Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Hydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.Blood Pressure Determination: Techniques for measuring blood pressure.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory: Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Atmospheric Pressure: The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Arterial Pressure: The blood pressure in the ARTERIES. It is commonly measured with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER on the upper arm which represents the arterial pressure in the BRACHIAL ARTERY.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Central Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.Pulmonary Wedge Pressure: The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Pulse: The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Portal Pressure: The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Renin: A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.Rats, Inbred SHR: A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.Lower Body Negative Pressure: External decompression applied to the lower body. It is used to study orthostatic intolerance and the effects of gravitation and acceleration, to produce simulated hemorrhage in physiologic research, to assess cardiovascular function, and to reduce abdominal stress during childbirth.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Baroreflex: A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Hydrocephalus, Normal Pressure: A form of compensated hydrocephalus characterized clinically by a slowly progressive gait disorder (see GAIT DISORDERS, NEUROLOGIC), progressive intellectual decline, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. Spinal fluid pressure tends to be in the high normal range. This condition may result from processes which interfere with the absorption of CSF including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, chronic MENINGITIS, and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp631-3)Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Tonometry, Ocular: Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Sphygmomanometers: Instruments for measuring arterial blood pressure consisting of an inflatable cuff, inflating bulb, and a gauge showing the blood pressure. (Stedman, 26th ed)Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Hypertension, Renal: Persistent high BLOOD PRESSURE due to KIDNEY DISEASES, such as those involving the renal parenchyma, the renal vasculature, or tumors that secrete RENIN.Rats, Inbred WKY: A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Intracranial Hypertension: Increased pressure within the cranial vault. This may result from several conditions, including HYDROCEPHALUS; BRAIN EDEMA; intracranial masses; severe systemic HYPERTENSION; PSEUDOTUMOR CEREBRI; and other disorders.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Sodium Chloride, Dietary: Sodium chloride used in foods.Blood Volume: Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Telemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Renal Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the vessels of the KIDNEY.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: A class of drugs whose main indications are the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. They exert their hemodynamic effect mainly by inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. They also modulate sympathetic nervous system activity and increase prostaglandin synthesis. They cause mainly vasodilation and mild natriuresis without affecting heart rate and contractility.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Diet, Sodium-Restricted: A diet which contains very little sodium chloride. It is prescribed by some for hypertension and for edematous states. (Dorland, 27th ed)Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Phenylephrine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist used as a mydriatic, nasal decongestant, and cardiotonic agent.Sodium, Dietary: Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Renin-Angiotensin System: A BLOOD PRESSURE regulating system of interacting components that include RENIN; ANGIOTENSINOGEN; ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME; ANGIOTENSIN I; ANGIOTENSIN II; and angiotensinase. Renin, an enzyme produced in the kidney, acts on angiotensinogen, an alpha-2 globulin produced by the liver, forming ANGIOTENSIN I. Angiotensin-converting enzyme, contained in the lung, acts on angiotensin I in the plasma converting it to ANGIOTENSIN II, an extremely powerful vasoconstrictor. Angiotensin II causes contraction of the arteriolar and renal VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE, leading to retention of salt and water in the KIDNEY and increased arterial blood pressure. In addition, angiotensin II stimulates the release of ALDOSTERONE from the ADRENAL CORTEX, which in turn also increases salt and water retention in the kidney. Angiotensin-converting enzyme also breaks down BRADYKININ, a powerful vasodilator and component of the KALLIKREIN-KININ SYSTEM.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Natriuresis: Sodium excretion by URINATION.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Vapor Pressure: The contribution to barometric PRESSURE of gaseous substance in equilibrium with its solid or liquid phase.Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Glaucoma: An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Ocular Hypertension: A condition in which the intraocular pressure is elevated above normal and which may lead to glaucoma.Brachial Artery: The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Respiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Constriction: The act of constricting.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Valsalva Maneuver: Forced expiratory effort against a closed GLOTTIS.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Ventilators, Negative-Pressure: Body ventilators that assist ventilation by applying intermittent subatmospheric pressure around the thorax, abdomen, or airway and periodically expand the chest wall and inflate the lungs. They are relatively simple to operate and do not require tracheostomy. These devices include the tank ventilators ("iron lung"), Portalung, Pneumowrap, and chest cuirass ("tortoise shell").Aldosterone: A hormone secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX that regulates electrolyte and water balance by increasing the renal retention of sodium and the excretion of potassium.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Captopril: A potent and specific inhibitor of PEPTIDYL-DIPEPTIDASE A. It blocks the conversion of ANGIOTENSIN I to ANGIOTENSIN II, a vasoconstrictor and important regulator of arterial blood pressure. Captopril acts to suppress the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM and inhibits pressure responses to exogenous angiotensin.Hypertension, Renovascular: Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Photoplethysmography: Plethysmographic determination in which the intensity of light reflected from the skin surface and the red cells below is measured to determine the blood volume of the respective area. There are two types, transmission and reflectance.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Propranolol: A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.Hypotension, Orthostatic: A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.Hydrochlorothiazide: A thiazide diuretic often considered the prototypical member of this class. It reduces the reabsorption of electrolytes from the renal tubules. This results in increased excretion of water and electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, chloride, and magnesium. It is used in the treatment of several disorders including edema, hypertension, diabetes insipidus, and hypoparathyroidism.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.TetrazolesCatheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Glomerular Filtration Rate: The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Work of Breathing: RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)Plethysmography: Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Atrial Natriuretic Factor: A potent natriuretic and vasodilatory peptide or mixture of different-sized low molecular weight PEPTIDES derived from a common precursor and secreted mainly by the HEART ATRIUM. All these peptides share a sequence of about 20 AMINO ACIDS.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Laser-Doppler Flowmetry: A method of non-invasive, continuous measurement of MICROCIRCULATION. The technique is based on the values of the DOPPLER EFFECT of low-power laser light scattered randomly by static structures and moving tissue particulates.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Atenolol: A cardioselective beta-1 adrenergic blocker possessing properties and potency similar to PROPRANOLOL, but without a negative inotropic effect.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Denervation: The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Diuretics: Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester: A non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. It has been used experimentally to induce hypertension.Glaucoma, Open-Angle: Glaucoma in which the angle of the anterior chamber is open and the trabecular meshwork does not encroach on the base of the iris.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Radial Artery: The direct continuation of the brachial trunk, originating at the bifurcation of the brachial artery opposite the neck of the radius. Its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to the three regions in which the vessel is situated, the forearm, wrist, and hand.Microcirculation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.Capillary Resistance: The vascular resistance to the flow of BLOOD through the CAPILLARIES portions of the peripheral vascular bed.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Losartan: An antagonist of ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR with antihypertensive activity due to the reduced pressor effect of ANGIOTENSIN II.
Pressure suits were worn. The glider is on display at the Seattle Museum of Flight. A new altitude record of 52,172 ft (15,902 ...
Williams Jr., James H.; E.K. Lau (1974). "Solid Particle Erosion of Graphite-Epoxy Composites". WEAR. 29: 219-230. doi:10.1016/ ... Williams Jr., James H. (May 1974). "Line Load on Cylindrical Shell with End Plates". Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology. 96 ... Williams Jr., James H. (August 1975). "Line Load Displacements in Orthotropic Cylindrical Shells". Journal of Pressure Vessel ...
Power Crazy Series 2 - 2002 - More Industrial Revelations - Mark Williams 1. Bread and Beer 2. What to Wear? 3. Gas on Wheels 4 ... Print and Paper 5. Under Pressure 6. Building a Revolution 7. Bright Sparks 8. Heavy Metal 9. Cutting it fine 10. Machine Tools ...
Vicki M. Young (July 24, 2012). "Wet Seal Pressures Grow". 204 (16). WWD: Women's Wear Daily. "The Wet Seal names Susan P. ...
Model Titan Minimal Art 8568 with green polarizer is worn by Lieutenant Horatio Caine in the series CSI: Miami, played by David ... resulting in a loss of suit pressure. Around 1982, Queen Elizabeth II for the first time chose a pair of Silhouette glasses. ... In 1994, the doll Barbie was seen wearing Silhouette sunglasses in the exhibit Art, Design and Barbie at the World Financial ... Since 1998, she has famously worn Modell 1899. This model is mostly handcrafted and consists of a special Polymer combination. ...
The pressure wore on him; he complained to a friend: "Not a day goes by but I hear from some of my old outfit, usually about ...
High-pressure water jet cutter nozzles. Scratch and wear resistant coatings. Cutting tools and dies. Abrasives. Neutron ...
It is worn in ears that have been stretched. It is normally held in place only by its own downward pressure. Glass ear spirals ... An ear spiral is a thick spiral that is usually worn through the ear lobe. ...
Cartilage will wear over the years. Cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-restoration. The newly formed tissue will ... In sports that place great pressure on the knees, especially with twisting forces, it is common to tear one or more ligaments ... Other causes of pain may be excessive on, and wear off, the knees, in combination with such things as muscle weakness and ... One form of patellofemoral syndrome involves a tissue-related problem that creates pressure and irritation in the knee between ...
... how much it is worn and what growth stage the patient is in. Typically the prescribed daily wear time will be between 14 and 16 ... Braces have constant pressure which, over time, move teeth into the desired positions. The process loosens the tooth after ... Even Cleopatra wore a pair. Roman philosopher and physician Aulus Cornelius Celsus first recorded the treatment of teeth by ... An advantage is one can eat and drink while wearing the braces, but a disadvantage is that one must give up certain foods and ...
After surgery people wear a light pressure dressing for four days, followed by an extension splint. The splint is worn ... They wear an extension splint for two to three weeks, except during physical therapy. The same procedure is used in the ... Moderate pressure for 10-20 seconds ruptures the cord. After the treatment with collagenase the person should use a night ... After the treatment the person wears an extension splint for 5 to 7 days. Thereafter the person returns to normal activities ...
"IAF ups pressure for V-22 buy." Flight Global, 2 August 2011. Retrieved: 4 September 2011. "Israeli pilots give detailed ... Most missions use fixed wing flight 75% or more of the time, reducing wear and tear and operational costs. This fixed wing ... The fuselage is not pressurized, and personnel must wear on-board oxygen masks above 10,000 feet. The V-22 has triple-redundant ... The OSD and Navy administration were against the tiltrotor project, but congressional pressure eventually proved persuasive. ...
Tipton, Jerry (February 17, 1991). "Wildcats' Pressure Wears on Rebels, Refs, Murphy Says". Lexington Herald-Leader. p. D4. ... Miller credited Pitino's decision to bring him off the bench in the second half with taking the pressure off him and helping ... Tipton, Jerry (March 16, 1992). "Wildcats Ride Over Low Tide to SEC Title; Mashburn Gets 28 as UK Wears Out Alabama 80-54 in ... Because of his physical maturity - he reportedly began shaving at age 12 and had begun wearing his trademark mustache by his ...
The pressure placed on the breasts results in many injuries and complications.[citation needed] Corset-wearing cannot cause ... that when weight lifting, the support belts that the men wore increased their blood pressure. This inspired the popular corset ... In a video, she measures her blood pressure both in and out of the corset, seeing a 10% increase of blood pressure while ... Corset wearing for most women usually does not encompass the amount of time put into a baby in the same nine months or anywhere ...
Granite is also much heavier than limestone, so the foundation was recast to withstand the additional pressure. The rim of worn ... the fountain eventually had to be renovated to replace the existing blocks which by 1998 had worn away to the point of being at ...
It's because they sometimes wear transparent clothes or shorts. Therefore I have been coming under pressure from all different ... and both friends and family had been pressuring her to stop training. She explained, "Traditionally Somalis view the girls as ...
The underreamer utilizes an increase in mud pressure or flow rate to deploy the expandable cutters. A corresponding pressure ... minimize bending and vibrations that cause tool joint wear; prevent collar contact with the sidewall of the bore-hole; minimize ... key-seating with differential pressure; restrict lateral movement of the lower BHA as such they lower the strain on the drill ...
People exposed to it should wear a gas mask. In aircraft gas turbine engines, "exhaust gas temperature" (EGT) is a primary ... Typically the EGT is compared with a primary engine power indication called "engine pressure ratio" (EPR). For example: at full ... Flue gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion In steam engine terminology the exhaust is steam that is now so low in pressure ...
It has a plain bearing pressure rating (P) of 1,500 psi (10 MPa); dry velocity rating (V) of 140 surface feet per minute (sfm ... such as low wear, low friction, and high strength. It is chemically inert and self lubricating. It qualifies as a class III ... 0.71 m/s); and a PV rating of 10,000 psi sfm (0.35 MPa m/s). Additional lubrication can reduce friction and wear by 50%. Frelon ...
Stress fatigue occurs when the metal is repeatedly pushed back and forth, such as from water pressure. This pressure eventually ... Thus normal wear and tear can cause metal fatigue. The combination of salt water and metal can cause several types of corrosion ...
Air pressures for the jet usually vary from 60 to 100 psig (4-7 bar). The carbon electrode can be worn away by oxidation from ...
On the other end of the spectrum is the vasodepressor response, caused by a drop in blood pressure (to as low as 80/20) without ... This may happen when wearing a tight collar, shaving, or turning the head. Regardless of the trigger, the mechanism of syncope ... A patient can move or cross his/her legs and tighten leg muscles to keep blood pressure from dropping so drastically before an ... Carotid sinus syncope is due to pressure on the carotid sinus in the neck. The underlying mechanism involves the nervous system ...
The foam used in the construction of these memory foam toppers reacts to both pressure and temperature. This, combined with its ... It is of particular benefit when the existing mattress is worn or uncomfortable. Toppers quite often have a contoured profile ... Visco-elastic foam toppers are regularly used in medical institutions because of their pressure relieving properties. ...
Steam turbines could be built to operate on higher pressure and temperature steam. A fundamental principle of thermodynamics is ... Steam turbines can operate for years with almost no wear. Reciprocating steam engines required high maintenance. Steam turbines ... The introduction of steam turbines motivated a series of improvements in temperatures and pressures. The resulting increased ... a generator using the high temperature combustion gases and then exhausts the cooler combustion gases to generate low pressure ...
The blood pressure is well balanced. In Spain, a stroll is called a ''Paseo'' and is a popular after-dinner pastime. The ... participants, whose membership is egalitarian, wear their best clothing. Activities include chatting with neighbors and ...
Spinal manipulation aims to treat "vertebral subluxations" which are claimed to put pressure on nerves. Chiropractic was ... and they find after three months the placebo effect wears off, and they're disappointed and they move on to the next one, and ...
Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), despite its name, is an abnormal condition. It occurs in older adults when cerebrospinal ... Patients should take it easy for several weeks after surgery, with no bending, twisting, heavy lifting, or wearing of tight- ... Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH). Overview. Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), despite its name, is an abnormal condition ... What is normal pressure hydrocephalus?. Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a progressive condition that occurs when there ...
Treating high blood pressure. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor. ... Use a sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you must be outside for more than a short time. ... Patients who take medicine for high blood pressure often feel tired or run down for a few weeks after starting treatment. Be ... Exactly how the diuretic works to decrease blood pressure is unknown, but it helps the kidneys to eliminate fluid and sodium ...
... likening refusal to wear a mask with traffic violations that put other drivers at risk. ... On one hand, he supports using social pressure to normalize mask wearing. On the other, he worries it could turn into ... Social pressure around masks continues to grow.. What started out months ago as a "#maskon" hashtag and online tools that allow ... How can officials get more people to wear masks?. Cincinnatis enforcement strategy serves as an example for the rest of the ...
I wear flip flops when Im pressure washing, because I hate the horrible feeling of wet shoes and socks. ... What kind of footwear do you wear when pressure washing? Work shoes, regular shoes, boots, crocs flip flops? I wear flip flops ... water proof , shoes , boots , but something that will you will not slip around wearing ... Poll: What kind of footwear are you wearing? Or bare or socks etc? ...
Talking bilingual wrist worn blood pressure meter has clinical accuracy and can speak results in either English or Spanish. It ... Click Here For the Wrist Worn Talking Blood Pressure Monitor Instructions. Customer Reviews ... This Healthsmart Talking bilingual wrist worn blood pressure meter has clinical accuracy and can speak results in either ... Home > Talking Products > Talking Blood Pressure Meters Talking Bilingual Digital Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor. Click to ...
... dont worry that she is the only adolescent who wants to wear the latest... ... "Pressure on Teens to Wear Fashionable Clothes","url":"https:\/\/www.livestrong.com\/article\/1002115-pressure-teens-wear- ... For example, if your teen gets an after-school job at a stylish store at the mall, his boss may pressure him to wear the ... Pressure on Teens to Wear Fashionable Clothes by ERICA LOOP June 13, 2017. ...
There might be a misalignment causing premature wear (if the belt is worn) or throwing the belt off ( if it shows normal wear ... A: Your clutch is worn out. Youll need to remove the transmission and replace the clutch disc, and probably the pressure plate ... The A.B.S. lights in the dash came on and now I have very little brake pressure. Ive looked the brake lines and the fittings ... Choose The Right Tractor Battery, Poor Brake Pressure, Rusting Brake Rotors, Pick Up Truck Stalling, How To Find Car Manuals: ...
LS&S sells an economical talking blood pressure monitor which you use on your wrist to help you stay healthy and on track. ... Talking Bilingual Digital Blood Pressure Wrist Monitor $54.95. Talking Upper Arm Blood Pressure Meter ... Click Here for the Talking Wrist Style Blood Pressure Monitor instructions.. You can download Adobes free PDF Reader. here.. ... Talking blood pressure meter, wrist style, offers easy one-touch operation. The LCD display has 3 color backlighting and ...
The in vivo sensor in the intraocular pressure monitor includes a capacitive pressure sensor and an inductive component. An ... provides readout of the pressure values and determines the intraocular pressure. ... The device directly and continuously measures the intraocular pressure of a patient. ... thereby permitting the instrument to determine the intraocular pressure. ...
Why is that important? Because years ago, Samsung ditched Android Wear to use Tizen on all of its wearable devices after the ... Samsungs next smartwatch will run Googles Wear OS, at least according to known leaker Ice Universe. ... Samsung Galaxy Watch Reported to Run Wear OS, Measure Blood Pressure. Tim July 6, 2018. @timotato 22 ... In addition to running Wear OS, its reported that the wearable, either called the Galaxy Watch or Gear S4, will sport a 470mAh ...
The purpose of this study is to determine if short-term wear of a scleral contact lens will raise intraocular pressure in ... History of contact lens wear (except scleral lenses), as long as they are willing to not wear their lenses the day of the study ...
... blood pressure increases, decreases, sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up, so I know it can have an effect. My body ... So I?m wondering if the Elavil is keeping my blood pressure low after taking it and after it wears off my blood pressure is ... Elavil and Blood Pressure increase as it wears off daily? I have read on these forums and elsewhere that Elavil can cause heart ... I thought I would ask if anyone has noticed these symptoms of daytime increase in blood pressure, ie as their Elavil wears off ...
Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Patients Wearing Nasal-Oral versus Full-Face Noninvasive Ventilation Masks. Author(s): Marilyn ... Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Patients Wearing Nasal-Oral versus Full-Face Noninvasive Ventilation Masks. ... Education Continuing Education Activities Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Patients Wearing Nasal-Oral versus Full-Face Noninvasive ... Enumerate advantage of wearing a full-face mask.. Continuing Education Disclosure Statement Successful Completion Learners must ...
Man typing whilst wearing an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. This device allows measurement of a patients blood pressure at ... High blood pressure (hypertension) may be caused by kidney disease, hormonal disorders and congenital problems and if left ... Low blood pressure (hypotension) can result from a heart attack, a severe infection or acute abdominal conditions. - Stock ... Such measurement avoids the white coat effect in which a patients blood pressure rises significantly when it is measured in ...
... wed heard that Samsung might be using Wear OS for its upcoming smartwatches instead of Tizen, which it had been using for the ... Samsungs upcoming Galaxy Watch may run Wear OS after all, be able to measure blood pressure. Richard Gao. ... "New UX interaction" is on board, which isnt surprising given the companys first use of Android Wear / Wear OS in years. ... A few weeks back, wed heard that Samsung might be using Wear OS for its upcoming smartwatches instead of Tizen, which it had ...
... 289982. ... AirPro Air Spray Pressure Feed Gun, Conventional, 0.110 inch (2.8 mm) Nozzle, for High Wear Applications. 289982. ... AirPro Air Spray Pressure Feed Gun, Conventional, 0.110 inch (2.8 mm) Nozzle, for High Wear Applications. 289982. ... AirPro Air Spray Pressure Feed Gun, Conventional, 0.110 inch (2.8 mm) Nozzle, for High Wear Applicat ...
android clock watch wifi gps watch portuguese gps smart watch heart rate waterproof smart watch wear a1 smart watch 2019 smart ...
A device for passively measuring intraocular pressure of a patient including an in vivo sensor and an instrument external to ... Method for monitoring intraocular pressure using a passive intraocular pressure sensor and patient worn monitoring recorder ... The invention relates to a method and device for monitoring intraocular pressure. Intraocular pressure, the pressure of fluid ... 2a and 2b, pressure was a parameter. The capacitor pressure sensitivity was assumed to be dC(P)/dP=S.sub.p =.about.5E-4pF/mmHg ...
Real Men Wear Gowns: Know the early signs of high blood pressure. Real Men wear Gowns, especially the ones who have realized ... KTHV) -- Real Men wear Gowns, especially the ones who have realized that a doctors office is never off limits. ... In todays Real Men Wear Gowns segment, Craig ONeill introduces us to a man who is outstanding in his field. No literally, he ... Almost every doctor weve heard from in this series has pointed out how high blood pressure has become a chronic health problem ...
School shooting puts pressure on Florida lawmakers to act 7-year-old killed in crossfire is 5th shot in Jacksonville in 2 weeks ... "We are fortunately long past the days when a pregnant woman had to wear a tent or a t-shirt with an arrow pointing to the belly ... Wearing high-heeled shoes and boots can exacerbate those problems, especially as feet start to swell in the later months. ... And, when a women does gain a healthy amount of weight, she is generally able to wear clothes that go along with her usual ...
Dont apply too much pressure, Sofronas says, because it can irritate the skin. Not to mention if you are a bit too forceful ...
Study of Two Tribes Sheds Light on Role of Western-Influenced Diet in Blood Pressure ... compared to those who wore soft lenses (1.41 mm - mean ptosis measurement). Twins who did not wear contact lenses had a mean ... The severity of the drooping eyelids was more evident in twins who wore hard contact lenses (1.84 mm - mean ptosis measurement ... The 3D shape of a protein involved in regulating blood pressure has been determined ...
Blood Pressure. 12/14/2017 Blood Pressure Millions suddenly have high blood pressure under new preventative measure ... Key items to wear outdoors include hats and light clothing to cover up your skin, Rosenbaum said. "For men who like to work ... Home Public Health and Safety What to wear, when to avoid outdoor treks during heat wave ...
Mexico enlists Frida to encourage mask-wearing. Posted For what would have been the artists 113th birthday earlier this month ...
Greater testing will save lives, money and pressure on the NHS Nishan Sunthares 5 Aug 2020, 12:00pm. ... Letters: Wearing masks lets the country sink into a pathological frame of mind By Letters to the Editor 14 July 2020 • 12:01am ... I do not wear a mask when visiting my newsagent, as only one person is allowed in the shop at a time and the person behind the ... A member of staff wears a face mask as she serves customers at the the Shy Horse pub and in Chessington, Surrey Credit: Ben ...
  • The severity of the drooping eyelids was more evident in twins who wore hard contact lenses ( 1.84 mm - mean ptosis measurement ) compared to those who wore soft lenses ( 1.41 mm - mean ptosis measurement ). (healthcanal.com)
  • Twins who did not wear contact lenses had a mean ptosis measurement of 1.00 mm. (healthcanal.com)
  • We assessed the correlations of many different environmental factors that could contribute to upper eyelid droopy eyelids and wearing contact lenses was the only external factor that was linked. (healthcanal.com)
  • If you are in need of prescription lenses and wear clear glasses , you may be straining through them. (healthtap.com)
  • To lower this probability you can wear lenses that block uv light. (healthtap.com)
  • The purpose of this research is to compare the on-eye performance of 12 month daily wear versus 6-night extended wear and 30-night extended wear of novel hyper-oxygen permeable contact lenses by studying its effects on human eyes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • and, 30-Night Versus 6-Night Immediate Extended Wear of Two HOP/SiH Lenses. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of this research is to compare the on-eye performance of 12 month daily wear versus 6-night extended wear and 30-night extended wear of novel hyper-oxygen permeable contact lenses on bacterial binding to corneal cells and central epithelial thickness. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This effect is known as the Venturi Effect.The air does not quite reach normal atmospheric pressure until it gets out of the column of air formed by the shower curtain. (answers.com)
  • Wading into a politically charged issue, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday preached the importance of wearing masks in public as the nation's economy reopens from the "cataclysmic" damage inflicted by the coronavirus pandemic. (pbs.org)
  • During a tour of hospitals this week in his home state of Kentucky, the Republican leader has stressed wearing masks in public and following social distancing guidelines. (pbs.org)
  • I'm one of those folks who likes to wear their jeans snug, and hates the thought of wearing elastic waist pants. (medhelp.org)
  • Sooo, just be patient, you'll get the jeans on again soon :-) I had vowed to have a big bonfire and roast all of my elastic waist pants once I didn't need them anymore, but I hung onto them as I found they were good things to wear when working in my garden and doing yard work. (medhelp.org)
  • Elastic bandages or compression garments are used to provide pressure over healing burns and grafts when they are durable enough to tolerate the shearing that occurs from the fabric against the skin. (regionshospital.com)
  • Elastic ear-loops with no pressure to the ears. (sciplus.com)
  • McConnell, who is in his late 70s and is in the midst of his own reelection campaign, has worn masks at his appearances. (pbs.org)
  • As the virus has taken hold in more conservative regions in the South and West, face coverings have become an unlikely focus of political partisanship, leading to mass refusals to wear them. (usatoday.com)
  • President Donald Trump has refused to wear face coverings, and polls find that conservative Americans are more likely to forgo them. (pbs.org)
  • In the cross-section, macro-observation reveals wear significant enough to virtually eliminate the hardened layer, while micro-observation shows a white layer structure typical of adhesive wear on the outermost surface layer, as well as a remarkable degree of plastic flow and cracking. (sae.org)
  • Based on these observations, wear on sleeve and dog gear chamfers can be identified as a combined pattern of peeling resulting from the propagation of fine cracks caused by the large loads generated by impact and sliding, as well as of adhesive wear, given the presence of a white layer and plastic flow. (sae.org)
  • I have read on these forums and elsewhere that Elavil can cause heart rate increases, blood pressure increases, decreases, sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up, so I know it can have an effect. (rutgers.edu)
  • Consequently, when cold water is diverted to another application such as a toilet or a sink, the amount of cold water available at the shower mixing valve decreases as the low pressure is unable to keep up with the shower's demand. (answers.com)
  • Shorter shift times are also expected to cause higher surface pressures. (sae.org)
  • In addition, extreme surface pressures are predicted because the contact between the sleeve and dog gear chamfers during shifting is not uniform and involves significant changes in the size of the contact area. (sae.org)
  • We are fortunately long past the days when a pregnant woman had to wear a tent or a t-shirt with an arrow pointing to the belly. (go.com)
  • It's fine for a pregnant woman to wear stilettos, but she may find her balance is off, especially when she gets large," said Streicher. (go.com)
  • The March of Dimes reports that there are nearly 170,000 car crashes involving pregnant women each year, and according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), research suggests that four out of five babies that were lost in car accidents would've been saved if their pregnant mothers had worn safety belts. (thebump.com)
  • High Blood Pressure and Getting Pregnant? (thebump.com)
  • More interestingly, the Galaxy Watch is expected to have the ability to take blood pressure measurements, which would make it the first (actual) smartwatch to be able to do so. (androidpolice.com)
  • Each one included a photo of happy children taking measurements-but no matter how mundane the activity, the children always wore goggles. (sciencemag.org)
  • Sound pressure level (SPL) measurements of vehicle coast-by runs of a passenger vehicle were performed across a range of temperatures. (sae.org)
  • In this work, a methodology is proposed for the evaluation of the abrasive wear of the plates of the centrifugal pump impellers, used in the gross water infrastructure station (GWIS) of sedimentary rivers, due to the sediment load variation and the river fluviometric dimension. (intechopen.com)
  • Gross water elevation stations (GWES), installed in rivers of sedimentary basins, suffer from impeller wear due to the abrasive drag of the sediment load that descends through rivers throughout the year. (intechopen.com)
  • To understand this process, we analyzed the abrasive wear caused by the sediments in three metal alloys used in the manufacture of centrifugal pump impellers for QWES. (intechopen.com)
  • Fifty-year-old tenured professors wear whatever the hell they want, and 80-year-old professors emeriti wear the same clothes they wore at 50, minus pants. (sciencemag.org)
  • I am having a pants crisis as I still can't wear my jeans, leaving me w/ 3 pairs of pants that fit. (medhelp.org)
  • Talking blood pressure meter, wrist style, offers easy one-touch operation. (lssproducts.com)
  • First is the MotionWatch 8, a small and light-weight waterproof wrist-worn device that uses a digital tri-axial accelerometer to monitor patient activity, similarly to many consumer fitness trackers. (medgadget.com)
  • The second cleared device is the PRO-Diary, a compact wrist-worn electronic diary which also integrates the same activity monitor as the MotionWatch. (medgadget.com)
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is pressure on a nerve in your wrist. (www.nhs.uk)
  • A wrist splint is something you wear on your hand to keep your wrist straight. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Now that you're sporting a baby bump, here's how you can wear your seat belt safely and comfortably. (thebump.com)
  • The jeans are too tight to sit or move comfortably in, and they put pressure on two of the incisions, one of which has a resulting small hematoma under it. (medhelp.org)
  • Device-related pressure ulcers from noninvasive ventilation masks alter skin integrity and cause patients discomfort. (aacn.org)
  • Gradually back off the last two bolts or nuts located at opposite ends of the cover or device and pry cover loose to relieve any spring or other pressure, before removing the last two bolts or nuts completely. (issuu.com)
  • A few weeks back, we'd heard that Samsung might be using Wear OS for its upcoming smartwatches instead of Tizen , which it had been using for the past few generations of Gear watches. (androidpolice.com)
  • Between magazines, movie and television shows, the media puts a strong pressure on teens to dress in a certain stylish way. (livestrong.com)
  • Along with her stiletto platform boots, Zoe wore a belted black shirt-dress with a knit bomber jacket. (go.com)
  • Dress to Profess: What Should Scientists Wear? (sciencemag.org)
  • Tip: A good rule of thumb is to wear watches with a metal body with suits and dress clothes. (lifehack.org)
  • If you are going to attend an evening event with other professionals, it makes sense to wear a dress watch. (lifehack.org)
  • Bride wears a Lace Minna wedding dress & Alice Temperley shoes at an outdoor wedding in Nymans National Trust Garden, with pastel floral decor and groom in Burberry suit. (rockmywedding.co.uk)
  • Thanks, Google image search, for reminding me that scientists wear a mortarboard (flat graduation hat) to work every day. (sciencemag.org)
  • KIEV, July 22 (Reuters) - Ukraine's security service said on Monday a search at ArcelorMittal's steel mill in Kryvyi Rih was not an attempt to put pressure on the company. (yahoo.com)
  • Repeated impacts and sliding and the complex motion of sleeves and dog gears mean that their wear mechanism is poorly understood. (sae.org)
  • These garments will need to be worn until the scars are mature - soft, flat, pliable and when the color is close to your skin tone. (regionshospital.com)
  • Wear scars on the steel balls are measured with a graduated-scale microscope and can be recorded with an optional CCD camera. (ferret.com.au)