Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.HandwritingAgraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Manuscripts, MedicalMedicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Literature, ModernReadingInkEducation of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Famous PersonsScience: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Paleography: The study of ancient inscriptions and modes of writing. It includes the deciphering of manuscripts and other forms to determine their date, provenance, etc. (Webster's 1st ed)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.ArtHistory, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Manuscripts as Topic: Compositions written by hand, as one written before the invention or adoption of printing. A manuscript may also refer to a handwritten copy of an ancient author. A manuscript may be handwritten or typewritten as distinguished from a printed copy, especially the copy of a writer's work from which printed copies are made. (Webster, 3d ed)Correspondence as Topic: Communication between persons or between institutions or organizations by an exchange of letters. Its use in indexing and cataloging will generally figure in historical and biographical material.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Civilization: The distinctly human attributes and attainments of a particular society.Philosophy, MedicalDystonic Disorders: Acquired and inherited conditions that feature DYSTONIA as a primary manifestation of disease. These disorders are generally divided into generalized dystonias (e.g., dystonia musculorum deformans) and focal dystonias (e.g., writer's cramp). They are also classified by patterns of inheritance and by age of onset.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Tremor: Cyclical movement of a body part that can represent either a physiologic process or a manifestation of disease. Intention or action tremor, a common manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES, is aggravated by movement. In contrast, resting tremor is maximal when there is no attempt at voluntary movement, and occurs as a relatively frequent manifestation of PARKINSON DISEASE.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Word Processing: Text editing and storage functions using computer software.Poetry as Topic: Literary and oral genre expressing meaning via symbolism and following formal or informal patterns.American Heart Association: A voluntary organization concerned with the prevention and treatment of heart and vascular diseases.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Graphite: An allotropic form of carbon that is used in pencils, as a lubricant, and in matches and explosives. It is obtained by mining and its dust can cause lung irritation.Pica: The persistent eating of nonnutritive substances for a period of at least one month. (DSM-IV)Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.

Do studies of the nature of cases mislead about the reality of cases? A response to Pattison et al. (1/547)

This article questions whether many are misled by current case studies. Three broad types of style of case study are described. A stark style, based on medical case studies, a fictionalised style in reaction, and a personal statement made in discussion groups by an original protagonist. Only the second type fits Pattison's category. Language remains an important issue, but to be examined as the case is lived in discussion rather than as a potentially reductionist study of the case as text.  (+info)

Pure apraxic agraphia with abnormal writing stroke sequences: report of a Japanese patient with a left superior parietal haemorrhage. (2/547)

A 67 year old Japanese male patient had pure agraphia after a haemorrhage in the left superior parietal lobule. He developed difficulty in letter formation but showed no linguistic errors, consistent with the criteria of apraxic agraphia. He manifested a selective disorder of sequencing writing strokes, although he was able to orally state the correct sequences. The patient's complete recovery after 1 month, without new learning, showed that he had manifested a selective disorder of writing stroke sequences. These findings indicate that the final stage of the execution of writing according to acquired sequential memory shown as a stroke sequence can be selectively disturbed, and should be considered to be distinct from the ability of character imagery and the knowledge of the writing stroke sequence itself. This case also indicates that the left superior parietal lobule plays an important part in the execution of writing.  (+info)

The limited use of digital ink in the private-sector primary care physician's office. (3/547)

Two of the greatest obstacles to the implementation of the standardized electronic medical record are physician and staff acceptance and the development of a complete standardized medical vocabulary. Physicians have found the familiar desktop computer environment cumbersome in the examination room and the coding and hierarchic structure of existing vocabulary inadequate. The author recommends the use of digital ink, the graphic form of the pen computer, in telephone messaging and as a supplement in the examination room encounter note. A key concept in this paper is that the development of a standard electronic medical record cannot occur without the thorough evaluation of the office environment and physicians' concerns. This approach reveals a role for digital ink in telephone messaging and as a supplement to the encounter note. It is hoped that the utilization of digital ink will foster greater physician participation in the development of the electronic medical record.  (+info)

Survey of outpatient sputum cytology: influence of written instructions on sample quality and who benefits from investigation. (4/547)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluated quality of outpatient sputum cytology and whether written instructions to patients improve sample quality and to identify variables that predict satisfactory samples. DESIGN: Prospective randomised study. SETTING: Outpatient department of a district general hospital. PATIENTS: 224 patients recruited over 18 months whenever their clinicians requested sputum cytology, randomized to receive oral or oral and written advice. INTERVENTIONS: Oral advice from nurse on producing a sputum sample (114 patients); oral advice plus written instructions (110). MAIN MEASURES: Percentages of satisfactory sputum samples and of patients who produced more than one satisfactory sample; clinical or radiological features identified from subsequent review of patients' notes and radiographs associated with satisfactory samples; final diagnosis of bronchial cancer. RESULTS: 588 sputum samples were requested and 477 received. Patients in the group receiving additional written instructions produced 75(34%) satisfactory samples and 43(39%) of them one or more sets of satisfactory samples. Corresponding figures for the group receiving only oral advice (80(31%) and 46(40%) respectively)were not significantly different. Logistic regression showed that radiological evidence of collapse or consolidation (p<0.01) and hilar mass (p<0.05) were significant predictors of the production of satisfactory samples. Sputum cytology confirmed the diagnosis in only 9(17%) patients with bronchial carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of outpatients' sputum samples was poor and was not improved by written instructions. Sputum cytology should be limited to patients with probable bronchial cancer unsuitable for surgery. IMPLICATIONS: Collection of samples and requests for sputum cytology should be reviewed in other hospitals.  (+info)

Practical suggestions in the writing of a research paper. (5/547)

Writing a scientific article requires proper planning and a methodical approach. This article provides practical tips to organize the materials before writing, and discusses how to approach the writing of different parts of an article; that is, introduction, materials and methods, results, and discussion. It also provides guidelines on authorship, citing references, selecting photographs, tables and legends, and finally on style, grammar and syntax.  (+info)

Tales from the front lines: the creative essay as a tool for teaching genetics. (6/547)

In contrast to the more typical mock grant proposals or literature reviews, we describe the use of the creative essay as a novel tool for teaching human genetics at the college level. This method has worked well for both nonmajor and advanced courses for biology majors. The 10- to 15-page essay is written in storylike form and represents a student's response to the choice of 6-8 scenarios describing human beings coping with various genetic dilemmas. We have found this tool to be invaluable both in developing students' ability to express genetic concepts in lay terms and in promoting student awareness of genetic issues outside of the classroom. Examples from student essays are presented to illustrate these points, and guidelines are suggested regarding instructor expectations of student creativity and scientific accuracy. Methods of grading this assignment are also discussed.  (+info)

Dear author--advice from a retiring editor. (7/547)

This commentary, detailing the handling of a manuscript by the editor and guiding authors on preparing manuscripts and responding to reviews, provides parting advice to authors from a retiring editor. A close reading of this commentary will give some insight into the editorial process at the American Journal of Epidemiology through the observations of one of its editors.  (+info)

Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. (8/547)

CONTEXT: Preparing a manuscript for publication in a medical journal is hard work. OBJECTIVE: To make it easier to prepare a readable manuscript. APPROACH: Start early--A substantial portion of the manuscript can be written before the project is completed. Even though you will revise it later, starting early will help document the methods and guide the analysis. Focus on high-visibility components--Pay attention to what readers are most likely to look at: the title, abstract, tables, and figures. Strive to develop a set of tables and figures that convey not only the major results but also the basic methods. Develop a systematic approach to the body of the paper--A standard framework can make it easier to write the introduction, methods, results, and discussion. An obvious organization with frequent subheadings and consistent labels makes the paper easier to read. Finish strong--Improve the paper by sharing it with others and by learning how to elicit and receive their feedback. Take the time to incorporate useful feedback by revising frequently.  (+info)

  • As a Writing Fellow, you will learn about the theory and practice of peer tutoring in a course offered Spring 2014 (T/Th 9:30-10:45), and will begin serving as a Fellow for Fall 2015-Spring 2016 earning $1000-$1500 each semester. (clemson.edu)
  • Writing Fellows, paired with Honors Seminars, comment upon drafts of papers three weeks before the due date, and then meet with each student for a one-on-one conference. (clemson.edu)
  • Therapists, coaches, healthcare professionals, and educators have known for decades that expressive writing is a powerful tool for better living, learning, and healing. (rowman.com)
  • The entries in Theory and Research feature interviews with outstanding researchers in Writing Center Studies and in rhetoric and composition. (wisc.edu)
  • Writing Fellows represent 8 majors, come from 7 states, and work with students from every discipline. (clemson.edu)
  • The downside to using a rubric, however, was that it may have stifled the creativity of some students who preferred a different style of writing and processing the material. (facultyfocus.com)
  • Our team of two physicians and two medical educators developed a descriptive matrix rubric that outlined five areas of writing competence: (1) organization, (2) professional presentation, (3) depth, (4) content, and (5) point of view. (facultyfocus.com)
  • The September-October issue of the European Journal of Dermatology similarly focused on the potential of "emotional writing disclosure" as an adjunct to conventional care. (healthyfellow.com)
  • The Calhoun Honors College, the Pearce Center for Professional Communication, the Department of English and the Clemson Writing Center invite applications for the 2014-2015 class of Clemson Writing Fellows. (clemson.edu)
  • She is the director of the Center for Journal Therapy and its online professional training division, the Therapeutic Writing Institute, in Denver. (rowman.com)
  • The common thread that connects the studies I've mentioned today is that they've employed expressive writing as a supportive therapy to professional care. (healthyfellow.com)
  • In this 25-minute podcast, Katrin Girgensohn outlines the history of writing centers in German universities, starting with the writing lab established by Andrea Frank at Bielefeld University in 1993. (wisc.edu)
  • She traces the subsequent introduction of peer tutoring and the successes in making writing centers more integral parts of German universities. (wisc.edu)
  • As important, though, is the practical work of teaching Writing Fellows to offer useful written feedback and to discuss strategies for revision and improvement with their peers. (clemson.edu)
  • Writing Fellows work with peers, in writing courses across campus and in the Writing Center, to facilitate revision and lead student writers toward more effective communication. (clemson.edu)
  • Good style is an essential part of efficient communication: Product translations written in language that meets the expectations of the reader/user reduce the review work required and minimize support needs. (proz.com)
  • The information appropriately formatted according to thousands writing a news article graphic organizer of interest down, sometimes work. (aronfeld.com)
  • Clemson Writing Fellows are ambassadors for writing at Clemson, helping support the award-winning Writing Across the Curriculum initiatives and increasing the focus on writing at Clemson. (clemson.edu)
  • Clemson Writing Fellows is based on the assumption that all writers, regardless of background and grade point average, have room for improvement and that peer editing is an effective means of improving student writing. (clemson.edu)
  • Student writers and Writing Fellows alike learn to see writing not as an act to perform, but as a process with which to engage. (clemson.edu)
  • Our goal is to produce not only better writing, but better writers. (clemson.edu)
  • Many of our members are particularly fine writers and have a lot to offer others on the subject of the art of effective writing. (proz.com)
  • A Writing Fellow values the process of student writing, and believes that peer dialogue can facilitate individual growth. (clemson.edu)
  • If you educate a handy, minneapolis, feel that writing a news article graphic organizer any information narrative texts and article. (aronfeld.com)
  • This presentation was taped during a meeting of the Madison Area Writing Center Colloquium on November 16, 2011. (wisc.edu)