Pinus sylvestris: A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the source of pinosylvin. It is sometimes called Scotch pine or Scots pine, which is also a common name for other species of this genus.Pinus: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.Gymnosperms: Gymnosperms are a group of vascular plants whose seeds are not enclosed by a ripened ovary (fruit), in contrast to ANGIOSPERMS whose seeds are surrounded by an ovary wall. The seeds of many gymnosperms (literally, "naked seed") are borne in cones and are not visible. Taxonomists now recognize four distinct divisions of extant gymnospermous plants (CONIFEROPHYTA; CYCADOPHYTA; GINKGOPHYTA; and GNETOPHYTA).Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Casearia: A plant genus of the family FLACOURTIACEAE. Members contain casearins which are clerodane type DITERPENES.Hymenoptera: An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.Pinus taeda: A plant species of the genus PINUS which is the subject of genetic study.Malva: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE, order Malvales, subclass Dilleniida. The common name of 'Mallow' may sometimes get confused with other plants.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Mycorrhizae: Symbiotic combination (dual organism) of the MYCELIUM of FUNGI with the roots of plants (PLANT ROOTS). The roots of almost all higher plants exhibit this mutually beneficial relationship, whereby the fungus supplies water and mineral salts to the plant, and the plant supplies CARBOHYDRATES to the fungus. There are two major types of mycorrhizae: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae.LithuaniaOils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Pinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Basidiomycota: A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Rorippa: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that includes several marshy plants. The common name of watercress is also used for NASTURTIUM & TROPAEOLUM.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.ScotlandGenetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.IdahoRocky Mountain Spotted Fever: An acute febrile illness caused by RICKETTSIA RICKETTSII. It is transmitted to humans by bites of infected ticks and occurs only in North and South America. Characteristics include a sudden onset with headache and chills and fever lasting about two to three weeks. A cutaneous rash commonly appears on the extremities and trunk about the fourth day of illness.Nurseries: Facilities which provide care for infants.Rickettsia rickettsii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is the etiologic agent of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. Its cells are slightly smaller and more uniform in size than those of RICKETTSIA PROWAZEKII.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Schools, Nursery: Schools for children usually under five years of age.Nurseries, Hospital: Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.SwitzerlandSnow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Floods: Sudden onset water phenomena with different speed of occurrence. These include flash floods, seasonal river floods, and coastal floods, associated with CYCLONIC STORMS; TIDALWAVES; and storm surges.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Cyclonic Storms: Non-frontal low-pressure systems over tropical or sub-tropical waters with organized convection and definite pattern of surface wind circulation.Acetylation: Formation of an acetyl derivative. (Stedman, 25th ed)Siderophores: Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Tubulin: A microtubule subunit protein found in large quantities in mammalian brain. It has also been isolated from SPERM FLAGELLUM; CILIA; and other sources. Structurally, the protein is a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 120,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of 5.8S. It binds to COLCHICINE; VINCRISTINE; and VINBLASTINE.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Hydroxamic Acids: A class of weak acids with the general formula R-CONHOH.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.
  • With Nei's genetic distance (D) the largest mean genetic distance (D = 0.171) was found between P. sylvestris and P. mugo , a distance corresponding to that between other closely related pine species. (springer.com)
  • Peak season multi-species cover of vegetation and burrow mound density were estimated for 3 years along a transect that ran from the geometric center of a black-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) colony, to its edge. (usda.gov)
  • Description of a new species of Dioryctria zeller on Pinus sylvestris var. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amount of data on genomewide nucleotide diversity from different species has increased during the past few years. (genetics.org)
  • family Pinaceae ) is a species of pine native to Europe and Asia , ranging from Ireland , Great Britain and Portugal in the west, east to eastern Siberia , south to the Caucasus Mountains , and as far north as well inside the Arctic circle in Scandinavia (including Lapland ). (thefullwiki.org)
  • We explored the phylogeography of a protected moth, Graellsia isabellae , and its two recognised host-plant species ( Pinus sylvestris and P. nigra ) in order to seek for any concordance useful to disentangle the evolutionary history of this iconic lepidopteran. (biomedcentral.com)
  • P. sylvestris is the host species of G. isabellae in the Central Iberian System, Pyrenees and Alps, where the presence of P. nigra is scarcer. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus , causes pine wilt disease (PWD) in Pinus species given suitable climatic conditions. (springer.com)
  • Predicted future temperature increases up to 2050 under both emission scenarios will lead to more stress, placing extensive areas of Germany at risk of PWD, including the north-eastern part where Pinus sylvestris is the dominant tree species. (springer.com)
  • Ectomycorrhizas on spruce were dominated by Wilcoxina , Amphinema and Tylospora , while on pine - by Suillus and Thelephora species. (sciendo.com)
  • Natural hybridisation was postulated between the closely related pine species Pinus sylvestris and the P. mugo complex, however no clear evidence on propagation of mature hybrids in nature has been documented so far. (ebscohost.com)
  • Focuses on a study which evaluated the radiata pine poles in southern Chile following the guidelines established by the O5.1 standard of The American National Standards Institute for approval of foreign species. (ebscohost.com)
  • Blue pine ( Pinus wallichiana ), the dominant species of pine widely grown in the Himalayan region including Jammu and Kashmir State, has been found affected by needle cast disease. (scialert.net)
  • and comparing the pathogen on P. wallichiana with L. pinastri , L. pini-execlsae and L. nitens , it was found that there were great variations between the three species. (scialert.net)
  • In the present study, a new species of Lophodermium isolated from the conifer needles, causing needle blight disease in Pinus wallichiana and P. halepensis is reported on the basis of conventional and molecular identification methods. (scialert.net)
  • Of the two-leaved species, P. sylvestris , the pine of northern Europe, may be taken as a type. (wikisource.org)
  • For example, defense mechanisms have been described in conifer trees such as Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) and Scotch pine ( Pinus sylvestris ) which can be constitutive or induced in response to biotic and abiotic stress and lead to the formation of physical barriers (i.e. formation of terpenoid-based oleoresin filled traumatic resin ducts), and/or the synthesis of phenolic compounds, volatile and nonvolatile terpenoid compounds. (mpg.de)
  • It is an evergreen coniferous tree growing up to 25 m in height and 1 m trunk diameter when mature, exceptionally to 35-45 m tall and 1.7 m trunk diameter and on very productive sites (in Estonia , there are some 220 year old trees that are 46 metres tall in the forests of Järvselja [ 6 ] ). (thefullwiki.org)
  • Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200 million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. (diva-portal.org)
  • In recent years, the multiple functions and potential uses of forests have attracted interest. (europa.eu)
  • It grows vigorously in Lapland on the lower ground, and is found even at an elevation of 700 ft., while in south Norway it occurs up to 3000 ft., though the great forests from which " Norway pine " timber is chiefly derived are on the comparatively lower slopes of the south-eastern dales: in the highest situations it dwindles to a mere bush. (wikisource.org)
  • Our study investigated how elevated temperature, and the combination of elevated temperature with elevated CO 2 , affected photosynthetic rates, leaf carbohydrates, freezing tolerance, and proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold hardening in Eastern white pine ( Pinus strobus ). (plantphysiol.org)
  • Filppula S., Szmit A. E., Savolainen O. (1992) Genetic comparison between Pinus sylvestris and P. mugo using isoenzymes and chloroplast DNA. (springer.com)
  • Hence, it is important to conduct experiments in different situations and habitats, and across different years to evaluate the repeatability of behaviours and assess the generality of previously reported genetic effects on behavioural variation. (biologists.org)
  • Common gorse may also be associated with maritime pine ( Pinus pinaster ), bluegum eucalyptus ( Eucalyptus globulus ), shrubby blackberry ( Rubus fruticosus ), western brackenfern ( Pteridium aquilinum ), European chestnut ( Castanea sativa ), English oak ( Quercus robur ), and sycamore maple ( Acer pseudoplatanus ) [ 58 ]. (fed.us)
  • Can wood density be efficiently selected at early stage in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait. (ebscohost.com)
  • Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. (diva-portal.org)
  • The relative expression of developmentally regulated genes was analyzed during zygotic embryo development in Pinus taeda and somatic embryo development/maturation in P. taeda and Pinus oocarpa. (ebscohost.com)
  • May be cut to the ground in late winter each year and grown as an herbaceous perennial in somewhat the same manner as buddleia. (agriseek.com)
  • UK-grown larch, larch from Siberia or regions where trees are slow-growing and older than 60 years have a similar expected service life with a similar age and growth pattern. (greenspec.co.uk)
  • Four-year-old Pinus sylvestris trees were exposed to ammonia (16, 55, 110 ppb for 24 h d-1)and ozone (0, 45 and 68 ppb, 9 h d-1) in a factorial design in open-top chambers for 15 months. (wur.nl)
  • Whether your space is itty-bitty or super spacious, these terrific trees add year-round interest and come in countless sizes, shapes, and foliage colors. (birdsandblooms.com)
  • After 10 years (7 in Nebraska), trees from 50º to 55º latitude and 20º to 40º longitude survived best, were taller, and had greener winter foliage. (usda.gov)
  • Bark beetle native to the Americas but causing serious damage to pine trees following its introduction to China. (shootgardening.co.uk)
  • The Romans used pine nuts for food, and the trees were used for sailing masts. (anniesremedy.com)
  • A model was run for Germany to assess the potential that Pinus sylvestris trees succumb to pine wilt once B. xylophilus has been introduced. (springer.com)
  • Under the current climatic conditions, P. sylvestris would not develop PWD assuming that trees are healthy. (springer.com)
  • ATP's forestry and community tree planting programs plant an average of 230,000-250,000 trees and shrubs every year. (hetq.am)
  • Natural hybridization between Pinus oocarpa Schiede ex Schlechtendal and P. pringlei Shaw was detected in a sample of 30 individual trees living in simpatry including putative hybrid trees. (ebscohost.com)
  • The article provides an answer to a question regarding pine trees. (ebscohost.com)
  • Subfossil pine trees, preserved for thousands of years in the inoxic mud layers of some lakes in Finnish Lapland make possible the construction of multimillenial timeseries of climate, which can be dated precisely at annual resolution. (luomus.fi)
  • However, in harsher environments such as Glen Affric, fruiting is irregular, and mast seed production, when all the trees produce a heavy crop, occurs every few years, with very little fruiting taking place in between. (treesforlife.org.uk)
  • The seed cones are red at pollination, then pale brown, globose and 4-8 mm diameter in their first year, expanding to full size in their second year, pointed ovoid-conic, green, then grey-green to yellow-brown at maturity, 3-7.5 cm in length. (thefullwiki.org)
  • This golden Dawn Redwood, Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Goldrush', is a deciduous conifer, and has only been available in the UK for about ten years, an excellent recent introduction, but does need a bit of space. (growsonyou.com)
  • A controlled heat treatment to temperatures over 200°C confers improved durability and stability to timber, typically European redwood (Pinus sylvestris).Expected service life for thermally modified, uncoated timber cladding is 30 years. (greenspec.co.uk)
  • In order to evaluate the usefulness of these management policies on reduced erosion in semi-arid landscapes, we compared 5 vegetation cover types (bare soil, dry grassland, shrublands, afforested dry grasslands and afforested thorn shrublands), monitored in 15 hydrological plots (8 2 m), in the Vento´ s catchment (Alicante, SE Spain), over 4 years (1996 to 1999). (scribd.com)
  • According to the American Conifer Society, dwarf varieties can grow 1 to 6 inches per year, but make sure to check the tags on your specific variety for growth and mature size. (birdsandblooms.com)
  • Nevertheless, the daily average values of photosynthesis in the summer were similar for pine stands with bilberry, heather, and dwarf shrub-polytric as understory dominants. (deepdyve.com)
  • Forest management policies in Mediterranean areas have traditionally encouraged land cover changes, with the establishment of tree cover (Aleppo pine) in natural or degraded ecosystems for soil conservation purposes: to reduce soil erosion and to increase the vegetation structure. (scribd.com)
  • Soil losses in vegetation plots averaged 0.04 Mg ha 1 year 1 and increased 40-fold in open-land plots. (scribd.com)
  • Aleppo pine) in natural or degraded ecosystems for soil conservation purposes: to reduce soil erosion and to increase the vegetation structure. (scribd.com)
  • Pine needle oil is used as a component in cough and cold medicines, vaporizer fluids, nasal decongestants , and analgesic ointments. (anniesremedy.com)
  • In fact conifers are the most diverse group of plants on the planet, and included here are just a sample of photos to show some of the more subtle changes and textures that some conifer cultivars display especially at this time of year and can be all too easily overlooked by many gardeners. (growsonyou.com)
  • Wreaths and pine cone displays can take the place of a bulky tree if you like, and a few drops essential oil of pine can freshen the scent. (anniesremedy.com)
  • At the end of the day, the organic and pure version is simply an essential oil and we also know that various other parts of the pine tree are extremely beneficial for human health so it doesn't surprise me that this product is effective for a multitude of health problems. (earthclinic.com)
  • Recalculation of three-year data per entire crown yielded an annual average carbon assimilation of 1.54 g C/(g dry wt year). (deepdyve.com)
  • 2. Here, we develop a stochastic scenario tree model of diagnostic sensitivity, allowing for a mixture of tissue sample types (lymph nodes and brain) and qualities while accounting for different detection probabilities during the CWD infection, lasting 2-3 years. (uio.no)
  • The invigorating pine scent the pervades the home when the tree is brought indoors is perhaps the signature aroma of the holiday season, a tradition that predates Christmas. (anniesremedy.com)
  • The aim of the current study was to investigate the process of microgametogenesis and diagnostic of condition of the Pinus sylvestris male generative system in the tree stands exposed to the influence of Reftinskiy GRES power plant (RGpp) emission during ontogenesis in connection with the level of technogenic pollution. (scirp.org)
  • De la Fuente B, Saura S, Beck PS (2018) Predicting the spread of an invasive tree pest: the pine wood nematode in Southern Europe. (springer.com)
  • MIKHAYLOVKA, Lori--Following a year of 25th anniversary celebrations and the inaugural Forest Summit in October, Armenia Tree Project planted its six millionth tree this fall. (hetq.am)
  • Nowhere more abundant than in the Scandinavian peninsula, this tree is the true fir (fur, fum) of the old Norsemen, and still retains the name among their descendants in Britain, though botanically now classed as a pine. (wikisource.org)
  • Seed production begins when the tree is about 15 years old, and in mild climates, rowan will fruit each year. (treesforlife.org.uk)
  • New infestations either occur in previously undisturbed forest stands ( i.e. , spot initiation) or depend on proximity to previous years' infestations ( i.e. , spot spreading). (sisef.it)
  • In this paper we use two climate models to test how Earth's vegetation responded to changes in climate over the last 120 000 years, looking at warm interglacial climates like today, cold ice-age glacial climates, and intermediate climates. (clim-past.net)
  • The following climate scenarios have been modelled: current climatic conditions, an exceptional hot year (2003) and two future climatic conditions with target year 2050 for low (B1) and middle (A1B) emission scenarios based on the IPCC classification. (springer.com)
  • Lodgepole pine from Canada is a 'moderately' to 'slightly durable' softwood, which is treated with preservative and coated in a high-performance paint system at the manufacturing plant. (greenspec.co.uk)
  • Growth and stem straightness are the two main selection criteria in the French maritime pine breeding programme. (ebscohost.com)
  • The lifespan is normally 150-300 years, with the oldest recorded specimens (in Sweden) just over 700 years. (thefullwiki.org)
  • The project relies on an existing supra-long collection of pinewood ( Pinus sylvestris ) material, complemented with recently collected specimens, covering the mid and late Holocene times continuously through the millennia since 5634 BCE until the present-day (Eronen et al. (luomus.fi)
  • Since it's very difficult to control through conventional disease treatments, we use a trunk injection that will prevent infection of your sycamore specimens for 3 years. (savatree.com)