Yohimbine: A plant alkaloid with alpha-2-adrenergic blocking activity. Yohimbine has been used as a mydriatic and in the treatment of ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Adrenergic Agents: Drugs that act on adrenergic receptors or affect the life cycle of adrenergic transmitters. Included here are adrenergic agonists and antagonists and agents that affect the synthesis, storage, uptake, metabolism, or release of adrenergic transmitters.Sympathomimetics: Drugs that mimic the effects of stimulating postganglionic adrenergic sympathetic nerves. Included here are drugs that directly stimulate adrenergic receptors and drugs that act indirectly by provoking the release of adrenergic transmitters.Adrenergic Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate adrenergic receptors.Phentolamine: A nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist. It is used in the treatment of hypertension and hypertensive emergencies, pheochromocytoma, vasospasm of RAYNAUD DISEASE and frostbite, clonidine withdrawal syndrome, impotence, and peripheral vascular disease.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha: One of the two major pharmacological subdivisions of adrenergic receptors that were originally defined by the relative potencies of various adrenergic compounds. The alpha receptors were initially described as excitatory receptors that post-junctionally stimulate SMOOTH MUSCLE contraction. However, further analysis has revealed a more complex picture involving several alpha receptor subtypes and their involvement in feedback regulation.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Prazosin: A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION.Receptors, Adrenergic: Cell-surface proteins that bind epinephrine and/or norepinephrine with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes. The two major classes of adrenergic receptors, alpha and beta, were originally discriminated based on their cellular actions but now are distinguished by their relative affinity for characteristic synthetic ligands. Adrenergic receptors may also be classified according to the subtypes of G-proteins with which they bind; this scheme does not respect the alpha-beta distinction.Propranolol: A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.Adrenergic alpha-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate alpha adrenergic receptors.Isoproterenol: Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Phenylephrine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.Receptors, Adrenergic, beta: One of two major pharmacologically defined classes of adrenergic receptors. The beta adrenergic receptors play an important role in regulating CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, SMOOTH MUSCLE relaxation, and GLYCOGENOLYSIS.Clonidine: An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2: A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors found on both presynaptic and postsynaptic membranes where they signal through Gi-Go G-PROTEINS. While postsynaptic alpha-2 receptors play a traditional role in mediating the effects of ADRENERGIC AGONISTS, the subset of alpha-2 receptors found on presynaptic membranes signal the feedback inhibition of NEUROTRANSMITTER release.Idazoxan: A benzodioxane-linked imidazole that has alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist activity.Adrenergic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the actions of the endogenous adrenergic transmitters EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE.Dioxanes: 1,4-Diethylene dioxides. Industrial solvents. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), dioxane itself may "reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen." (Merck Index, 11th ed)Oxymetazoline: A direct acting sympathomimetic used as a vasoconstrictor to relieve nasal congestion. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1251)Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists: Compounds that bind to and activate ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.Xylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.Chlorprothixene: A thioxanthine with effects similar to the phenothiazine antipsychotics.Imidazoline Receptors: Receptors of CLONIDINE and other IMIDAZOLINES. Activity of the ligands was earlier attributed to ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. Endogenous ligands include AGMATINE, imidazoleacetic acid ribotide, and harman.Vas Deferens: The excretory duct of the testes that carries SPERMATOZOA. It rises from the SCROTUM and joins the SEMINAL VESICLES to form the ejaculatory duct.Agmatine: Decarboxylated arginine, isolated from several plant and animal sources, e.g., pollen, ergot, herring sperm, octopus muscle.Sympatholytics: Drugs that inhibit the actions of the sympathetic nervous system by any mechanism. The most common of these are the ADRENERGIC ANTAGONISTS and drugs that deplete norepinephrine or reduce the release of transmitters from adrenergic postganglionic terminals (see ADRENERGIC AGENTS). Drugs that act in the central nervous system to reduce sympathetic activity (e.g., centrally acting alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, see ADRENERGIC ALPHA-AGONISTS) are included here.Mydriasis: Dilation of pupils to greater than 6 mm combined with failure of the pupils to constrict when stimulated with light. This condition may occur due to injury of the pupillary fibers in the oculomotor nerve, in acute angle-closure glaucoma, and in ADIE SYNDROME.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.QuinoxalinesDihydroergotoxine: A mixture of three different hydrogenated derivatives of ERGOTAMINE: DIHYDROERGOCORNINE; DIHYDROERGOCRISTINE; and DIHYDROERGOCRYPTINE. Dihydroergotoxine has been proposed to be a neuroprotective agent and a nootropic agent. The mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not clear, but it can act as an alpha-adrenergic antagonist and a dopamine agonist. The methanesulfonate salts of this mixture of alkaloids are called ERGOLOID MESYLATES.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Dihydroergotamine: A 9,10alpha-dihydro derivative of ERGOTAMINE. It is used as a vasoconstrictor, specifically for the therapy of MIGRAINE DISORDERS.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Dexmedetomidine: A imidazole derivative that is an agonist of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. It is closely-related to MEDETOMIDINE, which is the racemic form of this compound.Penile Erection: The state of the PENIS when the erectile tissue becomes filled or swollen (tumid) with BLOOD and causes the penis to become rigid and elevated. It is a complex process involving CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEMS; HORMONES; SMOOTH MUSCLES; and vascular functions.Medetomidine: An agonist of RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 that is used in veterinary medicine for its analgesic and sedative properties. It is the racemate of DEXMEDETOMIDINE.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.Methysergide: An ergot derivative that is a congener of LYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE. It antagonizes the effects of serotonin in blood vessels and gastrointestinal smooth muscle, but has few of the properties of other ergot alkaloids. Methysergide is used prophylactically in migraine and other vascular headaches and to antagonize serotonin in the carcinoid syndrome.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Tetralones: A group of TETRAHYDRONAPHTHALENES containing a keto oxygen.Phenoxybenzamine: An alpha-adrenergic antagonist with long duration of action. It has been used to treat hypertension and as a peripheral vasodilator.Tolazoline: A vasodilator that apparently has direct actions on blood vessels and also increases cardiac output. Tolazoline can interact to some degree with histamine, adrenergic, and cholinergic receptors, but the mechanisms of its therapeutic effects are not clear. It is used in treatment of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.Drug-Seeking Behavior: Activities performed to obtain licit or illicit substances.Neuroeffector Junction: The synapse between a neuron (presynaptic) and an effector cell other than another neuron (postsynaptic). Neuroeffector junctions include synapses onto muscles and onto secretory cells.Adrenergic Neurons: Neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is EPINEPHRINE.Nordefrin: A norepinephrine derivative used as a vasoconstrictor agent.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1: A subclass of alpha-adrenergic receptors that mediate contraction of SMOOTH MUSCLE in a variety of tissues such as ARTERIOLES; VEINS; and the UTERUS. They are usually found on postsynaptic membranes and signal through GQ-G11 G-PROTEINS.Methoxamine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist that causes prolonged peripheral VASOCONSTRICTION.Catecholamines: A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.Azepines: Seven membered heterocyclic rings containing a NITROGEN atom.Parasympathetic Nervous System: The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.Guanabenz: An alpha-2 selective adrenergic agonist used as an antihypertensive agent.alpha-Methyltyrosine: An inhibitor of the enzyme TYROSINE 3-MONOOXYGENASE, and consequently of the synthesis of catecholamines. It is used to control the symptoms of excessive sympathetic stimulation in patients with PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed)Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
... serotonergic agents such as mCPP and LY-293,284, adrenergic agents such as yohimbine, antipsychotics/dopamine antagonists such ... A number of agents are used to provoke anxiety (anxiogens) or panic (panicogens) in experimental models. Some of the most ... This effect is in contrast to anxiolytic agents, which inhibits anxiety. Together these categories of psychoactive compounds ...
The proposed mechanism for yohimbine is stimulation of the adrenergic receptors that are associated with penile erection and ... Atipamezole Idazoxan Mirtazapine Yohimbine Finally, the agents carvedilol and labetalol are both α and β-blockers. Below are ... are a class of pharmacological agents that act as antagonists on α-adrenergic receptors (α-adrenoceptors). Historically, alpha- ... Yohimbine, an α2 blocker derived from the bark of the Coryanthe yohimbe tree, has been tested to increase libido and treat ...
... serotonergic agents such as mCPP and LY-293,284, adrenergic agents such as yohimbine, antipsychotics/dopamine antagonists such ... Anxiogenic effects can be measured by, for example, the hole-board test in rats and mice.[1] A number of agents are used to ... This effect is in contrast to anxiolytic agents, which inhibits anxiety. Together these categories of psychoactive compounds ...
... can also be a side effect of alpha-1 blockers (alpha1 adrenergic blocking agents). Alpha1 blockers ... and yohimbine. Orthostatic hypotension may cause accidental falls. It is also linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular ...
... anticancer agent Eptapirone - anxiolytic Gepirone - anxiolytic Ipsapirone - anxiolytic Piribedil - antiparkinsonian agent ... It is known to act as an antagonist of the α2-adrenergic receptor (Ki = 7.3-40 nM) and, to a much lesser extent, as a partial ... Gobert, A.; Newman-Tancredi, A.; Rivet, J.M.; Audinot, V.; Millan, M.J. (1997). "P.1.047 Yohimbine is a potent, partial agonist ... 1-PP is a common metabolite of most or all of the listed agents. Alnespirone, binospirone, and enilospirone, despite being ...
ISBN 1-4684-3171-4. Griffith RK (2013). "Chapter 10: Adrenergic Receptors and Drugs Affecting Adrenergic Neurotransmission". In ... Yohimbine is banned in many countries, but in the United States, because it is extracted from a plant rather than chemically ... Surviving Sepsis Campaign recommended norepinephrine as first line agent in treating septic shock which is unresponsive to ... Yohimbine acts as a male potency enhancer, but its usefulness for that purpose is limited by serious side-effects including ...
In combination with additional agents it can be used against flea-infestation as well. For the treatment of dogs amitraz is ... In case of an amitraz overdose in humans atipamezole or yohimbine, which act as α2-antagonists, can be used as antidote. ... Adverse effects in mammals are caused by amitraz' alpha-adrenergic agonist activity. Symptoms can include low blood pressure ... Its effectiveness is traced back on alpha-adrenergic agonist activity, interaction with octopamine receptors of the central ...
Piribedil - also D3 receptor agonist and α2-adrenergic antagonist Pramipexole - also D3, D4 receptor agonist Quinelorane - ... although most of these agents do act as D2 agonists, they affect other subtypes as well. Several selective D2 ligands are, ... commonly employed in positron emission tomography studies Typical antipsychotics SV 293 Yohimbine D2sh selective (presynaptic ... resulting in a range of side-effects and making them poor agents for scientific research. In similar manner, older dopamine ...
Yohimbine has been used to decrease glucose levels to a healthy level. In clinical settings, Yohimbine can reverse the adverse ... Xylazine is a potent α2 adrenergic agonist. When xylazine and other α2 adrenergic receptor agonists are administered, they ... Xylazine was discovered as an antihypertensive agent in 1962 by Farbenfabriken Bayer in Leverkusen, Germany. Results from early ... Combining yohimbine and 4-aminopyridine in an effort to antagonize xylazine is superior as compared to the administration of ...
Yohimbine can be used as an antidote to rapidly reverse the effects. Spadavecchia C, Arendt-Nielsen L, Andersen OK, ... Romifidine acts as an agonist at the α2 adrenergic receptor subtype. Side effects can include bradycardia and respiratory ... Comparison of morphine and butorphanol as pre-anaesthetic agents in combination with romifidine for field castration in ponies ...
... presumptively also mediated by α2 adrenergic receptors because it is reversed by yohimbine, an α2 antagonist. α2A selective ... June 2001). "Antiparkinsonian agent piribedil displays antagonist properties at native, rat, and cloned, human alpha(2)- ... "Inhibition of the lipolytic action of beta-adrenergic agonists in human adipocytes by alpha-adrenergic agonists". J. Lipid Res ... where it sits alongside the more plentiful α1-adrenergic receptor. The α2-adrenergic receptor binds both norepinephrine ...
... α2-adrenergic agonist (used to temporarily sedate animals) yohimbine - used to reverse effects of xylazine, also called an " ... Newer agents may be more appropriate as they have a longer duration of action and fewer drug interactions (i.e. ranitidine, ... α2-adrenergic antagonist used to reverse the sedative and analgesic effects of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonists benazepril ... dichlorophene - fungicide, germicide, and antimicrobial agent used for the removal of parasites such as ascarids, hookworms, ...
Scorza C, Silveira R, Nichols DE, Reyes-Parada M (July 1999). "Effects of 5-HT-releasing agents on the extracellullar ... The sympatholytic antihypertensive drug urapidil is an α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist and 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and it ... Trazodone Trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine Trimethoxyamphetamine Urapidil Vortioxetine Vilazodone Xaliproden Yohimbine[citation ... For these reasons, selective serotonin releasing agents (SSRAs) such as MDAI and MMAI have been proposed as novel ...
Yohimbine was used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in men until emergence of more efficient drugs. Some alkaloids ... Ergometrine is an agonist of α-adrenergic, 5-HT2 and partly D2 receptors. Compared with other ergot alkaloids, ergometrine has ... Other drugs that affect the cardiovascular system include ajmaline, which is a Class I antiarrhythmic agents, and ajmalicine, ... Yohimbine is more selective to α2 adrenoceptor; by blocking presynaptic α2-adrenoceptors, it increases the release of ...
Yohimbine may also be used in an emergency situation, but is not licensed. Veterinary anesthesia Sinclair MD (November 2003). " ... It is an α2 adrenergic agonist that can be administered as an intravenous drug solution with sterile water. The drug has been ... Often the dosage of induction agents (e.g. propofol) may be drastically reduced, as may the volumes of anasthetic gases (i.e. ... would not allow the administration of the inductive agent without risk to the veterinarian. As such the use of alpha-two ...
... is as an antagonist of several receptors in the following order of potency: 5-HT2A receptor (36 nM) , α1-adrenergic ... I.K. Morton; Judith M. Hall (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and Synonyms. Springer ... See also: Receptor/signaling modulators • Monoamine releasing agents • Adrenergics • Dopaminergics • Serotonergics • Monoamine ... Eison, Michael S.; Taylor, Duncan B.; Riblet, Leslie A. (1987). "Atypical Psychotropic Agents". In Williams, Michael; Malick, ...
... tramadol's analgesic effects are also partially reversed by α2-adrenergic receptor antagonists like yohimbine, the 5-HT3 ... methylene blue as well as numerous other therapeutic agents. As it is a substrate of CYP3A4 and CYP2D6, any agents with the ... In addition, a few studies have found that it also acts as a serotonin releasing agent (1-10 μM), similar in effect to ... It is not a norepinephrine releasing agent. Tramadol does not inhibit the reuptake or induce the release of dopamine. A ...
beta-blockers, β-blockers, beta-adrenergic blocking agents, beta antagonists, beta-adrenergic antagonists, beta-adrenoreceptor ... These agents are capable of exerting low-level agonist activity at the β-adrenergic receptor while simultaneously acting as a ... β1-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in the heart and in the kidneys.[4] β2-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in ... Agents specifically labeled for glaucoma *Betaxolol,[84] carteolol,[84] levobunolol,[84] timolol,[84] metipranolol[88] ...
... alpha1 adrenergic blocking agents). Alpha1 blockers inhibit vasoconstriction normally initiated by the baroreceptor reflex upon ... and yohimbine.[22] ...
A catecholaminergic agent (or drug) is a chemical which functions to directly modulate the catecholamine systems in the body or ... List of adrenergic drugs. This drug article relating to the nervous system is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.. ...
The most common side effect is eye irritation felt as stinging or burning, which occurs in up to a third of patients. Blepharoconjunctivitis occurs in up to 5% of patients. Rarer adverse effects include keratitis, edema and increased lacrimation.[2][3] Allergies are rare, but seem to be more common than under the related drug timolol.[1] If the substance reaches the nasal mucosa via the tear duct, it can be absorbed into the bloodstream and cause systemic side effects. These include orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure) and other effects on the heart and circulatory system, breathing problems in people with asthma, and skin symptoms such as itching and aggravation of psoriasis.[1] ...
It has been proposed that Osemozotan be used as an analgesic agent because of its activation of 5-HT 1A receptors that lead to ... This molecules bind with almost 1000 times greater affinity to 5-HT1A receptors than most other 5-HT, dopamine, or adrenergic ... Yohimbine. *Antagonists: Atypical antipsychotics (e.g., iloperidone, risperidone, sertindole). *AV965. *Beta blockers (e.g., ...
A comparison with other anxiolytic agents". Psychopharmacology. 152 (1): 55-66. doi:10.1007/s002130000449. PMID 11041316.. ... dopamine hD2/hD3 and h alpha2A-adrenergic receptors in relation to modulation of cortical monoamine release and activity in ... Yohimbine. *Antagonists: Atypical antipsychotics (e.g., iloperidone, risperidone, sertindole). *AV965. *Beta blockers (e.g., ...
... receptor D2 agonist bromocriptine inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by direct activation of the α2-adrenergic ... Yohimbine. *Antagonists: Atypical antipsychotics (e.g., iloperidone, risperidone, sertindole). *AV965. *Beta blockers (e.g., ...
It acts as a monoamine releasing agent with 20- to 48-fold selectivity for releasing dopamine versus serotonin. It is most ...
... is used as an antihypertensive agent postoperatively, and also intravenously (IV) to treat a hypertensive crisis.[4] ... Fenoldopam is used as an antihypertensive agent.[2] It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in September 1997 ... Since fenoldopam is the only intravenous agent that improves renal perfusion, in theory it could be beneficial in hypertensive ...
yohimbine synonyms, yohimbine pronunciation, yohimbine translation, English dictionary definition of yohimbine. n. An alkaloid ... It is used in medicine as an adrenergic blocking agent. Formula: C21H26N2O3 ... a drug that decreases the noradrenaline release from adrenergic nerve endings) and yohimbine, an [alpha]-2 adrenergic receptor ... com/yohimbine-supplement-sexual-enhancement-adults-harmful-kids-study-2570211) Yohimbine, Supplement For Sexual Enhancement In ...
A plant alkaloid with alpha-2-adrenergic blocking activity. Yohimbine has been used as a mydriatic in the treatment of ERECTILE ... Bio-Agent Context: Research Results. *Heterocyclic Compounds: 60*Alkaloids: 1065*Indole Alkaloids: 36*Secologanin Tryptamine ... Yohimbine (Yocon). Subscribe to New Research on Yohimbine A plant alkaloid with alpha-2-adrenergic blocking activity. Yohimbine ... Solvay Brand of Yohimbine Hydrochloride; Star Brand of Yohimbine Hydrochloride; StegroPharm Brand of Yohimbine Hydrochloride; ...
Intracerebroventricular injection of the adrenergic alpha-2-receptor agonist, clonidine, stimulated food intake. ... The present study was designed to investigate the role of brain adrenergic alpha-2-receptors on feeding regulation of layer- ... 0/Neurotransmitter Agents; 0/Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2; 146-48-5/Yohimbine; 4205-90-7/Clonidine; 60617-12-1/beta-Endorphin ... Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2 / agonists, antagonists & inhibitors, physiology*. Yohimbine / pharmacology. beta-Endorphin / ...
Yohimbine Yohimbine is an adrenergic blocking agent, prescribed for impotence or erectile dysfunction. ...
Indications And Clinical Uses: As an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent.. Contra-Indications: Renal diseases, and patients ... Reportedly, yohimbine exerts no significant influence on cardiac stimulation and other effects mediated by b-adrenergic ... Action And Clinical Pharmacology: Yohimbine blocks presynaptic alpha-2 adrenergic receptors. Its action on peripheral blood ... Yohimbine is a 3a-15a-20b-17a-hydroxy yohimbine-16a-carboxylic acid methyl ester. The alkaloid is found in Rubaceae and related ...
Sensory System Agents. Peripheral Nervous System Agents. Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Mydriatics. Autonomic Agents. Adrenergic ... Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists. Adrenergic Antagonists. Adrenergic Agents. Neurotransmitter Agents. Molecular Mechanisms of ... participants will be given a capsule containing either different doses of the drug yohimbine or a placebo (blank). Yohimbine is ... Yohimbine. Narcotics. Central Nervous System Depressants. Physiological Effects of Drugs. Analgesics. ...
... adrenergic receptor antagonists, compositions comprising .alpha.-adrenergic receptor antagonists that are optionally ... yohimbine, yohimbol, pseudoyohimbine and epi-3.alpha.-yohimbine.. Another class of .alpha.-adrenergic blocking agents are ... Another class of .alpha.-adrenergic blocking agents are alkaloids. These include, for example, "ergotoxine" which is a mixture ... Another class of .alpha.-adrenergic blocking agents are piperidines. These include, for example, haloperidol.. Each of the ...
Yohimbine has been the subject of some heated debates among fitness enthusiasts and industry insiders alike. Find out all about ... Medically, yohimbine is a pre-synaptic alpha-2-adrenergic blocking agent, also referred to as an alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist ... Also, yohimbine, through its alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist activity, has been shown to increase levels of ... This research collaborated their earlier observations found using yohimbine as a lipid-mobilizing agent, as well as from the ...
adrenergic blocking agent synonyms, adrenergic blocking agent pronunciation, adrenergic blocking agent translation, English ... dictionary definition of adrenergic blocking agent. adj. 1. Activated by or capable of releasing epinephrine or a similar ... substance, especially in the sympathetic nervous system: adrenergic receptors. ... Yohimbine has been identified by medical researchers as an alpha-2 adrenergic blocking agent useful in the treatment and ...
... serotonergic agents such as mCPP and LY-293,284, adrenergic agents such as yohimbine, antipsychotics/dopamine antagonists such ... A number of agents are used to provoke anxiety (anxiogens) or panic (panicogens) in experimental models. Some of the most ... This effect is in contrast to anxiolytic agents, which inhibits anxiety. Together these categories of psychoactive compounds ...
... including a sympathomimetic amine or an adrenergic blocking agent. Other agents within the histamine and epinephrine groups may ... One androgen compound is a drug comprised of equal amounts of nux vomica extract, methyl testosterone, and yohimbine, marketed ... Tolazoline is an adrenergic blocking agent related structurally to both histamine (a vasodilator) and epinephrine. Tolazoline ... 8. The method of claim 1, wherein said vasodilator is an adrenergic blocking agent. ...
Alpha 2 Adrenergic Antagonists. Used as reversal agents for injectable anesthetics. Yohimbine ... I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described. ... Stress and anesthetic agents decrease rate of filtration. *Reduction in elimination = increase in acidity and plasma ... assess the action, uses, and modes of administration of drugs and anesthetic agents used in the care of the surgical patient ...
Spealman and colleagues gave the now "abstinent" animals various doses of two α2-adrenergic blocking agents, yohimbine and RS- ... First, they gave the monkeys yohimbine plus clonidine, a drug that selectively blocks yohimbines effects on the α2-adrenergic ... To confirm that yohimbines behavioral effects were due to its inhibition of the α2-adrenergic system, rather than any of the ... Both of these findings pointed to α2-adrenergic suppression as the key to yohimbines effects in the first experiment. ...
Warning: Yohimbe Bark Extract Result Contaims Yohimbine, One Alpha-2 Adrenergic Blocking Agent. Not To Be Taken By Children, ...
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists. Adrenergic Antagonists. Adrenergic Agents. Neurotransmitter Agents. Molecular Mechanisms of ... Drug: clonidine,yohimbine,metoclopramide,alpha-methyldopa Oral Pharmacological Testing. clonidine 0.1-0.3 mg, yohimbine 5-10 mg ... yohimbine,metoclopramide,alpha-methyldopa Procedure: BodPod Procedure: Eye exam Procedure: Sleep study Procedure: Pain response ...
Adrenergic agents influenced (P = 0.01) the tonic response after, but not during, hyperventilation. Yohimbine reduced the ... Adrenergic agents influenced (P = 0.01) the tonic response after, but not during, hyperventilation. Yohimbine reduced the ... Adrenergic agents influenced (P = 0.01) the tonic response after, but not during, hyperventilation. Yohimbine reduced the ... Adrenergic agents influenced (P = 0.01) the tonic response after, but not during, hyperventilation. Yohimbine reduced the ...
The best Yohimbe supplement made from the extract of Yohimbe bark contains yohimbine, an alpha-2-adrenergic blocking agent that ... The yohimbine chemical is found in the bark of the yohimbine tree, extracted and sold in varying alkaloid concentrations. It is ... Now, the coming of yohimbine. Yohimbine molecule is a friend of alpha receptors. It binds more readily to alpha receptors than ... Yohimbine HCL: The yohimbine molecule, containing Yohimbe extract in combination with a hydrochloric acid. ...
Effects of xylazine, when used in combination with ketamine, are antagonized by yohimbine, an alpha-2-adrenergic blocking agent ... Alpha-2-adrenergic agonist *Common agents: xylazine, medetomidine, detomidine. *Desirable effects *CNS depressant, analgesic ... When used as pre-anesthetic agents the amount of general anesthetic agent needed is decreased. Upon painful stimulation, ... Injectable Anesthetic Agents. *Ketamine, the most common drug in this class, produces a state of chemical restraint and a type ...
What is alpha-adrenergic blocking agent? Meaning of alpha-adrenergic blocking agent medical term. What does alpha-adrenergic ... Looking for online definition of alpha-adrenergic blocking agent in the Medical Dictionary? alpha-adrenergic blocking agent ... or α2 receptor blocking agents (for example, yohimbine). ... As with beta-adrenergic blocking agents, alpha-blocking agents ... alpha-adrenergic blocking agent (alpha-blocker) (alpha-blocking agent) any of a group of drugs that selectively inhibit the ...
To establish a correlation between binding and a biological function, the ability of alpha adrenergic agents to stimulate or ... yohimbine. These studies suggest that rat renal plasma membranes contain binding sites with both alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic ... Moreover, the order of potencies of a variety of adrenergic agents, determined by competitive inhibition studies, suggested ... Renal alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic receptors: biochemical and pharmacological correlations.. J M Schmitz, R M Graham, A ...
... studied in the canine dorsal pedal artery in an attempt to characterize the peripheral vascular response to adrenergic agents ... This study reports on the effects of yohimbine and clonidine on the release of adrenal and renal catecholamines (epinephrine, E ... 1. 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) and flesinoxan, agents which show high affinity and selectivity for 5- ... The interactions between yohimbine (selective alpha 2-antagonist) with noradrenaline (mixed agonist) and phenylephrine ( ...
Use of anti-obesity agents in obese type 2 diabetic patients. Weight reduction has been shown to improve glycemic control and ... Phenylpropanolamine is an a1adrenergic agonist widely used in the United States for many years. In Brazil, experience with this ... yohimbine (8 mg), T3 (25 µg), phenylpropanolamine (25 mg), or an ephedrine (25 mg) and aminophylline (100 mg) association (56 ... Sibutramine: a review of the pharmacology of a novel anti-obesity agent. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1997;21(suppl):S25-9. [ ...
30 These agents contain an indole ring and are, in some respects, structurally similar to yohimbine.30 These agents have been ... In a recent report, McWhirter and Morris45 described the use of an opioid agonist (dihydrocodeine) and an α-adrenergic ... One of the major problems in evaluating the potential uses and safety of an herbal agent such as kratom is the lack of ... They also noted that the agents were being used primarily for "musculoskeletal or other conditions involving chronic pain."1 ...
... compositions of an α-adrenergic receptor antagonist (α-antagonist), which can optionally be substituted with at least one NO or ... Disclosed are nitrosated and nitrosylated α-adrenergic receptor antagonists, ... Another class of such α-adrenergic blocking agents are alkaloids. These include, for example, "ergotoxine," which is a mixture ... Another indole alkaloid is yohimbine. This compound is a competitive antagonist that is selective for α2 -adrenergic receptors ...
Oral medications include neuropharmacologic agents that are adrenergic receptor antagonists (eg, phentolamine, yohimbine, ... To obtain therapeutic effects these agents Error 452 SECTION nutritional matters in at least every (eg 1. The pancreatic ...
  • Platelets isolated from patients with hypercholesterolemia are more sensitive in vitro to various aggregating agents, including epinephrine, than those isolated from normocholesterolemic subjects. (nih.gov)
  • This study assessed whether platelet hyperreactivity to epinephrine in hypercholesterolemia is associated with higher alpha 2-adrenergic receptor density or affinity for epinephrine. (nih.gov)
  • Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptor density is increased in hypercholesterolemia and directly correlates with plasma total and levels of LDL cholesterol, providing at least a partial explanation for the enhanced platelet response to epinephrine that is observed in hypercholesterolemia. (nih.gov)
  • Stimulation of food intake caused by neuropeptide Y and beta-endorphin was attenuated by co-injection with yohimbine. (biomedsearch.com)
  • However, yohimbine did not block prolactin-releasing peptide stimulation of food intake. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Yohimbine has a mild antidiuretic action, probably via stimulation of hypothalamic centres and release of posterior pituitary hormone. (rxmed.com)
  • Our hypothesis is based on studies of brain noradrenergic function in the stump-tailed monkey (Mscaca arctoides or spscioss) utilizing and combining electrical stimulation or lesions of the major noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) with the administration of pharmacologic agents which have relatively specific interactions with noradrenergic function. (baillement.com)
  • Nitric oxide and beta-adrenergic stimulation are major regulators of preprandial and postprandial subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in humans. (ox.ac.uk)
  • This review offers an overview of physiological agents, current therapeutics, as well as medications, which have been extensively used and those agents not currently available or non-classically considered anti-obesity drugs. (scielo.br)
  • Information presented in this review offer an overview of physiological agents, current therapeutics, as well as medications widely used in the past and no longer available. (scielo.br)
  • However, the mechanism of action for this protection and the physiological role of the α2 adrenergic system in the retina is not well understood. (arvojournals.org)
  • Stevens, CW & Brenner, GM 1996, ' Spinal administration of adrenergic agents produces analgesia in amphibians ', European Journal of Pharmacology , vol. 316, no. 2-3, pp. 205-210. (okstate.edu)
  • Flavahan, NA & Vanhoutte, PM 1986, ' Effect of cooling on alpha-1 and alpha-2, adrenergic responses in canine saphenous and femoral veins ', Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics , vol. 238, no. 1, pp. 139-147. (elsevier.com)
  • Employing a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we investigated the role of the α2 adrenergic receptor in extinction of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and lithium chloride-induced conditioned place aversion. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • We used the novel "microinfusion" technique, which allows for simultaneous local delivery of pharmacological agents (or contralateral saline) and measurement of ATBF with the 133Xe washout method. (ox.ac.uk)
  • SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVCmax) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. (shu.ac.uk)
  • The present invention relates generally to pharmacological methods for the prevention or amelioration of sleep-related breathing disorders via administration of agents or combinations of agents that possess serotonin-related pharmacological activity. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • This invention generally relates to methods for the pharmacological treatment of breathing disorders and, more specifically, to the administration of agents or compositions having serotonin-related receptor activity for the alleviation of sleep apnea (central and obstructive) and other sleep-related breathing disorders. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • In a study published in 1997 in the International journal of impotence research, it reported yohimbine HCL as significantly more effective than placebo. (proteinfactory.com)
  • In another event involving 86 patients with erectile dysfunction with no clearly identified organic or psychological causes, yohimbine hydrochloride was put to the test in a 1977 German double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical test. (proteinfactory.com)
  • dose of either yohimbine hydrochloride or placebo before completing a battery of impulsivity measures. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored throughout the study.Participants in the yohimbine group showed higher blood pressure and better response inhibition in the Stop Signal Task, relative to the placebo group. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Augmenting treatment efficiency in exposure therapy for PTSD: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of yohimbine HCl. (tripdatabase.com)
  • A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial (NCT 01031979) piloted yohimbine augmentation in 26 males with combat-related PTSD. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Participants were given one-time dose of yohimbine or placebo prior to the first imaginal exposure. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Thus, there is a continued need for new agents with improved efficacy and safety profile for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other types of psychosis. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Strictly speaking, because the action of PB administered prior to nerve-agent exposure is to increase the efficacy of the antidotes atropine and 2-pralidoxime chloride, PB is an antidote enhancer rather than a pretreatment capable of acting by itself in the absence of antidotes (Ellenhorn et al. (studyres.com)
  • The currently fielded pretreatment for nerve -agent exposure is pyridostigmine bromide (PB). (studyres.com)
  • This publication is intended to address the major issues that military health-care providers need to understand concerning nerve-agent pretreatment with PB. (studyres.com)
  • In military settings, PB is used as a pretreatment for nerve -agent intoxication. (studyres.com)
  • 1997). However, the use of the term pretreatment to describe enhancement of nerve -agent antidotes by pre -exposure use of PB has become so entrenched in medical and military settings that this term is unlikely to be supplanted by antidotal enhancement in the foreseeable future. (studyres.com)
  • The present invention describes novel nitrosated and/or nitrosylated potassium channel activators, and novel compositions comprising at least one nitrosated and/or nitrosylated potassium channel activator, and, optionally, at least one compound that donates, transfers or releases nitric oxide, elevates endogenous levels of endothelium-derived relaxing factor, stimulates endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide or is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase and/or at least one vasoactive agent. (google.es)
  • Yohimbine exerts a stimulating action on the mood and may increase anxiety. (rxmed.com)
  • This effect is in contrast to anxiolytic agents, which inhibits anxiety. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of agents are used to provoke anxiety (anxiogens) or panic (panicogens) in experimental models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although investigators are only beginning to characterize norepinephrine's role in addiction, a growing of animal and clinical research suggests important connections between the adrenergic system, mood and anxiety disorders, and the depression-like symptoms experienced by people trying to overcome cocaine addiction," Dr. Baumann says. (drugabuse.gov)
  • Yohimbine's peripheral autonomic nervous system effect is to increase parasympathetic (cholinergic) and decrease sympathetic (adrenergic) activity. (rxmed.com)
  • 1992). Release of GH is primarily controlled by the balance of activation via GHRH and inhibition via somatostatin, which are in turn modulated by cholinergic and dopaminergic, as well as adrenergic inputs (Devesa et al. (isiarticles.com)
  • Moreover, research on the effects of herbal supplements and their active constituents may provide insight that could lead to the development of new and more effective therapeutic agents. (jaoa.org)
  • Cardiovascular Response to Xylazine and Hellabrun mixture with Yohimbine as reversal in Asian Elephant. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • PB is a medication with a long history of civilian use for a) treatment of patients with myasthenia gravis, b) reversal of the effects of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents administered during general anesthesia, and c) treatment (as a second-line agent if edrophonium supplies are depleted) of envenomation by Asian snakes or of tetrodotoxin poisoning (Leikin and Paloucek 1995). (studyres.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Nitric oxide seems to determine the absolute level of ATBF, whereas a major proportion of the postprandial enhancement of ATBF is under beta-adrenergic regulation in vivo in humans. (ox.ac.uk)