Skin DiseasesSkin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Parasites: Invertebrate organisms that live on or in another organism (the host), and benefit at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Skin Aging: The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Lumpy skin disease virus: A species of CAPRIPOXVIRUS causing a cattle disease occurring in Africa.Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Psoriasis: A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous: Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)Lumpy Skin Disease: A poxvirus infection of cattle characterized by the appearance of nodules on all parts of the skin.Skin Physiological Phenomena: The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.Skin Diseases, Viral: Skin diseases caused by viruses.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Skin Absorption: Uptake of substances through the SKIN.Dermatitis, Atopic: A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Parasite Load: Measure of the number of the PARASITES present in a host organism.Epidermis: The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).Skin Diseases, Genetic: Diseases of the skin with a genetic component, usually the result of various inborn errors of metabolism.Plasmodium falciparum: A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.Skin Pigmentation: Coloration of the skin.Protozoan Proteins: Proteins found in any species of protozoan.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.Skin UlcerAcne Vulgaris: A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.Skin Diseases, Bacterial: Skin diseases caused by bacteria.Schistosoma mansoni: A species of trematode blood flukes of the family Schistosomatidae. It is common in the Nile delta. The intermediate host is the planorbid snail. This parasite causes schistosomiasis mansoni and intestinal bilharziasis.Skin, Artificial: Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.Pemphigus: Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.Prurigo: A name applied to several itchy skin eruptions of unknown cause. The characteristic course is the formation of a dome-shaped papule with a small transient vesicle on top, followed by crusting over or lichenification. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Skin Diseases, Infectious: Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.Keratinocytes: Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Eczema: A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.Keratosis: Any horny growth such as a wart or callus.Helminths: Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.Dermatitis, Seborrheic: A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.Nematode Infections: Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Dermatologic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Dermatomycoses: Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Epidermolysis Bullosa: Group of genetically determined disorders characterized by the blistering of skin and mucosae. There are four major forms: acquired, simple, junctional, and dystrophic. Each of the latter three has several varieties.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Toxoplasma: A genus of protozoa parasitic to birds and mammals. T. gondii is one of the most common infectious pathogenic animal parasites of man.Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).Pemphigoid, Bullous: A chronic and relatively benign subepidermal blistering disease usually of the elderly and without histopathologic acantholysis.Lupus Erythematosus, Cutaneous: A form of lupus erythematosus in which the skin may be the only organ involved or in which skin involvement precedes the spread into other body systems. It has been classified into three forms - acute (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC with skin lesions), subacute, and chronic (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, DISCOID).Apicomplexa: A phylum of unicellular parasitic EUKARYOTES characterized by the presence of complex apical organelles generally consisting of a conoid that aids in penetrating host cells, rhoptries that possibly secrete a proteolytic enzyme, and subpellicular microtubules that may be related to motility.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.DNA, Protozoan: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Dermatitis, Allergic Contact: A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Dermis: A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Parasitic Diseases: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.Skin Physiological Processes: Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.Blister: Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic: Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.Antigens, Protozoan: Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.Skin Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the skin.Ultraviolet Therapy: The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Trypanosoma cruzi: The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Cestoda: A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.Filarioidea: A superfamily of nematodes of the suborder SPIRURINA. Its organisms possess a filiform body and a mouth surrounded by papillae.Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Plasmodium berghei: A protozoan parasite of rodents transmitted by the mosquito Anopheles dureni.Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)PUVA Therapy: Photochemotherapy using PSORALENS as the photosensitizing agent and ultraviolet light type A (UVA).Staphylococcal Skin Infections: Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Malassezia: A mitosporic fungal genus that causes a variety of skin disorders. Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum orbiculare) causes TINEA VERSICOLOR.Capripoxvirus: A genus of the family POXVIRIDAE, subfamily CHORDOPOXVIRINAE, comprising poxviruses infecting sheep, goats, and cattle. Transmission is usually mechanical by arthropods, but also includes contact, airborne routes, and non-living reservoirs (fomites).National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress. It was established in 1986.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Tinea Pedis: Dermatological pruritic lesion in the feet, caused by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, or Epidermophyton floccosum.Parasitemia: The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Scleroderma, Localized: A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.Helminth Proteins: Proteins found in any species of helminth.Leishmania: A genus of flagellate protozoa comprising several species that are pathogenic for humans. Organisms of this genus have an amastigote and a promastigote stage in their life cycles. As a result of enzymatic studies this single genus has been divided into two subgenera: Leishmania leishmania and Leishmania viannia. Species within the Leishmania leishmania subgenus include: L. aethiopica, L. arabica, L. donovani, L. enrietti, L. gerbilli, L. hertigi, L. infantum, L. major, L. mexicana, and L. tropica. The following species are those that compose the Leishmania viannia subgenus: L. braziliensis, L. guyanensis, L. lainsoni, L. naiffi, and L. shawi.Hand DermatosesProtozoan Infections: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.Non-Fibrillar Collagens: A family of structurally-related short-chain collagens that do not form large fibril bundles.Schistosomiasis mansoni: Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni. It is endemic in Africa, the Middle East, South America, and the Caribbean and affects mainly the bowel, spleen, and liver.Lichen Planus: An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Genes, Protozoan: The functional hereditary units of protozoa.Onchocerciasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus ONCHOCERCA. Characteristics include the presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, PRURITUS, and ocular lesions.Mice, Inbred BALB CMycobacterium ulcerans: A slow-growing mycobacterium that infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues, giving rise to indolent BURULI ULCER.Polychaeta: A class of marine annelids including sandworms, tube worms, clamworms, and fire worms. It includes also the genus Myxicola infundibulum.Parasitology: The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Ichthyosis: Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome.Desmoglein 1: A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS.Vitiligo: A disorder consisting of areas of macular depigmentation, commonly on extensor aspects of extremities, on the face or neck, and in skin folds. Age of onset is often in young adulthood and the condition tends to progress gradually with lesions enlarging and extending until a quiescent state is reached.Antiprotozoal Agents: Substances that are destructive to protozoans.Dermatitis, Contact: A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.Nematoda: A class of unsegmented helminths with fundamental bilateral symmetry and secondary triradiate symmetry of the oral and esophageal structures. Many species are parasites.Filariasis: Infections with nematodes of the superfamily FILARIOIDEA. The presence of living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms of the genus Elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.Carcinoma, Basal Cell: A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)Leishmania major: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes cutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS) of the Old World. Transmission is by Phlebotomus sandflies.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Haemosporida: An order of heteroxenous protozoa in which the macrogamete and microgamont develop independently. A conoid is usually absent.Genome, Protozoan: The complete genetic complement contained in a set of CHROMOSOMES in a protozoan.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Antibodies, Protozoan: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Skin Diseases, Eczematous: Any of a variety of eruptive skin disorders characterized by erythema, oozing, vesiculation, and scaling. Etiology is varied.Strongylida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Skin Diseases, Metabolic: Diseases of the skin associated with underlying metabolic disorders.Schistosoma: A genus of trematode flukes belonging to the family Schistosomatidae. There are over a dozen species. These parasites are found in man and other mammals. Snails are the intermediate hosts.Mice, Inbred C57BLMite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.DNA, Helminth: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of helminths.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous: An endemic disease that is characterized by the development of single or multiple localized lesions on exposed areas of skin that typically ulcerate. The disease has been divided into Old and New World forms. Old World leishmaniasis is separated into three distinct types according to epidemiology and clinical manifestations and is caused by species of the L. tropica and L. aethiopica complexes as well as by species of the L. major genus. New World leishmaniasis, also called American leishmaniasis, occurs in South and Central America and is caused by species of the L. mexicana or L. braziliensis complexes.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Dermatitis, Irritant: A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.Patch Tests: Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.Leishmania donovani: A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes visceral leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL). The sandfly genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia are the vectors.Parasitic Sensitivity Tests: Tests that demonstrate the relative effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents against specific parasites.Onchocerca volvulus: A species of parasitic nematodes widely distributed throughout central Africa and also found in northern South America, southern Mexico, and Guatemala. Its intermediate host and vector is the blackfly or buffalo gnat.Annelida: A phylum of metazoan invertebrates comprising the segmented worms, and including marine annelids (POLYCHAETA), freshwater annelids, earthworms (OLIGOCHAETA), and LEECHES. Only the leeches are of medical interest. (Dorland, 27th ed)Keratoderma, Palmoplantar: Group of mostly hereditary disorders characterized by thickening of the palms and soles as a result of excessive keratin formation leading to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum (hyperkeratosis).Military HygieneBrugia malayi: A species of parasitic nematode causing Malayan filariasis and having a distribution centering roughly on the Malay peninsula. The life cycle of B. malayi is similar to that of WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI, except that in most areas the principal mosquito vectors belong to the genus Mansonia.Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.Langerhans Cells: Recirculating, dendritic, antigen-presenting cells containing characteristic racket-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). They are found principally in the stratum spinosum of the EPIDERMIS and are rich in Class II MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX molecules. Langerhans cells were the first dendritic cell to be described and have been a model of study for other dendritic cells (DCs), especially other migrating DCs such as dermal DCs and INTERSTITIAL DENDRITIC CELLS.Dermatitis, Exfoliative: The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Sporozoites: The product of meiotic division of zygotes in parasitic protozoa comprising haploid cells. These infective cells invade the host and undergo asexual reproduction producing MEROZOITES (or other forms) and ultimately gametocytes.Desmoglein 3: A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS.Acantholysis: Separation of the prickle cells of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis, resulting in atrophy of the prickle cell layer. It is seen in diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris (see PEMPHIGUS) and DARIER DISEASE.Skin Cream: A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Cestode Infections: Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Emollients: Oleagenous substances used topically to soothe, soften or protect skin or mucous membranes. They are used also as vehicles for other dermatologic agents.Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Platyhelminths: A phylum of acoelomate, bilaterally symmetrical flatworms, without a definite anus. It includes three classes: Cestoda, Turbellaria, and Trematoda.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Onchocerca: A genus of parasitic nematodes whose organisms live and breed in skin and subcutaneous tissues. Onchocercal microfilariae may also be found in the urine, blood, or sputum.Keratolytic Agents: Agents that soften, separate, and cause desquamation of the cornified epithelium or horny layer of skin. They are used to expose mycelia of infecting fungi or to treat corns, warts, and certain other skin diseases.Plasmodium yoelii: A species of PLASMODIUM causing malaria in rodents.Mice, Hairless: Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.Drug Eruptions: Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.Schistosomiasis: Infection with flukes (trematodes) of the genus SCHISTOSOMA. Three species produce the most frequent clinical diseases: SCHISTOSOMA HAEMATOBIUM (endemic in Africa and the Middle East), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI (in Egypt, northern and southern Africa, some West Indies islands, northern 2/3 of South America), and SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM (in Japan, China, the Philippines, Celebes, Thailand, Laos). S. mansoni is often seen in Puerto Ricans living in the United States.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Eye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Helminthiasis: Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.Leishmaniasis: A disease caused by any of a number of species of protozoa in the genus LEISHMANIA. There are four major clinical types of this infection: cutaneous (Old and New World) (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS), diffuse cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS), mucocutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, MUCOCUTANEOUS), and visceral (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL).Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Pyoderma Gangrenosum: An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A chronic suppurative and cicatricial disease of the apocrine glands occurring chiefly in the axillae in women and in the groin and anal regions in men. It is characterized by poral occlusion with secondary bacterial infection, evolving into abscesses which eventually rupture. As the disease becomes chronic, ulcers appear, sinus tracts enlarge, fistulas develop, and fibrosis and scarring become evident.Warts: Benign epidermal proliferations or tumors; some are viral in origin.Trichinellosis: An infection with TRICHINELLA. It is caused by eating raw or undercooked meat that is infected with larvae of nematode worms TRICHINELLA genus. All members of the TRICHINELLA genus can infect human in addition to TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS, the traditional etiological agent. It is distributed throughout much of the world and is re-emerging in some parts as a public health hazard and a food safety problem.Scalp DermatosesPoxviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the POXVIRIDAE.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Skin Diseases, Papulosquamous: A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.Acanthocephala: A phylum of parasitic worms, closely related to tapeworms and containing two genera: Moniliformis, which sometimes infects man, and Macracanthorhynchus, which infects swine.Erythema Multiforme: A skin and mucous membrane disease characterized by an eruption of macules, papules, nodules, vesicles, and/or bullae with characteristic "bull's-eye" lesions usually occurring on the dorsal aspect of the hands and forearms.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Buruli Ulcer: A lesion in the skin and subcutaneous tissues due to infections by MYCOBACTERIUM ULCERANS. It was first reported in Uganda, Africa.Scleroderma, Diffuse: A rapid onset form of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA with progressive widespread SKIN thickening over the arms, the legs and the trunk, resulting in stiffness and disability.Leishmaniasis, Visceral: A chronic disease caused by LEISHMANIA DONOVANI and transmitted by the bite of several sandflies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. It is commonly characterized by fever, chills, vomiting, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, emaciation, and an earth-gray color of the skin. The disease is classified into three main types according to geographic distribution: Indian, Mediterranean (or infantile), and African.Haemonchus: A genus of parasitic nematode worms which infest the duodenum and stomach of domestic and wild herbivores, which ingest it with the grasses (POACEAE) they eat. Infestation of man is accidental.Plasmodium vivax: A protozoan parasite that causes vivax malaria (MALARIA, VIVAX). This species is found almost everywhere malaria is endemic and is the only one that has a range extending into the temperate regions.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Sebaceous Glands: Small, sacculated organs found within the DERMIS. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent BASEMENT MEMBRANE enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into a HAIR FOLLICLE, but some open on the general surface of the SKIN. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.Ascariasis: Infection by nematodes of the genus ASCARIS. Ingestion of infective eggs causes diarrhea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer.Trichostrongyloidea: A superfamily of nematodes. Most are intestinal parasites of ruminants and accidentally in humans. This superfamily includes seven genera: DICTYOCAULUS; HAEMONCHUS; Cooperia, OSTERTAGIA; Nematodirus, TRICHOSTRONGYLUS; and Hyostrongylus.Chloroquine: The prototypical antimalarial agent with a mechanism that is not well understood. It has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and in the systemic therapy of amebic liver abscesses.Trophozoites: Cells or feeding stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. In the malarial parasite, the trophozoite develops from the MEROZOITE and then splits into the SCHIZONT. Trophozoites that are left over from cell division can go on to form gametocytes.Urticaria: A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.Hair Follicle: A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.Chagas Disease: Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Anopheles: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.Praziquantel: An anthelmintic used in most schistosome and many cestode infestations.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
... is not classified as a neglected tropical disease unlike many other parasitic worm infections. Garlic has ... German botanist Lonicerus (1564) recommended garlic against parasitic worms. Applying raw garlic on skin may cause a chemical ... Total elimination of the parasite in a household may require repeated doses of medication for up to a year or more. Because the ... Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2009-04-08. Nakano T, Okamoto M, Ikeda Y ...
... , also known as river blindness, is a disease caused by infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. ... The microfilaria migrate to the skin during the day, and the black flies only feed in the day, so the parasite is in a prime ... The disease, commonly called the "filarial blinding disease", and later referred to as "Robles disease", was common among ... and looking within the bumps under the skin for adult worms. A vaccine against the disease does not exist. Prevention is by ...
... is a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent, traditionally against parasitic worms and other multicellular parasites. It ... and some epidermal parasitic skin diseases, including scabies. Ivermectin is currently being used to help eliminate river ... "Selective mass treatment with ivermectin to control intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in a severely affected ... Common side effects include red eyes, dry skin, and burning skin. It is unclear if it is safe for use during pregnancy, but is ...
After penetrating the skin and eventually traveling to the intestines or the urinary tract, the parasite lays eggs and infects ... Malaria, a disease still rampant in Africa also increases the risk of contracting HIV. These parasitic diseases, affect the ... "Guinea worm disease") Onchocerciasis Schistosomiasis Trichomoniasis Tropical diseases such as these tend to be neglected in ... Gum disease has been linked to diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Diseases of poverty reflect the dynamic relationship ...
Human parasites include various protozoa and worms which may infect humans that cause parasitic diseases. Human parasites are ... The most documented by far was Guinea worm disease mainly because the grown female worm emerges from the skin which causes ... Not many parasitic diseases were identified in ancient Greek and Roman texts mainly because the symptoms for parasitic diseases ... This disease is caused by the Guinea worm and is characterized by the female worm emerging from the leg. This symptom is so ...
List of parasites (human) Ernesto Ruiz-Tiben, Donald R. Hopkins (2006). "Dracunculiasis (Guinea Worm Disease) Eradication". ... once represented a worm wrapped around a rod; parasitic worms such as the guinea worm (Dracunculus medinensis) were common in ... ancient times, and were extracted from beneath the skin by winding them slowly around a stick. According to this theory, ... The worms can reach a metre in length. If one simply pulls off the protruding head of the worm, the worm will break and leak ...
Pathogens and parasites. The diseases and parasites that affect octopuses have been little studied, but cephalopods are known ... It was described in 1829 by the French zoologist Georges Cuvier, who supposed it to be a parasitic worm, naming it as a new ... To do this they use specialised skin cells which change the appearance of the skin by adjusting its colour, opacity, or ... 150 species of protistan and metazoan parasites have been recognised.[104] The Dicyemidae are a family of tiny worms that are ...
... is the scientific name of a human parasitic roundworm causing the disease streptocerciasis. It is a common parasite in the skin ... Bamuhiiga, Jotham T. (1998). "Mansonella Streptocerca: Another Filarial Worm in the Skin in Western Uganda". Community Eye ... M. streptocerca infections fortunately do not cause any nodules, skin disease, or ocular infections like that of Onchocerca ... The other two filarial nematodes are Loa loa (the African eye worm), and Onchocerca volvulus (river blindness). The worm is ...
... disease caused by any parasitic worm Nematomorpha, the horsehair worms are parasitoids not truly parasites. Parasitology, ... parasite nutrition by feeding off the host Ringworm, a fungal infection which causes a ring shaped discoloration in the skin. ... Parasitic worm, known for flukes and intestinal worms, may refer to: Acanthocephala, or the spiny-headed worms all of which are ... Hookworms, intestinal parasites of mammals. Pentastomida, sometimes referred to as tongue worms which are obligate parasites ...
Adult worms are 7.5 mm to 12 mm long and 4 mm to 6 mm wide. The thickness ranges from 3.5 mm to 5 mm. The skin of the worm ( ... Bithionol is an alternative drug for treatment of this disease but is associated with skin rashes and urticaria. For additional ... This parasite is easily spread because it is able to infect other animals (zoonosis). An assortment of mammals and birds can be ... Parasitic infections of the pleural space. Semin Respir Infect. 1988;3:362-382. Minh VD, Engle P, Greenwood JR, Prendergast TJ ...
Parasites normally enter the body through the skin or mouth. Close contact with pets can lead to parasite infestation as dogs ... Another medication administered to kill worm infections has been pyrantel pamoate. For some parasitic diseases, there is no ... is an infectious disease caused or transmitted by a parasite. Many parasites do not cause diseases. Parasitic diseases can ... "Parasite Infection and Parasite Treatment". Retrieved 2010-07-07. "Parasitic Diseases". Retrieved 2010-07-07. "Hookworm disease ...
Fish diseases and parasites WoRMS (2008). Walter TC, Boxshall G, eds. "Lepeophtheirus pectoralis (Müller O.F., 1776)". World of ... Lepeophtheirus pectoralis is a species of parasitic copepod. It is a parasite of flatfish, the most frequent hosts being the ... It feeds on the mucus, skin and blood of the fish, with oviferous females being found in the pectoral and pelvic fins of the ...
List of parasites (human) Berger SA, Marr JS (2006). Human Parasitic Diseases Sourcebook. Jones and Bartlett Publishers: ... Within a few hours of ingestion, the parasitic worm tries to burrow though the intestinal wall, but since it cannot penetrate ... Sensitivization and allergy are determined by skin-prick test and detection of specific antibodies against Anisakis. ... The presence of the parasite triggers an immune response; immune cells surround the worms, forming a ball-like structure that ...
... mature under the skin into adult worms forming visible nodules throughout the body. Pairs of adult worms produce millions of ... Onchocerciasis is a parasitic disease transmitted through the bite of the small black fly that breeds along the banks of fast- ... The primary strategy to control onchocerciasis is to interrupt the life cycle of the parasite. Ivermectin, known by its trade ... Carter Center Helen Keller International Ivermectin black fly parasitic diseases microfilariae depigmentation onchocerciasis ...
Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 8 April 2009. Nakano T, Okamoto M, Ikeda ... is a parasitic worm. It is a nematode (roundworm) and a common intestinal parasite or helminth, especially in humans. The ... They emerge from the anus, and while moving on the skin near the anus, the female pinworms deposit eggs either through (1) ... The pinworm has a worldwide distribution, and is the most common helminth (i.e., parasitic worm) infection in the United States ...
Major groups of parasites include protozoans (organisms having only one cell) and parasitic worms (helminths). Of these, ... Specifically, lack of access to facilities for safe disposal of human waste can result in intestinal parasites and disease. ... fecal-oral transmission and skin absorption. Some types of helminths and protozoa are classified as intestinal parasites that ... An intestinal parasite infection is a condition in which a parasite infects the gastro-intestinal tract of humans and other ...
... is any macroparasitic disease of humans and other animals in which a part of the body is infected with parasitic worms, known ... Where the burden of parasites in the body is light, there may be no symptoms. Certain worms may cause particular constellations ... Immune-mediated inflammatory changes occur in the skin, lung, liver, intestine, central nervous system, and eyes. Signs of the ... the type of worm involved; the number of worms and their volume; the type of damage the infesting worms cause; and, the ...
This is an incomplete list of organisms that are true parasites upon other organisms. (endo = within; parasites that live ... Plasmodium - causes the fatal disease, Malaria. P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae are pathogenic to humans. Babesia ... attached to their skin) Acari Varroa destructor Cymothoa exigua Bed bugs Culicidae (mosquitoes) Calyptra (vampire moths) ... Guinea worm) Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) Filariasis Hookworm Loa loa Onchocerciasis (river blindness) Schistosomiasis ...
... refers to parasitic diseases caused by animals such as arthropods (i.e. mites, ticks, and lice) and worms, but excluding ... Infestation is the state of being invaded or overrun by pests or parasites. It can also refer to the actual organisms living on ... ". "Bedbugs". Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center. Retrieved 2013-11-20. Leland S. Shapiro; Leland Shapiro (2005). ... Infestations can be classified as either external or internal with regards to the parasites' location in relation to the host. ...
Some mites are the intermediate host of parasitic worms, but not defined as vectors because they do not parasitize a host. For ... C. Brown Company Publishers, ISBN 0-697-04757-1. Paterson, S. (2008) Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat. Oxford: ... Companion Animal Parasite Council, USA Dog ear mites - Companion Animal Parasite Council, USA Sarcoptic mites in dogs and cats ... They can crawl out on the surface of the skin, aided by secretions from the skin's sebaceous glands. Puppies become infected by ...
... can produce a skin disease called cutaneous larva migrans also known as creeping eruption. The hosts of these worms are not ... CDC Department of Parasitic Diseases images of the hookworm life cycle Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dog hookworm ... Parasites to combat celiac disease (Report). Queensland Institute of Medical Research. April 3, 2008. Archived from the ... The disease was linked to nematode worms (Ankylostoma duodenalis) from one-third to half an inch long in the intestine chiefly ...
Canine vector-borne disease "DPDx - Coenurosis". Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. ... coenurosis do not develop a tapeworm infection because the larvae of coenurosis-causing parasites cannot develop into worms ... T. serialis: In 1933 a French woman was proven to have coenurosis when the cyst that had been growing under her skin was ... ParaSites2005: Coenurosis, stanford.edu Coenurosis, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. ...
... belongs to a group of parasitic diseases known as filarial disease (nematode), all of which are ... neurological disorders and skin lumps. It is mainly found in Africa. The parasite is transmitted through the bite of small ... Parasitic worms and nematodes regulate many immune pathways of their host in order to increase their chances of survival. For ... It was first known as mansonelliasis, which referred to an infectious disease of any of three parasite species, including ...
It will likely be the first parasitic disease to be globally eradicated. Guinea worm disease has been known since ancient times ... "Parasites - Dracunculiasis (also known as Guinea Worm Disease) Eradication Program". CDC. November 22, 2013. Archived from the ... Broken worms have a tendency to putrefy or petrify. Putrefaction leads to the skin sloughing off around the worm. Petrification ... Although Guinea worm disease is usually not fatal, the wound where the worm emerges could develop a secondary bacterial ...
... is a skin disease leaving lesions that is transmitted through skin-to-skin contact. Cutaneous anthrax is also called ... Oral anti-parasitic medicines, known as drenches, are given to a flock to treat worms, sometimes after worm eggs in the feces ... Other than parasites and disease, predation is a threat to sheep and the profitability of sheep raising. Sheep have little ... Ovine Johne's disease is a wasting disease that affects young sheep. Bluetongue disease is an insect-borne illness causing ...
Sweet's syndrome (SS), or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a skin disease characterized by the sudden onset of fever, an elevated white blood cell count, and tender, red, well-demarcated papules and plaques that show dense infiltrates by neutrophil granulocytes on histologic examination. The syndrome was first described in 1964 by Robert Douglas Sweet. It was also known as Gomm-Button disease in honour of the first two patients Sweet diagnosed with the condition. Sweet described a disease with four features: fever; leukocytosis; acute, tender, red plaques; and a papillary dermal infiltrate of neutrophils. This led to the name acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis. Larger series of patients showed that fever and neutrophilia are not consistently present.[citation needed] The diagnosis is based on the two constant features, a typical eruption and the characteristic histologic features;[citation needed] thus the eponym "Sweet's syndrome" is used. Acute, tender, ...
... is primarily caused by uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase deficiency (UROD). Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase occurs in nature as a homodimer of two subunits. It participates in the fifth step in heme synthesis pathway, and is active in the cytosol. This enzymatic conversion results in coproporphyrinogen III as the primary product. This is accomplished by the clockwise removal of the four carboxyl groups present in the cyclic uroporphyrinogen III molecule. Therefore, a deficiency in this enzyme causes the aforementioned buildup of uroporphyrinogen and hepta-carboxylic porphyrinogen, and to a lesser extent hexa-carboxylic porphyrinogen, and penta-carboxylic porphyrinogen in the urine, which can be helpful in the diagnosis of this disorder.[16][17] The dermatological symptoms of PCT that include blistering and lesions on sun-exposed areas of the skin are caused by a buildup of porphyrin compounds (specifically uroporphyrinogen) close to the surface of the ...
... are among the most common health problems in cats. Skin disorders in cats have many causes, and many of the common skin disorders that afflict people have a counterpart in cats. The condition of a cat's skin and coat can also be an important indicator of its general health. Skin disorders of cats vary from acute, self-limiting problems to chronic or long-lasting problems requiring life-time treatment. Cat skin disorders may be grouped into categories according to the causes. Skin disease may result from deficiencies in immune system function. In cats, the most common cause of immune deficiency is infection with retroviruses, FIV or FeLV, and cats with these chronic infections are subject to repeated bouts of skin infection and abscesses. This category also includes ...
A skin condition, also known as cutaneous condition, is any medical condition that affects the integumentary system-the organ system that encloses the body and includes skin, hair, nails, and related muscle and glands.[1] The major function of this system is as a barrier against the external environment.[2] Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses, as well as many nonpathologic states (like, in certain circumstances, melanonychia and racquet nails).[3][4] While only a small number of skin diseases account for most visits to the physician, thousands of skin conditions have been described.[5] Classification of these conditions often presents many nosological challenges, since underlying causes and pathogenetics are often not known.[6][7] Therefore, most current textbooks ...
Direct consultation involves an individual with a skin condition contacting a dermatologist via telecommunication to request diagnosis and treatment. In this field, mobile applications of teledermatology gain importance. Telediagnosis in the absence of personal contact with health care workers to the individual is complex. It requires active participation of the individual and without appropriate guidance may lead to improper management. However, as a triage tool, leading the individual directly to the appropriate specialist for his/her disease, it could be very valuable in the near future. Specialist referral is a major area of application in teledermatology A general practitioner (or other medical professional) that sees the individual consults a specialist/ specialised centre via telecommunication in order to get a second opinion. The specialist then helps the GP in rendering a diagnosis, providing management options et cetera.[6] Home telehealth/telehomecare involves an ...
... (Gk, chrysos - 'gold', osis - 'condition of') is a dermatological condition induced by the parenteral administration of gold salts, usually for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Such treatment has been superseded as the best practice for treating the disease because of "numerous side effects and monitoring requirements, their limited efficacy, and very slow onset of action". Similar to silver, a gold preparation used parenterally for a long period may rarely produce a permanent skin pigmentation - especially if the skin is exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet radiation. The skin's pigmentation (in this condition) has been described as uniformly gray, grayish purple, slate gray, or grayish blue, and is usually limited to exposed portions of the body. It may involve the conjunctivae over the scleras but usually not the oral mucosa. Location of pigment predominantly in the upper dermis leads ...
Atopy is a hereditary[4] and chronic (lifelong) allergic skin disease. Signs usually begin between 6 months and 3 years of age, with some breeds of dog, such as the golden retriever, showing signs at an earlier age. Dogs with atopic dermatitis are itchy, especially around the eyes, muzzle, ears and feet. In severe cases, the irritation is generalised. If the allergens are seasonal, the signs of irritation are similarly seasonal. Many dogs with house dust mite allergy have perennial disease.[5] Some of the allergens associated with atopy in dogs include pollens of trees, grasses and weeds, as well as molds and house dust mites. Ear and skin infections by the bacteria Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and the yeast Malassezia pachydermatis are commonly secondary to atopic dermatitis. Food allergy can be associated with identical signs and some authorities consider food allergy to be a type of atopic dermatitis.[6] Food allergy can be identified ...
... is a commune in the Hérault department in the Occitanie region in southern France. A Hydrotherapy Centre was built near the Sainte-Odile spring in 1743[citation needed], and focuses on using the purported therapeutic properties of Avène Thermal Spring Water to address a variety of dermatological conditions and skin concerns such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, eczema and burns. The brand is centered on Avène Thermal spring water. Precipitation filters through the Cévennes Mountains and resurfaces at the Sainte-Odile spring. Its composition is thought to make it effective for the care and management of sensitive skin. Over 150 stringent biological, pharmacological and clinical studies on Avène Thermal Spring Water have been conducted by the Avene Thermal Spring Company and independent researchers.[citation needed] Communes of the Hérault department ...
PBC has an immunological basis, and is classified as an autoimmune disorder.[12] It results from a slow, progressive destruction of the small bile ducts of the liver, with the intralobular ducts and the Canals of Hering (intrahepatic ductules) being affected early in the disease.[13] This progresses to the development of fibrosis, cholestasis and, in some people, cirrhosis.[2]. Most people with PBC (,90 percent) have anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) against pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), an enzyme complex that is found in the mitochondria.[1] People who are negative for AMAs are usually found to be positive when more sensitive methods of detection are used.[14]. People with PBC may also have been diagnosed with another autoimmune disease, such as a rheumatological, endocrinological, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, or dermatological condition, suggesting shared genetic and immune abnormalities.[11] Common associations include Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid ...
Grover's disease (GD) is a polymorphic, pruritic, papulovesicular dermatosis characterized histologically by acantholysis with or without dyskeratosis. Once confirmed, most cases of Grover's disease last six to twelve months, which is why it was originally called "transient". However it may last much longer. Nevertheless, it is not to be confused with relapsing linear acantholytic dermatosis. Grover's disease often starts quite suddenly. There are intensely itchy spots on the central back, mid chest and occasionally elsewhere. Frequently, it follows sweating or some unexpected heat stress. The itchy eruption lasts an average of 10-12 months. It is characterized by papules and papulovesicles with excoriations occurring on the chest, back, lower sternum, arms, and thighs. The papules are most commonly found on the mid chest. Sometimes the features of Grover's are found in people who do not itch or have a conspicuous rash. Most of the people with Grover's who visit a dermatologist, however, itch a ...
... is a skin condition in which accumulation of sebum, keratin, sweat, dirt and debris leads to a localized patch of skin discoloration or a wart-like plaque. It is caused by inadequate hygiene of a certain body part, usually due to some form of disability or a condition that is associated with pain or increased sensitivity to touch (hyperesthesia) or immobility.[1] Dermatosis neglecta typically develops several months after a disability or other affliction leads to improper cleaning. Patients may deny that negligence is the cause of the lesion, even though it completely resolves on vigorous rubbing with alcohol swabs or water and soap (which provides both diagnosis and treatment). Recognizing the diagnosis avoids unnecessary skin biopsies. Examples of case reports from the literature include a man who avoided washing the skin area surrounding an artificial pacemaker out ...
... is a medication belonging to the family of medications known as topical corticosteroids. It is used for the relief of various skin conditions, including rashes. It helps to reduce redness, itching, and irritation. Desoximetasone is a synthetic corticosteroid, a class of primarily synthetic steroids used as anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic agents. Three brand name products are available (availability depending on country): Topicort Emollient Cream (0.25% desoximetasone) Topicort LP Emollient Cream (0.05% desoximetasone) Topisolone Cream (0.25% desoximetasone) When using desoximetasone, some of the medication may be absorbed through the skin and into the bloodstream. Too much absorption can lead to unwanted side effects elsewhere in the body. Large amounts of desoximetasone should be avoided over large areas. It should not be used for extended periods of time. Treated areas should not be covered with airtight dressings such as plastic ...
Most cacti possess spines, some large enough to cause serious wounds. Glochids however, though smaller, commonly induce more troublesome, more persistent, dermatological manifestations in humans. Though minute, glochids commonly are barbed and once they have penetrated the skin barbed glochids are practically impossible to dislodge without leaving scraps of foreign material in the wound. Implantation of glochidia in the skin does sometimes cause immediate irritation, but not always, as one may deduce from the presentation of patients with granulomatous lesions around glochidia, patients who have no recollection of the penetration that caused the acute injury, even when it is clear that the injury is far from fresh. Distraction or excitement might cause the victim to overlook brushing past a cactus and picking up a few hundred barely visible glochids. In such cases, the irritant reaction may have a delayed onset. Shanon reported that brushing ...
Human parasites include various protozoa and worms which may infect humans that cause parasitic diseases. Human parasites are ... The most documented by far was Guinea worm disease mainly because the grown female worm emerges from the skin which causes ... Not many parasitic diseases were identified in ancient Greek and Roman texts mainly because the symptoms for parasitic diseases ... This disease is caused by the Guinea worm and is characterized by the female worm emerging from the leg. This symptom is so ...
Parasitic Worms. live in or on host; after eggs ingested or larvae burrow in skin. Prions. consist of just protein without RNA ... infectious parasites containing DNA or RNA in protein shell. Fungi. single celled or multi-celled organisms; make spores. Mold ... Chronic Disease. Your Bodys Defenses. External Barriers:. Skin. Mucous membranes. Hair and cilia. Saliva. Stomach Acid. Innate ... Most disease information complementary of WebMD. In pairs, pick a disease from the book. Practice labeling each component In ...
A parasite is an organism that lives on or in a host and gets its food from or at the expense of its host. Parasites can cause ... Schistosomiasis, also known as bilharzia, is a disease caused by parasitic worms. Although the worms that cause schistosomiasis ... Schistosomiasis is considered one of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).The parasites that cause schistosomiasis live in ... You can become infected when your skin comes in contact with contaminated freshwater. Most human infections are caused by ...
Schistosoma mansoni parasites, the cause of the disease bilharzia, or schistosomiasis. The brown worm is an adult male and the ... As soon as the larvae passed through their skin, all of the volunteers displayed a bit of a rash. One had a mild fever. But all ... Theyre Hosting Parasitic Worms in Their Bodies to Help Treat a Neglected Disease. ... Health,Theyre Hosting Parasitic Worms in Their Bodies to Help Treat a Neglected Disease ...
It is also an anthelmintic, which means it fights to expel parasitic worms. Parasites ingest the drug when they feed on the ... Skin & Coat. Skin & Coat Categories. Allergy Relief Antibacterials Fish Oils & Omega 3 Grooming Tools Hairball Remedies Itch ... Concentrations of selamectin, the active ingredient, in the tissue and bloodstream prevent heartworm disease. Selamectin also ... Flea & Tick Heartworm Pain Joints Medications Skin & Coat Vitamins Dental Supplies Arthritis Hormonal Endocrine Urinary Tract ...
The genome reveals dozens of potential new targets for drugs or vaccines to fight elephantiasis and similar parasitic diseases. ... sequenced the genome of a tiny threadlike worm that can live for a decade in the human body and cause the debilitating disease ... It spreads from person to person via mosquito bites, which deposit worm larvae into the skin. The parasites wend their way to ... Parasitic Worm Genome Gives Insight into Elephantiasis. Elephantiasis of the leg.Dr. F.W. OConnor, courtesy of Wellcome ...
Against skin worms, gill worms, and tapeworms. Worms are also wide-spread parasitic diseases of fish. Bacterial infections are ... The application areas include multi-cellular parasites such as skin worms, gill worms, tape worms, or cercarian. View products ... The application areas include parasites such as skin parasites, white-spot disease, velvet, Crytobia, or also bacterial ... For fish lice and anchor worms. Parasitic infection is a disease that often affects fish. As a remedy in this case OASE ...
Schistosomiasis (also known as bilharzia) is a vector-borne parasitic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus ... The temperatures here are blistering and the young boys cannot resist the temptation of soothing their sunburnt skin with a ... Freshwater snails act as the vector, releasing larval forms of the parasite into water. These larvae subsequently penetrate the ... He is sure his love of swimming in the Ruya River exposed him to the tiny worms or flukes that are shed by freshwater snails. ...
vectorborne diseases acquired through the bite of an infected arthropod:. Malaria - caused by single-cell parasitic protozoa ... fresh water snails act as intermediate host and release larval form of parasite that penetrates the skin of people exposed to ... contaminated water; worms mature and reproduce in the blood vessels, liver, kidneys, and intestines releasing eggs, which ... Major infectious diseases This entry lists major infectious diseases likely to be encountered in countries where the risk of ...
Anchor worm disease. Lernaea cyprinacea. Parasitic copepod. Parasite visible on skin, head embedded deep in the tissues of the ... Protozoan parasite. Slime covers skin like fog, fins clamped and denuded of tissue. 250 ml/litre formalin bath for 15 min. ... DISEASE. AGENT. TYPE. SYNDROME. MEASURES. Nematode infestation. Capillaria sp.. Parasitic nematode. Emaciated, although shows ... Protozoan parasite. Dark coloration; increased mucus build-up; occasional appearance of skin lesions followed by scale loss; ...
... but here are 5 ways a parasite just might be beneficial to humans. ... Parasites are typically seen as dangerous, as well as disgusting, ... researchers reported in Science that parasitic worms reduce symptoms of irritable bowel disease in mice. These worms basically ... Could allergy sufferers find relief by getting a few worms under their skin? ...
Treatments include praziquantel for parasites, antibiotics and antifungal... ... Common aquarium fish diseases are flukes, mites, lice, bacterial infections and fungal infections, according to Tetra. ... Anchor worms are a type of parasitic crustacean that burrow into the skin of fish, explains Tetra. Fish owners can manually ... A: Common skin disorders in dogs are infections, allergies and parasites, according to the ASPCA. Some skin disorders are acute ...
The disease is caused by parasitic trematode worms (genus Schistosoma). The parasites larvae, released by freshwater snails, ... penetrate the skin and eventually travel to the liver via the blood stream. Feeding on the hosts blood, the parasites mature ... Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease caused by parasitic worms, which kills as many as 200,000 people per year and affects ... The bodys immune response to the eggs, which remain in the body, is the main cause of the disease. The immune response is the ...
... is a disease caused by parasitic worms. More than 200 million people are infected worldwide. In terms of impact this disease is ... Metazoal is a disease caused by metazoan parasites, such as nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, or arthropods.. Schistosomiasis is ... penetrating trauma of the skin. Grown on soil or on decaying vegetation.. Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease that can ... Infectious Diseases. lupus;. immune diseases;. nutritional deficiency diseases, eg rickets, anaemia;. diseases caused by ...
The intestinal disease is also known as bilharzia. It comes from flatworm parasites that burrow into peoples skin, usually ... BEAUBIEN: The parasite cycles between the snails and people. In the water, the tiny worms penetrate peoples skin. The ... the worms penetrate the skin and then mate inside the intestines. Human excrement then carries the parasite eggs back into the ... Once the worms are large enough, the parasites swim away from the snails and go out in search of the next human host. ...
A worm parasite enters the human body and produces thousands of larval worms which migrate in the skin and eye. When the worms ... Mectizan®. Mectizan® kills the parasites larvae in the human body, preventing river blindness and transmission of the disease ... Onchocerciasis, also known as "river blindness," is a parasitic infection that occurs through the bite of a black fly, which is ... as well as disfiguring skin diseases. River blindness is endemic to Central, East and West Africa, parts of Latin America and ...
Category: Parasitic Infectionsdisease.causetreatmentsirritationLymphatic FilariasisGuinea Worm DiseaseSchistosomiasisMalaria ... Scabies is a skin condition in which a parasite (also called a mite) burrows under a persons skin causing irritation. While ... A parasitic infection is a disease that is transmitted by parasites. Parasites are microscopic organisms that live inside or on ... SexuallySTDSTIparasitesoverviewinfectionsparasiticinfectionlicerashbug bitesbitesbugsmitesdiseasessex diseasesParasitic ...
Nonhuman primates and people share fungal and parasitic diseases as well.27 Although not common, fungal diseases of potential ... elongated cylindrical worms), tapeworms, and arthropods (lice, mites, and fleas). Giardia, a protozoan parasite that reproduces ... concern include streptothricosis (a skin infection), candidiasis (an infection of the mucous membranes), and ringworm. Many ... and parasitic diseases. Each species of nonhuman primate has the capacity to introduce or spread illnesses that threaten human ...
Learn how you can heal from a parasitic infection, naturally. ... Parasites can affect anyone, and are more common in developed ... These are all organisms that burrow into the skin and can transmit disease. (3) ... This group of parasitic infection includes flatworms, roundworms, and thorny-headed worms. ... 9. Generally itchy skin: In addition to eczema and hives, parasites can cause a rash that can lead to itchy skin. This is ...
... have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and ... which could help in finding new ways to fight the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis. ... have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and ... "And thats becoming more and more of an issue as the geographic range of the parasite may be spreading and hybrids between ...
Currently, parasitic and bacterial diseases are the major causes of losses in Brazilian tilapia culture. The tilapia can host ... Many parasites (such as Paratrichodina africana and monogenetic worms, figure 2) commonly diagnosed in cases of outbreaks in ... Symposium to focus on skin, gills and guts. 12 Dec 2018. A brand-new conference that aims to cover issues relating to the skin ... Under these circumstances, the control of parasitic diseases in nursery farms is key to achieving greater sanitary control in ...
... which occurs when water-borne cercariae enter the skin. Adult worms dwell in the blood vessels, and S. haematobium worms ... Schistosomiasis in particular is one of the most devastating parasitic diseases, with at least 240 million people currently ... I investigate how parasites modulate the human innate immune system to cause diseases like leishmaniasis and lymphatic ... There are several parasite species - namely the trematode parasite Schistosoma haematobium, and the liver flukes Opisthorchis ...
The intestinal disease is also known as bilharzia. It comes from flatworm parasites that burrow into peoples skin, usually ... BEAUBIEN: The parasite cycles between the snails and people. In the water, the tiny worms penetrate peoples skin. The ... the worms penetrate the skin and then mate inside the intestines. Human excrement then carries the parasite eggs back into the ... Thriving Towns In East Africa Are Good News For A Parasitic Worm By Jason Beaubien • May 28, 2014 ...
Pinworm infection is not classified as a neglected tropical disease unlike many other parasitic worm infections. Garlic has ... German botanist Lonicerus (1564) recommended garlic against parasitic worms. Applying raw garlic on skin may cause a chemical ... Total elimination of the parasite in a household may require repeated doses of medication for up to a year or more. Because the ... Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2009-04-08. Nakano T, Okamoto M, Ikeda Y ...
... and warned her that the worm can carry the rat lungworm parasite. ... The Centers for Disease Control says the rat lungworm parasite ... Symptoms can include severe headache, stiff neck, tingling or painful feelings in the skin, nausea and vomiting. The CDC says ... Why an invasive parasitic worm was found in a Pearland familys backyard. By Jacob Rascon - Anchor-Reporter ... Certain worms and snails eat the infected rat poop and carry the parasite. Yes, people can get infected, under unusual ...
  • In addition to visual impairment or blindness, onchocerciasis causes skin disease, including nodules under the skin or debilitating itching. (cdc.gov)
  • SightFirst supports onchocerciasis control programs in countries where the disease exists as a major threat to sight. (lionsclubs.org)
  • The parasite that causes onchocerciasis is transmitted through repeated bites by blackflies that live and breed near fast-flowing streams and rivers like this part of the Nile River in northern Uganda. (cdc.gov)
  • As of 2010 about 6 million people still suffered from skin disease, 800,000 suffered from visual impairment, and 300,000 suffered from blindness, reflecting around a 60%, 30% and 50% decrease respectively of people debilitated by onchocerciasis since the start of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control ( APOC ) in 1995. (cdc.gov)
  • The Onchocerciasis Elimination Program for the Americas ( OEPA ) also seized the opportunity to put this generous donation program to use and adopt an aggressive response to the disease that has nearly eliminated the parasitic worm from the region. (cdc.gov)
  • About 2 million residents of Plateau and Nasarawa states will no longer be taking this medicine because the potentially blinding tropical disease, known in the medical field as onchocerciasis, is no longer being transmitted in the area. (cartercenter.org)
  • In 2015 The Carter Center helped the country launch the Nigeria Onchocerciasis Elimination Committee , which includes representatives of the Ministry of Health, The Carter Center and other NGOs assisting the ministry, national experts, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cartercenter.org)
  • Lab technician Wigdan Elmubarak examines a blood sample, which she is testing for exposure to onchocerciasis microfilariae, the pre-larval-stage parasites that can infect the body. (cartercenter.org)
  • Selamectin also redistributes into the skin from the bloodstream and kills adult fleas, American dog ticks, and ear mites, and prevents flea eggs from hatching. (1800petmeds.com)
  • Fleas can also carry diseases such as bubonic plague, or the Black Death. (howstuffworks.com)
  • It contains substances that produce a skin odour known to deter fleas. (infobarrel.com)
  • Dracunculiasis is only transmitted when individuals drink stagnant water contaminated with parasite-infected water fleas. (naturalpedia.com)
  • Revolution (selamectin) is the safe, simple way to protect your dog from heartworms, fleas and other harmful parasites. (petloverscentre.com)
  • There are no drugs to treat the disease, but it can be prevented by filtering the fleas out of the water through finely meshed cloth. (sudantribune.com)
  • You must also protect your dog from a variety of parasites, from fleas to heartworms. (bhg.com)
  • Owing to the rapid multiplication of fleas, dogs that are not regularly groomed or washed, soon become swarmed with these pests, consequently the severe irritation they produce upon the skin causes the animal to lose condition , whilst the scratching and biting destroys its coat. (bookdome.com)
  • Scabies and fleas are the biggest culprits here and good animal as well as human hygiene play a most important role in disease prevention and control. (luzdoc.com)
  • The idea of having a worm grow inside you is awful," says Meta Roestenberg, an infectious disease physician at Leiden University Medical Center, who is directing the research. (nytimes.com)
  • Many in the medical community question whether Morgellons is an infectious disease or a psychiatric disorder. (scientificamerican.com)
  • To learn more about Morgellons, which many patients believe is caused by parasites , we consulted Michael Cappello, a pediatrics professor and infectious disease specialist at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Do these patients have other signs of infectious disease? (scientificamerican.com)
  • An infectious disease tends to get attention in this country only after it starts scaring people in the suburbs of the Northeast. (protomag.com)
  • In healthy ecosystems-say, one with a high diversity of snails or mosquitoes where the dilution effect is strong and infectious disease is better contained-competition from nonvector snails or mosquitoes keeps the vector populations in check. (newsweek.com)
  • Eco-sanitation is scaling up from a stage of pilot studies to extensive use in a number of countries, for example China and South Africa, says Professor Thor Axel Stenstroem who holds positions at the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and the Stockholm Environment Institute. (webwire.com)
  • By targeting Wolbachia, a bacterial symbiont that the filarial parasites need to live, the team has discovered a drug synergy that enables effective treatment over a shorter time. (news-medical.net)
  • Currently, parasitic and bacterial diseases are the major causes of losses in Brazilian tilapia culture. (thefishsite.com)
  • Some bacterial diseases have a seasonal pattern with increasing cases in some periods of the year, while others may occur throughout the whole cycle and are not necessarily related to climatic factors such as columnaris disease. (thefishsite.com)
  • Representative results are included to demonstrate effects of isotope exposure time, various bacterial clearing protocols, and alternative worm disruption methods in wild-type nematodes, as well as the relative extent of isotopic incorporation in mitochondrial complex III mutant worms ( isp-1(qm150) ) relative to wild-type worms. (jove.com)
  • Vaccines prevent many viral and bacterial diseases that are difficult to treat in dogs. (bhg.com)
  • Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that affects the liver, kidneys, and other major organs. (bhg.com)
  • Lyme disease is a progressively debilitating bacterial disease carried by ticks, primarily deer ticks. (bhg.com)
  • Pearlman's team infected mice with extracts taken from worms treated with doxycycline, which contained few Wolbachia , and extracts from untreated worms with a normal bacterial load. (newscientist.com)
  • Most often found in northern and central Africa, the disease infects the brain and spinal cord, accounting for its shockingly high mortality rate. (wn.com)
  • Known as the Oriental liver fluke, it's a dangerous parasite that causes cancer of the liver when it infects those who eat raw fish - but it may have a tremendous medical upside if used correctly, according to a UPI report . (babwnews.com)
  • The disease is very prevalent in parts of Africa, and is spread by a certain type of mosquito. (ucsb.edu)
  • These parasites thrive in tropical regions, including parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America. (nih.gov)
  • In Central Africa, a boom in agriculture and fishing on the shores of Lake Malawi is changing the environment and in the process creating more favorable conditions for a parasitic worm. (mtpr.org)
  • The world's first vaccine for a disease that causes misery for millions in Africa could be tested within five years. (news-medical.net)
  • Approximately 100 million people in Africa and Latin America are at-risk of contracting the disease. (lionsclubs.org)
  • 10 Most Common Deadly African Diseases It's a sad fact that preventable diseases claim so many lives each year, particularly in regions of Africa where healthcare is unreliable. (wn.com)
  • 3. Tuberculosis Tuberculosis or TB has become one of the deadliest diseases in Africa, often going hand-in-hand with hivv and AIDS. (wn.com)
  • Diarrhea is often associated with other diseases, but is pinpointed for more than 8 percent of all deathhs in Africa each year. (wn.com)
  • Not so long ago, human diseases caused by parasitic worms were thought to be confined to resource poor communities throughout Africa, Asia and South America. (prisonplanet.com)
  • Most neglected tropical diseases did originate in the tropics of Africa and Asia. (protomag.com)
  • Along with lessons learned by OEPA, studies conducted in Africa have demonstrated that it is possible to eliminate parasite with ivermectin treatment as a primary intervention in this region as well. (cdc.gov)
  • Few efforts to control the disease have been undertaken in Africa, the continent where the disease is most prevalent. (illinois.edu)
  • Neglected tropical diseases are widespread, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, affecting over 2 billion individuals. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Sub-Saharan Africa bears the biggest burden of many of these NTDs, and the numbers of people afflicted by each of several of these diseases are simply striking [ 24 ], representing up to over 90% of the world's burden for some of these diseases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Parasitic causes are often associated with travel to subtropical regions, including Central and South America and different regions throughout Africa. (curesdecoded.com)
  • These worms are found in raw or undercooked fish, poultry and frogs in Southeast Asia, Latin America, India and South Africa. (healthline.com)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • But she said the risk to the student volunteers is "extremely small," especially compared with the potential benefit to preventing a disease that burdens millions of the world's poorest people. (nytimes.com)
  • The traditional path forward, which would cost millions, requires setting up a study in an afflicted area and using only people who have already been exposed to the worms. (nytimes.com)
  • 4 In the United States, an estimated 3 million of people are infected by this parasite. (ucsb.edu)
  • The worm, Brugia malayi , is one of several related parasites known as filarial nematodes, which infect more than 150 million people worldwide. (nih.gov)
  • People trying to grow food and support their families on the shores of Lake Malawi are not only causing serious environmental problems, they're also causing a surge in a debilitating disease. (mtpr.org)
  • Now we're going to hear how a rise in a debilitating disease is being fueled in part by people trying to improve their lives. (mtpr.org)
  • Since 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) has been reporting outstanding success in dealing with neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) with 1 billion people estimated to have received treatments in 2015. (news-medical.net)
  • Any time you're talking about treating that many people with just one drug and no alternative, you're really concerned about the ability of the parasites to develop resistance," Newmark says. (eurekalert.org)
  • People suffering from parasitic diseases can take a few cloves of fresh garlic or supplements containing garlic extract daily. (natural-homeremedies.com)
  • Some skin parasites spread between people or other animals, but you can also pick them up from just being in a particular environment. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Tackling neglected tropical diseases that disproportionately affect poor and developing communities requires collaboration across sectors and sustainable partnerships committed to helping people live longer, healthier lives free of disease. (devex.com)
  • The parasitic disease affects hundreds of millions of people around the world and kills thousands every year. (rt.com)
  • There are still hundreds of thousands of people dying each year from diseases directly related to their lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation. (planetaid.org)
  • About half the world's population (over 3 billion people) are in infected with at least one of the three worms forming what Columbia University parasitologist Dickson Despommier calls the "unholy trinity"-large roundworm, hookworm and whipworm. (adventuresofaglutenfreemom.com)
  • It is one of the common skin conditions that affects many people, but stretch marks are usually not a medical concern. (healthhype.com)
  • People become infected with the parasites when they come into contact with certain types of freshwater snail that produce human-infective stage schistosomes. (prisonplanet.com)
  • As you can see, this parasite is spread by people who defecate (and urinate) in public, which as we all know, is now a major problem all over Europe. (prisonplanet.com)
  • Currently, people living in more than 70 tropical nations require annual or semi-annual drug treatment to rid their bodies of the parasite. (scienceblog.com)
  • A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host's immune system. (phys.org)
  • Normally thought of as plagues of the developing world-which is the focus for what little attention and research funding they receive-many of these diseases exist within U.S. borders, afflicting an estimated 12 million people, largely in impoverished pockets of Appalachia, the Mississippi Delta, other areas of the rural South, Native American tribal lands, U.S.-Mexico borderlands and disadvantaged urban enclaves. (protomag.com)
  • Hotez has called them "forgotten diseases of forgotten people. (protomag.com)
  • People report the sensation of creatures crawling under their skin, mysterious moving fibers appear, and finally bugs and worms pop out. (jonimitchell.com)
  • The people having them are experiencing Morgellons, the latest and scariest in the series of bizarre diseases appearing in the last few years, seemingly from nowhere. (jonimitchell.com)
  • People with the disease experience neurological damage that manifests as difficulty concentrating, inability to process and use language effectively, and generalized brain fog. (jonimitchell.com)
  • With no help from the medical community, people with Morgellons turn to the internet where they learn the name for their disease and the names for the parasites that are coming through their skin. (jonimitchell.com)
  • One of the few people to take the disease seriously was Randy Wymore, a neuroscientist at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Science. (jonimitchell.com)
  • He received samples from a range of people who claimed the fibers had come through their skin. (jonimitchell.com)
  • People are often infected while swimming, fishing or washing clothes in waters infested with the parasitic flatworms known as schistosomes. (illinois.edu)
  • Once people come in contact with water infested by the parasites, the worms are able to wriggle through the host's skin and into their tissue until they reach the blood vessels. (illinois.edu)
  • People traveling to subtropical regions or who have compromised immune systems are at a greater risk of contracting parasitic diseases. (curesdecoded.com)
  • 19 February 2015 ¦ GENEVA - WHO urges affected countries to scale up their investment in tackling 17 neglected tropical diseases in order to improve the health and well-being of more than 1.5 billion people. (who.int)
  • For example, in 2012 alone, more than 800 million people were treated for at least one neglected tropical disease. (who.int)
  • By 2017, the number of people receiving preventive treatment for at least one of the diseases should reach 1.5 billion. (who.int)
  • As diseases are reduced or eliminated, the number of people needing and receiving treatment will obviously fall. (who.int)
  • Moving towards universal health coverage will ensure that all people have access to preventive and curative health services for neglected tropical diseases without the risk of financial hardship when paying for them. (who.int)
  • In the world today so many people are sick from diseases that modern medicine does not seem to cure. (dreddyclinic.com)
  • In recent studies taken at major hospitals over the last ten years, experts in this field have found that well over 95%of all people have parasitic animals living in them. (dreddyclinic.com)
  • But even if doctors could reach the people of southern Sudan, many of their diseases are untreatable. (sudantribune.com)
  • Many people have parasites and never know. (nogreaterjoy.org)
  • Often people get a disease, crashing their immune system, thus making their body a perfect home for parasites. (nogreaterjoy.org)
  • People with parasites can become malnourished and weak because parasites secrete toxins and steal vital mineral nutrients and amino acids needed for digestion and a healthy body. (nogreaterjoy.org)
  • Although the disease is not documented in Italy, it is possible that the anonymous painter noticed the parasite in the wound of some traveler who arrived in Bari, which was an important port for people traveling to the East, particularly Syria and Palestine. (livescience.com)
  • This work suggested that antibiotics could be used to prevent the spread of the disease, by sterilising mature worms in infected people. (newscientist.com)
  • The soil-transmitted worms also are treatable with drugs, but reinfection rates are high due to the contaminated environment in which many people live. (uga.edu)
  • Established in 1998, the center promotes international biomedical research and educational programs at UGA and throughout Georgia to address the parasitic and other tropical diseases that continue to threaten the health of people throughout the world. (uga.edu)
  • Scientists have discovered that a parasitic worm found in Australia could provide a miracle treatment for people with diabetes. (babwnews.com)
  • Adult schistosomes are intravascular parasites that metabolize imported glucose largely via glycolysis. (jove.com)
  • These findings provide direct evidence for the importance of SGTP1 and SGTP4 for schistosomes in importing exogenous glucose and show that these proteins are important for normal parasite development in the mammalian host. (prolekare.cz)
  • By understanding how schistosomes develop inside the host, the lab hopes to find new ways to combat this disease. (phys.org)
  • But other researchers of this disease are conflicted about the study's method, fearing there is no way to be sure that all of the tiny parasites have been evicted from the hosts when the trial ends. (nytimes.com)
  • Thriving towns along the lake are changing the ecosystem in ways that are allowing a parasitic worm to flourish, researchers reported last week in the journal Trends in Parasitology . (mtpr.org)
  • Researchers at the LSTM's Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics, and University of Buea, Cameroon have developed new models of the tropical eye worm, Loa loa for the development of new drugs against filariasis. (news-medical.net)
  • The researchers believe that parasites trigger immune responses that can affect how likely a woman is to successfully carry a fetus to term. (statnews.com)
  • He explained that knowing who has the disease and where it is prevalent allows for more focused treatment and control of the parasite, and for researchers and health workers to react faster in cases of recurrence. (devex.com)
  • To get the root cause of at least one outbreak of giraffe skin disease, Whittier assisted researchers from the Uganda Wildlife Authority, the Uganda Conservation Foundation, the Global Health Program at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, and Busch Gardens Tampa Bay. (phys.org)
  • Researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have undertaken an in-depth analysis of the genetic make-up of the disease, with the aim of pinpointing a weakness. (digitaljournal.com)
  • SCORE researchers are working with local African communities and governments to evaluate mass drug administration, snail control, diagnostic tests and sanitation and hygiene changes designed to slow or stop disease spread. (uga.edu)
  • A new study from Indiana University may explain how a bacterium called Wolbachia prevents mosquitoes from transmitting deadly diseases such as dengue fever, West Nile virus and Zika. (news-medical.net)
  • · This disease is spread to dogs and cats by mosquitoes, so it is important to eliminate areas of standing water that can serve as breeding grounds. (infobarrel.com)
  • These juvenile worms' location just under the skin makes them ripe for being ingested by feeding mosquitoes and the cycle begins anew. (howstuffworks.com)
  • This diverse group of insidious disorders may be transmitted by parasites, worms, mosquitoes and other bugs, notes Peter Hotez , president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington, D.C., and founder of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. (protomag.com)
  • Today, increased global travel and massive population upheavals driven by war, famine and climate change-which is making more and more of the world hospitable to the species of mosquitoes, bugs and worms that transmit these diseases-have accelerated their spread. (protomag.com)
  • Others stem from viruses or parasites transmitted by vectors such as mosquitoes, flies or other insects. (protomag.com)
  • Dirofilaria repens is a long parasitic roundworm that is spread by mosquitoes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . (chicagotribune.com)
  • Ectoparasites, such as ticks or mosquitoes, feed off the skin. (curesdecoded.com)
  • Daniel Colley at the University of Georgia told Science magazine , which first reported on the study, that the drug is "not terribly effective" and given that the worms' life span is five to 10 years, "That is a long time to have something as ugly as a schistosome living in your blood vessels, putting out excrement and things. (nytimes.com)
  • And that's becoming more and more of an issue as the geographic range of the parasite may be spreading and hybrids between human- and livestock-infecting schistosome species are being reported. (eurekalert.org)
  • About 10 years ago, the lab began applying their knowledge of planarian biology to understand the planarian's parasitic cousin, the schistosome. (phys.org)
  • According to the World Health Organization , filariasis is a potentially eradicable disease. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The main way to eliminate the disease is through inset control programs, and the World Health Organization aims to achieve global eradication by 2025. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Such conditions have enabled the full range of nasty infectious diseases - many of which are fading out or become nonexistent elsewhere - to flourish, says Dr. Nevio Zagaria, an expert in neglected diseases at the World Health Organization. (sudantribune.com)
  • One year after the person ingests the contaminated water, a spaghetti-like worm 2 to 3 feet (0.6 to 1 meter) long erupts from a blistered area of the person's skin - usually in the lower part of the leg, according to he World Health Organization. (livescience.com)
  • This worm was distinguished by the presence of "massive cysts" in the liver of animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long term disease can lead to damage of the bladder, kidneys, bowel, liver and genital tract. (nomadtravel.co.uk)
  • The adult worm then migrates to its preferred body part (bladder, rectum, intestines, liver, portal venous system (the veins that carry blood from the intestines to liver, spleen, lungs), depending on its species. (nih.gov)
  • Good Ayurvedic preparations address several issues simultaneously: the need to destroy the parasites , intestinal peristalsis and flora, and blood and liver detoxification. (dreddyclinic.com)
  • Because these parasites were designed to live in dogs and cats, they become "lost" in the human body - often in the liver or eyes. (luzdoc.com)
  • The Oriental liver fluke has a growth factor that boosts how fast wounds heal in the skin of mice in recent tests. (babwnews.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • Other veterinarians work at federal agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where they deal with the implications of diseases affecting human health that originate in nonhuman primates. (avma.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control says the rat lungworm parasite is born in the lungs of rats and ends up in their feces. (click2houston.com)
  • Last year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched a study of a curious and controversial condition known as Morgellons disease , which is characterized by creeping, crawling and stinging sensations under the skin. (scientificamerican.com)
  • An obstacle to this is with some parasites showing resistance to the ivermectin drug. (digitaljournal.com)
  • The outcome affirms that as part of the strategy to eliminate the disease worldwide, an alternative drug to ivermectin may be needed to complete the process. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Each study met its respective primary endpoints, showing a statistically significant superiority of moxidectin over the current standard of care, ivermectin, in suppressing the presence of the microfilariae in skin. (medindia.net)
  • A chronic allergy sufferer who worked for the Medical Research Council in the United Kingdom, Turton intentionally infected himself with parasitic hookworms. (statnews.com)
  • An ultrasensitive test has been developed that detects a corrupted protein associated with Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. (nih.gov)
  • Nowadays, hirudotherapy is used in patients with extensive and chronic inflammation of the skin, as a prevention for tissue necrosis after some surgeries and in several others fields of medicine. (scribd.com)