of the third ventricle. The anterior and posterior paraventricular nuclei of the thalamus are included with the THALAMIC NUCLEI although they develop from the same pronuclear mass as the epithalamic nuclei and are sometimes considered part of the epithalamus.
Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.
An agent that causes the production of physical defects in the developing embryo.
Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.
Cells in certain regions of an embryo that self-regulate embryonic development. These organizers have been found in dorsal and ventral poles of GASTRULA embryos, including Spemann organizer in amphibians, and Hensen node in chicken and mouse. These organizer cells communicate with each other via a network of secreted signaling proteins, such as BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS and their antagonists (chordin and noggin).
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.
Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.
Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The presence of two or more genetic loci on the same chromosome. Extensions of this original definition refer to the similarity in content and organization between chromosomes, of different species for example.
A gelatinous membrane overlying the acoustic maculae of SACCULE AND UTRICLE. It contains minute crystalline particles (otoliths) of CALCIUM CARBONATE and protein on its outer surface. In response to head movement, the otoliths shift causing distortion of the vestibular hair cells which transduce nerve signals to the BRAIN for interpretation of equilibrium.
A GATA transcription factor that is expressed predominately in SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS and is involved in the CELL DIFFERENTIATION of CARDIAC MYOCYTES. In the developing heart, GATA5 becomes restricted to the ENDOCARDIUM and regulates transcription of genes such as cardiac TROPONIN C.
A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.
The anterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of the embryonic brain arising from the NEURAL TUBE. It subdivides to form DIENCEPHALON and TELENCEPHALON. (Stedmans Medical Dictionary, 27th ed)
Formation of NEURONS which involves the differentiation and division of STEM CELLS in which one or both of the daughter cells become neurons.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.
Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.
The field of biology which deals with the process of the growth and differentiation of an organism.
Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
The reproductive cells in multicellular organisms at various stages during GAMETOGENESIS.
A family of VERTEBRATE homeodomain proteins that share homology with orthodenticle protein, Drosophila. They regulate GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and play an important role in EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT of the BRAIN.
Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS.
Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).
Recording serial images of a process at regular intervals spaced out over a longer period of time than the time in which the recordings will be played back.
Cells of epithelial origin possessing specialized sensory functions. They include cells that are found in the TASTE BUDS; OLFACTORY MUCOSA; COCHLEA; and NEUROEPITHELIAL BODIES.
The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.
Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
Signaling ligands that act in opposition to NODAL PROTEIN. During vertebrate development they regulate the degree of left-right asymmetry by controlling the spatiotemporal influence of NODAL PROTEIN.
The anterior subdivision of the embryonic PROSENCEPHALON or the corresponding part of the adult prosencephalon that includes the cerebrum and associated structures.
A small protuberance at the dorsal, posterior corner of the wall of the THIRD VENTRICLE, adjacent to the dorsal THALAMUS and PINEAL BODY. It contains the habenular nuclei and is a major part of the epithalamus.
The large pigment cells of fish, amphibia, reptiles and many invertebrates which actively disperse and aggregate their pigment granules. These cells include MELANOPHORES, erythrophores, xanthophores, leucophores and iridiophores. (In algae, chromatophores refer to CHLOROPLASTS. In phototrophic bacteria chromatophores refer to membranous organelles (BACTERIAL CHROMATOPHORES).)
Sensory cells in the organ of Corti, characterized by their apical stereocilia (hair-like projections). The inner and outer hair cells, as defined by their proximity to the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), change morphologically along the COCHLEA. Towards the cochlear apex, the length of hair cell bodies and their apical STEREOCILIA increase, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.
The middle of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of the embryonic brain. Without further subdivision, midbrain develops into a short, constricted portion connecting the PONS and the DIENCEPHALON. Midbrain contains two major parts, the dorsal TECTUM MESENCEPHALI and the ventral TEGMENTUM MESENCEPHALI, housing components of auditory, visual, and other sensorimoter systems.
A fibroblast growth factor that preferentially activates FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 4. It was initially identified as an androgen-induced growth factor and plays a role in regulating growth of human BREAST NEOPLASMS and PROSTATIC NEOPLASMS.
Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.
A light-sensitive neuroendocrine organ attached to the roof of the THIRD VENTRICLE of the brain. The pineal gland secretes MELATONIN, other BIOGENIC AMINES and NEUROPEPTIDES.
Normal nystagmus produced by looking at objects moving across the field of vision.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Different forms of a protein that may be produced from different GENES, or from the same gene by ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
An array of tests used to determine the toxicity of a substance to living systems. These include tests on clinical drugs, foods, and environmental pollutants.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
Messenger RNA that is stored in a masked state for translation at a later time. Distinguish from RNA, UNTRANSLATED which refers to non-messenger RNA, i.e. RNA that does not code for protein.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Goosecoid protein is a homeodomain protein that was first identified in XENOPUS. It is found in the SPEMANN ORGANIZER of VERTEBRATES and plays an important role in neuronal CELL DIFFERENTIATION and ORGANOGENESIS.
The parts of the gene sequence that carry out the different functions of the GENES.
Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.
A chemical by-product that results from burning or incinerating chlorinated industrial chemicals and other hydrocarbons. This compound is considered an environmental toxin, and may pose reproductive, as well as, other health risks for animals and humans.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
Short fragments of RNA that are used to alter the function of target RNAs or DNAs to which they hybridize.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
The outer of the three germ layers of an embryo.
A moderate-growing, photochromogenic species found in aquariums, diseased fish, and swimming pools. It is the cause of cutaneous lesions and granulomas (swimming pool granuloma) in humans. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.
A subclass of LIM domain proteins that include an additional centrally-located homeodomain region that binds AT-rich sites on DNA. Many LIM-homeodomain proteins play a role as transcriptional regulators that direct cell fate.
Specialized PHOTOTRANSDUCTION neurons in the vertebrates, such as the RETINAL ROD CELLS and the RETINAL CONE CELLS. Non-visual photoreceptor neurons have been reported in the deep brain, the PINEAL GLAND and organs of the circadian system.
A subclass of closely-related SOX transcription factors. Members of this subclass are expressed in VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS and may play a role in vasculogenesis.
The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.
Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.
'Eye proteins' are structural or functional proteins, such as crystallins, opsins, and collagens, located in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, retina, and aqueous humor, that contribute to maintaining transparency, refractive power, phototransduction, and overall integrity of the visual system.
Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.
A complex signaling pathway whose name is derived from the DROSOPHILA Wg gene, which when mutated results in the wingless phenotype, and the vertebrate INT gene, which is located near integration sites of MOUSE MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS. The signaling pathway is initiated by the binding of WNT PROTEINS to cells surface WNT RECEPTORS which interact with the AXIN SIGNALING COMPLEX and an array of second messengers that influence the actions of BETA CATENIN.
A family of freshwater fish comprising the minnows or CARPS.
Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.
An important regulator of GENE EXPRESSION during growth and development, and in NEOPLASMS. Tretinoin, also known as retinoic acid and derived from maternal VITAMIN A, is essential for normal GROWTH; and EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. An excess of tretinoin can be teratogenic. It is used in the treatment of PSORIASIS; ACNE VULGARIS; and several other SKIN DISEASES. It has also been approved for use in promyelocytic leukemia (LEUKEMIA, PROMYELOCYTIC, ACUTE).
The fertilized OVUM resulting from the fusion of a male and a female gamete.
Chromosomal, biochemical, intracellular, and other methods used in the study of genetics.
A tube of ectodermal tissue in an embryo that will give rise to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, including the SPINAL CORD and the BRAIN. Lumen within the neural tube is called neural canal which gives rise to the central canal of the spinal cord and the ventricles of the brain. For malformation of the neural tube, see NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS.
Developmental events leading to the formation of adult muscular system, which includes differentiation of the various types of muscle cell precursors, migration of myoblasts, activation of myogenesis and development of muscle anchorage.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.
The gamete-producing glands, OVARY or TESTIS.
Derivatives of BENZOIC ACID that contain one or more amino groups attached to the benzene ring structure. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include the aminobenzoate structure.
A large maf protein that regulates HINDBRAIN development, contributes to CELL DIFFERENTIATION of MONOCYTES, and interacts with ETS-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR.
Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.
Regulatory proteins and peptides that are signaling molecules involved in the process of PARACRINE COMMUNICATION. They are generally considered factors that are expressed by one cell and are responded to by receptors on another nearby cell. They are distinguished from HORMONES in that their actions are local rather than distal.
The anatomical parts that make up an organism in the early stages of development.
The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.
Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.
The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.
The technique of using a cryostat or freezing microtome, in which the temperature is regulated to -20 degrees Celsius, to cut ultrathin frozen sections for microscopic (usually, electron microscopic) examination.
Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.
A subclass of closely-related SOX transcription factors. Members of this subfamily have been implicated in regulating the differentiation of OLIGODENDROCYTES during neural crest formation and in CHONDROGENESIS.
A layer of cells lining the fluid-filled cavity (blastocele) of a BLASTULA, usually developed from a fertilized insect, reptilian, or avian egg.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Microscopy in which television cameras are used to brighten magnified images that are otherwise too dark to be seen with the naked eye. It is used frequently in TELEPATHOLOGY.
The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.
A copper-containing dye used as a gelling agent for lubricants, for staining of bacteria and for the dyeing of histiocytes and fibroblasts in vivo.
Mammalian pigment cells that produce MELANINS, pigments found mainly in the EPIDERMIS, but also in the eyes and the hair, by a process called melanogenesis. Coloration can be altered by the number of melanocytes or the amount of pigment produced and stored in the organelles called MELANOSOMES. The large non-mammalian melanin-containing cells are called MELANOPHORES.
Photosensitive afferent neurons located in the peripheral retina, with their density increases radially away from the FOVEA CENTRALIS. Being much more sensitive to light than the RETINAL CONE CELLS, the rod cells are responsible for twilight vision (at scotopic intensities) as well as peripheral vision, but provide no color discrimination.
Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.
Cytoplasm stored in an egg that contains nutritional reserves for the developing embryo. It is rich in polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins.
Photosensitive proteins expressed in the ROD PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of rod photoreceptor pigments such as RHODOPSIN.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.

The homeobox gene Pitx2: mediator of asymmetric left-right signaling in vertebrate heart and gut looping. (1/8702)

Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is controlled by activities emanating from the left lateral plate. How these signals get transmitted to the forming organs is not known. A candidate mediator in mouse, frog and zebrafish embryos is the homeobox gene Pitx2. It is asymmetrically expressed in the left lateral plate mesoderm, tubular heart and early gut tube. Localized Pitx2 expression continues when these organs undergo asymmetric looping morphogenesis. Ectopic expression of Xnr1 in the right lateral plate induces Pitx2 transcription in Xenopus. Misexpression of Pitx2 affects situs and morphology of organs. These experiments suggest a role for Pitx2 in promoting looping of the linear heart and gut.  (+info)

oko meduzy mutations affect neuronal patterning in the zebrafish retina and reveal cell-cell interactions of the retinal neuroepithelial sheet. (2/8702)

Mutations of the oko meduzy (ome) locus cause drastic neuronal patterning defect in the zebrafish retina. The precise, stratified appearance of the wild-type retina is absent in the mutants. Despite the lack of lamination, at least seven retinal cell types differentiate in oko meduzy. The ome phenotype is already expressed in the retinal neuroepithelium affecting morphology of the neuroepithelial cells. Our experiments indicate that previously unknown cell-cell interactions are involved in development of the retinal neuroepithelial sheet. In genetically mosaic animals, cell-cell interactions are sufficient to rescue the phenotype of oko meduzy retinal neuroepithelial cells. These cell-cell interactions may play a critical role in the patterning events that lead to differentiation of distinct neuronal laminae in the vertebrate retina.  (+info)

A Drosophila doublesex-related gene, terra, is involved in somitogenesis in vertebrates. (3/8702)

The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene encodes a transcription factor that mediates sex determination. We describe the characterization of a novel zebrafish zinc-finger gene, terra, which contains a DNA binding domain similar to that of the Drosophila dsx gene. However, unlike dsx, terra is transiently expressed in the presomitic mesoderm and newly formed somites. Expression of terra in presomitic mesoderm is restricted to cells that lack expression of MyoD. In vivo, terra expression is reduced by hedgehog but enhanced by BMP signals. Overexpression of terra induces rapid apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that a tight regulation of terra expression is required during embryogenesis. Terra has both human and mouse homologs and is specifically expressed in mouse somites. Taken together, our findings suggest that terra is a highly conserved protein that plays specific roles in early somitogenesis of vertebrates.  (+info)

Isolation of zebrafish gdf7 and comparative genetic mapping of genes belonging to the growth/differentiation factor 5, 6, 7 subgroup of the TGF-beta superfamily. (4/8702)

The Growth/differentiation factor (Gdf) 5, 6, 7 genes form a closely related subgroup belonging to the TGF-beta superfamily. In zebrafish, there are three genes that belong to the Gdf5, 6, 7 subgroup that have been named radar, dynamo, and contact. The genes radar and dynamo both encode proteins most similar to mouse GDF6. The orthologous identity of these genes on the basis of amino acid similarities has not been clear. We have identified gdf7, a fourth zebrafish gene belonging to the Gdf5, 6, 7 subgroup. To assign correct orthologies and to investigate the evolutionary relationships of the human, mouse, and zebrafish Gdf5, 6, 7 subgroup, we have compared genetic map positions of the zebrafish and mammalian genes. We have mapped zebrafish gdf7 to linkage group (LG) 17, contact to LG9, GDF6 to human chromosome (Hsa) 8 and GDF7 to Hsa2p. The radar and dynamo genes have been localized previously to LG16 and LG19, respectively. A comparison of syntenies shared among human, mouse, and zebrafish genomes indicates that gdf7 is the ortholog of mammalian GDF7/Gdf7. LG16 shares syntenic relationships with mouse chromosome (Mmu) 4, including Gdf6. Portions of LG16 and LG19 appear to be duplicate chromosomes, thus suggesting that radar and dynamo are both orthologs of Gdf6. Finally, the mapping data is consistent with contact being the zebrafish ortholog of mammalian GDF5/Gdf5.  (+info)

Sequential PKC- and Cdc2-mediated phosphorylation events elicit zebrafish nuclear envelope disassembly. (5/8702)

Molecular markers of the zebrafish inner nuclear membrane (NEP55) and nuclear lamina (L68) were identified, partially characterized and used to demonstrate that disassembly of the zebrafish nuclear envelope requires sequential phosphorylation events by first PKC, then Cdc2 kinase. NEP55 and L68 are immunologically and functionally related to human LAP2beta and lamin B, respectively. Exposure of zebrafish nuclei to meiotic cytosol elicits rapid phosphorylation of NEP55 and L68, and disassembly of both proteins. L68 phosphorylation is completely inhibited by simultaneous inhibition of Cdc2 and PKC and only partially blocked by inhibition of either kinase. NEP55 phosphorylation is completely prevented by inhibition or immunodepletion of cytosolic Cdc2. Inhibition of cAMP-dependent kinase, MEK or CaM kinase II does not affect NEP55 or L68 phosphorylation. In vitro, nuclear envelope disassembly requires phosphorylation of NEP55 and L68 by both mammalian PKC and Cdc2. Inhibition of either kinase is sufficient to abolish NE disassembly. Furthermore, novel two-step phosphorylation assays in cytosol and in vitro indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation of L68 prior to Cdc2-mediated phosphorylation of L68 and NEP55 is essential to elicit nuclear envelope breakdown. Phosphorylation elicited by Cdc2 prior to PKC prevents nuclear envelope disassembly even though NEP55 is phosphorylated. The results indicate that sequential phosphorylation events elicited by PKC, followed by Cdc2, are required for zebrafish nuclear disassembly. They also argue that phosphorylation of inner nuclear membrane integral proteins is not sufficient to promote nuclear envelope breakdown, and suggest a multiple-level regulation of disassembly of nuclear envelope components during meiosis and at mitosis.  (+info)

Comparative synteny cloning of zebrafish you-too: mutations in the Hedgehog target gli2 affect ventral forebrain patterning. (6/8702)

Zebrafish you-too (yot) mutations interfere with Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during embryogenesis. Using a comparative synteny approach, we isolated yot as a zinc finger transcription factor homologous to the Hh target gli2. Two alleles of yot contain nonsense mutations resulting in carboxy-terminally truncated proteins. In addition to causing defects in midline development, muscle differentiation, and retinal axon guidance, yot mutations disrupt anterior pituitary and ventral forebrain differentiation. yot mutations also cause ectopic lens formation in the ventral diencephalon. These findings reveal that truncated zebrafish Gli2 proteins interfere with Hh signaling necessary for differentiation and axon guidance in the ventral forebrain.  (+info)

Retinal neurogenesis: the formation of the initial central patch of postmitotic cells. (7/8702)

We have investigated the relationship between the birthdate and the onset of differentiation of neurons in the embryonic zebrafish neural retina. Birthdates were established by a single injection of bromodeoxyuridine into embryos of closely spaced ages. Differentiation was revealed in the same embryos with a neuron-specific antibody, zn12. The first bromodeoxyuridine-negative (postmitotic) cells occupied the ganglion cell layer of ventronasal retina, where they formed a small cluster of 10 cells or less that included the first zn12-positive cells (neurons). New cells were recruited to both populations (bromodeoxyuridine-negative and zn12-positive) along the same front, similar to the unfolding of a fan, to produce a circular central patch of hundreds of cells in the ganglion cell layer about 9 h later. Thus the formation of this central patch, previously considered as the start of retinal neurogenesis, was actually a secondary event, with a developmental history of its own. The first neurons outside the ganglion cell layer also appeared in ventronasal retina, indicating that the ventronasal region was the site of initiation of all retinal neurogenesis. Within a column (a small cluster of neuroepithelial cells), postmitotic cells appeared first in the ganglion cell layer, then the inner nuclear layer, and then the outer nuclear layer, so cell birthday and cell fate were correlated within a column. The terminal mitoses occurred in three bursts separated by two 10-h intervals during which proliferation continued without terminal mitoses.  (+info)

beta-thymosin is required for axonal tract formation in developing zebrafish brain. (8/8702)

beta-Thymosins are polypeptides that bind monomeric actin and thereby function as actin buffers in many cells. We show that during zebrafish development, &bgr;-thymosin expression is tightly correlated with neuronal growth and differentiation. It is transiently expressed in a subset of axon-extending neurons, essentially primary neurons that extend long axons, glia and muscle. Non-neuronal expression in the brain is restricted to a subset of glia surrounding newly forming axonal tracts. Skeletal muscle cells in somites, jaw and fin express beta-thymosin during differentiation, coinciding with the time of innervation. Injection of beta-thymosin antisense RNA into zebrafish embryos results in brain defects and impairment of the development of beta-thymosin-associated axon tracts. Furthermore, irregularities in somite formation can be seen in a subset of embryos. Compared to wild-type, antisense-injected embryos show slightly weaker and more diffuse engrailed staining at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and a strong reduction of Isl-1 labeling in Rohon Beard and trigeminal neurons. The decreased expression is not based on a loss of neurons indicating that beta-thymosin may be involved in the maintenance of the expression of molecules necessary for neuronal differentiation. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that beta-thymosin is an important regulator of development.  (+info)

Zebrafish proteins refer to the diverse range of protein molecules that are produced by the organism Danio rerio, commonly known as the zebrafish. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes such as growth, development, reproduction, and response to environmental stimuli. They are involved in cellular functions like enzymatic reactions, signal transduction, structural support, and regulation of gene expression.

Zebrafish is a popular model organism in biomedical research due to its genetic similarity with humans, rapid development, and transparent embryos that allow for easy observation of biological processes. As a result, the study of zebrafish proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of protein function, structure, and interaction in both zebrafish and human systems.

Some examples of zebrafish proteins include:

* Transcription factors that regulate gene expression during development
* Enzymes involved in metabolic pathways
* Structural proteins that provide support to cells and tissues
* Receptors and signaling molecules that mediate communication between cells
* Heat shock proteins that assist in protein folding and protect against stress

The analysis of zebrafish proteins can be performed using various techniques, including biochemical assays, mass spectrometry, protein crystallography, and computational modeling. These methods help researchers to identify, characterize, and understand the functions of individual proteins and their interactions within complex networks.

A nonmammalian embryo refers to the developing organism in animals other than mammals, from the fertilized egg (zygote) stage until hatching or birth. In nonmammalian species, the developmental stages and terminology differ from those used in mammals. The term "embryo" is generally applied to the developing organism up until a specific stage of development that is characterized by the formation of major organs and structures. After this point, the developing organism is referred to as a "larva," "juvenile," or other species-specific terminology.

The study of nonmammalian embryos has played an important role in our understanding of developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). By comparing the developmental processes across different animal groups, researchers can gain insights into the evolutionary origins and diversification of body plans and structures. Additionally, nonmammalian embryos are often used as model systems for studying basic biological processes, such as cell division, gene regulation, and pattern formation.

Genetically modified animals (GMAs) are those whose genetic makeup has been altered using biotechnological techniques. This is typically done by introducing one or more genes from another species into the animal's genome, resulting in a new trait or characteristic that does not naturally occur in that species. The introduced gene is often referred to as a transgene.

The process of creating GMAs involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The desired gene is isolated from the DNA of another organism.
2. Transfer: The isolated gene is transferred into the target animal's cells, usually using a vector such as a virus or bacterium.
3. Integration: The transgene integrates into the animal's chromosome, becoming a permanent part of its genetic makeup.
4. Selection: The modified cells are allowed to multiply, and those that contain the transgene are selected for further growth and development.
5. Breeding: The genetically modified individuals are bred to produce offspring that carry the desired trait.

GMAs have various applications in research, agriculture, and medicine. In research, they can serve as models for studying human diseases or testing new therapies. In agriculture, GMAs can be developed to exhibit enhanced growth rates, improved disease resistance, or increased nutritional value. In medicine, GMAs may be used to produce pharmaceuticals or other therapeutic agents within their bodies.

Examples of genetically modified animals include mice with added genes for specific proteins that make them useful models for studying human diseases, goats that produce a human protein in their milk to treat hemophilia, and pigs with enhanced resistance to certain viruses that could potentially be used as organ donors for humans.

It is important to note that the use of genetically modified animals raises ethical concerns related to animal welfare, environmental impact, and potential risks to human health. These issues must be carefully considered and addressed when developing and implementing GMA technologies.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Morpholinos are synthetic oligonucleotides that contain morpholine rings in their backbone instead of the ribose or deoxyribose sugars found in DNA and RNA. They are often used as antisense agents to inhibit gene expression by binding to complementary RNA sequences, preventing translation or splicing. Morpholinos are resistant to nucleases and have a neutral charge, which makes them more stable and less likely to cause off-target effects compared to other antisense technologies. They have been widely used in research to study gene function and have also shown promise as therapeutic agents for various diseases, including neuromuscular disorders and viral infections.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

"Body patterning" is a general term that refers to the process of forming and organizing various tissues and structures into specific patterns during embryonic development. This complex process involves a variety of molecular mechanisms, including gene expression, cell signaling, and cell-cell interactions. It results in the creation of distinct body regions, such as the head, trunk, and limbs, as well as the organization of internal organs and systems.

In medical terminology, "body patterning" may refer to specific developmental processes or abnormalities related to embryonic development. For example, in genetic disorders such as Poland syndrome or Holt-Oram syndrome, mutations in certain genes can lead to abnormal body patterning, resulting in the absence or underdevelopment of certain muscles, bones, or other structures.

It's important to note that "body patterning" is not a formal medical term with a specific definition, but rather a general concept used in developmental biology and genetics.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

I could not find a medical definition for "animal fins" as a single concept. However, in the field of comparative anatomy and evolutionary biology, fins are specialized limbs that some aquatic animals use for movement, stability, or sensory purposes. Fins can be found in various forms among different animal groups, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, and even mammals like whales and dolphins.

Fins consist of either bony or cartilaginous structures that support webs of skin or connective tissue. They may contain muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and sensory organs, which help animals navigate their underwater environment efficiently. The specific structure and function of fins can vary greatly depending on the animal's taxonomic group and lifestyle adaptations.

In a medical context, studying animal fins could provide insights into the evolution of limbs in vertebrates or contribute to the development of biomimetic technologies inspired by nature. However, there is no standalone medical definition for 'animal fins.'

The lateral line system is a sensory organ found in aquatic animals, such as fish and some aquatic amphibians. It is a series of fluid-filled canals and sensory cells that run along the sides of the body, head, and fins. These sensory cells are called neuromasts and contain hair cells that respond to vibrations and water movements. The lateral line system helps these animals detect movement, pressure changes, and vibrations in their aquatic environment, which aids in schooling behavior, prey detection, and avoiding predators.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The rhombencephalon is a term used in the field of neuroanatomy, which refers to the most posterior region of the developing brain during embryonic development. It is also known as the hindbrain and it gives rise to several important structures in the adult brain.

More specifically, the rhombencephalon can be further divided into two main parts: the metencephalon and the myelencephalon. The metencephalon eventually develops into the pons and cerebellum, while the myelencephalon becomes the medulla oblongata.

The rhombencephalon plays a crucial role in several critical functions of the nervous system, including regulating heart rate and respiration, maintaining balance and posture, and coordinating motor movements. Defects or abnormalities in the development of the rhombencephalon can lead to various neurological disorders, such as cerebellar hypoplasia, Chiari malformation, and certain forms of brainstem tumors.

Somites are transient, segmentally repeated embryonic structures that form along the anterior-posterior body axis during vertebrate development. They are derived from the paraxial mesoderm and give rise to various tissues, including the sclerotome (which forms the vertebrae and ribs), myotome (which forms the skeletal muscles of the back and limbs), and dermatome (which forms the dermis of the skin).

Each somite is a block-like structure that is arranged in a repeating pattern along the notochord, which is a flexible rod-like structure that provides mechanical support to the developing embryo. The formation of somites is a critical step in the development of the vertebrate body plan, as they help to establish the segmental organization of the musculoskeletal system and contribute to the formation of other important structures such as the dermis and the circulatory system.

The process of somitogenesis, or the formation of somites, is a highly regulated and coordinated event that involves the interaction of various signaling molecules and genetic pathways. Defects in somite formation can lead to a range of developmental abnormalities, including spinal deformities, muscle weakness, and skin defects.

Embryonic development is the series of growth and developmental stages that occur during the formation and early growth of the embryo. In humans, this stage begins at fertilization (when the sperm and egg cell combine) and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (now called a zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which then implants into the uterus. The cells in the blastocyst begin to differentiate and form the three germ layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These germ layers will eventually give rise to all of the different tissues and organs in the body.

Embryonic development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It is characterized by rapid cell division, migration, and differentiation, as well as programmed cell death (apoptosis) and tissue remodeling. Abnormalities in embryonic development can lead to birth defects or other developmental disorders.

It's important to note that the term "embryo" is used to describe the developing organism from fertilization until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy in humans, after which it is called a fetus.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Gene knockdown techniques are methods used to reduce the expression or function of specific genes in order to study their role in biological processes. These techniques typically involve the use of small RNA molecules, such as siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) or shRNAs (short hairpin RNAs), which bind to and promote the degradation of complementary mRNA transcripts. This results in a decrease in the production of the protein encoded by the targeted gene.

Gene knockdown techniques are often used as an alternative to traditional gene knockout methods, which involve completely removing or disrupting the function of a gene. Knockdown techniques allow for more subtle and reversible manipulation of gene expression, making them useful for studying genes that are essential for cell survival or have redundant functions.

These techniques are widely used in molecular biology research to investigate gene function, genetic interactions, and disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that gene knockdown can have off-target effects and may not completely eliminate the expression of the targeted gene, so results should be interpreted with caution.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Morphogenesis is a term used in developmental biology and refers to the process by which cells give rise to tissues and organs with specific shapes, structures, and patterns during embryonic development. This process involves complex interactions between genes, cells, and the extracellular environment that result in the coordinated movement and differentiation of cells into specialized functional units.

Morphogenesis is a dynamic and highly regulated process that involves several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. These processes are controlled by genetic programs and signaling pathways that respond to environmental cues and regulate the behavior of individual cells within a developing tissue or organ.

The study of morphogenesis is important for understanding how complex biological structures form during development and how these processes can go awry in disease states such as cancer, birth defects, and degenerative disorders.

Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is not a medical term per se, but a scientific term used in the field of molecular biology. GFP is a protein that exhibits bright green fluorescence when exposed to light, particularly blue or ultraviolet light. It was originally discovered in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.

In medical and biological research, scientists often use recombinant DNA technology to introduce the gene for GFP into other organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals, including humans. This allows them to track the expression and localization of specific genes or proteins of interest in living cells, tissues, or even whole organisms.

The ability to visualize specific cellular structures or processes in real-time has proven invaluable for a wide range of research areas, from studying the development and function of organs and organ systems to understanding the mechanisms of diseases and the effects of therapeutic interventions.

Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are short synthetic single stranded DNA-like molecules that are designed to complementarily bind to a specific RNA sequence through base-pairing, with the goal of preventing the translation of the target RNA into protein or promoting its degradation.

The antisense oligonucleotides work by hybridizing to the targeted messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule and inducing RNase H-mediated degradation, sterically blocking ribosomal translation, or modulating alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA.

ASOs have shown promise as therapeutic agents for various genetic diseases, viral infections, and cancers by specifically targeting disease-causing genes. However, their clinical application is still facing challenges such as off-target effects, stability, delivery, and potential immunogenicity.

Nodal signaling ligands refer to a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the developmental processes of organisms, particularly during embryogenesis. Nodal is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily and functions as a key morphogen in establishing left-right asymmetry, inducing mesoderm formation, and promoting cell differentiation and proliferation.

Nodal signals are transmitted through a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways involving type I and type II receptors, regulatory Smad proteins (Smad2 and Smad3), and co-activators or co-repressors. The activation of Nodal signaling ligands is tightly regulated both spatially and temporally to ensure proper embryonic development.

Abnormalities in Nodal signaling have been implicated in various human congenital disorders, such as heterotaxy syndrome, which affects the normal asymmetry of internal organs. Additionally, deregulated Nodal signaling has also been associated with certain types of cancer, including ovarian and colorectal cancers.

Homeodomain proteins are a group of transcription factors that play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of cells in animals and plants. They are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which is typically about 60 amino acids long. The homeodomain consists of three helices, with the third helix responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences.

Homeodomain proteins are involved in regulating gene expression during embryonic development, tissue maintenance, and organismal growth. They can act as activators or repressors of transcription, depending on the context and the presence of cofactors. Mutations in homeodomain proteins have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, congenital abnormalities, and neurological disorders.

Some examples of homeodomain proteins include PAX6, which is essential for eye development, HOX genes, which are involved in body patterning, and NANOG, which plays a role in maintaining pluripotency in stem cells.

Gastrulation is a fundamental process in embryonic development, characterized by the transformation of a initially flat layer of cells called the blastula into a three-layered structure known as the gastrula. This complex series of cellular movements and rearrangements establishes the foundation for the formation of the three primary germ layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These germ layers further differentiate to give rise to all the diverse cell types and tissues in the developing organism, including the nervous system, muscles, bones, and internal organs.

The precise mechanisms of gastrulation vary among different animal groups; however, common features include:

1. Formation of a blastopore: A small indentation or opening that forms on the surface of the blastula, which eventually develops into the primitive gut or anus in the gastrula.
2. Invagination: The process by which cells at the blastopore fold inward and migrate towards the interior of the embryo, forming the endodermal layer.
3. Epiboly: A coordinated movement of cells that spreads over and encloses the yolk within the embryo, contributing to the formation of the ectodermal layer.
4. Delamination: The separation and migration of cells from the epiblast (the outer layer of the blastula) to form the mesodermal layer in between the ectoderm and endoderm.

Gastrulation is a critical period in embryonic development, as errors during this process can lead to severe congenital abnormalities or even embryonic lethality. A thorough understanding of gastrulation has important implications for regenerative medicine, stem cell research, and the study of evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-Devo).

The notochord is a flexible, rod-shaped structure that is present in the embryos of chordates, including humans. It is composed of cells called chordocytes and is surrounded by a sheath. The notochord runs along the length of the body, providing support and flexibility. In human embryos, the notochord eventually becomes part of the discs between the vertebrae in the spine. An abnormal or absent notochord can lead to developmental problems with the spine and nervous system.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

The branchial region, also known as the pharyngeal region or viscerocranium, is a term used in human anatomy to refer to the area of the developing embryo that gives rise to structures derived from the branchial (or pharyngeal) arches. The branchial arches are a series of paired, rod-like structures that appear early in embryonic development and give rise to various head and neck structures, including the bones and muscles of the face, jaws, and neck, as well as the associated nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissues.

The branchial region is divided into several subregions, each corresponding to a specific branchial arch. The first branchial arch gives rise to structures such as the mandible (lower jaw), maxilla (upper jaw), and muscles of mastication (chewing). The second branchial arch forms the stapes and styloid process in the ear, as well as some neck muscles. The third and fourth branchial arches contribute to the formation of the larynx, thyroid cartilage, and other structures in the neck.

Abnormalities in the development of the branchial region can lead to a variety of congenital defects, such as cleft palate, micrognathia (small jaw), and branchial cysts or sinuses. These conditions may require surgical intervention to correct.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Organogenesis is the process of formation and development of organs during embryonic growth. It involves the complex interactions of cells, tissues, and signaling molecules that lead to the creation of specialized structures in the body. This process begins in the early stages of embryonic development, around week 4-8, and continues until birth. During organogenesis, the three primary germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) differentiate into various cell types and organize themselves into specific structures that will eventually form the functional organs of the body. Abnormalities in organogenesis can result in congenital disorders or birth defects.

A blastula is a stage in the early development of many animals, including mammals. It is a hollow ball of cells that forms as a result of cleavage, which is the process of cell division during embryonic development. The blastula is typically characterized by the presence of a fluid-filled cavity called the blastocoel, which is surrounded by a single layer of cells known as the blastoderm.

In mammals, the blastula stage follows the morula stage, which is a solid mass of cells that results from cleavage of the fertilized egg. During further cell division and rearrangement, the cells in the morula become organized into an inner cell mass and an outer layer of cells, called the trophoblast. The inner cell mass will eventually give rise to the embryo proper, while the trophoblast will contribute to the formation of the placenta.

As the morula continues to divide and expand, it forms a cavity within the inner cell mass, which becomes the blastocoel. The single layer of cells surrounding the blastocoel is called the blastoderm. At this stage, the blastula is capable of further development through a process called gastrulation, during which the three germ layers of the embryo (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) are formed.

It's important to note that not all animals go through a blastula stage in their development. Some animals, such as insects and nematodes, have different patterns of early development that do not include a blastula stage.

An animal model in medicine refers to the use of non-human animals in experiments to understand, predict, and test responses and effects of various biological and chemical interactions that may also occur in humans. These models are used when studying complex systems or processes that cannot be easily replicated or studied in human subjects, such as genetic manipulation or exposure to harmful substances. The choice of animal model depends on the specific research question being asked and the similarities between the animal's and human's biological and physiological responses. Examples of commonly used animal models include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and non-human primates.

In medical and embryological terms, the mesoderm is one of the three primary germ layers in the very early stages of embryonic development. It forms between the ectoderm and endoderm during gastrulation, and it gives rise to a wide variety of cell types, tissues, and organs in the developing embryo.

The mesoderm contributes to the formation of structures such as:

1. The connective tissues (including tendons, ligaments, and most of the bones)
2. Muscular system (skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscles)
3. Circulatory system (heart, blood vessels, and blood cells)
4. Excretory system (kidneys and associated structures)
5. Reproductive system (gonads, including ovaries and testes)
6. Dermis of the skin
7. Parts of the eye and inner ear
8. Several organs in the urogenital system

Dysfunctions or abnormalities in mesoderm development can lead to various congenital disorders and birth defects, highlighting its importance during embryogenesis.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

Melanophores are specialized pigment-containing cells found in various organisms, including vertebrates and some invertebrates. In humans and other mammals, melanophores are primarily located within the skin's dermal layer and are part of the larger group of chromatophores.

Melanophores contain melanosomes, which are organelles that store and transport the pigment melanin. These cells play a crucial role in determining the coloration of an individual's skin, hair, and eyes by producing, storing, and distributing melanin granules within their cytoplasm.

In response to hormonal signals or neural stimulation, melanophores can undergo changes in the distribution of melanosomes, leading to variations in color intensity. This process is known as melanin dispersion or aggregation and is responsible for various physiological responses, such as skin tanning upon exposure to sunlight or the color-changing abilities observed in some animals like chameleons and cuttlefish.

It's important to note that while humans do not have the ability to change their skin color rapidly like some other animals, melanophores still play a significant role in protecting our skin from harmful ultraviolet radiation by producing melanin, which helps absorb and dissipate this energy, reducing damage to skin cells.

Hedgehog proteins are a group of signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the development and regulation of various biological processes in animals. They are named after the hedgehog mutant fruit flies, which have spiky bristles due to defects in this pathway. These proteins are involved in cell growth, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. They exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately influence gene expression and cell behavior.

There are three main types of Hedgehog proteins in mammals: Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), and Desert hedgehog (Dhh). These protecules undergo post-translational modifications, including cleavage and lipid modification, which are essential for their activity. Dysregulation of Hedgehog signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, developmental abnormalities, and degenerative disorders.

"Takifugu" is not a medical term, but a genus of pufferfish found in the waters of East Asia. However, some people may use it to refer to "pufferfish poisoning," which is a type of food poisoning caused by the consumption of pufferfish that contain a potent neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin. This toxin is found in the fish's organs, such as the liver and ovaries, and can be deadly if ingested in large quantities. Proper preparation and cooking of pufferfish by trained chefs can make it safe to eat, but it is still considered a delicacy with significant risks.

The diencephalon is a term used in anatomy to refer to the part of the brain that lies between the cerebrum and the midbrain. It includes several important structures, such as the thalamus, hypothalamus, epithalamus, and subthalamus.

The thalamus is a major relay station for sensory information, receiving input from all senses except smell and sending it to the appropriate areas of the cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus plays a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions, including hunger, thirst, body temperature, and sleep-wake cycles. It also produces hormones that regulate mood, growth, and development.

The epithalamus contains the pineal gland, which produces melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep-wake cycles. The subthalamus is involved in motor control and coordination.

Overall, the diencephalon plays a critical role in integrating sensory information, regulating autonomic functions, and modulating behavior and emotion.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Pronephros is the most primitive type of kidney that develops in the early stages of embryonic development, specifically in the first few weeks of gestation. It is present in many vertebrate animals, including humans, but it is nonfunctional in higher vertesbrates. In humans, pronephros starts to develop around 22 days of gestation and regresses by the end of the fourth week, giving way to the development of the mesonephros, which is the functional kidney at this stage.

Histologically, pronephros consists of a pair of nephrotomes, which are thickened epithelial plates located along the anterior portion of the intermediate mesoderm. Each nephrotome gives rise to a pronephric duct, which extends caudally and eventually forms part of the permanent excretory system. The pronephros also includes a few glomeruli, which are clusters of capillaries that filter waste products from the blood. However, these glomeruli do not function in humans and other higher vertebrates.

Despite its nonfunctional nature in humans, the study of pronephros is important for understanding the developmental processes that give rise to the functional kidney later in gestation. Additionally, studying pronephros in lower vertebrates can provide insights into the evolutionary origins of the kidney and excretory systems in animals.

The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population that originates from the ectoderm (outermost layer) of the developing neural tube (precursor to the central nervous system). These cells undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and migrate throughout the embryo, giving rise to a diverse array of cell types and structures.

Neural crest cells differentiate into various tissues, including:

1. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) components: sensory neurons, sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia, and glial cells (e.g., Schwann cells).
2. Facial bones and cartilage, as well as connective tissue of the skull.
3. Melanocytes, which are pigment-producing cells in the skin.
4. Smooth muscle cells in major blood vessels, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and other organs.
5. Secretory cells in endocrine glands (e.g., chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla).
6. Parts of the eye, such as the cornea and iris stroma.
7. Dental tissues, including dentin, cementum, and dental pulp.

Due to their wide-ranging contributions to various tissues and organs, neural crest cells play a crucial role in embryonic development and organogenesis. Abnormalities in neural crest cell migration or differentiation can lead to several congenital disorders, such as neurocristopathies.

Regeneration in a medical context refers to the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that replaces damaged or missing cells, tissues, organs, or even whole limbs in some organisms. This complex biological process involves various cellular and molecular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which work together to restore the structural and functional integrity of the affected area.

In human medicine, regeneration has attracted significant interest due to its potential therapeutic applications in treating various conditions, including degenerative diseases, trauma, and congenital disorders. Researchers are actively studying the underlying mechanisms of regeneration in various model organisms to develop novel strategies for promoting tissue repair and regeneration in humans.

Examples of regeneration in human medicine include liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, where the remaining liver lobes can grow back to their original size within weeks, and skin wound healing, where keratinocytes migrate and proliferate to close the wound and restore the epidermal layer. However, the regenerative capacity of humans is limited compared to some other organisms, such as planarians and axolotls, which can regenerate entire body parts or even their central nervous system.

The retina is the innermost, light-sensitive layer of tissue in the eye of many vertebrates and some cephalopods. It receives light that has been focused by the cornea and lens, converts it into neural signals, and sends these to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina contains several types of photoreceptor cells including rods (which handle vision in low light) and cones (which are active in bright light and are capable of color vision).

In medical terms, any pathological changes or diseases affecting the retinal structure and function can lead to visual impairment or blindness. Examples include age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa among others.

"Oryzias" is not a medical term, but a genus name in the family Adrianichthyidae, which includes various species of small fish commonly known as "ricefishes" or "medaka." These fish are often used in scientific research, particularly in the fields of genetics and developmental biology. They are not associated with human diseases or medical conditions.

In the context of human anatomy, the term "tail" is not used to describe any part of the body. Humans are considered tailless primates, and there is no structure or feature that corresponds directly to the tails found in many other animals.

However, there are some medical terms related to the lower end of the spine that might be confused with a tail:

1. Coccyx (Tailbone): The coccyx is a small triangular bone at the very bottom of the spinal column, formed by the fusion of several rudimentary vertebrae. It's also known as the tailbone because it resembles the end of an animal's tail in its location and appearance.
2. Cauda Equina (Horse's Tail): The cauda equina is a bundle of nerve roots at the lower end of the spinal cord, just above the coccyx. It got its name because it looks like a horse's tail due to the numerous rootlets radiating from the conus medullaris (the tapering end of the spinal cord).

These two structures are not tails in the traditional sense but rather medical terms related to the lower end of the human spine.

SOX (SRY-related HMG box) transcription factors are a family of proteins that regulate gene expression during embryonic development and in adult tissues. They contain a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, the HMG box, which allows them to bind to specific DNA sequences and influence the transcription of nearby genes. SOX proteins play critical roles in various biological processes such as cell fate determination, differentiation, proliferation, and survival.

SOX transcription factors are classified into several groups (A-H) based on their sequence similarities and functional redundancies. Some well-known members of this family include SOX1, SOX2, SOX3, SOX4, SOX9, SOX10, and SOX17. These proteins often form complexes with other transcription factors or cofactors to modulate their target genes' expression.

Dysregulation of SOX transcription factors has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. For example, SOX2 overexpression is associated with certain types of tumors, while mutations in the SOX9 gene can cause campomelic dysplasia, a severe skeletal disorder.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "swimming" is not typically considered a medical term. It refers to the act of moving through water using your arms and legs in a rhythmic pattern, often as a form of exercise, recreation, or competition. However, if you're referring to a medical condition related to swimming, such as "swimmer's ear" (otitis externa), I would be happy to provide a definition for that.

Swimmer's ear is a type of outer ear infection caused by water remaining in the ear after swimming or bathing, creating a moist environment that can lead to bacterial growth. It can also be caused by scratching or damaging the lining of the ear canal through the use of cotton swabs or other objects. Symptoms may include itching, redness, pain, and sometimes discharge from the ear. If left untreated, swimmer's ear can lead to more serious complications, such as hearing loss or damage to the inner ear.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Microinjection is a medical technique that involves the use of a fine, precise needle to inject small amounts of liquid or chemicals into microscopic structures, cells, or tissues. This procedure is often used in research settings to introduce specific substances into individual cells for study purposes, such as introducing DNA or RNA into cell nuclei to manipulate gene expression.

In clinical settings, microinjections may be used in various medical and cosmetic procedures, including:

1. Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI): A type of assisted reproductive technology where a single sperm is injected directly into an egg to increase the chances of fertilization during in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments.
2. Botulinum Toxin Injections: Microinjections of botulinum toxin (Botox, Dysport, or Xeomin) are used for cosmetic purposes to reduce wrinkles and fine lines by temporarily paralyzing the muscles responsible for their formation. They can also be used medically to treat various neuromuscular disorders, such as migraines, muscle spasticity, and excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis).
3. Drug Delivery: Microinjections may be used to deliver drugs directly into specific tissues or organs, bypassing the systemic circulation and potentially reducing side effects. This technique can be particularly useful in treating localized pain, delivering growth factors for tissue regeneration, or administering chemotherapy agents directly into tumors.
4. Gene Therapy: Microinjections of genetic material (DNA or RNA) can be used to introduce therapeutic genes into cells to treat various genetic disorders or diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, or cancer.

Overall, microinjection is a highly specialized and precise technique that allows for the targeted delivery of substances into small structures, cells, or tissues, with potential applications in research, medical diagnostics, and therapeutic interventions.

The nervous system is a complex, highly organized network of specialized cells called neurons and glial cells that communicate with each other via electrical and chemical signals to coordinate various functions and activities in the body. It consists of two main parts: the central nervous system (CNS), including the brain and spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), which includes all the nerves and ganglia outside the CNS.

The primary function of the nervous system is to receive, process, and integrate information from both internal and external environments and then respond by generating appropriate motor outputs or behaviors. This involves sensing various stimuli through specialized receptors, transmitting this information through afferent neurons to the CNS for processing, integrating this information with other inputs and memories, making decisions based on this processed information, and finally executing responses through efferent neurons that control effector organs such as muscles and glands.

The nervous system can be further divided into subsystems based on their functions, including the somatic nervous system, which controls voluntary movements and reflexes; the autonomic nervous system, which regulates involuntary physiological processes like heart rate, digestion, and respiration; and the enteric nervous system, which is a specialized subset of the autonomic nervous system that controls gut functions. Overall, the nervous system plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis, regulating behavior, and enabling cognition and consciousness.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Air sacs, also known as alveoli, are tiny air-filled sacs in the lungs where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide occurs during respiration. They are a part of the respiratory system in mammals and birds. In humans, the lungs contain about 300 million alveoli, which are clustered together in small groups called alveolar sacs. The walls of the air sacs are extremely thin, allowing for the easy diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the air in the sacs and the blood in the capillaries that surround them.

Antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) are short synthetic single-stranded DNA molecules that are designed to be complementary to a specific RNA sequence. They work by binding to the target mRNA through base-pairing, which prevents the translation of the mRNA into protein, either by blocking the ribosome or inducing degradation of the mRNA. This makes antisense ODNs valuable tools in research and therapeutics for modulating gene expression, particularly in cases where traditional small molecule inhibitors are not effective.

The term "oligodeoxyribonucleotides" refers to short DNA sequences, typically made up of 15-30 nucleotides. These molecules can be chemically modified to improve their stability and binding affinity for the target RNA, which increases their efficacy as antisense agents.

In summary, Antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) are short synthetic single-stranded DNA molecules that bind to a specific RNA sequence, preventing its translation into protein and thus modulating gene expression.

P-Aminoazobenzene, also known as Aniline Yellow or C.I. 11020, is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with potential health implications. Therefore, I will provide you with its chemical definition and some information related to its toxicological properties.

P-Aminoazobenzene is an organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5NH2-C6H5N=N-. It belongs to the class of aromatic amines and azo dyes, which are known for their potential carcinogenic effects. P-Aminoazobenzene is formed by the diazotization of p-aminophenol followed by coupling with phenol or its derivatives.

In terms of toxicity, p-Aminoazobenzene has been shown to have carcinogenic and mutagenic effects in various animal models. It can cause liver damage and increase the risk of developing liver tumors after prolonged exposure. The compound is also believed to have immunotoxic properties, affecting the immune system's functioning.

However, it is essential to note that p-Aminoazobenzene is not typically used in medical applications or treatments due to its toxicity and potential health hazards. It is primarily used in research settings for studying chemical reactions and understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis.

The PAX2 transcription factor is a protein that plays a crucial role in the development and function of the kidneys and urinary system. It belongs to the PAX family of transcription factors, which are characterized by a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the paired box. The PAX2 protein helps regulate gene expression during embryonic development, including genes involved in the formation of the nephrons, the functional units of the kidneys.

PAX2 is expressed in the intermediate mesoderm, which gives rise to the kidneys and other organs of the urinary system. It helps to specify the fate of these cells and promote their differentiation into mature kidney structures. In addition to its role in kidney development, PAX2 has also been implicated in the development of the eye, ear, and central nervous system.

Mutations in the PAX2 gene have been associated with various genetic disorders, including renal coloboma syndrome, which is characterized by kidney abnormalities and eye defects. Proper regulation of PAX2 expression is essential for normal development and function of the urinary system and other organs.

A conserved sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to a pattern of nucleotides (in DNA or RNA) or amino acids (in proteins) that has remained relatively unchanged over evolutionary time. These sequences are often functionally important and are highly conserved across different species, indicating strong selection pressure against changes in these regions.

In the case of protein-coding genes, the corresponding amino acid sequence is deduced from the DNA sequence through the genetic code. Conserved sequences in proteins may indicate structurally or functionally important regions, such as active sites or binding sites, that are critical for the protein's activity. Similarly, conserved non-coding sequences in DNA may represent regulatory elements that control gene expression.

Identifying conserved sequences can be useful for inferring evolutionary relationships between species and for predicting the function of unknown genes or proteins.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

T-box domain proteins are a family of transcription factors that share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, known as the T-box. The T-box domain is a DNA-binding motif that specifically recognizes and binds to T-box binding elements (TBEs) in the regulatory regions of target genes. These proteins play crucial roles during embryonic development, particularly in the formation of specific tissues and organs, such as the heart, limbs, and brain. Mutations in T-box domain proteins can lead to various congenital defects and developmental disorders. Some examples of T-box domain proteins include TBX1, TBX5, and TBX20.

Notch receptors are a type of transmembrane receptor proteins that play crucial roles in cell-cell communication and regulation of various biological processes, including cell fate determination, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. These receptors are highly conserved across species and are essential for normal development and tissue homeostasis.

The Notch signaling pathway is initiated when the extracellular domain of a Notch receptor on one cell interacts with its ligand (such as Delta or Jagged) on an adjacent cell. This interaction triggers a series of proteolytic cleavage events that release the intracellular domain of the Notch receptor, which then translocates to the nucleus and regulates gene expression by interacting with transcription factors like CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Su(H)/Lag-1).

There are four known Notch receptors in humans (Notch1-4) that share a similar structure, consisting of an extracellular domain containing multiple epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular domain. Mutations or dysregulation of the Notch signaling pathway have been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and developmental abnormalities.

Endoderm is the innermost of the three primary germ layers in a developing embryo, along with the ectoderm and mesoderm. The endoderm gives rise to several internal tissues and organs, most notably those found in the digestive system and respiratory system. Specifically, it forms the lining of the gut tube, which eventually becomes the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, pancreas, lungs, and other associated structures.

During embryonic development, the endoderm arises from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, following a series of cell divisions and migrations that help to establish the basic body plan of the organism. As the embryo grows and develops, the endoderm continues to differentiate into more specialized tissues and structures, playing a critical role in the formation of many essential bodily functions.

A group of chordate animals (Phylum Chordata) that have a vertebral column, or backbone, made up of individual vertebrae. This group includes mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. Vertebrates are characterized by the presence of a notochord, which is a flexible, rod-like structure that runs along the length of the body during development; a dorsal hollow nerve cord; and pharyngeal gill slits at some stage in their development. The vertebral column provides support and protection for the spinal cord and allows for the development of complex movements and behaviors.

The eye is the organ of sight, primarily responsible for detecting and focusing on visual stimuli. It is a complex structure composed of various parts that work together to enable vision. Here are some of the main components of the eye:

1. Cornea: The clear front part of the eye that refracts light entering the eye and protects the eye from harmful particles and microorganisms.
2. Iris: The colored part of the eye that controls the amount of light reaching the retina by adjusting the size of the pupil.
3. Pupil: The opening in the center of the iris that allows light to enter the eye.
4. Lens: A biconvex structure located behind the iris that further refracts light and focuses it onto the retina.
5. Retina: A layer of light-sensitive cells (rods and cones) at the back of the eye that convert light into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.
6. Optic Nerve: The nerve that carries visual information from the retina to the brain.
7. Vitreous: A clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina, providing structural support to the eye.
8. Conjunctiva: A thin, transparent membrane that covers the front of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids.
9. Extraocular Muscles: Six muscles that control the movement of the eye, allowing for proper alignment and focus.

The eye is a remarkable organ that allows us to perceive and interact with our surroundings. Various medical specialties, such as ophthalmology and optometry, are dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of various eye conditions and diseases.

Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors that play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. They bind to specific tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs) on the cell surface, leading to intracellular signaling cascades that regulate gene expression and downstream cellular responses. FGFs are involved in embryonic development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). There are at least 22 distinct FGFs identified in humans, each with unique functions and patterns of expression. Some FGFs, like FGF1 and FGF2, have mitogenic effects on fibroblasts and other cell types, while others, such as FGF7 and FGF10, are essential for epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during organ development. Dysregulation of FGF signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders.

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors that play crucial roles in the development, growth, and repair of bones and other tissues. They belong to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and were first discovered when researchers found that certain proteins extracted from demineralized bone matrix had the ability to induce new bone formation.

BMPs stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are the cells responsible for bone formation. They also promote the recruitment and proliferation of these cells, enhancing the overall process of bone regeneration. In addition to their role in bone biology, BMPs have been implicated in various other biological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and the regulation of fat metabolism.

There are several types of BMPs (BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-7, etc.) that exhibit distinct functions and expression patterns. Due to their ability to stimulate bone formation, recombinant human BMPs have been used in clinical applications, such as spinal fusion surgery and non-healing fracture treatment. However, the use of BMPs in medicine has been associated with certain risks and complications, including uncontrolled bone growth, inflammation, and cancer development, which necessitates further research to optimize their therapeutic potential.

Fibroblast Growth Factor 3 (FGF3) is a protein that belongs to the fibroblast growth factor family, which plays crucial roles in various biological processes such as cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Specifically, FGF3 is involved in embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis. It exerts its functions by binding to FGF receptors (FGFRs) and activating downstream signaling pathways. Mutations in the FGF3 gene have been associated with certain diseases, including craniosynostosis, a condition characterized by premature fusion of skull bones.

"Fish proteins" are not a recognized medical term or concept. However, fish is a source of protein that is often consumed in the human diet and has been studied in various medical and nutritional contexts. According to the USDA FoodData Central database, a 100-gram serving of cooked Atlantic salmon contains approximately 25 grams of protein.

Proteins from fish, like other animal proteins, are complete proteins, meaning they contain all nine essential amino acids that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Fish proteins have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their role in muscle growth and repair, immune function, and cardiovascular health.

It's worth noting that some people may have allergies to fish or seafood, which can cause a range of symptoms from mild skin irritation to severe anaphylaxis. If you suspect you have a fish allergy, it's important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and management.

The inner ear is the innermost part of the ear that contains the sensory organs for hearing and balance. It consists of a complex system of fluid-filled tubes and sacs called the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance and spatial orientation, and the cochlea, a spiral-shaped organ that converts sound vibrations into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

The inner ear is located deep within the temporal bone of the skull and is protected by a bony labyrinth. The vestibular system includes the semicircular canals, which detect rotational movements of the head, and the otolith organs (the saccule and utricle), which detect linear acceleration and gravity.

Damage to the inner ear can result in hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), vertigo (a spinning sensation), and balance problems.

Tetraodontiformes is not a medical term, but a taxonomic order in zoology. It refers to a group of marine fish that includes pufferfish, porcupinefish, boxfish, and triggerfish, among others. These fish are characterized by their specialized teeth, which are fused into beak-like structures. Some species within this order contain tetrodotoxin, a potent neurotoxin, in their organs. While not directly related to medical terminology, it is important for healthcare providers and medical professionals to have an understanding of various animal taxonomies, especially those that can pose a risk to human health.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Veratrum alkaloids are a group of steroidal alkaloids found in plants belonging to the genus Veratrum, such as Veratrum album (white hellebore) and Veratrum viride (American false hellebore). These compounds have complex structures and can be divided into several types, including veratrine, jervine, and cevadine. They have various pharmacological effects, such as being anticholinergic, antiarrhythmic, and emetic. Veratrum alkaloids are used in traditional medicine, but they can also be highly toxic if ingested or handled improperly.

Basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors are a type of proteins that regulate gene expression through binding to specific DNA sequences. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. The bHLH domain is composed of two amphipathic α-helices separated by a loop region. This structure allows the formation of homodimers or heterodimers, which then bind to the E-box DNA motif (5'-CANNTG-3') to regulate transcription.

The bHLH family can be further divided into several subfamilies based on their sequence similarities and functional characteristics. Some members of this family are involved in the development and function of the nervous system, while others play critical roles in the development of muscle and bone. Dysregulation of bHLH transcription factors has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders.

Growth Differentiation Factor 6 (GDF6) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, which plays crucial roles in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and development. Specifically, GDF6 is involved in the regulation of skeletal development, joint formation, and limb morphogenesis. It has been shown to inhibit chondrogenic differentiation and promote osteogenic differentiation during bone development. Genetic variations in the GDF6 gene have been associated with certain musculoskeletal disorders, such as osteoarthritis and joint laxity.

The Central Nervous System (CNS) is the part of the nervous system that consists of the brain and spinal cord. It is called the "central" system because it receives information from, and sends information to, the rest of the body through peripheral nerves, which make up the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS).

The CNS is responsible for processing sensory information, controlling motor functions, and regulating various autonomic processes like heart rate, respiration, and digestion. The brain, as the command center of the CNS, interprets sensory stimuli, formulates thoughts, and initiates actions. The spinal cord serves as a conduit for nerve impulses traveling to and from the brain and the rest of the body.

The CNS is protected by several structures, including the skull (which houses the brain) and the vertebral column (which surrounds and protects the spinal cord). Despite these protective measures, the CNS remains vulnerable to injury and disease, which can have severe consequences due to its crucial role in controlling essential bodily functions.

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Jaw abnormalities, also known as maxillofacial abnormalities, refer to any structural or functional deviations from the normal anatomy and physiology of the jaw bones (mandible and maxilla) and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as trauma, infection, tumors, or degenerative diseases.

Examples of jaw abnormalities include:

1. Micrognathia: a condition where the lower jaw is underdeveloped and appears recessed or small.
2. Prognathism: a condition where the lower jaw protrudes forward beyond the normal position.
3. Maxillary hypoplasia/aplasia: a condition where the upper jaw is underdeveloped or absent.
4. Mandibular hypoplasia/aplasia: a condition where the lower jaw is underdeveloped or absent.
5. Condylar hyperplasia: a condition where one or both of the condyles (the rounded ends of the mandible that articulate with the skull) continue to grow abnormally, leading to an asymmetrical jaw and facial deformity.
6. TMJ disorders: conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint, causing pain, stiffness, and limited movement.
7. Jaw tumors or cysts: abnormal growths that can affect the function and structure of the jaw bones.

Jaw abnormalities can cause various problems, including difficulty with chewing, speaking, breathing, and swallowing, as well as aesthetic concerns. Treatment options may include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both, depending on the severity and nature of the abnormality.

'Cell lineage' is a term used in biology and medicine to describe the developmental history or relationship of a cell or group of cells to other cells, tracing back to the original progenitor or stem cell. It refers to the series of cell divisions and differentiation events that give rise to specific types of cells in an organism over time.

In simpler terms, cell lineage is like a family tree for cells, showing how they are related to each other through a chain of cell division and specialization events. This concept is important in understanding the development, growth, and maintenance of tissues and organs in living beings.

Nerve tissue proteins are specialized proteins found in the nervous system that provide structural and functional support to nerve cells, also known as neurons. These proteins include:

1. Neurofilaments: These are type IV intermediate filaments that provide structural support to neurons and help maintain their shape and size. They are composed of three subunits - NFL (light), NFM (medium), and NFH (heavy).

2. Neuronal Cytoskeletal Proteins: These include tubulins, actins, and spectrins that provide structural support to the neuronal cytoskeleton and help maintain its integrity.

3. Neurotransmitter Receptors: These are specialized proteins located on the postsynaptic membrane of neurons that bind neurotransmitters released by presynaptic neurons, triggering a response in the target cell.

4. Ion Channels: These are transmembrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the neuronal membrane and play a crucial role in generating and transmitting electrical signals in neurons.

5. Signaling Proteins: These include enzymes, receptors, and adaptor proteins that mediate intracellular signaling pathways involved in neuronal development, differentiation, survival, and death.

6. Adhesion Proteins: These are cell surface proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, playing a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of neural circuits.

7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins: These include proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens that provide structural support to nerve tissue and regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and survival.

A genome is the complete set of genetic material (DNA, or in some viruses, RNA) present in a single cell of an organism. It includes all of the genes, both coding and noncoding, as well as other regulatory elements that together determine the unique characteristics of that organism. The human genome, for example, contains approximately 3 billion base pairs and about 20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes.

The term "genome" was first coined by Hans Winkler in 1920, derived from the word "gene" and the suffix "-ome," which refers to a complete set of something. The study of genomes is known as genomics.

Understanding the genome can provide valuable insights into the genetic basis of diseases, evolution, and other biological processes. With advancements in sequencing technologies, it has become possible to determine the entire genomic sequence of many organisms, including humans, and use this information for various applications such as personalized medicine, gene therapy, and biotechnology.

Wnt proteins are a family of secreted signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the regulation of fundamental biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. They were first discovered in 1982 through genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) and have since been found to be highly conserved across various species, from invertebrates to humans.

Wnt proteins exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the target cell surface, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways:

1. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway: In the absence of Wnt ligands, β-catenin is continuously degraded by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli), and GSK3β (Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta). When Wnt proteins bind to their receptors Frizzled and LRP5/6, the formation of a "signalosome" complex leads to the inhibition of the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. Here, it interacts with TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor) transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.
2. Non-canonical Wnt pathways: These include the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. In the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and activate heterotrimeric G proteins, leading to an increase in intracellular Ca^2+^ levels and activation of downstream targets such as protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). These signaling events ultimately regulate cell movement, adhesion, and gene expression. In the PCP pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and coreceptor complexes containing Ror2 or Ryk, leading to activation of small GTPases such as RhoA and Rac1, which control cytoskeletal organization and cell polarity.

Dysregulation of Wnt signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. In cancer, aberrant activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis by promoting cell proliferation, survival, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Inhibitors targeting different components of the Wnt signaling pathway are currently being developed as potential therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Embryonic induction is a process that occurs during the development of a multicellular organism, where one group of cells in the embryo signals and influences the developmental fate of another group of cells. This interaction leads to the formation of specific structures or organs in the developing embryo. The signaling cells that initiate the process are called organizers, and they release signaling molecules known as morphogens that bind to receptors on the target cells and trigger a cascade of intracellular signals that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression and cell fate. Embryonic induction is a crucial step in the development of complex organisms and plays a key role in establishing the body plan and organizing the different tissues and organs in the developing embryo.

A transgene is a segment of DNA that has been artificially transferred from one organism to another, typically between different species, to introduce a new trait or characteristic. The term "transgene" specifically refers to the genetic material that has been transferred and has become integrated into the host organism's genome. This technology is often used in genetic engineering and biomedical research, including the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural purposes or the creation of animal models for studying human diseases.

Transgenes can be created using various techniques, such as molecular cloning, where a desired gene is isolated, manipulated, and then inserted into a vector (a small DNA molecule, such as a plasmid) that can efficiently enter the host organism's cells. Once inside the cell, the transgene can integrate into the host genome, allowing for the expression of the new trait in the resulting transgenic organism.

It is important to note that while transgenes can provide valuable insights and benefits in research and agriculture, their use and release into the environment are subjects of ongoing debate due to concerns about potential ecological impacts and human health risks.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping is a genetic mapping technique used to determine the relative order and distance between DNA markers or genes on a chromosome. This technique involves exposing donor cells, which contain the chromosome of interest, to high-dose radiation. The radiation causes breaks in the chromosomes, which are then repaired by fusing the donor cells with irradiated hamster cells (the recipient cells).

During the repair process, the broken chromosomal fragments from the donor cell randomly assort and integrate into the genome of the recipient cell. The resulting hybrid cells contain a mosaic of donor chromosomal fragments, which can be analyzed to determine the order and distance between DNA markers or genes on the original chromosome.

The frequency of co-occurrence of two markers in the same hybrid cell is used as an estimate of their physical proximity on the chromosome. The greater the frequency of co-occurrence, the closer the two markers are assumed to be. RH mapping can provide high-resolution maps of large genomes and has been widely used for mapping human and other mammalian genomes. However, with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, RH mapping has largely been replaced by sequence-based methods such as whole-genome sequencing and optical mapping.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Blood vessels are the part of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the body. They form a network of tubes that carry blood to and from the heart, lungs, and other organs. The main types of blood vessels are arteries, veins, and capillaries. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body, while veins return deoxygenated blood back to the heart. Capillaries connect arteries and veins and facilitate the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste materials between the blood and the body's tissues.

Gills are specialized respiratory organs found in many aquatic organisms such as fish, crustaceans, and some mollusks. They are typically thin, feathery structures that increase the surface area for gas exchange between the water and the animal's bloodstream. Gills extract oxygen from water while simultaneously expelling carbon dioxide.

In fish, gills are located in the gill chamber, which is covered by opercula or protective bony flaps. Water enters through the mouth, flows over the gills, and exits through the opercular openings. The movement of water over the gills allows for the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the gill filaments and lamellae, which are the thin plates where gas exchange occurs.

Gills contain a rich supply of blood vessels, allowing for efficient transport of oxygen to the body's tissues and removal of carbon dioxide. The counter-current flow of water and blood in the gills ensures that the concentration gradient between the water and the blood is maximized, enhancing the efficiency of gas exchange.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Trans-activators are proteins that increase the transcriptional activity of a gene or a set of genes. They do this by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with the transcription machinery, thereby enhancing the recruitment and assembly of the complexes needed for transcription. In some cases, trans-activators can also modulate the chromatin structure to make the template more accessible to the transcription machinery.

In the context of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection, the term "trans-activator" is often used specifically to refer to the Tat protein. The Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the replication of HIV by activating the transcription of the viral genome. It does this by binding to a specific RNA structure called the Trans-Activation Response Element (TAR) located at the 5' end of all nascent HIV transcripts, and recruiting cellular cofactors that enhance the processivity and efficiency of RNA polymerase II, leading to increased viral gene expression.

Cilia are tiny, hair-like structures that protrude from the surface of many types of cells in the body. They are composed of a core bundle of microtubules surrounded by a protein matrix and are covered with a membrane. Cilia are involved in various cellular functions, including movement of fluid or mucus across the cell surface, detection of external stimuli, and regulation of signaling pathways.

There are two types of cilia: motile and non-motile. Motile cilia are able to move in a coordinated manner to propel fluids or particles across a surface, such as those found in the respiratory tract and reproductive organs. Non-motile cilia, also known as primary cilia, are present on most cells in the body and serve as sensory organelles that detect chemical and mechanical signals from the environment.

Defects in cilia structure or function can lead to a variety of diseases, collectively known as ciliopathies. These conditions can affect multiple organs and systems in the body, including the brain, kidneys, liver, and eyes. Examples of ciliopathies include polycystic kidney disease, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

'Animal behavior' refers to the actions or responses of animals to various stimuli, including their interactions with the environment and other individuals. It is the study of the actions of animals, whether they are instinctual, learned, or a combination of both. Animal behavior includes communication, mating, foraging, predator avoidance, and social organization, among other things. The scientific study of animal behavior is called ethology. This field seeks to understand the evolutionary basis for behaviors as well as their physiological and psychological mechanisms.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

The epithalamus is a part of the brain that is located in the diencephalon, near the thalamus. It includes several small structures, such as the habenula and the pineal gland. The epithalamus plays a role in regulating sleep-wake cycles, hormone production, and emotional responses. It also has connections to other parts of the brain that are involved in vision, hearing, and movement.

The main function of the epithalamus is to regulate the release of hormones from the pituitary gland, which is located at the base of the brain. The epithalamus contains specialized cells called neurosecretory cells, which produce and release hormones that control various bodily functions, such as growth, development, and reproduction.

The epithalamus also plays a role in regulating mood and emotional responses. It has connections to the limbic system, which is a network of structures involved in emotion, behavior, and long-term memory. The habenula, which is part of the epithalamus, is thought to be involved in processing rewarding and aversive stimuli, and may play a role in addiction and depression.

In addition, the pineal gland, which is also part of the epithalamus, produces melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep-wake cycles. The production of melatonin is influenced by light exposure, with higher levels produced at night and lower levels during the day.

Overall, the epithalamus is an important part of the brain that plays a role in various physiological and psychological processes. Dysfunction of the epithalamus has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, depression, and addiction.

Gene duplication, in the context of genetics and genomics, refers to an event where a segment of DNA that contains a gene is copied, resulting in two identical copies of that gene. This can occur through various mechanisms such as unequal crossing over during meiosis, retrotransposition, or whole genome duplication. The duplicate genes are then passed on to the next generation.

Gene duplications can have several consequences. Often, one copy may continue to function normally while the other is free to mutate without affecting the organism's survival, potentially leading to new functions (neofunctionalization) or subfunctionalization where each copy takes on some of the original gene's roles.

Gene duplication plays a significant role in evolution by providing raw material for the creation of novel genes and genetic diversity. However, it can also lead to various genetic disorders if multiple copies of a gene become dysfunctional or if there are too many copies, leading to an overdose effect.

Teratogens are substances, such as certain medications, chemicals, or infectious agents, that can cause birth defects or abnormalities in the developing fetus when a woman is exposed to them during pregnancy. They can interfere with the normal development of the fetus and lead to a range of problems, including physical deformities, intellectual disabilities, and sensory impairments. Examples of teratogens include alcohol, tobacco smoke, some prescription medications, and infections like rubella (German measles). It is important for women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to avoid exposure to known teratogens as much as possible.

Luminescent proteins are a type of protein that emit light through a chemical reaction, rather than by absorbing and re-emitting light like fluorescent proteins. This process is called bioluminescence. The light emitted by luminescent proteins is often used in scientific research as a way to visualize and track biological processes within cells and organisms.

One of the most well-known luminescent proteins is Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which was originally isolated from jellyfish. However, GFP is actually a fluorescent protein, not a luminescent one. A true example of a luminescent protein is the enzyme luciferase, which is found in fireflies and other bioluminescent organisms. When luciferase reacts with its substrate, luciferin, it produces light through a process called oxidation.

Luminescent proteins have many applications in research, including as reporters for gene expression, as markers for protein-protein interactions, and as tools for studying the dynamics of cellular processes. They are also used in medical imaging and diagnostics, as well as in the development of new therapies.

Embryonic organizers are specialized cells or tissues in developing embryos that provide critical signals to guide the organization and development of surrounding cells and tissues. They play a crucial role in establishing the body plan and patterning of the organism during embryogenesis. A well-known example is the Spemann-Mangold organizer, first described in amphibians, which induces the formation of the neural tissue and organizes the surrounding tissues to form the body axis. Embryonic organizers have been identified in various animal models, including mammals, birds, and fish, and they are essential for normal embryonic development.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

An "escape reaction" is a behavioral response displayed by an organism when it attempts to escape from a harmful, noxious, or stressful stimulus or situation. This response is typically characterized by rapid and directed movement away from the source of discomfort or danger. It is a fundamental survival mechanism that is observed across many species, including humans.

In a medical context, an escape reaction may be observed in response to painful medical procedures or treatments. For example, a patient may try to move or pull away during an injection or other invasive procedure. Healthcare providers must be aware of and prepared to manage escape reactions to ensure the safety and comfort of their patients during medical procedures.

Motor neurons are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that play a crucial role in controlling voluntary muscle movements. They transmit electrical signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling us to perform actions such as walking, talking, and swallowing. There are two types of motor neurons: upper motor neurons, which originate in the brain's motor cortex and travel down to the brainstem and spinal cord; and lower motor neurons, which extend from the brainstem and spinal cord to the muscles. Damage or degeneration of these motor neurons can lead to various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Synteny, in the context of genetics and genomics, refers to the presence of two or more genetic loci (regions) on the same chromosome, in the same relative order and orientation. This term is often used to describe conserved gene organization between different species, indicating a common ancestry.

It's important to note that synteny should not be confused with "colinearity," which refers to the conservation of gene content and order within a genome or between genomes of closely related species. Synteny is a broader concept that can also include conserved gene order across more distantly related species, even if some genes have been lost or gained in the process.

In medical research, synteny analysis can be useful for identifying conserved genetic elements and regulatory regions that may play important roles in disease susceptibility or other biological processes.

The otolithic membrane is a part of the inner ear's vestibular system, which contributes to our sense of balance and spatial orientation. It is composed of a gelatinous material containing tiny calcium carbonate crystals called otoconia or otoliths. These crystals provide weight to the membrane, allowing it to detect linear acceleration and gravity-induced head movements.

There are two otolithic membranes in each inner ear, located within the utricle and saccule, two of the three main vestibular organs. The utricle is primarily responsible for detecting horizontal movement and head tilts, while the saccule senses vertical motion and linear acceleration.

Damage to the otolithic membrane can result in balance disorders, vertigo, or dizziness.

GATA5 transcription factor is a protein that binds to specific DNA sequences, called GATA sites, in the regulatory regions of target genes and regulates their expression. The GATA5 protein contains two conserved domains, called zinc fingers, which mediate its binding to the GATA sites. GATA5 is mainly expressed in tissues derived from the endoderm, such as the gut, liver, and pancreas, where it plays critical roles in developmental processes, including cell fate determination, proliferation, and differentiation.

Mutations in the gene encoding GATA5 have been associated with congenital heart defects, suggesting that GATA5 is essential for normal cardiac development. In addition to its role in development, GATA5 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including cancer, where it can act as a tumor suppressor or oncogene depending on the context.

Confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used in medical and biological research to obtain high-resolution, contrast-rich images of thick samples. This super-resolution technology provides detailed visualization of cellular structures and processes at various depths within a specimen.

In confocal microscopy, a laser beam focused through a pinhole illuminates a small spot within the sample. The emitted fluorescence or reflected light from this spot is then collected by a detector, passing through a second pinhole that ensures only light from the focal plane reaches the detector. This process eliminates out-of-focus light, resulting in sharp images with improved contrast compared to conventional widefield microscopy.

By scanning the laser beam across the sample in a raster pattern and collecting fluorescence at each point, confocal microscopy generates optical sections of the specimen. These sections can be combined to create three-dimensional reconstructions, allowing researchers to study cellular architecture and interactions within complex tissues.

Confocal microscopy has numerous applications in medical research, including studying protein localization, tracking intracellular dynamics, analyzing cell morphology, and investigating disease mechanisms at the cellular level. Additionally, it is widely used in clinical settings for diagnostic purposes, such as analyzing skin lesions or detecting pathogens in patient samples.

The prosencephalon is a term used in the field of neuroembryology, which refers to the developmental stage of the forebrain in the embryonic nervous system. It is one of the three primary vesicles that form during the initial stages of neurulation, along with the mesencephalon (midbrain) and rhombencephalon (hindbrain).

The prosencephalon further differentiates into two secondary vesicles: the telencephalon and diencephalon. The telencephalon gives rise to structures such as the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and olfactory bulbs, while the diencephalon develops into structures like the thalamus, hypothalamus, and epithalamus.

It is important to note that 'prosencephalon' itself is not used as a medical term in adult neuroanatomy, but it is crucial for understanding the development of the human brain during embryogenesis.

Neurogenesis is the process by which new neurons (nerve cells) are generated in the brain. It occurs throughout life in certain areas of the brain, such as the hippocampus and subventricular zone, although the rate of neurogenesis decreases with age. Neurogenesis involves the proliferation, differentiation, and integration of new neurons into existing neural circuits. This process plays a crucial role in learning, memory, and recovery from brain injury or disease.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

An axon is a long, slender extension of a neuron (a type of nerve cell) that conducts electrical impulses (nerve impulses) away from the cell body to target cells, such as other neurons or muscle cells. Axons can vary in length from a few micrometers to over a meter long and are typically surrounded by a myelin sheath, which helps to insulate and protect the axon and allows for faster transmission of nerve impulses.

Axons play a critical role in the functioning of the nervous system, as they provide the means by which neurons communicate with one another and with other cells in the body. Damage to axons can result in serious neurological problems, such as those seen in spinal cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Craniofacial abnormalities refer to a group of birth defects that affect the development of the skull and face. These abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may involve differences in the shape and structure of the head, face, and jaws, as well as issues with the formation of facial features such as the eyes, nose, and mouth.

Craniofacial abnormalities can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Some common examples of craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and palate, craniosynostosis (premature fusion of the skull bones), and hemifacial microsomia (underdevelopment of one side of the face).

Treatment for craniofacial abnormalities may involve a team of healthcare professionals, including plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthodontists, speech therapists, and other specialists. Treatment options may include surgery, bracing, therapy, and other interventions to help improve function and appearance.

Developmental biology is a branch of biological research that studies the processes by which organisms grow and develop from fertilized eggs (zygotes) to adults. This field of study encompasses understanding the genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and molecular mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectory of an organism, including cellular differentiation, pattern formation, morphogenesis, and growth control.

Developmental biology has important implications for understanding congenital disorders, regenerative medicine, and evolutionary biology. Researchers in this field use a variety of model organisms, such as fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), zebrafish (Danio rerio), mice (Mus musculus), and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans), to investigate the fundamental principles that govern developmental processes. These insights can then be applied to understanding human development and disease.

Organ specificity, in the context of immunology and toxicology, refers to the phenomenon where a substance (such as a drug or toxin) or an immune response primarily affects certain organs or tissues in the body. This can occur due to various reasons such as:

1. The presence of specific targets (like antigens in the case of an immune response or receptors in the case of drugs) that are more abundant in these organs.
2. The unique properties of certain cells or tissues that make them more susceptible to damage.
3. The way a substance is metabolized or cleared from the body, which can concentrate it in specific organs.

For example, in autoimmune diseases, organ specificity describes immune responses that are directed against antigens found only in certain organs, such as the thyroid gland in Hashimoto's disease. Similarly, some toxins or drugs may have a particular affinity for liver cells, leading to liver damage or specific drug interactions.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Germ cells are the reproductive cells, also known as sex cells, that combine to form offspring in sexual reproduction. In females, germ cells are called ova or egg cells, and in males, they are called spermatozoa or sperm cells. These cells are unique because they carry half the genetic material necessary for creating new life. They are produced through a process called meiosis, which reduces their chromosome number by half, ensuring that when two germ cells combine during fertilization, the normal diploid number of chromosomes is restored.

OTX (Orthodenticle homeobox) transcription factors are a family of proteins that regulate gene expression during embryonic development, particularly in the eye, forebrain, and midbrain. They play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of these tissues, including the specification of eye field identity, the determination of dorsoventral patterning in the neural tube, and the regulation of neurogenesis.

OTX transcription factors contain a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which allows them to recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences. In humans, there are four known OTX transcription factors (OTX1, OTX2, OTX3, and CRX), each with distinct expression patterns and functions.

Mutations in OTX genes have been associated with various developmental disorders, such as microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and severe eye malformations, highlighting their importance in normal eye development. Additionally, OTX transcription factors have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of certain cancers, including medulloblastoma and retinoblastoma.

Homeobox genes are a specific class of genes that play a crucial role in the development and regulation of an organism's body plan. They encode transcription factors, which are proteins that regulate the expression of other genes. The homeobox region within these genes contains a highly conserved sequence of about 180 base pairs that encodes a DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain. This domain is responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the transcription of target genes.

Homeobox genes are particularly important during embryonic development, where they help establish the anterior-posterior axis and regulate the development of various organs and body segments. They also play a role in maintaining adult tissue homeostasis and have been implicated in certain diseases, including cancer. Mutations in homeobox genes can lead to developmental abnormalities and congenital disorders.

Some examples of homeobox gene families include HOX genes, PAX genes, and NKX genes, among others. These genes are highly conserved across species, indicating their fundamental role in the development and regulation of body plans throughout the animal kingdom.

"Fish diseases" is a broad term that refers to various health conditions and infections affecting fish populations in aquaculture, ornamental fish tanks, or wild aquatic environments. These diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or environmental factors such as water quality, temperature, and stress.

Some common examples of fish diseases include:

1. Bacterial diseases: Examples include furunculosis (caused by Aeromonas salmonicida), columnaris disease (caused by Flavobacterium columnare), and enteric septicemia of catfish (caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri).

2. Viral diseases: Examples include infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) in salmonids, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and koi herpesvirus (KHV).

3. Fungal diseases: Examples include saprolegniasis (caused by Saprolegnia spp.) and cotton wool disease (caused by Aphanomyces spp.).

4. Parasitic diseases: Examples include ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich), costia, trichodina, and various worm infestations such as anchor worms (Lernaea spp.) and tapeworms (Diphyllobothrium spp.).

5. Environmental diseases: These are caused by poor water quality, temperature stress, or other environmental factors that weaken the fish's immune system and make them more susceptible to infections. Examples include osmoregulatory disorders, ammonia toxicity, and low dissolved oxygen levels.

It is essential to diagnose and treat fish diseases promptly to prevent their spread among fish populations and maintain healthy aquatic ecosystems. Preventative measures such as proper sanitation, water quality management, biosecurity practices, and vaccination can help reduce the risk of fish diseases in both farmed and ornamental fish settings.

Time-lapse imaging is a medical imaging technique where images are captured at regular intervals over a period of time and then played back at a faster rate to show the progression or changes that occur during that time frame. This technique is often used in various fields of medicine, including microbiology, pathology, and reproductive medicine. In microbiology, for example, time-lapse imaging can be used to observe bacterial growth or the movement of individual cells. In pathology, it might help track the development of a lesion or the response of a tumor to treatment. In reproductive medicine, time-lapse imaging is commonly employed in embryo culture during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures to assess the development and quality of embryos before implantation.

Neuroepithelial cells are stem cells that line the developing central nervous system (CNS) in embryos. These cells have the ability to differentiate into various cell types, including neurons and glial cells, which make up the brain and spinal cord. Neuroepithelial cells form a pseudostratified epithelium, meaning that the nuclei of the cells are at varying heights within the cell layer, giving it a striped appearance. These cells play a crucial role in the development and growth of the CNS.

The ear is the sensory organ responsible for hearing and maintaining balance. It can be divided into three parts: the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. The outer ear consists of the pinna (the visible part of the ear) and the external auditory canal, which directs sound waves toward the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called ossicles that transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. The inner ear contains the cochlea, a spiral-shaped organ responsible for converting sound vibrations into electrical signals that are sent to the brain, and the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance.

A "reporter gene" is a type of gene that is linked to a gene of interest in order to make the expression or activity of that gene detectable. The reporter gene encodes for a protein that can be easily measured and serves as an indicator of the presence and activity of the gene of interest. Commonly used reporter genes include those that encode for fluorescent proteins, enzymes that catalyze colorimetric reactions, or proteins that bind to specific molecules.

In the context of genetics and genomics research, a reporter gene is often used in studies involving gene expression, regulation, and function. By introducing the reporter gene into an organism or cell, researchers can monitor the activity of the gene of interest in real-time or after various experimental treatments. The information obtained from these studies can help elucidate the role of specific genes in biological processes and diseases, providing valuable insights for basic research and therapeutic development.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

"Left-right determination factors" refer to the genetic and molecular mechanisms that establish the left-right asymmetry during embryonic development. These factors determine which side of the body will become the left and which will become the right. The process is critical for the proper development and function of various organs, including the heart, lungs, and gut.

In humans, the primary left-right determination factor is a gene called NODAL, which is expressed on the left side of the embryo and initiates a cascade of molecular events that lead to the establishment of left-right asymmetry. Other genes, such as PITX2 and LEFTY2, are also involved in this process and help to amplify and maintain the left-right asymmetry.

Defects in left-right determination factors can result in a variety of congenital abnormalities, including heterotaxy syndrome, in which the organs are arranged in mirror-image patterns or randomly on both sides of the body.

The telencephalon is the most anterior (front) region of the embryonic brain, which eventually develops into the largest portion of the adult human brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and olfactory bulbs. It is derived from the prosencephalon (forebrain) during embryonic development and is responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, perception, and language. The telencephalon can be further divided into two hemispheres, each containing regions associated with different functions.

The habenula is a small, paired nucleus located in the epithalamus region of the brain. It plays a crucial role in the modulation of various functions such as mood, reward, and motivation. The habenula can be further divided into two subregions: the medial and lateral habenula.

The medial habenula is involved in the regulation of emotional behaviors, including responses to stress and anxiety. It receives inputs from several brain regions associated with emotion, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, and projects to the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) in the midbrain.

The lateral habenula is primarily involved in processing aversive stimuli and modulating dopaminergic reward pathways. It receives inputs from various regions associated with motivation, learning, and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus. The lateral habenula then projects to the midbrain's dopamine-producing neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), which are critical components of the brain's reward system.

Dysfunction of the habenula has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, addiction, and schizophrenia.

Chromatophores are pigment-containing cells found in various organisms, including animals and plants. In animals, chromatophores are primarily found in the skin, eyes, and hair or feathers, and they play a crucial role in color changes exhibited by many species. These cells contain pigments that can be concentrated or dispersed to change the color of the cell, allowing the animal to camouflage itself, communicate with other individuals, or regulate its body temperature.

There are several types of chromatophores, including:

1. Melanophores: These cells contain the pigment melanin and are responsible for producing dark colors such as black, brown, and gray. They are found in many animals, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.
2. Xanthophores: These cells contain yellow or orange pigments called pteridines and carotenoids. They are found in many animals, including fish, amphibians, and reptiles.
3. Iridophores: These cells do not contain pigments but instead reflect light to produce iridescent colors. They are found in many animals, including fish, reptiles, and amphibians.
4. Erythrophores: These cells contain red or pink pigments called porphyrins and are found in some species of fish and crustaceans.
5. Leucophores: These cells reflect white light and are found in some species of fish, cephalopods (such as squid and octopuses), and crustaceans.

The distribution and concentration of pigments within chromatophores can be controlled by hormones, neurotransmitters, or other signaling molecules, allowing the animal to change its color rapidly in response to environmental stimuli or social cues.

Auditory hair cells are specialized sensory receptor cells located in the inner ear, more specifically in the organ of Corti within the cochlea. They play a crucial role in hearing by converting sound vibrations into electrical signals that can be interpreted by the brain.

These hair cells have hair-like projections called stereocilia on their apical surface, which are embedded in a gelatinous matrix. When sound waves reach the inner ear, they cause the fluid within the cochlea to move, which in turn causes the stereocilia to bend. This bending motion opens ion channels at the tips of the stereocilia, allowing positively charged ions (such as potassium) to flow into the hair cells and trigger a receptor potential.

The receptor potential then leads to the release of neurotransmitters at the base of the hair cells, which activate afferent nerve fibers that synapse with these cells. The electrical signals generated by this process are transmitted to the brain via the auditory nerve, where they are interpreted as sound.

There are two types of auditory hair cells: inner hair cells and outer hair cells. Inner hair cells are the primary sensory receptors responsible for transmitting information about sound to the brain. They make direct contact with afferent nerve fibers and are more sensitive to mechanical stimulation than outer hair cells.

Outer hair cells, on the other hand, are involved in amplifying and fine-tuning the mechanical response of the inner ear to sound. They have a unique ability to contract and relax in response to electrical signals, which allows them to adjust the stiffness of their stereocilia and enhance the sensitivity of the cochlea to different frequencies.

Damage or loss of auditory hair cells can lead to hearing impairment or deafness, as these cells cannot regenerate spontaneously in mammals. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of hair cells is essential for developing therapies aimed at treating hearing disorders.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. The term "fishes" is not typically used in a medical context. "Fish" or "fishes" refers to any aquatic organism belonging to the taxonomic class Actinopterygii (bony fish), Chondrichthyes (sharks and rays), or Agnatha (jawless fish).

However, if you are referring to a condition related to fish or consuming fish, there is a medical issue called scombroid fish poisoning. It's a foodborne illness caused by eating spoiled or improperly stored fish from the Scombridae family, which includes tuna, mackerel, and bonito, among others. The bacteria present in these fish can produce histamine, which can cause symptoms like skin flushing, headache, diarrhea, and itchy rash. But again, this is not related to the term "fishes" itself but rather a condition associated with consuming certain types of fish.

The mesencephalon, also known as the midbrain, is the middle portion of the brainstem that connects the hindbrain (rhombencephalon) and the forebrain (prosencephalon). It plays a crucial role in several important functions including motor control, vision, hearing, and the regulation of consciousness and sleep-wake cycles. The mesencephalon contains several important structures such as the cerebral aqueduct, tectum, tegmentum, cerebral peduncles, and several cranial nerve nuclei (III and IV).

Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 (FGF-8) is a growth factor that belongs to the fibroblast growth factor family. It plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, tissue repair, and cancer progression. Specifically, FGF-8 has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival.

During embryonic development, FGF-8 is involved in the formation of the nervous system, limbs, and other organs. It acts as a signaling molecule that helps to establish patterns of gene expression and cell behavior during development. In tissue repair, FGF-8 can stimulate the proliferation and migration of cells involved in wound healing, such as fibroblasts and endothelial cells.

In cancer, FGF-8 has been shown to promote tumor growth, angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), and metastasis. It can do this by activating signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Overexpression of FGF-8 has been found in various types of cancer, including breast, lung, prostate, and ovarian cancer.

In summary, Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 (FGF-8) is a signaling molecule that plays important roles in embryonic development, tissue repair, and cancer progression by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival.

Pigmentation, in a medical context, refers to the coloring of the skin, hair, or eyes due to the presence of pigment-producing cells called melanocytes. These cells produce a pigment called melanin, which determines the color of our skin, hair, and eyes.

There are two main types of melanin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Eumelanin is responsible for brown or black coloration, while pheomelanin produces a red or yellow hue. The amount and type of melanin produced by melanocytes can vary from person to person, leading to differences in skin color and hair color.

Changes in pigmentation can occur due to various factors such as genetics, exposure to sunlight, hormonal changes, inflammation, or certain medical conditions. For example, hyperpigmentation refers to an excess production of melanin that results in darkened patches on the skin, while hypopigmentation is a condition where there is a decreased production of melanin leading to lighter or white patches on the skin.

The pineal gland, also known as the epiphysis cerebri, is a small endocrine gland located in the brain. It is shaped like a pinecone, hence its name, and is situated near the center of the brain, between the two hemispheres, attached to the third ventricle. The primary function of the pineal gland is to produce melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep-wake cycles and circadian rhythms in response to light and darkness. Additionally, it plays a role in the onset of puberty and has been suggested to have other functions related to cognition, mood, and reproduction, although these are not as well understood.

Optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) is a type of involuntary eye movement that occurs in response to large moving visual patterns. It serves as a mechanism for stabilizing the image on the retina during head movement and helps in maintaining visual fixation.

In OKN, there are two phases of eye movement: a slow phase where the eyes follow or track the moving pattern, and a fast phase where the eyes quickly reset to the starting position. This results in a back-and-forth or "to-and-fro" motion of the eyes.

Optokinetic nystagmus can be elicited by observing a large moving object or a series of alternating visual stimuli, such as stripes on a rotating drum. It is often used in clinical settings to assess various aspects of the visual system, including oculomotor function and visual acuity.

Abnormalities in OKN can indicate problems with the vestibular system, brainstem, or cerebellum, and may be associated with conditions such as brain injury, multiple sclerosis, or cerebral palsy.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming and developing blood cells. It occurs in the bone marrow and includes the production of red blood cells (erythropoiesis), white blood cells (leukopoiesis), and platelets (thrombopoiesis). This process is regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and cytokines. Hematopoiesis begins early in fetal development and continues throughout a person's life. Disorders of hematopoiesis can result in conditions such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Protein isoforms are different forms or variants of a protein that are produced from a single gene through the process of alternative splicing, where different exons (or parts of exons) are included in the mature mRNA molecule. This results in the production of multiple, slightly different proteins that share a common core structure but have distinct sequences and functions. Protein isoforms can also arise from genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms or mutations that alter the protein-coding sequence of a gene. These differences in protein sequence can affect the stability, localization, activity, or interaction partners of the protein isoform, leading to functional diversity and specialization within cells and organisms.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), stem cells are "initial cells" or "precursor cells" that have the ability to differentiate into many different cell types in the body. They can also divide without limit to replenish other cells for as long as the person or animal is still alive.

There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which come from human embryos, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues throughout the body. Embryonic stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types in the body, while adult stem cells have more limited differentiation potential.

Stem cells play an essential role in the development and repair of various tissues and organs in the body. They are currently being studied for their potential use in the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand the properties and capabilities of these cells before they can be used safely and effectively in clinical settings.

Toxicity tests, also known as toxicity assays, are a set of procedures used to determine the harmful effects of various substances on living organisms, typically on cells, tissues, or whole animals. These tests measure the degree to which a substance can cause damage, inhibit normal functioning, or lead to death in exposed organisms.

Toxicity tests can be conducted in vitro (in a test tube or petri dish) using cell cultures or in vivo (in living organisms) using animals such as rats, mice, or rabbits. The results of these tests help researchers and regulators assess the potential risks associated with exposure to various chemicals, drugs, or environmental pollutants.

There are several types of toxicity tests, including:

1. Acute toxicity tests: These tests measure the immediate effects of a single exposure to a substance over a short period (usually 24 hours or less).
2. Chronic toxicity tests: These tests evaluate the long-term effects of repeated exposures to a substance over an extended period (weeks, months, or even years).
3. Genotoxicity tests: These tests determine whether a substance can damage DNA or cause mutations in genetic material.
4. Developmental and reproductive toxicity tests: These tests assess the impact of a substance on fertility, embryonic development, and offspring health.
5. Carcinogenicity tests: These tests evaluate the potential of a substance to cause cancer.
6. Ecotoxicity tests: These tests determine the effects of a substance on entire ecosystems, including plants, animals, and microorganisms.

Toxicity tests play a crucial role in protecting public health by helping to identify potentially harmful substances and establish safe exposure levels. They also contribute to the development of new drugs, chemicals, and consumer products by providing critical data for risk assessment and safety evaluation.

The term "extremities" in a medical context refers to the most distant parts of the body, including the hands and feet (both fingers and toes), as well as the arms and legs. These are the farthest parts from the torso and head. Medical professionals may examine a patient's extremities for various reasons, such as checking circulation, assessing nerve function, or looking for injuries or abnormalities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there isn't a medical definition for "RNA, Messenger, Stored" as it is not a standard medical term. However, I can provide information on the individual components:

1. RNA (Ribonucleic Acid): This is a type of nucleic acid that plays several important roles in biological systems, including coding, decoding, regulation, and expression of genes. There are several types of RNA, including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA).

2. Messenger RNA (mRNA): This is the RNA molecule that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. After being processed in the nucleus, mRNA moves out into the cytoplasm, where it serves as a template for protein synthesis.

3. Stored: In the context of biology, this term isn't typically associated with RNA or mRNA. Generally, mRNA is not "stored" in cells but rather is quickly translated into proteins after it is produced. There are some exceptions, such as in egg cells, where mRNAs can be stored and then used for protein synthesis after fertilization.

I hope this helps clarify the concepts! If you have any further questions or need more information, please don't hesitate to ask.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Goosecoid protein is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is a biological term related to the field of developmental biology and genetics.

Goosecoid protein is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, particularly during gastrulation - an early stage of embryogenesis where the three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) are formed. The goosecoid gene encodes this protein, and it is primarily expressed in the Spemann-Mangold organizer, a structure located in the dorsal blastopore lip of amphibian embryos. This organizer region is essential for establishing the body axis and inducing the formation of the central nervous system.

In humans, goosecoid protein homologs have been identified, and they are involved in various developmental processes, including limb development and craniofacial morphogenesis. Dysregulation of goosecoid protein expression or function has been implicated in several congenital disorders and cancer types. However, a direct medical definition focusing on 'Goosecoid Protein' is not available due to its broader biological context.

I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. In genetics, there are no specific "gene components." However, genes themselves are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules, which consist of two complementary strands that twist around each other to form a double helix.

The DNA molecule is composed of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). These bases pair up with each other in specific ways: Adenine with thymine, and guanine with cytosine.

The gene is a segment of DNA that contains the instructions for making a particular protein or performing a specific function within an organism. The sequence of these nucleotide bases determines the genetic information encoded in a gene.

So, if you're referring to the parts of a gene, they can be described as:

1. Promoter: A region at the beginning of a gene that acts as a binding site for RNA polymerase, an enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA.
2. Introns and exons: Introns are non-coding sequences within a gene, while exons are coding sequences that contain information for protein synthesis. Introns are removed during RNA processing, and exons are spliced together to form the final mature mRNA (messenger RNA) molecule.
3. Regulatory elements: These are specific DNA sequences that control gene expression, such as enhancers, silencers, and transcription factor binding sites. They can be located upstream, downstream, or even within introns of a gene.
4. Terminator: A region at the end of a gene that signals RNA polymerase to stop transcribing DNA into RNA.

Retinal cone photoreceptor cells are specialized neurons located in the retina of the eye, responsible for visual phototransduction and color vision. They are one of the two types of photoreceptors, with the other being rods, which are more sensitive to low light levels. Cones are primarily responsible for high-acuity, color vision during daylight or bright-light conditions.

There are three types of cone cells, each containing different photopigments that absorb light at distinct wavelengths: short (S), medium (M), and long (L) wavelengths, which correspond to blue, green, and red light, respectively. The combination of signals from these three types of cones allows the human visual system to perceive a wide range of colors and discriminate between them. Cones are densely packed in the central region of the retina, known as the fovea, which provides the highest visual acuity.

Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) is not a common medical term, but it is known in toxicology and environmental health. TCDD is the most toxic and studied compound among a group of chemicals known as dioxins.

Medical-related definition:

Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) is an unintended byproduct of various industrial processes, including waste incineration, chemical manufacturing, and pulp and paper bleaching. It is a highly persistent environmental pollutant that accumulates in the food chain, primarily in animal fat. Human exposure to TCDD mainly occurs through consumption of contaminated food, such as meat, dairy products, and fish. TCDD is a potent toxicant with various health effects, including immunotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, and carcinogenicity. The severity of these effects depends on the level and duration of exposure.

The skull is the bony structure that encloses and protects the brain, the eyes, and the ears. It is composed of two main parts: the cranium, which contains the brain, and the facial bones. The cranium is made up of several fused flat bones, while the facial bones include the upper jaw (maxilla), lower jaw (mandible), cheekbones, nose bones, and eye sockets (orbits).

The skull also provides attachment points for various muscles that control chewing, moving the head, and facial expressions. Additionally, it contains openings for blood vessels, nerves, and the spinal cord to pass through. The skull's primary function is to protect the delicate and vital structures within it from injury and trauma.

Oligoribonucleotides are short, single-stranded RNA molecules that consist of fewer than 200 nucleotides. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) are a type of oligoribonucleotide that are designed to be complementary to a specific target RNA molecule. They work by binding to the target RNA through base-pairing, which can prevent the target RNA from being translated into protein or can trigger its degradation by cellular enzymes. Antisense ORNs have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of various diseases, including viral infections and genetic disorders.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Ectoderm is the outermost of the three primary germ layers in a developing embryo, along with the endoderm and mesoderm. The ectoderm gives rise to the outer covering of the body, including the skin, hair, nails, glands, and the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. It also forms the lining of the mouth, anus, nose, and ears. Essentially, the ectoderm is responsible for producing all the epidermal structures and the neural crest cells that contribute to various derivatives such as melanocytes, adrenal medulla, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous system components.

"Mycobacterium marinum" is a slow-growing, gram-positive bacterium that belongs to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It is commonly found in fresh and saltwater environments, including aquariums and swimming pools. This pathogen can cause skin infections, known as swimmer's granuloma or fish tank granuloma, in individuals who have exposure to contaminated water. The infection typically occurs through minor cuts or abrasions on the skin, leading to a localized, chronic, and slowly progressive lesion. In some cases, disseminated infection can occur in people with weakened immune systems.

References:
1. Chan, R. C., & Cohen, S. M. (2017). Nontuberculous mycobacterial skin infections. Clinics in dermatology, 35(4), 416-423.
2. Kohler, P., Bloch, A., & Pfyffer, G. E. (2002). Nontuberculous mycobacteria: an overview. Swiss medical weekly, 132(35-36), 548-557.
3. Sanguinetti, M., & Bloch, S. A. (2019). Mycobacterium marinum skin infection. American journal of clinical dermatology, 20(2), 219-226.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

The spinal cord is a major part of the nervous system, extending from the brainstem and continuing down to the lower back. It is a slender, tubular bundle of nerve fibers (axons) and support cells (glial cells) that carries signals between the brain and the rest of the body. The spinal cord primarily serves as a conduit for motor information, which travels from the brain to the muscles, and sensory information, which travels from the body to the brain. It also contains neurons that can independently process and respond to information within the spinal cord without direct input from the brain.

The spinal cord is protected by the bony vertebral column (spine) and is divided into 31 segments: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal. Each segment corresponds to a specific region of the body and gives rise to pairs of spinal nerves that exit through the intervertebral foramina at each level.

The spinal cord is responsible for several vital functions, including:

1. Reflexes: Simple reflex actions, such as the withdrawal reflex when touching a hot surface, are mediated by the spinal cord without involving the brain.
2. Muscle control: The spinal cord carries motor signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling voluntary movement and muscle tone regulation.
3. Sensory perception: The spinal cord transmits sensory information, such as touch, temperature, pain, and vibration, from the body to the brain for processing and awareness.
4. Autonomic functions: The sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system originate in the thoracolumbar and sacral regions of the spinal cord, respectively, controlling involuntary physiological responses like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and respiration.

Damage to the spinal cord can result in various degrees of paralysis or loss of sensation below the level of injury, depending on the severity and location of the damage.

LIM-homeodomain proteins are a family of transcription factors that contain both LIM domains and homeodomains. LIM domains are cysteine-rich motifs that function in protein-protein interactions, often mediating the formation of multimeric complexes. Homeodomains are DNA-binding domains that recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences, thereby regulating gene transcription.

LIM-homeodomain proteins play important roles in various developmental processes, including cell fate determination, differentiation, and migration. They have been implicated in the regulation of muscle, nerve, and cardiovascular development, as well as in cancer and other diseases. Some examples of LIM-homeodomain proteins include LMX1A, LHX2, and ISL1.

These proteins are characterized by the presence of two LIM domains at the N-terminus and a homeodomain at the C-terminus. The LIM domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, while the homeodomain is responsible for DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. Some LIM-homeodomain proteins also contain other functional domains, such as zinc fingers or leucine zippers, which contribute to their diverse functions.

Overall, LIM-homeodomain proteins are important regulators of gene expression and play critical roles in various developmental and disease processes.

Photoreceptor cells in vertebrates are specialized types of neurons located in the retina of the eye that are responsible for converting light stimuli into electrical signals. These cells are primarily responsible for the initial process of vision and have two main types: rods and cones.

Rods are more numerous and are responsible for low-light vision or scotopic vision, enabling us to see in dimly lit conditions. They do not contribute to color vision but provide information about the shape and movement of objects.

Cones, on the other hand, are less numerous and are responsible for color vision and high-acuity vision or photopic vision. There are three types of cones, each sensitive to different wavelengths of light: short (S), medium (M), and long (L) wavelengths, which correspond to blue, green, and red, respectively. The combination of signals from these three types of cones allows us to perceive a wide range of colors.

Both rods and cones contain photopigments that consist of a protein called opsin and a light-sensitive chromophore called retinal. When light hits the photopigment, it triggers a series of chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the generation of an electrical signal that is transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve. This process enables us to see and perceive our visual world.

SOXF transcription factors are a subgroup of the SOX (SRY-related HMG box) family of proteins, which are involved in various developmental processes. The SOXF group includes SOX7, SOX17, and SOX18, all of which contain a conserved high mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain. These transcription factors play crucial roles in the development of several organ systems, including the cardiovascular system, nervous system, and urogenital system. They are involved in cell fate determination, differentiation, and morphogenesis during embryonic development and have also been implicated in various disease processes, such as cancer.

Physiologic neovascularization is the natural and controlled formation of new blood vessels in the body, which occurs as a part of normal growth and development, as well as in response to tissue repair and wound healing. This process involves the activation of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, and their migration, proliferation, and tube formation to create new capillaries. Physiologic neovascularization is tightly regulated by a balance of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, ensuring that it occurs only when and where it is needed. It plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and wound healing.

Fluorescence microscopy is a type of microscopy that uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to highlight and visualize specific components within a sample. In this technique, the sample is illuminated with high-energy light, typically ultraviolet (UV) or blue light, which excites the fluorescent molecules causing them to emit lower-energy, longer-wavelength light, usually visible light in the form of various colors. This emitted light is then collected by the microscope and detected to produce an image.

Fluorescence microscopy has several advantages over traditional brightfield microscopy, including the ability to visualize specific structures or molecules within a complex sample, increased sensitivity, and the potential for quantitative analysis. It is widely used in various fields of biology and medicine, such as cell biology, neuroscience, and pathology, to study the structure, function, and interactions of cells and proteins.

There are several types of fluorescence microscopy techniques, including widefield fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, each with its own strengths and limitations. These techniques can provide valuable insights into the behavior of cells and proteins in health and disease.

Eye proteins, also known as ocular proteins, are specific proteins that are found within the eye and play crucial roles in maintaining proper eye function and health. These proteins can be found in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, retina, and other structures. They perform a wide range of functions, such as:

1. Structural support: Proteins like collagen and elastin provide strength and flexibility to the eye's tissues, enabling them to maintain their shape and withstand mechanical stress.
2. Light absorption and transmission: Proteins like opsins and crystallins are involved in capturing and transmitting light signals within the eye, which is essential for vision.
3. Protection against damage: Some eye proteins, such as antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, help protect the eye from oxidative stress, UV radiation, and other environmental factors that can cause damage.
4. Regulation of eye growth and development: Various growth factors and signaling molecules, which are protein-based, contribute to the proper growth, differentiation, and maintenance of eye tissues during embryonic development and throughout adulthood.
5. Immune defense: Proteins involved in the immune response, such as complement components and immunoglobulins, help protect the eye from infection and inflammation.
6. Maintenance of transparency: Crystallin proteins in the lens maintain its transparency, allowing light to pass through unobstructed for clear vision.
7. Neuroprotection: Certain eye proteins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), support the survival and function of neurons within the retina, helping to preserve vision.

Dysfunction or damage to these eye proteins can contribute to various eye disorders and diseases, such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and others.

Cell polarity refers to the asymmetric distribution of membrane components, cytoskeleton, and organelles in a cell. This asymmetry is crucial for various cellular functions such as directed transport, cell division, and signal transduction. The plasma membrane of polarized cells exhibits distinct domains with unique protein and lipid compositions that define apical, basal, and lateral surfaces of the cell.

In epithelial cells, for example, the apical surface faces the lumen or external environment, while the basolateral surface interacts with other cells or the extracellular matrix. The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity are regulated by various factors including protein complexes, lipids, and small GTPases. Loss of cell polarity has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

The Wnt signaling pathway is a complex cell communication system that plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and cancer. It is named after the Wingless (Wg) gene in Drosophila melanogaster and the Int-1 gene in mice, both of which were found to be involved in this pathway.

In essence, the Wnt signaling pathway involves the binding of Wnt proteins to Frizzled receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. There are three main branches of the Wnt signaling pathway: the canonical (or Wnt/β-catenin) pathway, the noncanonical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and the noncanonical Wnt/calcium pathway.

The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is the most well-studied branch. In the absence of Wnt signaling, cytoplasmic β-catenin is constantly phosphorylated by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC, GSK3β, and CK1, leading to its ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and their coreceptor LRP5/6, Dishevelled is recruited and inhibits the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with TCF/LEF transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. For example, mutations in components of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway can lead to the accumulation of β-catenin and subsequent activation of oncogenic target genes, contributing to tumorigenesis in various types of cancer.

Cyprinidae is a family of fish that includes carps, minnows, and barbs. It is the largest family of freshwater fish, with over 2,400 species found worldwide, particularly in Asia and Europe. These fish are characterized by their lack of teeth on the roof of their mouths and have a single dorsal fin. Some members of this family are economically important as food fish or for aquarium trade.

Tissue distribution, in the context of pharmacology and toxicology, refers to the way that a drug or xenobiotic (a chemical substance found within an organism that is not naturally produced by or expected to be present within that organism) is distributed throughout the body's tissues after administration. It describes how much of the drug or xenobiotic can be found in various tissues and organs, and is influenced by factors such as blood flow, lipid solubility, protein binding, and the permeability of cell membranes. Understanding tissue distribution is important for predicting the potential effects of a drug or toxin on different parts of the body, and for designing drugs with improved safety and efficacy profiles.

Tretinoin is a form of vitamin A that is used in the treatment of acne vulgaris, fine wrinkles, and dark spots caused by aging or sun damage. It works by increasing the turnover of skin cells, helping to unclog pores and promote the growth of new skin cells. Tretinoin is available as a cream, gel, or liquid, and is usually applied to the affected area once a day in the evening. Common side effects include redness, dryness, and peeling of the skin. It is important to avoid sunlight and use sunscreen while using tretinoin, as it can make the skin more sensitive to the sun.

A zygote is the initial cell formed when a sperm fertilizes an egg, also known as an oocyte. This occurs in the process of human reproduction and marks the beginning of a new genetic identity, containing 46 chromosomes - 23 from the sperm and 23 from the egg. The zygote starts the journey of cell division and growth, eventually developing into a blastocyst, then an embryo, and finally a fetus over the course of pregnancy.

Genetic techniques refer to a variety of methods and tools used in the field of genetics to study, manipulate, and understand genes and their functions. These techniques can be broadly categorized into those that allow for the identification and analysis of specific genes or genetic variations, and those that enable the manipulation of genes in order to understand their function or to modify them for therapeutic purposes.

Some examples of genetic analysis techniques include:

1. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): a method used to amplify specific DNA sequences, allowing researchers to study small amounts of DNA.
2. Genome sequencing: the process of determining the complete DNA sequence of an organism's genome.
3. Genotyping: the process of identifying and analyzing genetic variations or mutations in an individual's DNA.
4. Linkage analysis: a method used to identify genetic loci associated with specific traits or diseases by studying patterns of inheritance within families.
5. Expression profiling: the measurement of gene expression levels in cells or tissues, often using microarray technology.

Some examples of genetic manipulation techniques include:

1. Gene editing: the use of tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 to modify specific genes or genetic sequences.
2. Gene therapy: the introduction of functional genes into cells or tissues to replace missing or nonfunctional genes.
3. Transgenic technology: the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by introducing foreign DNA into their genomes.
4. RNA interference (RNAi): the use of small RNA molecules to silence specific genes and study their function.
5. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs): the creation of stem cells from adult cells through genetic reprogramming, allowing for the study of development and disease in vitro.

The Neural Tube is a structure that forms during the development of an embryo and eventually becomes the brain, spinal cord, and other parts of the nervous system. It is a narrow channel that runs along the back of the embryo, forming from the ectoderm (one of the three germ layers) and closing around the 23rd or 26th day after conception. Defects in the closure of the neural tube can lead to conditions such as spina bifida and anencephaly.

Muscle development, also known as muscle hypertrophy, refers to the increase in size and mass of the muscles through a process called myofiber growth. This is primarily achieved through resistance or strength training exercises that cause micro-tears in the muscle fibers, leading to an inflammatory response and the release of hormones that promote muscle growth. As the muscles repair themselves, they become larger and stronger than before. Proper nutrition, including adequate protein intake, and rest are also essential components of muscle development.

It is important to note that while muscle development can lead to an increase in strength and muscular endurance, it does not necessarily result in improved athletic performance or overall fitness. A well-rounded exercise program that includes cardiovascular activity, flexibility training, and resistance exercises is recommended for optimal health and fitness outcomes.

Chemical water pollutants refer to harmful chemicals or substances that contaminate bodies of water, making them unsafe for human use and harmful to aquatic life. These pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural runoff, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and improper disposal of hazardous materials.

Examples of chemical water pollutants include heavy metals (such as lead, mercury, and cadmium), pesticides and herbicides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and petroleum products. These chemicals can have toxic effects on aquatic organisms, disrupt ecosystems, and pose risks to human health through exposure or consumption.

Regulations and standards are in place to monitor and limit the levels of chemical pollutants in water sources, with the aim of protecting public health and the environment.

Gonads are the reproductive organs that produce gametes (sex cells) and sex hormones. In males, the gonads are the testes, which produce sperm and testosterone. In females, the gonads are the ovaries, which produce eggs and estrogen and progesterone. The development, function, and regulation of the gonads are crucial for reproductive health and fertility.

Aminobenzoates are a group of chemical compounds that contain an amino (NH2) group and a benzoate (C6H5COO-) group in their structure. They are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries due to their various properties, such as ultraviolet light absorption, antimicrobial activity, and anti-inflammatory effects.

One of the most well-known aminobenzoates is para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), which is a naturally occurring compound found in some foods and also synthesized by bacteria in the human gut. PABA has been used as a topical sunscreen agent due to its ability to absorb ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, but its use as a sunscreen ingredient has declined in recent years due to concerns about skin irritation and potential allergic reactions.

Other aminobenzoates have various medical uses, such as:

* Antimicrobial agents: Some aminobenzoates, such as benzalkonium chloride and cetylpyridinium chloride, are used as antiseptics and disinfectants due to their ability to disrupt bacterial cell membranes.
* Analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents: Aminobenzoates such as methyl salicylate and acetaminophen (paracetamol) are commonly used as pain relievers and fever reducers.
* Vitamin B supplements: PABA is a component of folic acid, which is an essential vitamin for human health. Some people take PABA supplements to treat or prevent various conditions, such as graying hair, rheumatoid arthritis, and vitiligo, although there is limited scientific evidence to support these uses.

It's important to note that some aminobenzoates can be toxic in high doses or with prolonged exposure, so they should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

MafB (v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B) is a transcription factor that belongs to the Maf family of basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins. Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the rate of transcription of genetic information from DNA to RNA.

The MafB protein contains a highly conserved basic region and a leucine zipper motif, which facilitate its DNA-binding and dimerization functions, respectively. MafB plays crucial roles in various biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival, primarily through the regulation of gene transcription.

MafB is widely expressed during embryonic development, particularly in the central nervous system, hematopoietic system, and pancreas. In the hematopoietic system, MafB is essential for the development and function of macrophages, which are immune cells that play a critical role in the innate immune response. Additionally, MafB has been implicated in the differentiation of other cell types, such as B lymphocytes and pancreatic β-cells.

Dysregulation of MafB expression or function has been associated with several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MafB's functions is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Preclinical drug evaluation refers to a series of laboratory tests and studies conducted to determine the safety and effectiveness of a new drug before it is tested in humans. These studies typically involve experiments on cells and animals to evaluate the pharmacological properties, toxicity, and potential interactions with other substances. The goal of preclinical evaluation is to establish a reasonable level of safety and understanding of how the drug works, which helps inform the design and conduct of subsequent clinical trials in humans. It's important to note that while preclinical studies provide valuable information, they may not always predict how a drug will behave in human subjects.

Intercellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that mediate communication and interaction between different cells in living organisms. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). These signals can be released into the extracellular space, where they bind to specific receptors on the target cell's surface, triggering intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately lead to a response.

Peptides are short chains of amino acids, while proteins are larger molecules made up of one or more polypeptide chains. Both can function as intercellular signaling molecules by acting as ligands for cell surface receptors or by being cleaved from larger precursor proteins and released into the extracellular space. Examples of intercellular signaling peptides and proteins include growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, hormones, neurotransmitters, and their respective receptors.

These molecules contribute to maintaining homeostasis within an organism by coordinating cellular activities across tissues and organs. Dysregulation of intercellular signaling pathways has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intercellular signaling is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these disorders.

Embryonic structures refer to the various parts and components that develop during the embryonic stage of prenatal development, which occurs from fertilization to the end of the 8th week of gestation. These structures include the primitive streak, notochord, neural tube, heart, somites, and limb buds, among others.

During this stage, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division, differentiation, and organization to form these structures, which will eventually develop into the various organs and systems of the human body. The embryonic structures are formed through a complex process of gene expression, signaling pathways, and interactions between cells and tissues.

Understanding the development of embryonic structures is crucial for understanding normal human development, as well as for identifying abnormalities or defects that may occur during this critical period. This knowledge can also inform medical interventions and treatments to address developmental issues and improve health outcomes for individuals throughout their lives.

In medical terms, the "head" is the uppermost part of the human body that contains the brain, skull, face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. It is connected to the rest of the body by the neck and is responsible for many vital functions such as sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and thought processing. The head also plays a crucial role in maintaining balance, speech, and eating.

'Animal structures' is a broad term that refers to the various physical parts and organs that make up animals. These structures can include everything from the external features, such as skin, hair, and scales, to the internal organs and systems, such as the heart, lungs, brain, and digestive system.

Animal structures are designed to perform specific functions that enable the animal to survive, grow, and reproduce. For example, the heart pumps blood throughout the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the cells, while the lungs facilitate gas exchange between the animal and its environment. The brain serves as the control center of the nervous system, processing sensory information and coordinating motor responses.

Animal structures can be categorized into different systems based on their function, such as the circulatory system, respiratory system, nervous system, digestive system, and reproductive system. Each system is made up of various structures that work together to perform a specific function.

Understanding animal structures and how they function is essential for understanding animal biology and behavior. It also has important implications for human health, as many animals serve as models for studying human disease and developing new treatments.

The superior colliculi are a pair of prominent eminences located on the dorsal surface of the midbrain, forming part of the tectum or roof of the midbrain. They play a crucial role in the integration and coordination of visual, auditory, and somatosensory information for the purpose of directing spatial attention and ocular movements. Essentially, they are involved in the reflexive orienting of the head and eyes towards novel or significant stimuli in the environment.

In a more detailed medical definition, the superior colliculi are two rounded, convex mounds of gray matter that are situated on the roof of the midbrain, specifically at the level of the rostral mesencephalic tegmentum. Each superior colliculus has a stratified laminated structure, consisting of several layers that process different types of sensory information and control specific motor outputs.

The superficial layers of the superior colliculi primarily receive and process visual input from the retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and other visual areas in the brain. These layers are responsible for generating spatial maps of the visual field, which allow for the localization and identification of visual stimuli.

The intermediate and deep layers of the superior colliculi receive and process auditory and somatosensory information from various sources, including the inferior colliculus, medial geniculate nucleus, and ventral posterior nucleus of the thalamus. These layers are involved in the localization and identification of auditory and tactile stimuli, as well as the coordination of head and eye movements towards these stimuli.

The superior colliculi also contain a population of neurons called "motor command neurons" that directly control the muscles responsible for orienting the eyes, head, and body towards novel or significant sensory events. These motor command neurons are activated in response to specific patterns of activity in the sensory layers of the superior colliculus, allowing for the rapid and automatic orientation of attention and gaze towards salient stimuli.

In summary, the superior colliculi are a pair of structures located on the dorsal surface of the midbrain that play a critical role in the integration and coordination of visual, auditory, and somatosensory information for the purpose of orienting attention and gaze towards salient stimuli. They contain sensory layers that generate spatial maps of the environment, as well as motor command neurons that directly control the muscles responsible for orienting the eyes, head, and body.

Cryoultramicrotomy is a specialized microscopy technique used in the field of pathology and biology. It involves cutting extremely thin sections (typically less than 100 nanometers thick) of biological samples that have been frozen and hardened at very low temperatures, often using liquid nitrogen or helium.

The process begins by embedding the sample in a suitable medium, such as a cryoprotectant or a low-temperature wax, to prevent ice crystal formation during freezing. The embedded sample is then mounted on a specimen holder and cooled to a temperature below its glass transition point, typically around -150°C to -196°C.

Once the sample is frozen and hardened, it is cut using an ultramicrotome, a precision instrument that uses a diamond knife to slice the sample into thin sections. These sections are then collected on a grid or other support and can be stained with various dyes or stains to enhance contrast and visualization under an electron microscope.

Cryoultramicrotomy is particularly useful for studying the ultrastructure of biological samples, such as cells, tissues, and organelles, that may be sensitive to heat or chemical fixation methods commonly used in traditional histology techniques. It allows researchers to visualize details at the molecular level, providing valuable insights into cellular processes and disease mechanisms.

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a type of microscopy in which an electron beam is transmitted through a ultra-thin specimen, interacting with it as it passes through. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons with the specimen; the image is then magnified and visualized on a fluorescent screen or recorded on an electronic detector (or photographic film in older models).

TEM can provide high-resolution, high-magnification images that can reveal the internal structure of specimens including cells, viruses, and even molecules. It is widely used in biological and materials science research to investigate the ultrastructure of cells, tissues and materials. In medicine, TEM is used for diagnostic purposes in fields such as virology and bacteriology.

It's important to note that preparing a sample for TEM is a complex process, requiring specialized techniques to create thin (50-100 nm) specimens. These include cutting ultrathin sections of embedded samples using an ultramicrotome, staining with heavy metal salts, and positive staining or negative staining methods.

SOXE transcription factors are a subgroup of the SOX (SRY-related HMG box) family of proteins, which are involved in various developmental processes, including cell fate specification and differentiation. The SOXE group includes SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10, all of which contain a conserved high mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain. They play crucial roles in the development of several tissues, such as the nervous system, skeletal system, and urogenital system.

SOXE transcription factors are known to regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences, often acting in combination with other transcription factors to control various cellular processes. Dysregulation of SOXE transcription factors has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders.

The blastoderm is the layer of cells that forms on the surface of a developing embryo, during the blastula stage of embryonic development. In mammals, this layer of cells is also known as the epiblast. The blastoderm is responsible for giving rise to all of the tissues and organs of the developing organism. It is formed by the cleavage of the fertilized egg, or zygote, and is typically a single layer of cells that surrounds a fluid-filled cavity called the blastocoel. The blastoderm plays a critical role in the early stages of embryonic development, and any disruptions to its formation or function can lead to developmental abnormalities or death of the embryo.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

A multigene family is a group of genetically related genes that share a common ancestry and have similar sequences or structures. These genes are arranged in clusters on a chromosome and often encode proteins with similar functions. They can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication, recombination, and transposition. Multigene families play crucial roles in many biological processes, such as development, immunity, and metabolism. Examples of multigene families include the globin genes involved in oxygen transport, the immune system's major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, and the cytochrome P450 genes associated with drug metabolism.

Video microscopy is a medical technique that involves the use of a microscope equipped with a video camera to capture and display real-time images of specimens on a monitor. This allows for the observation and documentation of dynamic processes, such as cell movement or chemical reactions, at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve with the naked eye. Video microscopy can also be used in conjunction with image analysis software to measure various parameters, such as size, shape, and motion, of individual cells or structures within the specimen.

There are several types of video microscopy, including brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, fluorescence, and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Each type uses different optical techniques to enhance contrast and reveal specific features of the specimen. For example, fluorescence microscopy uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to label specific structures within the specimen, allowing them to be visualized against a dark background.

Video microscopy is used in various fields of medicine, including pathology, microbiology, and neuroscience. It can help researchers and clinicians diagnose diseases, study disease mechanisms, develop new therapies, and understand fundamental biological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

Genomics is the scientific study of genes and their functions. It involves the sequencing and analysis of an organism's genome, which is its complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. Genomics also includes the study of how genes interact with each other and with the environment. This field of study can provide important insights into the genetic basis of diseases and can lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and treatments.

Alcian Blue is a type of dye that is commonly used in histology, which is the study of the microscopic structure of tissues. It is particularly useful for staining acidic mucopolysaccharides and proteoglycans, which are important components of the extracellular matrix in many tissues.

Alcian Blue binds to these negatively charged molecules through ionic interactions, forming a complex that can be visualized under a microscope. The dye is often used in combination with other stains to provide contrast and highlight specific structures within tissues.

The intensity of the Alcian Blue stain can also provide information about the degree of sulfation or carboxylation of the mucopolysaccharides, which can be useful in diagnosing certain diseases or abnormalities. For example, changes in the staining pattern of proteoglycans have been associated with various types of arthritis and other joint disorders.

Overall, Alcian Blue is an important tool in the field of histology and has contributed significantly to our understanding of tissue structure and function.

Melanocytes are specialized cells that produce, store, and transport melanin, the pigment responsible for coloring of the skin, hair, and eyes. They are located in the bottom layer of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin) and can also be found in the inner ear and the eye's retina. Melanocytes contain organelles called melanosomes, which produce and store melanin.

Melanin comes in two types: eumelanin (black or brown) and pheomelanin (red or yellow). The amount and type of melanin produced by melanocytes determine the color of a person's skin, hair, and eyes. Exposure to UV radiation from sunlight increases melanin production as a protective response, leading to skin tanning.

Melanocyte dysfunction or abnormalities can lead to various medical conditions, such as albinism (lack of melanin production), melasma (excessive pigmentation), and melanoma (cancerous growth of melanocytes).

Retinal rod photoreceptor cells are specialized neurons in the retina of the eye that are primarily responsible for vision in low light conditions. They contain a light-sensitive pigment called rhodopsin, which undergoes a chemical change when struck by a single photon of light. This triggers a cascade of biochemical reactions that ultimately leads to the generation of electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.

Rod cells do not provide color vision or fine detail, but they allow us to detect motion and see in dim light. They are more sensitive to light than cone cells, which are responsible for color vision and detailed sight in bright light conditions. Rod cells are concentrated at the outer edges of the retina, forming a crescent-shaped region called the peripheral retina, with fewer rod cells located in the central region of the retina known as the fovea.

Cadherins are a type of cell adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of intercellular junctions. They are transmembrane proteins that mediate calcium-dependent homophilic binding between adjacent cells, meaning that they bind to identical cadherin molecules on neighboring cells.

There are several types of cadherins, including classical cadherins, desmosomal cadherins, and protocadherins, each with distinct functions and localization in tissues. Classical cadherins, also known as type I cadherins, are the most well-studied and are essential for the formation of adherens junctions, which help to maintain cell-to-cell contact and tissue architecture.

Desmosomal cadherins, on the other hand, are critical for the formation and maintenance of desmosomes, which are specialized intercellular junctions that provide mechanical strength and stability to tissues. Protocadherins are a diverse family of cadherin-related proteins that have been implicated in various developmental processes, including neuronal connectivity and tissue patterning.

Mutations in cadherin genes have been associated with several human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and heart defects. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of cadherins is essential for elucidating their roles in health and disease.

The egg yolk is the nutrient-rich, inner portion of an egg that is surrounded by a protective layer of egg white. It is typically yellowish-orange and has a creamy consistency. The egg yolk contains various essential nutrients such as proteins, fats, vitamins (like A, D, E, and K), minerals (such as calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and iron), and antioxidants (like lutein and zeaxanthin). It is also a significant source of cholesterol. The egg yolk plays an essential role in the development of embryos in birds and reptiles, providing them with necessary nutrients for growth and energy. In culinary applications, egg yolks are often used as emulsifiers, thickeners, and leavening agents in various dishes.

Rhodopsin, also known as visual purple, is a light-sensitive protein found in the rods of the eye's retina. It is a type of opsin, a class of proteins that are activated by light and play a crucial role in vision. Rhodopsin is composed of two parts: an apoprotein called opsin and a chromophore called 11-cis-retinal. When light hits the retina, it changes the shape of the 11-cis-retinal, which in turn activates the rhodopsin protein. This activation triggers a series of chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the transmission of a visual signal to the brain. Rhodopsin is highly sensitive to light and allows for vision in low-light conditions.

Genetic models are theoretical frameworks used in genetics to describe and explain the inheritance patterns and genetic architecture of traits, diseases, or phenomena. These models are based on mathematical equations and statistical methods that incorporate information about gene frequencies, modes of inheritance, and the effects of environmental factors. They can be used to predict the probability of certain genetic outcomes, to understand the genetic basis of complex traits, and to inform medical management and treatment decisions.

There are several types of genetic models, including:

1. Mendelian models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of simple genetic traits that follow Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment. Examples include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance.
2. Complex trait models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of complex traits that are influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. Examples include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
3. Population genetics models: These models describe the distribution and frequency of genetic variants within populations over time. They can be used to study evolutionary processes, such as natural selection and genetic drift.
4. Quantitative genetics models: These models describe the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypic variation in continuous traits, such as height or IQ. They can be used to estimate heritability and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to trait variation.
5. Statistical genetics models: These models use statistical methods to analyze genetic data and infer the presence of genetic associations or linkage. They can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or traits.

Overall, genetic models are essential tools in genetics research and medical genetics, as they allow researchers to make predictions about genetic outcomes, test hypotheses about the genetic basis of traits and diseases, and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Mosaicism, in the context of genetics and medicine, refers to the presence of two or more cell lines with different genetic compositions in an individual who has developed from a single fertilized egg. This means that some cells have one genetic makeup, while others have a different genetic makeup. This condition can occur due to various reasons such as errors during cell division after fertilization.

Mosaicism can involve chromosomes (where whole or parts of chromosomes are present in some cells but not in others) or it can involve single genes (where a particular gene is present in one form in some cells and a different form in others). The symptoms and severity of mosaicism can vary widely, depending on the type and location of the genetic difference and the proportion of cells that are affected. Some individuals with mosaicism may not experience any noticeable effects, while others may have significant health problems.

High mobility group proteins (HMG proteins) are a family of nuclear proteins that are characterized by their ability to bind to DNA and influence its structure and function. They are named "high mobility" because of their rapid movement in gel electrophoresis. HMG proteins are involved in various nuclear processes, including chromatin remodeling, transcription regulation, and DNA repair.

There are three main classes of HMG proteins: HMGA, HMGB, and HMGN. Each class has distinct structural features and functions. For example, HMGA proteins have a unique "AT-hook" domain that allows them to bind to the minor groove of AT-rich DNA sequences, while HMGB proteins have two "HMG-box" domains that enable them to bend and unwind DNA.

HMG proteins play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, inflammation, and cancer. Dysregulation of HMG protein function has been implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of HMG proteins is crucial for developing new therapeutic strategies for these diseases.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP-4) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, cell growth, and differentiation. In the skeletal system, BMP-4 stimulates the formation of bone and cartilage by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts. It also regulates the maintenance and repair of bones throughout life. An imbalance in BMP-4 signaling has been associated with several skeletal disorders, such as heterotopic ossification and osteoarthritis.

MAF transcription factors are a family of proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as MAF recognition elements (MAREs), in the promoter regions of target genes. The name "MAF" stands for "musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma," which was the name of the first identified member of this protein family.

MAF transcription factors contain a basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, which is a conserved structural motif that allows them to dimerize and bind to DNA. The bZIP domain consists of a basic region, which makes contact with the negatively charged phosphate groups in the DNA backbone, and a leucine zipper, which mediates protein-protein interactions and helps to stabilize the dimer.

MAF transcription factors can form homodimers (dimeric complexes composed of two identical subunits) or heterodimers (dimers composed of two different subunits) with other bZIP proteins, such as cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), activating transcription factor (ATF), and jun proto-oncogene (JUN). The specific combination of MAF transcription factors in a dimer can influence its DNA binding specificity and transcriptional activity.

MAF transcription factors play important roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Dysregulation of MAF transcription factors has been implicated in the development and progression of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Gene targeting is a research technique in molecular biology used to precisely modify specific genes within the genome of an organism. This technique allows scientists to study gene function by creating targeted genetic changes, such as insertions, deletions, or mutations, in a specific gene of interest. The process typically involves the use of engineered nucleases, such as CRISPR-Cas9 or TALENs, to introduce double-stranded breaks at desired locations within the genome. These breaks are then repaired by the cell's own DNA repair machinery, often leading to the incorporation of designed changes in the targeted gene. Gene targeting is a powerful tool for understanding gene function and has wide-ranging applications in basic research, agriculture, and therapeutic development.

Inbreeding in animals refers to the mating of closely related individuals, such as siblings or offspring of siblings, over multiple generations. An inbred strain is a population of animals produced by this repeated mating of close relatives, which results in a high degree of genetic similarity among members of the strain.

Inbreeding can lead to an increase in homozygosity, where identical alleles are present at corresponding loci on both chromosomes. This can result in the expression of recessive traits, some of which may be deleterious or even lethal. However, inbred strains also have advantages, such as reduced genetic variability, which makes them useful for scientific research.

Inbred strains are commonly used in biomedical research, including genetics, immunology, and behavioral studies. They provide a consistent and controlled genetic background, allowing researchers to study the effects of specific genes or environmental factors with greater precision. Additionally, inbred strains can be crossed with other strains to create hybrid populations, which can be used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) and identify genes associated with complex traits.

SOX9 (SRY-related HMG-box gene 9) is a transcription factor that belongs to the SOX family of proteins, which are characterized by a high mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain. SOX9 plays crucial roles in various developmental processes, including sex determination, chondrogenesis, and neurogenesis.

As a transcription factor, SOX9 binds to specific DNA sequences in the promoter or enhancer regions of its target genes and regulates their expression. In the context of sex determination, SOX9 is essential for the development of Sertoli cells in the male gonad, which are responsible for supporting sperm production. SOX9 also plays a role in maintaining the undifferentiated state of stem cells and promoting cell differentiation in various tissues.

Mutations in the SOX9 gene have been associated with several human genetic disorders, including campomelic dysplasia, a severe skeletal disorder characterized by bowed legs, and sex reversal in individuals with XY chromosomes.

Laboratory Animal Science (also known as Experimental Animal Science) is a multidisciplinary field that involves the care, use, and breeding of animals for scientific research. It encompasses various disciplines such as veterinary medicine, biology, genetics, nutrition, and ethology to ensure the humane treatment, proper husbandry, and experimental validity when using animals in research.

The primary goal of laboratory animal science is to support and advance biological and medical knowledge by providing well-characterized and healthy animals for research purposes. This field also includes the development and implementation of guidelines, regulations, and standards regarding the use of animals in research to ensure their welfare and minimize any potential distress or harm.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP-2) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays a crucial role in bone and cartilage formation, as well as in the regulation of wound healing and embryonic development. BMP-2 stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation.

BMP-2 has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a medical device to promote bone growth in certain spinal fusion surgeries and in the treatment of open fractures that have not healed properly. It is usually administered in the form of a collagen sponge soaked with recombinant human BMP-2 protein, which is a laboratory-produced version of the natural protein.

While BMP-2 has shown promising results in some clinical applications, its use is not without risks and controversies. Some studies have reported adverse effects such as inflammation, ectopic bone formation, and increased rates of cancer, which have raised concerns about its safety and efficacy. Therefore, it is essential to weigh the benefits and risks of BMP-2 therapy on a case-by-case basis and under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

Cardiac myosins are a type of myosin protein that are specifically expressed in the cardiac muscle cells (or cardiomyocytes) of the heart. These proteins play a crucial role in the contraction and relaxation of heart muscles, which is essential for proper heart function and blood circulation.

Myosins are molecular motors that use chemical energy from ATP to generate force and movement. In the context of cardiac muscle cells, cardiac myosins interact with another protein called actin to form sarcomeres, which are the basic contractile units of muscle fibers. During contraction, the heads of cardiac myosin molecules bind to actin filaments and pull them together, causing the muscle fiber to shorten and generate force.

There are different isoforms of cardiac myosins that can vary in their structure and function. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins have been linked to various forms of cardiomyopathy, which are diseases of the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure and other complications. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of cardiac myosins is an important area of research for developing therapies and treatments for heart disease.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

In situ nick-end labeling (ISEL, also known as TUNEL) is a technique used in pathology and molecular biology to detect DNA fragmentation, which is a characteristic of apoptotic cells (cells undergoing programmed cell death). The method involves labeling the 3'-hydroxyl termini of double or single stranded DNA breaks in situ (within tissue sections or individual cells) using modified nucleotides that are coupled to a detectable marker, such as a fluorophore or an enzyme. This technique allows for the direct visualization and quantification of apoptotic cells within complex tissues or cell populations.

Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short, single-pass DNA sequences that are derived from cDNA libraries. They represent a quick and cost-effective method for large-scale sequencing of gene transcripts and provide an unbiased view of the genes being actively expressed in a particular tissue or developmental stage. ESTs can be used to identify and study new genes, to analyze patterns of gene expression, and to develop molecular markers for genetic mapping and genome analysis.

Microsporidia are a group of small, obligate intracellular parasites that belong to the kingdom Fungi. They are characterized by their spore stage, which contains a unique infection apparatus called the polar tube or coiled filament. These spores can infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, animals, and insects.

In humans, Microsporidia can cause chronic diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS. They can also infect various other tissues, including the eye, muscle, and kidney, leading to a variety of clinical manifestations.

Microsporidia were once considered to be protozoa but are now classified as fungi based on genetic and biochemical evidence. There are over 1,300 species of Microsporidia, with at least 14 species known to infect humans.

Genetic enhancer elements are DNA sequences that increase the transcription of specific genes. They work by binding to regulatory proteins called transcription factors, which in turn recruit RNA polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into messenger RNA (mRNA). This results in the activation of gene transcription and increased production of the protein encoded by that gene.

Enhancer elements can be located upstream, downstream, or even within introns of the genes they regulate, and they can act over long distances along the DNA molecule. They are an important mechanism for controlling gene expression in a tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific manner, allowing for the precise regulation of gene activity during embryonic development and throughout adult life.

It's worth noting that genetic enhancer elements are often referred to simply as "enhancers," and they are distinct from other types of regulatory DNA sequences such as promoters, silencers, and insulators.

Repressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein in molecular biology that suppress the transcription of specific genes into messenger RNA (mRNA) by binding to DNA. They function as part of gene regulation processes, often working in conjunction with an operator region and a promoter region within the DNA molecule. Repressor proteins can be activated or deactivated by various signals, allowing for precise control over gene expression in response to changing cellular conditions.

There are two main types of repressor proteins:

1. DNA-binding repressors: These directly bind to specific DNA sequences (operator regions) near the target gene and prevent RNA polymerase from transcribing the gene into mRNA.
2. Allosteric repressors: These bind to effector molecules, which then cause a conformational change in the repressor protein, enabling it to bind to DNA and inhibit transcription.

Repressor proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as development, metabolism, and stress response, by controlling gene expression patterns in cells.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) The European Zebrafish Resource Center (EZRC) The China Zebrafish Resource ... Zebrafish have been used as a model system in environmental toxicology studies. Zebrafish have been used as a model system to ... In research, adult zebrafish are often fed with brine shrimp, or paramecia. Zebrafish are hardy fish and considered good for ... Zebrafish is widely used as model organism to study muscular dystrophies. For example, the sapje (sap) mutant is the zebrafish ...
Zebrafish is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal focusing on research using the zebrafish and related species. It is published by ...
Look up zebrafish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Zebrafish may also refer to: Zebrafish (journal), an academic journal ... also known as zebrafish Red lionfish (Pterois volitans), an Australian coral reef fish also known as a zebrafish Girella zebra ... Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a small freshwater fish commonly used as a model organism. ... a genus of cichlids This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Zebrafish. If an internal link led you ...
ZFIN The Zebrafish Model Organism Database Vega Zebrafish Genome Annotation FishMap : The Zebrafish Community Genomics Browser ... The Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN) is an online biological database of information about the zebrafish (Danio rerio). The ... 2008). The Zebrafish Information Network: the zebrafish model organism database provides expanded support for genotypes and ... the China Zebrafish Resource Center (CZRC), and so on, which maintain and provide zebrafish-related research resources, ...
Zebra Fish is an outdoor 1989 sculpture by Wayne Chabre, installed at the University of Oregon campus in Eugene, Oregon, in the ... 1989 in art "Zebra Fish, (sculpture)". Smithsonian Institution. Archived from the original on February 1, 2016. Retrieved ...
"Zebrafish Health Conditions in the China Zebrafish Resource Center and 20 Major Chinese Zebrafish Laboratories". Zebrafish. 13 ... "Zebrafish Health Conditions in the China Zebrafish Resource Center and 20 Major Chinese Zebrafish Laboratories". Zebrafish. 13 ... The China Zebrafish Resource Center (CZRC) is a non-profit organization located in 7 Donghu South Road, Wuhan, Focusing mainly ... "China Zebrafish Resource Center". (CS1: long volume value, Danios, Animal models, Stem cell research, Regenerative biomedicine ...
Zebrafish AB9 cells are a primary fibroblast cell line developed from fin tissue of the AB strain. These cells are commonly ... Primary zebrafish embryonic fibroblasts, ZEF1 and ZEF2 were maintained at 29C and 5% CO2 for two and three months before ... Zebrafish is an important vertebrate and emerged as an important model for genetics, developmental biology, chemical biology, ... In order to establish cell culture about 200-300 zebrafish Ab strain embryos at 5-10 somite stage were dechlorinated by 300 ul/ ...
The Importance of Shoaling on Behavioral and Stress Responses in Zebrafish". Zebrafish. 10 (3): 338-342. doi:10.1089/zeb. ...
Zebrafish. 16 (3): 291-299. doi:10.1089/zeb.2018.1710. PMID 30939077. S2CID 92999901. Ryu WS (2016). "Chapter 11 - Picornavirus ... "A highly divergent picornavirus infecting the Gut Epithelia of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) in research institutions worldwide". ...
Ekker SC (2008). "Zinc finger-based knockout punches for zebrafish genes". Zebrafish. 5 (2): 121-3. doi:10.1089/zeb.2008.9988. ...
Ekker SC (2008). "Zinc finger-based knockout punches for zebrafish genes". Zebrafish. 5 (2): 121-3. doi:10.1089/zeb.2008.9988. ...
Genus information: Kallman, Klaus D.; Kazianis, Steven (2006). "The GenusXiphophorusin Mexico and Central America". Zebrafish. ...
Ekker SC (2008). "Zinc Finger-Based Knockout Punches for Zebrafish Genes". Zebrafish. 5 (2): 1121-1123. doi:10.1089/zeb. ... Similar research of using ZFNs to create specific mutations in zebrafish embryo has also been carried out by other research ... The kdr gene in zebra fish encodes for the vascular endothelial growth factor-2 receptor. Mutagenic lesions at this target site ... Meng X, Noyes MB, Zhu LJ, Lawson ND, Wolfe SA (June 2008). "Targeted gene inactivation in zebrafish using engineered zinc ...
Some fish like carp and zebrafish have pharyngeal teeth only. Sea horses, pipefish, and adult sturgeon have no teeth of any ... Zebrafish. 2 (4): 243-257. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.210.7203. doi:10.1089/zeb.2005.2.243. PMID 18248183. Koentges, G; Matsuoka, T (2002 ...
Kallman, K.D.; S. Kazianis (2006). "The genus Xiphophorus in Mexico and Central America". Zebrafish. 3 (3): 271-285. doi: ...
Grush J, Noakes DL, Moccia RD (February 2004). "The efficacy of clove oil as an anesthetic for the zebrafish, Danio rerio ( ... Hamilton)". Zebrafish. 1 (1): 46-53. doi:10.1089/154585404774101671. PMID 18248205. Monks, Neale (2 April 2009). "Aquarium Fish ...
Begemann, Gerrit (2009). "Evolutionary Developmental Biology". Zebrafish. 6 (3): 303-4. doi:10.1089/zeb.2009.0593. Cole, ...
S.C. Ekker (2008). "Zinc finger-based knockout punches for zebrafish genes". Zebrafish. 5 (2): 1121-3. doi:10.1089/zeb. ... zebrafish, various types of mammalian cells, and rats. An ongoing clinical trial is evaluating Zinc finger nucleases that ...
Kallman, K.D.; S. Kazianis (2006). "The genus Xiphophorus in Mexico and Central America". Zebrafish. 3 (3): 271-285. doi: ...
"Animal personality relates to thermal preference in wild-type zebrafish, Danio rerio". Zebrafish. 12 (3): 243-249. doi:10.1089/ ... Similarly, zebrafish have been used as a neurobehavioral model species for studying personality using the trait approach in non ... In zebrafish (Danio rerio), Proactive and Reactive personalities express different thermal preferences and general activity ...
Page L, Polok B, Bustamante M, Schorderet DF (2013). "Bigh3 is upregulated in regenerating zebrafish fin". Zebrafish. 10 (3): ...
Zebrafish. 15 (4): 382-388. doi:10.1089/zeb.2018.1574. ISSN 1545-8547. PMID 29634423. Scharpf, Christopher; Lazara, Kenneth J ... Zebrafish. 16 (1): 115-127. doi:10.1089/zeb.2018.1668. ISSN 1545-8547. PMID 30457941. S2CID 53943624. Kullander, Sven O. (1982 ...
Ekker SC (2008). "Zinc finger-based knockout punches for zebrafish genes". Zebrafish. 5 (2): 121-3. doi:10.1089/zeb.2008.9988. ...
Price, Anna; Weadick, Cameron; Shim, Janet; Rodd, Frieda (2009-01-01). "Pigments, Patterns, and Fish Behavior". Zebrafish. 5 (4 ...
"KSI - Domain". Zebrafish. 25 December 2020. Archived from the original on 25 February 2021. Retrieved 5 December 2020. "KSI - ...
Zebrafish. 16 (1): 115-127. doi:10.1089/zeb.2018.1668. PMID 30457941. S2CID 53943624. Deprá, I.C.; Gomes, V.N.; Deprá, G.C.; ... Zebrafish. 12 (1): 81-90. doi:10.1089/zeb.2014.1036. PMID 25549064. Moysés, Cinthia Bachir; Almeida-Toledo, Lurdes F. de (2002 ... Zebrafish. 13 (6): 565-570. doi:10.1089/zeb.2016.1292. hdl:11449/169827. PMID 27332923. Martinez, Emanuel; Alves, Anderson; ...
Her lab uses zebrafish as a genetic model to research retinal stem cells. From 1997 to 2002, Raymond was the associate provost ... Zebrafish. 2 (3): 157-164. 2005. doi:10.1089/zeb.2005.2.157. ISSN 1545-8547. PMID 18248190. "Raymond Lab , Molecular, Cellular ...
March 2013). "A sequence-based variation map of zebrafish". Zebrafish. 10 (1): 15-20. doi:10.1089/zeb.2012.0848. PMC 3629779. ... "Genome of Zebrafish Wild-type Strain (ASWT)". IGIB.in. Retrieved 17 April 2013. "Detailed map of TB genome to help treatment". ... analysis of the first Malaysian Genome sequencing and analysis of the Wild-type strain of Zebrafish and the IndiGen programme ... colleagues at the Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology announced the sequencing of the wild-type strain of zebrafish ...
Zebrafish. 5 (4): 243-245. doi:10.1089/zeb.2008.0576. PMC 2757926. PMID 19133822. Staff Reports (September 14, 2021). "Former ...
Bill BR, Petzold AM, Clark KJ, Schimmenti LA, Ekker SC (March 2009). "A primer for morpholino use in zebrafish". Zebrafish. 6 ( ... Flynt AS, Li N, Thatcher EJ, Solnica-Krezel L, Patton JG (February 2007). "Zebrafish miR-214 modulates Hedgehog signaling to ... Draper BW, Morcos PA, Kimmel CB (July 2001). "Inhibition of zebrafish fgf8 pre-mRNA splicing with morpholino oligos: a ... These molecules have been applied to studies in several model organisms, including mice, zebrafish, frogs and sea urchins. ...
The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) The European Zebrafish Resource Center (EZRC) The China Zebrafish Resource ... Zebrafish have been used as a model system in environmental toxicology studies. Zebrafish have been used as a model system to ... In research, adult zebrafish are often fed with brine shrimp, or paramecia. Zebrafish are hardy fish and considered good for ... Zebrafish is widely used as model organism to study muscular dystrophies. For example, the sapje (sap) mutant is the zebrafish ...
A new type of microscope has allowed scientists to map the behaviour and movements of cells during zebrafish (Danio rerio) ... Starr, L. Zebrafish development tracked cell by cell. Nature (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/news.2008.1162 ...
He also works to develop tools to enhance zebrafish behavioural neurobiology, such as a digital adult zebrafish brain atlas ( ... Influence of various neurotransmitters on zebrafish cognition and behavior • Evolutionary perspectives on zebrafish cognition: ... Call for papers - Zebrafish cognition. Guest Editors:. Kyriacos Kareklas: Gulbenkian Science Institute, Portugal. Justin W. ... The study of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cognition is being increasingly recognized for its complexity and the translational ...
Zebrafish brain shows that new neurons are formed in the brain in a coordinated manner Peer-Reviewed Publication Tel-Aviv ... Zebrafish were chosen because the stem cells in their brains are similar to those of mammals, but are much more numerous, so ... Zebrafish brain shows that new neurons are formed in the brain in a coordinated manner. Tel-Aviv University ... Using Zebrafish, researchers from the School of Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics at the Faculty of Life Sciences of ...
Zebrafish widely used as an animal model in various fields of biomedical research as a disease model for cancer, metabolic and ... The transparency of the zebrafish embryo allows real-time visualization of the ... Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a small fish of the Cyprinidae family originating in the streams of India and Myanmar. ... Zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a small fish of the Cyprinidae family originating in the streams of India and ...
... although this function appears to be independent of signalling activated by zebrafish Apelin. The defects in epiboly caused by ... Zebrafish aplnra functions in epiboly BMC Res Notes. 2009 Nov 19;2:231. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-2-231. ... Background: The zebrafish, Danio rerio, possesses the paralogous genes aplnra and aplnrb that are duplicates of an ancestral ... Findings: Blockage of translation of aplnra mRNA in zebrafish embryos results in retarded or failed epiboly with the blastoderm ...
Zebrafish produce a chemical, called gadusol, that works as a sunscreen, protecting them from the harsh sunlight in their reef ... Zebrafish produce a chemical, called gadusol, that works as a sunscreen, protecting them from the harsh sunlight in their reef ...
Bring wonder and excitement to your classroom, office, or home freshwater aquarium with fluorescent zebra fish. GloFish® get their illuminating appearance from a borrowed sea coral gene. Originally bred to help detect environmental pollutants in waterways, the brightly colored fish are completel...
... two neuronal cell types that confer touch-sensitivity in normal zebrafish, suggesting a role of these cell types in the ... This molecule is highly conserved in vertebrates enabling the investigation of its function in the developing zebrafish. We ... b) (i) Morphology of 72 hpf zebrafish embryos injected with MOs. (b) (ii) Morphology of 72 hpf zebrafish embryos injected with ... Zebrafish maintenance and transgenic lines. Adult zebrafish and embryos were maintained by standard protocols approved by the ...
The zebrafish shares 70 % of the genes found in humans and many critical signalling pathways. The eggs are fertilised ... We will exploit the advantages of zebrafish as a small transparent vertebrate with superb genetic accessibility and use cutting ... The goal of the ZENITH ETN, "ZEbrafish Neuroscience Interdisciplinary Training Hub", is to understand how neural networks ... a new generation of scientists for interdisciplinary collaboration on pressing neuroscience challenges utilising the zebrafish ...
Although the role of Kitlg in this process has not been reported in Danio rerio (zebrafish), in the present study we show that ... Zebrafish Kit ligands cooperate with erythropoietin to promote erythroid cell expansion Blood Adv. 2020 Dec 8;4(23):5915-5924. ... Zebrafish possess 2 copies of Kitlg genes (Kitlga and Kitlgb) as a result of whole-genome duplication. To determine the role of ... Although the role of Kitlg in this process has not been reported in Danio rerio (zebrafish), in the present study we show that ...
Zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae provide a unique platform to study macrophage-microbe interactions in vivo, from the level of ... Studies using zebrafish allow non-invasive, real-time visualization of macrophage recruitment and phagocytosis. Furthermore, ... Studies using zebrafish allow non-invasive, real-time visualisation of macrophage recruitment and phagocytosis. Furthermore, ... Here, we discuss the latest developments using zebrafish models of bacterial and fungal infection. We also review novel aspects ...
San Diego School of Medicine has discovered that zebrafish -- an important animal model in disease and environmental studies ... UCSD researcher finds new role for zebrafish in human studies. May 19, 2010. ScienceBlog.com ... Michael E. Baker, PhD, a researcher at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has discovered that zebrafish ... is present in zebrafish, where it appears to serve an important role in fish endocrine physiology. ...
... zebrafish). Find diseases associated with this biological target and compounds tested against it in bioassay experiments. ...
... zebrafish). Find diseases associated with this biological target and compounds tested against it in bioassay experiments. ...
Isolation of Cardiac and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Adult, Juvenile, Larval and Embryonic Zebrafish for ... Isolation of Cardiac and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Adult, Juvenile, Larval and Embryonic Zebrafish for ... Live Imaging of Microtubule Dynamics in Glioblastoma Cells Invading the Zebrafish Brain… ... Live Imaging of Microtubule Dynamics in Glioblastoma Cells Invading the Zebrafish Brain… ...
Read the latest Behavioral Research blog posts in the category Zebrafish research ... Behavioral Research Blog - Animal behavior research- Zebrafish research Zebrafish research Discover the importance of zebrafish ... Tracking zebrafish activity to study a key element in circadian rhythmicity. Zebrafish are a popular model of choice for many ... How zebrafish are changing neuroscience. Zebrafish. This little fish is a vertebrate, and a relatively complex one. Looking at ...
Figure 4. Zebrafish with spot patterns in nature (www.sucaiw.com). * Figure 5. Pictures of the time evolution of $u$. at ... Zebrafish with spot-stripe patterns in nature (www.pethoo.com). * Figure 11. Pictures of the time evolution of $u$. at ... Zebrafish with spot patterns in nature (www.4908.cn). * Figure 13. Pictures of the time evolution of $u$. at different instants ... Figure 8. Zebrafish with stripe patterns in nature (Baidu Baike). * Figure 9. Pictures of the time evolution of $u$. at ...
Spinal Basis of Direction Control during Locomotion in Larval Zebrafish. Michael Jay, Malcolm A. MacIver and David L. McLean ... Spinal Basis of Direction Control during Locomotion in Larval Zebrafish Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you ... Here we have developed a system using larval zebrafish that allows us to directly record electrical signals from spinal neurons ... Here, we use drifting vertical gratings to evoke directed "fictive" swimming in intact but immobilized larval zebrafish while ...
... *Download PDF Copy ... The most common experimental models of traumatic brain injury in both rodents and zebrafish, such as a mechanical blow to the ... Due to the fact that the skin and skull of the used variety of zebrafish are transparent, scientists enlightened the brain ... Tikhonova, M.A., et al. (2022) A Novel Laser-Based Zebrafish Model for Studying Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Molecular ...
... zebrafish). Find diseases associated with this biological target and compounds tested against it in bioassay experiments. ...
Danios. A small, very active, egg-laying fish with horizontal stripes. Nonaggressive. The zebra fish is widely used in molecular and developmental genetic engineering studies. Tropical fish such as zebra fish are excellent choices for the classroom aquarium. Our zebra fish are hand-selected for size...
These data suggest that estrogenic compounds are essential for distal segment fate during nephrogenesis in the zebrafish ... our lab conducted a high-throughput drug screen using a bioactive chemical library and developing zebrafish, which are a ... The Center for Zebrafish Research at the University of Notre Dame maintained the zebrafish used in these studies and ... A Nikon Eclipse Ni with a DS-Fi2 camera was used to image WISH samples and live zebrafish. Live zebrafish were mounted in ...
A new type of microscopy is helping scientists study the regenerative hearts of zebrafish. ... The Difficulty with Imaging Zebrafish. Imaging zebrafish hearts comes with complications. Zebrafish embryos hearts move ... Zebrafish hearts are commonly used in cardiac research as models for the human heart. Interestingly, while they are similar to ... New imaging technique sheds light on zebrafish and heart disease. A new type of microscopy is helping scientists study the ...
... in regulating lipid and cholesterol metabolism during zebrafish development. Explore the impact of LXR activation on gene ... By in situ hybridization we showed distinct expression of lxr in the brain and the retina in the developing and adult zebrafish ... X. Meng, M. B. Noyes, L. J. Zhu, N. D. Lawson and S. A. Wolfe, "Targeted Gene Inactivation in Zebrafish Using Engineered Zinc- ... C. B. Kimmel, W. W. Ballard, S. R. Kimmel, B. Ullmann and T. F. Schilling, "Stages of Embryonic Development of the Zebrafish," ...
Timeline for Species Zebrafish (Danio rerio) [TaxId:7955] from a.288.1.1 OHCU decarboxylase, UraD: *Species Zebrafish (Danio ... PDB entries in Species: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) [TaxId: 7955]:. *Domain(s) for 2o70: *. Domain d2o70a1: 2o70 A:2-166 [148645]. ... Lineage for Species: Zebrafish (Danio rerio) [TaxId: 7955]. *Root: SCOPe 2.08 *. Class a: All alpha proteins [46456] (290 folds ... Species Zebrafish (Danio rerio) [TaxId:7955] [158698] (3 PDB entries). Uniprot A1L259 2-166. ...
It doesnt take long to see that Mason Posner likes zebrafish. ... Posner continues to study eyes using zebrafish Published on Oct ... "Most of my students dont keep doing zebrafish research, but there have been a couple," Posner said about one who did his post- ... It doesnt take long to see that Mason Posner likes zebrafish.. The Ashland University biology professor has a drawing of one ... Grant funding through the NIH has helped Posner since 2002 with his research on zebrafish, which he said has been a valuable ...
Research suggests that zebrafish could be used to study the role of sleep in health and disease. ... Given the zebrafishs place in the vertebrate family tree, these results suggest that common mechanisms of sleep are shared ... Zebrafish are also uniquely useful in biological research, partially because their larvae are transparent, allowing use of ... Zebrafish share neural and biochemical similarities with other vertebrates, including humans, that make them a potentially good ...
... TOPICS:Max Planck InstituteNeurologyNeuroscienceZebrafish ... A new study from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research reveals how the eye of a zebrafish larva can already distinguish ... Small and large objects activate various circuits in the visual system of zebrafish larvae. This separation begins in the eye ... Other cell types downstream in the tectum distinguish between small and large objects on the zebrafishs magnitude scale in ...
  • The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a freshwater fish belonging to the minnow family (Cyprinidae) of the order Cypriniformes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A new type of microscope has allowed scientists to map the behaviour and movements of cells during zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) embryonic development, and create a three-dimensional digital movie of the process. (nature.com)
  • The study of zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) cognition is being increasingly recognized for its complexity and the translational insights it offers into neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and behavioral conditions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a small fish of the Cyprinidae family originating in the streams of India and Myanmar. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • The zebrafish, Danio rerio, possesses the paralogous genes aplnra and aplnrb that are duplicates of an ancestral orthologue of the human APLNR gene encoding a G-protein coupled receptor that binds the peptide ligand APELIN and is required for normal cardiovascular function. (nih.gov)
  • The zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) is an attractive and versatile model to gain insight into vertebrate brain development and function. (nature.com)
  • Although the role of Kitlg in this process has not been reported in Danio rerio (zebrafish), in the present study we show that its function is evolutionarily conserved. (nih.gov)
  • Zebrafish ( Danio rerio ) larvae provide a unique platform to study macrophage-microbe interactions in vivo , from the level of the single cell to the whole organism. (frontiersin.org)
  • E. J. Flynn, C. M. Trent and J. F. Rawls, "Ontogeny and Nutritional Control of Adipogenesis in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)," Journal of LIPID Research, Vol. 50, No. 8, 2009, pp. 1641-1652. (scirp.org)
  • Combinatorial effects of zinc deficiency and arsenic exposure on zebrafish (Danio rerio) development. (oregonstate.edu)
  • To address this, we utilized the Danio rerio (zebrafish) model to test the hypothesis that parental zinc deficiency sensitizes the developing embryo to low-concentration arsenic toxicity, leading to altered developmental outcomes. (oregonstate.edu)
  • We addressed these questions using a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model of developmental VitE deficiency followed by dietary remediation. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Bioaccumulation: 'Flow through study with zebrafish (Danio rerio) kinetic BCF = 44. (janusinfo.se)
  • aplnrb is required for migration of cells contributing to heart development in zebrafish embryos. (nih.gov)
  • Blockage of translation of aplnra mRNA in zebrafish embryos results in retarded or failed epiboly with the blastoderm apparently disconnected from the nuclei of the yolk syncytial layer. (nih.gov)
  • To further address the role of kitlga and kitlgb in hematopoietic development in vivo, we performed gain-of-function experiments in zebrafish embryos, showing that both ligands cooperate with erythropoietin (Epo) to promote erythroid cell expansion. (nih.gov)
  • Zebrafish embryos' hearts move incredibly quickly, beating three times per second. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Lxr ligand activation affected the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in zebrafish adult brain and eye as well as in zebrafish embryos. (scirp.org)
  • Our experiments with the zebrafish embryos shows quite clearly the effects the Primodos components have. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Upon zTERT knockdown, zebrafish embryos show reduced telomerase activity and are viable, but develop pancytopenia resulting from aberrant hematopoiesis. (harvard.edu)
  • The blood cell counts in TERT-depleted zebrafish embryos are markedly decreased and hematopoietic cell differentiation is impaired, whereas other somatic lineages remain morphologically unaffected. (harvard.edu)
  • Adult zebrafish were fed defined zinc deficient and zinc adequate diets and were spawned resulting in zinc adequate and zinc deficient embryos. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Adult zebrafish maintained on VitE-deficient (E-) or sufficient (E+) diets were spawned to obtained E- and E+ embryos, respectively, which we evaluated up to 12 days post-fertilization (dpf). (oregonstate.edu)
  • To complement the in vivo system of chick embryos, we employ patient omics data, single cell RNA sequencing, human and mouse embryos, human cancer cell cultures, human pluripotent stem cells, chick embryo neural crest-derived in vitro crestosphere cultures, and zebrafish and mouse in vivo models. (lu.se)
  • The transparent nature of zebrafish larvae, combined with their genetic tractability, presents a unique avenue to unravel the complexities of cognition at the neural circuitry level. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Zebrafish are also uniquely useful in biological research, partially because their larvae are transparent, allowing use of advanced visualization techniques to answer scientific questions in living animals. (nih.gov)
  • Small and large objects activate various circuits in the visual system of zebrafish larvae. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Knockdown of miR-10 led to premature truncation of intersegmental vessel growth (ISV) in the trunk of zebrafish larvae, while overexpression of miR-10 promoted angiogenic behavior in zebrafish and cultured human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs). (ca.gov)
  • Using Zebrafish, researchers from the School of Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics at the Faculty of Life Sciences of Tel Aviv University have developed an advanced simulation of a key process in the brain - the activation of the stem cells responsible for generating neurons. (eurekalert.org)
  • Zebrafish were chosen because the stem cells in their brains are similar to those of mammals, but are much more numerous, so new neurons in their brains are constantly added. (eurekalert.org)
  • We observed miR-137 expression and activity in sensory neurons including Rohon-Beard neurons and dorsal root ganglia, two neuronal cell types that confer touch-sensitivity in normal zebrafish, suggesting a role of these cell types in the observed phenotype. (nature.com)
  • At the same time, after analyzing several molecular biomarkers of neuroinflammation, damage, and recovery of neurons, scientists were convinced that, unlike mammals, zebrafish are capable of full restoration of brain functions as early as a week after neuroinjury. (news-medical.net)
  • Here, we use drifting vertical gratings to evoke directed "fictive" swimming in intact but immobilized larval zebrafish while performing electrophysiological recordings from spinal neurons. (jneurosci.org)
  • Here we have developed a system using larval zebrafish that allows us to directly record electrical signals from spinal neurons during "fictive" swimming guided by visual cues. (jneurosci.org)
  • Zebrafish oxytocin neurons drive nocifensive behavior via brainstem premotor targets. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Using a combination of optical, behavioral and genetic approaches in the larval zebrafish, we describe a novel role for hypothalamic oxytocin (OXT) neurons in the processing of noxious stimuli. (iasp-pain.org)
  • In vivo imaging revealed that a large and distributed fraction of zebrafish OXT neurons respond strongly to noxious inputs, including the activation of damage-sensing TRPA1 receptors. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Title : Motor Behavior Mediated by Continuously Generated Dopaminergic Neurons in the Zebrafish Hypothalamus Recovers After Cell Ablation Personal Author(s) : McPherson, Adam D.;Barrios, Joshua P.;Luks-Morgan, Sasha J.;Manfredi, John P.;Bonkowsky, Joshua L.;Douglass, Adam D.;Dorsky, Richard I. (cdc.gov)
  • Tiny zebrafish can also regrow parts of the eye, including neurons in the eye's retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eyeball). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Here, we investigate how differences in aspect ratio and changes to surface chemistry, as well as synthesis methods, influence the biocompatibility of nanocellulose materials using the embryonic zebrafish. (cdc.gov)
  • Using fluorescently labeled nanocellulose we were able to show that nanocellulose uptake did occur in embryonic zebrafish during development. (cdc.gov)
  • A new study from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research reveals how the eye of a zebrafish larva can already distinguish between prey and predator. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have now shed light on how such circuits, which are likely to be crucial in classifying objects by size, function in the brain of the zebrafish larva. (scitechdaily.com)
  • The basic mechanisms of object classification can be studied using zebrafish larva as the model system. (scitechdaily.com)
  • These cells respond specifically to those object sizes that correspond to a small prey or a large troublemaker in the world of the zebrafish larva. (scitechdaily.com)
  • The zebrafish also exhibits measurable behavioral and hormonal responses already at the larval stages, providing a viable vertebrate animal model for high-throughput drug screening and chemical genetics. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • Recognizing the lack of hands-on education, Dr. Kalueff has started organizing zebrafish behavioral neuroscience and phenotyping workshops. (noldus.com)
  • This technique allowed the researchers to analyze not just the behavioral characteristics of sleep such as muscle relaxation and decrease in heart rate, but also the neural signatures of sleep in the zebrafish brain. (nih.gov)
  • Our setups include custom-made behavioral arenas for zebrafish, brain imaging in zebrafish, psychophysics and virtual reality for humans and molecular biology. (fchampalimaud.org)
  • The zebrafish is an important and widely used vertebrate model organism in scientific research, for example in drug development, in particular pre-clinical development. (wikipedia.org)
  • His lab is interested in uncovering the neural and molecular basis for individual differences in behaviour using adult zebrafish as a model system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Zebrafish widely used as an animal model in various fields of biomedical research as a disease model for cancer, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, and regenerative medicine. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • With the available tools of the genomic era and the abundance of disease-associated human genes yet to be explored, the zebrafish model is becoming the preferred choice in basic and applied life sciences. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • The EU-funded ZENITH project is preparing a new generation of scientists for interdisciplinary collaboration on pressing neuroscience challenges utilising the zebrafish model system and leveraging academic and industrial mentoring. (europa.eu)
  • Discover the importance of zebrafish as a model organism in behavior research. (noldus.com)
  • Zebrafish are a popular model of choice for many researchers, including chronobiologists. (noldus.com)
  • This paper investigates the spatial dynamics of a zebrafish model with cross-diffusions. (aimsciences.org)
  • A group of scientists, which included researchers from the Ural Federal University (UrFU), have developed and successfully tested a new model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in zebrafish. (news-medical.net)
  • In an effort to identify elusive regulators of nephron segmentation, our lab conducted a high-throughput drug screen using a bioactive chemical library and developing zebrafish, which are a conserved vertebrate model and particularly conducive to large-scale screening approaches. (mdpi.com)
  • The objective of this study was to determine the role of LXR during development using the zebrafish model. (scirp.org)
  • Zebrafish share neural and biochemical similarities with other vertebrates, including humans, that make them a potentially good model for studying sleep and sleep-related disorders. (nih.gov)
  • These findings suggest that zebrafish, and the novel imaging techniques possible in this model organism, could be powerful new tools for research to increase understanding of human sleep and its impacts on health and disease. (nih.gov)
  • The new zebrafish model provides a highly expedient way of studying tumourigenesis in living creatures. (worldpharmanews.com)
  • Together with other distinctive advantages offered by zebrafish (they are small, practically transparent and easy to propagate and maintain), the model could prove a valuable tool for gaining new insights into the mechanisms of cutaneous melanoma, and hopefully for developing new treatments. (worldpharmanews.com)
  • As an optically transparent model organism with an endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB), zebrafish offer a powerful tool to study the vertebrate BBB. (elifesciences.org)
  • Expanding our understanding of the zebrafish BBB can thus reveal the mechanistic similarities between the zebrafish and mammalian BBB to further evaluate the position of zebrafish as a model organism for studying the BBB. (elifesciences.org)
  • We present the developmental toxicity for 15 DBPs and a chlorinated wastewater to a model aquatic vertebrate, zebrafish. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Tissue macrophages are essential components of the immune system that also play key roles in vertebrate development and homeostasis , including in zebrafish , which has gained popularity over the years as a translational model for human disease . (bvsalud.org)
  • Moreover, in a zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency, the drug restored enzyme levels and alleviated symptoms of lethargy and hyperpigmentation. (medscape.com)
  • He also works to develop tools to enhance zebrafish behavioural neurobiology, such as a digital adult zebrafish brain atlas ( azba.wayne.edu ), tracking fish in 3D, and precision approaches for drug delivery. (biomedcentral.com)
  • By in situ hybridization we showed distinct expression of lxr in the brain and the retina in the developing and adult zebrafish. (scirp.org)
  • Isolation of Tissue Macrophages in Adult Zebrafish. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this chapter, we describe the methodology for analyzing macrophages in various tissues in the adult zebrafish by flow cytometry . (bvsalud.org)
  • Overall, we aim at providing a guide for the zebrafish community based on our expertise investigating the adult mononuclear phagocyte system . (bvsalud.org)
  • The goal of the ZENITH ETN, "ZEbrafish Neuroscience Interdisciplinary Training Hub", is to understand how neural networks mediate perception and behavior. (europa.eu)
  • We will exploit the advantages of zebrafish as a small transparent vertebrate with superb genetic accessibility and use cutting-edge technology to elucidate the interactions between molecules, cells and entire networks that ultimately generate adaptive behavior. (europa.eu)
  • Learn how studies on zebrafish can reveal valuable insights into genetic disorders, learning and memory, developmental biology and even social behavior. (noldus.com)
  • miR-10 Regulates the Angiogenic Behavior of Zebrafish and Human Endothelial Cells by Promoting VEGF Signaling. (ca.gov)
  • Genetic experiments in zebrafish revealed that miR-10 functions, in part, by directly regulating the level of a protein called FLT1, which inhibits the behavior of endothelial cells that promotes new blood vessel growth. (ca.gov)
  • The increase in FLT1/sFLT1 protein levels upon miR-10 knockdown in zebrafish and in HUVECs inhibited the angiogenic behavior of endothelial cells largely by antagonizing VEGF receptor-2 signaling. (ca.gov)
  • Funding for the single plane illumination microscope (SPIM) and advanced transgenic zebrafish used in these studies was provided by The BHF Centre of Research Excellence Award, University of Edinburgh. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Commonly, zebrafish macrophages are identified based on expression of fluorescent transgenic reporters, allowing for real- time imaging in living animals . (bvsalud.org)
  • The transparency of the zebrafish embryo allows real-time visualization of the development and morphogenesis of practically all of its tissues and organs. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • Studies using zebrafish allow non-invasive, real-time visualization of macrophage recruitment and phagocytosis. (frontiersin.org)
  • BMC Neuroscience is now welcoming submissions to our Collection on zebrafish cognition. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To determine the role of each ligand in zebrafish, we performed a series of ex vivo and in vivo gain- and loss-of-function experiments. (nih.gov)
  • Importantly, past experiments using zebrafish (a different type of freshwater fish) have shown that one type of signalling involving Raf is enough to initiate melanocyte neoplasia formation. (worldpharmanews.com)
  • The zebrafish used in the experiments responded to signalling changes in much the same way as humans. (worldpharmanews.com)
  • Furthermore, the chemical and genetic tractability of zebrafish has been central to decipher the complex role of macrophages during infection. (frontiersin.org)
  • Zebrafish embryo toxicity of 15 chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated disinfection by-products. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Impacts of chemical modification on the toxicity of diverse nanocellulose materials to developing zebrafish. (cdc.gov)
  • First, we tested the biological activity of recombinant Kitlg proteins in suspension culture from zebrafish whole-kidney marrow, and we demonstrate that Kitlga is necessary for expansion of erythroid progenitors ex vivo. (nih.gov)
  • Collaborating researchers from the Centre for Cardiovascular Science and the University of Glasgow's School of Physics and Astronomy hope that by providing incredibly detailed time-lapse videos of growing zebrafish hearts, we can better understand the cellular and subcellular processes by which these hearts form and repair themselves. (ed.ac.uk)
  • While some 3D images of beating zebrafish hearts have been captured before, cardiac researchers have struggled to create useful 3D time-lapse videos of the heart growing over the course of a full day. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Researchers recently identified several neural activity signatures in the zebrafish brain that suggest certain sleep states in these fish are similar to human sleep and that they could thus be used for studying the role of sleep in health and disease. (nih.gov)
  • To explore this question, researchers sought to determine whether the zebrafish brain undergoes sleep states found in people and other vertebrates, such as the slow-wave and rapid eye movement (REM) states. (nih.gov)
  • This new visualization technique also enabled the researchers to study and identify cellular and molecular regulators of zebrafish sleep, such as a hormone that controls the onset of propagating wave sleep. (nih.gov)
  • More surprisingly, according to the researchers, the study showed that the drug accumulates in the zebrafish embryo over time. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • To gain insight into the two signalling pathways, the researchers created several zebrafish models for studying melanoma in which the Ras signalling pathways were disrupted in different ways. (worldpharmanews.com)
  • No zebrafish development effects were observed after exposure to undiluted or non-concentrated, chlorinated wastewater. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Chronic dietary exposure of zebrafish to PAH mixtures results in carcinogenotoxic events that impair survival and physiology of exposed fish. (ifremer.fr)
  • In summary, using optimized suspension culture conditions with recombinant cytokines (Epo, Kitlga), we report, for the first time, ex vivo suspension cultures of zebrafish hematopoietic progenitor cells that can serve as an indispensable tool to study normal and aberrant hematopoiesis in zebrafish. (nih.gov)
  • However, the precise developmental profile of functional zebrafish BBB acquisition and the subcellular and molecular mechanisms governing the zebrafish BBB remain poorly characterized. (elifesciences.org)
  • Our findings indicate a conserved developmental program of barrier acquisition between zebrafish and mice. (elifesciences.org)
  • Recombinant Zebrafish MRPL21 full length or partial length protein was expressed. (creativebiomart.net)
  • The most common experimental models of traumatic brain injury in both rodents and zebrafish, such as a mechanical blow to the head or piercing the brain with a needle, are associated with penetrating damage to brain tissue. (news-medical.net)
  • Due to the fact that the skin and skull of the used variety of zebrafish are transparent, scientists 'enlightened' the brain directly, and non-invasively. (news-medical.net)
  • The results obtained showed that, firstly, during the entire period of observation, microglia were activated in the brain of zebrafish. (news-medical.net)
  • Most of my students don't keep doing zebrafish research, but there have been a couple," Posner said about one who did his post-doctorate work with zebrafish at the Cleveland Clinic and another who had a research job with the National Institute of Health (NIH) using the small fish to study brain development before she went on to work in public health. (ashland.edu)
  • With the help of four students, Posner did gene-editing research during the fall 2021 semester on zebrafish, which builds its lens in a similar way to humans. (ashland.edu)
  • This Collection aims to showcase the most innovative new research on the neural networks shaping zebrafish cognition, as well as the impact of genetics, environment, and hormones on their cognitive skills, and insights gleaned from zebrafish models into the mechanisms of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative conditions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We also review novel aspects of macrophage biology revealed by zebrafish, which can potentiate development of new therapeutic strategies for humans. (frontiersin.org)
  • Zebrafish are amenable to genetic manipulation, for which innovative genetic and molecular techniques are constantly being introduced. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • However, the subcellular and molecular mechanisms governing the formation and maintenance of the zebrafish BBB are only beginning to be characterized. (elifesciences.org)
  • The zebrafish shares 70 % of the genes found in humans and many critical signalling pathways. (europa.eu)
  • However, measuring the neural signatures of sleep in zebrafish has been technically challenging, and it was unknown whether or not they organize their sleep cycle similar to humans and other vertebrate animals. (nih.gov)
  • Given the zebrafish's place in the vertebrate family tree, these results suggest that common mechanisms of sleep are shared among animals as disparate as zebrafish and humans. (nih.gov)
  • Finally, we demonstrate a key mammalian BBB regulator Mfsd2a, which inhibits transcytosis, plays a conserved role in zebrafish, as mfsd2aa mutants display increased BBB permeability due to increased transcytosis. (elifesciences.org)
  • We find zebrafish development to be a viable in vivo alternative or confirmatory assay to mammalian in vitro cell assays. (oregonstate.edu)
  • In 2015, a study was published about zebrafishes' capacity for episodic memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr Kareklas is currently working with Prof Rui Oliveira at the Gulbenkian Science Institute, Portugal, using genetic zebrafish models to study neuromodulatory and neurodevelopmental mechanisms of sociality. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A new type of microscopy is helping scientists study the regenerative hearts of zebrafish. (ed.ac.uk)
  • All three of Posner's study leave work have been with eye research using zebrafish. (ashland.edu)
  • Their results, based on a study of the see-through zebrafish, are published in the journal Disease Models and Mechanisms. (worldpharmanews.com)
  • and colleagues used healthy and abnormal human cells, mice, and zebrafish to demonstrate the ability of phenylbutyrate to treat lactic acidosis . (medscape.com)
  • 2017). The not-so-long history of zebrafish research in Israel. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • Zebrafish are also closely related to the genus Devario, as demonstrated by a phylogenetic tree of close species. (wikipedia.org)
  • The unusually cold temperature was at one of the highest known zebrafish locations at 1,576 m (5,171 ft) above sea level, although the species has been recorded to 1,795 m (5,889 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • Zebrafish are not the first species one might think of as being exposed to alcohol in their natural environment. (noldus.com)
  • 2018) In: Development and function of the zebrafish neuroendocrine system. (weizmann.ac.il)
  • Our data show that lxr is an important component of the regulatory network governing the lipid homeostasis during zebrafish development, which in turn may support a role of lxr for normal development of the central nervous sytem, including the retina. (scirp.org)
  • To further examine the role of telomerase during vertebrate development, the zebrafish telomerase reverse transcriptase (zTERT) was functionally characterized. (harvard.edu)
  • Unlocking the secrets of zebrafish heart formation through these detailed images could, in turn, reveal more about how human hearts grow and heal. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Zebrafish hearts are commonly used in cardiac research as models for the human heart. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Interestingly, while they are similar to human hearts, zebrafish hearts have the added ability to regenerate and heal themselves after injury. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Different pharmacological responses to CFTR inhibitor/blocker between zebrafish and human CFTR. (figshare.com)
  • To this end, we conducted research on Zebrafish, in which the laboratory at the Pasteur Institute in France specializes. (eurekalert.org)
  • I have been reading a lot about zebrafish research lately and I thought it would be nice to share some of my favorite articles with you. (noldus.com)
  • Posner has been studying zebrafish since his post-doctoral days at UCLA in 1998, bringing that research to Ashland the following year when he joined the AU faculty. (ashland.edu)
  • He and his students have been working with zebrafish ever since - always eye research. (ashland.edu)
  • There are thousands of people worldwide who work on zebrafish," said Posner, who attends a national eye research meeting annually and zebrafish conferences regularly. (ashland.edu)
  • Vitamin E deficiency during embryogenesis in zebrafish causes lasting metabolic and cognitive impairments despite refeeding adequate diets. (oregonstate.edu)