World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.United Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.EuropeReproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.IndiaHealth Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.International Agencies: International organizations which provide health-related or other cooperative services.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.BrazilAfricaVoluntary Health Agencies: Non-profit organizations concerned with various aspects of health, e.g., education, promotion, treatment, services, etc.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Great BritainWorld War II: Global conflict involving countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America that occurred between 1939 and 1945.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Asia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Latin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Health Communication: The transfer of information from experts in the medical and public health fields to patients and the public. The study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Immunization Programs: Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Health Transition: Demographic and epidemiologic changes that have occurred in the last five decades in many developing countries and that are characterized by major growth in the number and proportion of middle-aged and elderly persons and in the frequency of the diseases that occur in these age groups. The health transition is the result of efforts to improve maternal and child health via primary care and outreach services and such efforts have been responsible for a decrease in the birth rate; reduced maternal mortality; improved preventive services; reduced infant mortality, and the increased life expectancy that defines the transition. (From Ann Intern Med 1992 Mar 15;116(6):499-504)Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Health Planning Councils: Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.

Mumps and mumps vaccine: a global review. (1/3145)

Mumps is an acute infectious disease caused by a paramyxovirus. Although the disease is usually mild, up to 10% of patients can develop aseptic meningitis; a less common but more serious complication is encephalitis, which can result in death or disability. Permanent deafness, orchitis, and pancreatitis are other untoward effects of mumps. Based on data reported to WHO up to April 1998, mumps vaccine is routinely used by national immunization programmes in 82 countries/areas: 23 (92%) of 25 developed countries, 19 (86%) of 22 countries with economies in transition (mainly the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union), and 40 (24%) of 168 developing countries. Countries that have achieved high coverage have shown a rapid decline in mumps morbidity. Furthermore, in many of these countries, mumps-associated encephalitis and deafness have nearly vanished. This review considers the disease burden due to mumps; summarizes studies on the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of different strains of mumps vaccine; and highlights lessons learned about implementing mumps immunization in different countries. Countries already using mumps vaccine should monitor immunization coverage and establish routine mumps surveillance with investigation of outbreaks. Where mumps is targeted for elimination, countries need to add a second dose of mumps vaccine for children, keeping in mind that the disease may still occur in susceptible adults.  (+info)

Eradication: lessons from the past. (2/3145)

The declaration in 1980 that smallpox had been eradicated reawakened interest in disease eradication as a public health strategy. The smallpox programme's success derived, in part, from lessons learned from the preceding costly failure of the malaria eradication campaign. In turn, the smallpox programme offered important lessons with respect to other prospective disease control programmes, and these have been effectively applied in the two current global eradication initiatives, those against poliomyelitis and dracunculiasis. Taking this theme a step further, there are those who would now focus on the development of an inventory of diseases which might, one by one, be targeted either for eradication or elimination. This approach, while interesting, fails to recognize many of the important lessons learned and their broad implications for contemporary disease control programmes worldwide.  (+info)

The principles of disease elimination and eradication. (3/3145)

The Dahlem Workshop discussed the hierarchy of possible public health interventions in dealing with infectious diseases, which were defined as control, elimination of disease, elimination of infections, eradication, and extinction. The indicators of eradicability were the availability of effective interventions and practical diagnostic tools and the essential need for humans in the life-cycle of the agent. Since health resources are limited, decisions have to be made as to whether their use for an elimination or eradication programme is preferable to their use elsewhere. The costs and benefits of global eradication programmes concern direct effects on morbidity and mortality and consequent effects on the health care system. The success of any disease eradication initiative depends strongly on the level of societal and political commitment, with a key role for the World Health Assembly. Eradication and ongoing programmes constitute potentially complementary approaches to public health. Elimination and eradication are the ultimate goals of public health, evolving naturally from disease control. The basic question is whether these goals are to be achieved in the present or some future generation.  (+info)

Disease eradication and health systems development. (4/3145)

This article provides a framework for the design of future eradication programmes so that the greatest benefit accrues to health systems development from the implementation of such programmes. The framework focuses on weak and fragile health systems and assumes that eradication leads to the cessation of the intervention required to eradicate the disease. Five major components of health systems are identified and key elements which are of particular relevance to eradication initiatives are defined. The dearth of documentation which can provide "lessons learned" in this area is illustrated with a brief review of the literature. Opportunities and threats, which can be addressed during the design of eradication programmes, are described and a number of recommendations are outlined. It is emphasized that this framework pertains to eradication programmes but may be useful in attempts to coordinate vertical and horizontal disease control activities for maximum mutual benefits.  (+info)

Perspectives from micronutrient malnutrition elimination/eradication programmes. (5/3145)

Micronutrient malnutrition cannot be eradicated, but the elimination and control of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiencies and their health-related consequences as public health problems are currently the targets of global programmes. Remarkable progress is occurring in the control of goitre and xerophthalmia, but iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) has been less responsive to prevention and control efforts. Subclinical consequences of micronutrient deficiencies, i.e. "hidden hunger", include compromised immune functions that increase the risk of morbidity and mortality, impaired cognitive development and growth, and reduced reproductive and work capacity and performance. The implications are obvious for human health and national and global economic and social development. Mixes of affordable interventions are available which, when appropriately adapted to resource availability and context, are proven to be effective. These include both food-based interventions, particularly fortification programmes, such as salt iodization, and use of concentrated micronutrient supplements. A mix of accompanying programmes for infection control, community participation, including education, communication and information exchange, and private sector involvement are lessons learned for overcoming deterrents and sustaining progress towards elimination.  (+info)

Perspectives from the dracunculiasis eradication programme. (6/3145)

After a slow beginning in association with the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1981-1990), the global Dracunculiasis Eradication Programme has reduced the incidence of dracunculiasis by nearly 97%, from an estimated 3.2 million cases in 1986 to less than 100,000 cases in 1997. Over half of the remaining cases are in Sudan. In addition, the programme has already produced many indirect benefits such as improved agricultural production and school attendance, extensive provision of clean drinking-water, mobilization of endemic communities, and improved care of infants. Most workers in the campaign have other responsibilities in their communities or ministries of health besides dracunculiasis eradication.  (+info)

Perspectives from the global poliomyelitis eradication initiative. (7/3145)

Ten years after the year 2000 target was set by the World Health Assembly, the global poliomyelitis eradication effort has made significant progress towards that goal. The success of the initiative is built on political commitment within the endemic countries. A partnership of international organizations and donor countries works to support the work of the countries. Interagency coordinating committees are used to ensure that all country needs are met and to avoid duplication of donor effort. Private sector support has greatly expanded the resources available at both the national and international level. At the programmatic level, rapid implementation of surveillance is the key to success, but the difficulty of building effective surveillance programmes is often underestimated. Mass immunization campaigns must be carefully planned with resources mobilized well in advance. Programme strategies should be simple, clear and concise. While improvements in strategy and technology should be continuously sought, changes should be introduced only after careful consideration. Careful consideration should be given in the planning phases of a disease control initiative on how the initiative can be used to support other health initiatives.  (+info)

Candidate noninfectious disease conditions. (8/3145)

Important micronutrient deficiencies in at-risk populations can be addressed simultaneously with programmatically cost-effective results. Because of the interaction between many micronutrients, this would also be biologically effective. With adequate investment and political support, the chances of eliminating iodine deficiency as a problem in women of reproductive age and young children and of eliminating vitamin A deficiency as a problem in young children in the future are high. To eliminate iron deficiency and folic-acid-dependent neural tube defects (FADNTDs) in low-income populations, a new set of approaches will have to be developed. These same approaches, if successful, could be used to tackle other important micronutrient deficiencies.  (+info)

Ms. McKenzie-White is the Managing Director and Director of Education Technology and Design at the Center for Clinical Global Health Education. She also serves as adjunct faculty for the Johns Hopkins School of Education.. She has more than 20 years of experience in program leadership, web development, health education, and research. Since joining the CCGHE in 2006, her efforts have focused on distance learning and capacity-building initiatives. Her work has contributed to numerous peer-reviewed publications on leveraging technology to facilitate clinical global health education and optimize healthcare delivery.. An innovator, McKenzie-White was one of the inventors of emocha® (emocha.com), a CCGHE-developed mobile health platform now being used to facilitate research, education and healthcare delivery in more than 11 countries. She continues to design research studies and oversee pilot testing of new emocha® applications, and most recently has been involved in a country-wide effort in South ...
1. Global perspectives on mental-physical comorbidity Michael R. Von Korff; Part I. An Epidemiological Map of Mental-Physical Comorbidity: 2. The global burden of chronic physical disease Michael R. Von Korff; 3. The global burden of chronic pain Adley Tsang and Sing Lee; 4. World Mental Health Survey methods for studying mental-physical comorbidity Gemma Vilagut, Kathleen Saunders, and Jordi Alonso; 5. The pattern and nature of mental-physical comorbidity: specific or general Oye Gureje; 6. Age patterns in the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders by physical comorbidity status Kate M. Scott; Part II. Risk Factors for Mental-Physical Comorbidity: 7. The development of mental-physical comorbidity Kate M. Scott; 8. Childhood adversity, early-onset mental disorders and adult-onset asthma Kate M. Scott; 9. Childhood adversities, mental disorders and heart disease Huibert Burger; 10. Early childhood adversities and later hypertension Dan Stein, Kate M. Scott, and Michael R. Von Korff; 11. ...
Hair Transplant 360: Volume 3: Advances, Techniques, Business Development & Global Perspectives by Samuel M. Lam starting at $213.38. Hair Transplant 360: Volume 3: Advances, Techniques, Business Development & Global Perspectives has 1 available editions to buy at Alibris
Booktopia has Polymer Clay Global Perspectives by Cynthia Tinapple. Buy a discounted Paperback of Polymer Clay Global Perspectives online from Australias leading online bookstore.
There is evidence that STIs may enhance both the transmission and acquisition of HIV infection, and that improved control of STIs may slow down HIV transmission.3 The prevention and control of STIs is not an easy task. Epidemiological patterns of STIs vary geographically and are influenced by cultural, political, economical and social forces. Many affected by STIs are in marginalised vulnerable groups. The asymptomatic nature of some STIs remains a challenge to healthcare providers in areas of the world where laboratory screening tests are unaffordable.. The World Health Organizations "Global Strategy for the prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections: 2006-2015" was presented to Member States at the 59th World Health Assembly in May 2006. The World Health Assembly endorsed the Global Strategy and urged member states to adopt and draw on … ...
Take My Online Global Impact Class gives high exceptional assignment remedies to let youve obtained accessibility to high top quality on-line Global Impact help as well as.
Dr. Golub is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and International Health at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research focuses on the epidemiology of tuberculosis in South Africa, Brazil, India and the US, with specific focus on the drivers of TB in these settings. He leads a cluster randomized trial in South Africa observing diagnostic and treatment practices for latent TB infection among HIV-infected patients at 14 HIV clinics. Also, in South Africa, he leads a smoking cessation clinical trial among HIV-infected patients and projects investigating indoor air pollution, smoking, and potential mHealth solutions for many patient populations. He also leads a study investigating TB treatment outcomes among TB patients with diabetes in India, and other studies in India looking at impact of indoor air pollution and smoking on TB in this setting. In Brazil, he continues to lead a Fogarty training program which has trained ...
Richard Cibulskis and colleagues present estimates of the worldwide incidence of malaria in 2009, together with a critique of different estimation methods, including those based on risk maps constructed from surveys of parasite prevalence, and those based on routine case reports compiled by health ministries.
NIH should capitalize on the current supportive environment for global health science, its director Dr. Francis S. Collins recently urged members of the newly created Trans-NIH Global Health Research Working Group. Our country is poised to move from the hard power stance to soft power or, as Hillary Clinton said, smart power. Shouldnt we at NIH be leading that charge? he asked.. The high-level working group is the result of a two-year effort by institute and center directors to analyze global health research activities at NIH and explore better ways to coordinate efforts, both across NIH and throughout the government. The Obama administration has pledged $63 billion to its Global Health Initiative and is seeking input on its approach.. If we dont step forward and point out the value of research, the focus is likely to be increasingly on delivery, which of course is critical, Collins noted. But we need the research aspect of this to be vigorously supported.. The genesis of the working ...
PubMed journal article Global epidemiology of hepatitis B and hepatitis C in people who inject drugs: results of systematic review were found in PRIME PubMed. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone or iPad.
Socioeconomic Inequality in Smoking in Low-Income and Middle-Income Countries: Results from the World Health Survey. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
View Notes - Notes # 13 reading Health-Garrett from IR 109 at Rochester. Laurie Garrett The Challenge of Global Health Topic: Global Health Problem: Money donated to severe diseases is so much more
According to the Global Health Committee the global disease burden has shifted from infectious diseases to non-communicable diseases in the recent years.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Impact of Open Data Introduction Recent years have witnessed considerable enthusiasm over the opportunities offered by open data. Across sectors, it is widely believed today that … - Selection from The Global Impact of Open Data [Book]
Zhang Y, Yang L, Kucherlapati M, Hadjipanayis A, Pantazi A, Bristow CA, Lee EA, Mahadeshwar HS, Tang J, Zhang J, Seth S, Lee S, Ren X, Song X, Sun H, Seidman J, Luquette LJ, Xi R, Chin L, Protopopov A, Park PJ, Kucherlapati R, Creighton CJ. Global impact of somatic structural variation on the DNA methylome of human cancers [Internet]. Genome Biol 2019;20(1):209.
In 2011, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) released a consensus report, Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD. It recommended a major revision in the management strategy for COPD that was presented in the original 2001 document. Updated reports released in January 2013, January 2014, January 2015, and December 2015 are based on scientific literature published since the completion of the 2011 document but maintain the same treatment paradigm. Assessment of COPD is based on the patients level of symptoms, future risk of exacerbations, the severity of the spirometric abnormality, and the identification of comorbidities. The January 2015 update added an Appendix on Asthma COPD Overlap Syndrome, material prepared jointly by the GOLD and GINA Science Committees. ...
Degenhardt, L., Charlson, F., Stanaway, J., Larney, S., Alexander, L., Hickman, M., Cowie, B., Hall, W., Strang, J., Whiteford, H., & Vos, T. (2016). Estimating the burden of disease attributable to injecting drug use as a risk factor for HIV, hepatitis C and hepatitis B: Results from the Global Burden of Disease GBD 2013 study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(16)30325-5. GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators (2016). Global, regional, and national life expectancy levels of age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. The Lancet, 388, 1459-1544.. GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence And Prevalence Collaborators (2016). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence and years lived with disability for 310 acute and chronic diseases and injuries, 1990-2015: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. ...
million children across the globe. 1990 2014 . An estimated: Globally. from 4.. WHO and World Bank Group released updated joint child malnutrition estimates for the 1990 to 2014 period. which allow users to visualize and export the global and regional estimates. with a global prevalence in 2014 of 2. there were 667 million children under 5 in the world. 50M Approximately 1 out of every 13 children in the world was wasted in 2014.6 per cent to 23. 2014 Nearly a third of all wasted children were severely wasted.who.8 per cent to 6.1 per cent… + 10M …and numbers affected have risen from 31 million to 41 million.2 Global overview Stunting The global trend in stunting prevalence and numbers of children affected is decreasing. Overweight The global trend in overweight prevalence and numbers of children affected is rising.5 per cent.cf/jmedashboard2015, WHO ,www.. 159 million were stunted 41 million were overweight 20M 50 million were wasted (each pair of children represents 20 million children) ...
Diagnostic Scan systems are electronic tools programmed to find significant applications as an interface to diagnose problems or malfunctioning of any operations in an automobile. These tools enable in upgrading and reprograming of the vehicles control module.. The global Diagnostic Scan Tools market was valued at 490 million US$ in 2018 and will reach 720 million US$ by the end of 2025, growing at a CAGR of 5.0% during 2019-2025.. This report focuses on Diagnostic Scan Tools volume and value at global level, regional level and company level. From a global perspective, this report represents overall Diagnostic Scan Tools market size by analyzing historical data and future prospect.. Regionally, this report categorizes the production, apparent consumption, export and import of Diagnostic Scan Tools in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India.. For each manufacturer covered, this report analyzes their Diagnostic Scan Tools manufacturing sites, capacity, production, ex-factory ...
In just over two decades, global health has gained a political visibility and status that some authors have called a political revolution. As health related is
Latest News, World , Asia, ASEAN, Singapore,Phillipines, Malaysia , Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Hong Kong,China and India News Headlines. Latest on Sports, Politics, Science and Technology and other things around the globe.
This project w misadventure focus on the components of the environment, the study(ip) classes of contamination in each component, the effect these pollutants can puddle on our health, and how sustainable development chance upons our environment. The three components of the environment ar the walkover we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat (Holtz, 2008). Considering that we all moldiness breathe, eat, and drink, we must try to keep these components clean and clear of whatever pollutants or toxins that can mystify our bodies to reject or go away ill from the consumption of these different products. Although wrinkle can appear to be clean, mainly because we cant see it, thither atomic number 18 many things that can cause our air to be virulent to our bodies. These things are called air polluting gases. in that respect are four major classes of air polluting gases. They are irritants, asphyxiants, air toxics, and atmospheric reactants. Each of these prom pts our bodies in different ...
South Korea features a challenge present in many other societies: significant prejudice against mental illness, often due to a preventable level of education. There are few resources available in South Korea to help neuro-atypical individuals reintegrate into society, and families of affected individuals often feel uninformed about their loved ones conditions and cut out of the decision-making process for their care and treatment. While 1 in 4 people there are reported to experience mental illness in their lifetimes, only 1 in 10 seek treatment due to its stigma and the inaccessibility of care.. In light of this, The Korean Association for Psychosocial Rehabilitation (KAPR) work to spread resources that combine treatment and knowledge sharing to affected persons and their families. KAPR is an organization of mental health professionals founded in 1995 to improve the quality of life of those suffering from chronic mental illness. They work to facilitate these individuals integration society ...
Procter and Gamble (P&G) has announced that its non-profit Childrens Safe Drinking Water Program (CSDW) provided its 7 billionth liter of clean drinking water to a family in Brazil, as part of P&Gs Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) commitment to save one life every hour by the year 2020
Technology Networks is an internationally recognised publisher that provides access to the latest scientific news, products, research, videos and posters.
Arlene Joyner, Senior Project Officer/Program Manager of BARDA provides an overview of the key BARDA Core Service programs that are designed to assist pharmaceutical companies developing novel vaccines and therapeutics to protect against Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) threats as well as emerging infectious diseases such as Ebola and pandemic influenza ...
Global Health rotations for credit must be pre-approved for both education and safety by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the FSM Institute for Global Health. Global health rotations without these approvals are not eligible for credit or funding and are considered vacation. In terms of safety requirements, global health elective rotations, research or public health projects, and any other international education programs will generally not be approved in countries with U.S. State Department Travel Warnings, Students who wish to rotate to an established partner institution located in a country with a travel warning may appeal to the Feinberg Study Abroad Risk Assessment Committee. This committee, jointly run by FSM and the Center for Global Health, considers proposals, reviews safety and security issues, and assesses the academic merit of the program(s). This committee will make final decisions regarding international rotations to countries with travel warnings for all FSM students, ...
A resolution on strengthening noncommunicable disease policies to promote active ageing was approved by countries on the second day of WHOs global annual meeting.
We have seen how detrimental vaccine preventable diseases can be and how an unvaccinated person can be a disease threat to others. A short video below will further illustrate this point. Megan shared her frightening experience of caring for her ill baby who contracted measles from a visit to her paediatricians waiting room. In an attempt…
GPI talked to Dr David Fine and Ying Sunny Sun from McKinsey about the difficult road ahead for most African nations after the COVID-19 pandemic.
Yamin is currently a Senior Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics at Harvard Law School (PFC); a Senior Scholar at the Global Health Education and Learning Incubator at Harvard University (GHELI); and a Senior Adviser at the Bergen Center for Ethics and Priority Setting (BCEPS) in Bergen, Norway. ...
Berlin-based architect and designer Justin Allen, visiting Stott Professor, will share his comprehensive design approach with students in a new Interior Architecture seminar and studio this spring.
As COVID-19 spreads globally, there has been growing interest relating to the role and appropriateness of Chest X-rays, CT scans and Lung Ultrasound
TreeHuggers have shown some skepticism toward biodiesel, fed in part, we might suppose, by the anti-green spinmeisters of US media, but also by diesels dirty history. In a mood for a vegetarian car or truck? Redemption is here and getting better all
In Africa, only 3% of the worlds healthcare workers tend to 24% of the global disease burden. To help bridge the skills divide, the University of Cape...
The course of immune maturation has evolved to favour survival at each stage of development in early life. Fetal and neonatal immune adaptations facilitate intrauterine survival and provide early postnatal protection against extracellular pathogens, but they leave infants susceptible to intracellular pathogens such as viruses that are acquired perinatally. This Review focuses on three such pathogens--HIV, hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus--and relates the differential impact of these infections in infants and adults to the antiviral immunity that is generated at different ages. A better understanding of age-specific antiviral immunity may inform the development of integrated prevention, treatment and vaccine strategies to minimize the global disease burden resulting from these infections.
The World Health Organization (WHO) today released new data on global progress toward hepatitis elimination, a review of efforts in 28 countries that revealed momentum is gaining. The group detailed its findings in an 83-page report released on the eve of the World Hepatitis Day.. According to the report, nearly all countries have formed national hepatitis elimination committees that have put together plans that include targets, and more than half have earmarked dedicated funding for hepatitis response. The report findings are geared toward increasing action toward meeting 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, which were endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2016.. In a press release, the WHO said it is concerned that progress needed to speed up. Gottfried Hirnschall, MD, MPH, who directs the WHOs HIV and global hepatitis program, said "at best one in ten people who are living with hepatitis know they are infected and can access treatment. This is unacceptable." He added that countries need to ...
The Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health (JEGH) plans to impact global epidemiology and international health with peer-reviewed articles focused...
View this essay on Global Health & HIV Global Health Issue. The purpose of this essay is to discuss in detail the HIV AIDS issue and its different aspects...
The mission and organization of the Division of Global Health Protection within the Center for Global Health at the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Consortium of Universities for Global Health: Selected Abstracts from the 5th Annual CUGH Conference: Universities 2.0: Advancing Global Health in the Post-MDG Era - 5th Annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health: Universities 2.0: Advancing Global Health in the Post-MDG Era (CUGH) ...
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The African Plasmodium Diversity Network (PDNA) has been established across eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa to ensure that African scientists can together play a key role in the global effort for malaria elimination ...
I meet many childbirth professionals who are interested in global health. I often find their understanding of the issues facing women globally is based on old data or common myths.. Here is an opportunity to learn about maternal and newborn health in low and middle income countries. Check it out.. Childbirth: A Global Perspective , Coursera.. ...
Download the questionnaires, technical documents and reports that describe the survey process and the key results for this study ...
Reconciling domestic and global estimates of the social cost of carbon will be a necessary challenge to construct effective climate policy, especially to the extent that other countries look to the United States for climate leadership ...
Outbreak Investigations: Case Studies in Epidemiology - 3 credits. At times, human societies have difficulty separating fact from fallacy. This is especially true during times of stress, such as when the Spanish flu swept the globe killing millions of people in 1918-1919. Uncertainties and false conclusions regarding the identity of the specific pathogen and the mode of transfer from one individual to another led to delayed or poor decisions that resulted in significantly more deaths. Health and human services were far exceeded and measures were taken that most would find unacceptable today. HIV/AIDS is another example of where the blend of fact and fallacy has led to the deaths of millions. Modern epidemiology has a set of approaches designed to help separate fact from fallacy and to help the human population effectively detect, identify, monitor, contain, prevent, and possibly eradicate a new or existing disease. In this course you will learn about these epidemiologic principles and concepts ...
Four new trainees have joined the Global Health Pathway for Residents and Fellows, a program administered through the Duke Hubert-Yeargan Center for Global Health, a part of DGHI.
Each year on 5 May, the "SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands" campaign takes place as part of a major global effort led by the World Health Organization (WHO) to improve hand hygiene in healthcare settings.. ...
The New York Times on Monday published a special section, titled Small Fixes, containing several articles examining how low-cost innovations could help ...
World Health Organization[edit]. The World Health Organization defines infertility as follows:[9] ... Twelve months is the lower reference limit for Time to Pregnancy (TTP) by the World Health Organization.[6] ... "World Health Organization reference values for human semen characteristics". Hum. Reprod. Update. 16 (3): 231-45. doi:10.1093/ ... and of the importance of a strict diet to ameliorate their health condition and reproductive health.. ...
"World Health Organization. 11 June 2015.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Severe respiratory disease ... "World Health Organization. June 2015. Retrieved 22 June 2015.. *^ a b c d e f g h Zumla A, Hui DS, Perlman S (September 2015). ... "World Health Organization. 24 October 2014. Retrieved 26 October 2014.. *^ "Egypt detects first case of MERS virus". Press TV. ... "World Health Organization. Retrieved 10 April 2017.. *^ Hui DS, Memish ZA, Zumla A (May 2014). "Severe acute respiratory ...
Your World. October 3, 2005. Fox News. Salmon, Jacqueline L. (August 26, 2007). "Candidates Reach Out to Muslims". The ... Stuart, Alex J. (2003). Moral Health. Elderberry Press. ISBN 1-930859-78-3. Milbank, Dana (August 11, 2005). "Antagonist of the ... "moral health". Delgaudio was a board member of the youth group Young Americans for Freedom. He has staged numerous protests ...
"Turkish surgeons perform world's first uterus transplant , Family & Health". World Bulletin. Retrieved 2012-11-21. "World's ... "Yahoo Health". Retrieved 5 October 2014. "World's first woman with uterus transplant gets pregnant - HEALTH". Retrieved 5 ... "World's first womb transplant in Turkey promises hope for women". Alarabiya.net. 2011-10-01. Retrieved 2012-11-21. "HEALTH - ... "World's first uterus transplant performed in Turkey/TRT-English". Trt-world.com. 2012-02-27. Retrieved 2012-11-21. " ...
World Bank. p. 19. Missing or empty ,url= (help); ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) Vaidya Balendu Prakash. "Indigenous ... "Indigenous Approach to Combat Cancer" (PDF). Health Administrator. XVII (1): 169-171. [permanent dead link] Balendu Prakash ( ... World Bank. p. 19. Retrieved November 3, 2015. Vaidya Balendu Prakash; Shyam Prakash; Rajesh Sharma & Sanjoy K. Pal. (February ... and the Advisory Committee of the National Cancer Control Programme of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. He is also a ...
It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health ... Organization., World Health. Safe abortion : technical and policy guidance for health systems (Second ed.). Geneva. ISBN ... The World Health Organization provides clear guidelines on the use, benefits and risks of misoprostol for abortions. ... "WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (19th List)" (PDF). World Health Organization. April 2015. Archived (PDF) from the ...
"Mortality and Burden of Disease Estimates for WHO Member States in 2002" (xls). World Health Organization. 2002. Meeting the ... Source: FAO: The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2009 Source: FAO Statistics Division Source: Nations World Food ... Eradicating world hunger - taking stock ten years after the World Food Summit". Food and Agriculture Organization of the United ... There were 795 million undernourished people in the world in 2014, a decrease of 216 million since 1990, despite the fact that ...
Argentina (Argentine) • Regional (Regions) • Mundo (World) • Sociales • Salud (Health) • Mujer (Women) • Espectáculo ( ... El Intransigente.com offers its readers news from Argentina and from world live and continuously. • ...
World Scientific. p. 763. ISBN 978-981-277-226-8. Retrieved 14 May 2011. "Julien I.E. Hoffman, MD - Pediatric Cardiology". ... Health.com. Retrieved 14 May 2011. Tobias, Phillip V. (31 December 1991). Images of humanity: the selected writings of Phillip ...
"Health Canada - Home Page". Health Canada. Retrieved 4 December 2013. "Sponsor a Child , Child Sponsorship Program". World ... He received the H J Heinz Humanitarian Award in 2001 for his international contribution to the health of children globally, The ... He has active research in Canada (supported by Health Canada and the CDC), Ghana (supported by the CIHR), Mongolia (supported ... Stanley Howard Zlotkin, CM OOnt is a Canadian Professor of Paediatrics, Public Health Sciences and Nutritional Sciences at the ...
World Cancer Report 2014. World Health Organization. 2014. pp. Chapter 1.1. ISBN 9283204298. Canavan TP, Doshi NR (2000). " ... World Cancer Report 2014. World Health Organization. 2014. pp. Chapter 5.12. ISBN 9283204298. "Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ ... The World Health Organization classification system was descriptive of the lesions, naming them mild, moderate, or severe ... World Health Organization (February 2014). "Fact sheet No. 297: Cancer". Archived from the original on 2014-02-13. Retrieved ...
The World Health Organization (WHO) is one of many health organizations that have campaigned against the procedures on behalf ... "Female genital mutilation". World Health Organization. Retrieved August 22, 2012. Momoh, Comfort (2005). "1: Female Genital ... Laws of the world on female genital mutilation McVeigh, Tracy and Sutton, Tara. "British girls undergo horror of genital ... Approximately 125 million girls and women are victims of female genital mutilation throughout the world. With the practices ...
It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, a list of the most important medications needed in a ... "WHO Model List of EssentialMedicines" (PDF). World Health Organization. October 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2014. "Crixivan® ( ... basic health system. Unfortunately, indinavir wears off quickly after dosing, so requires very precise dosing every eight hours ...
Singapore ; New York: World Scientific. ISBN 978-981-02-3148-4. Tan YH, Armstrong JA, Ke YH, Ho M (1970). "Regulation of ... Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 1502. ISBN 1437727026. Jamall IS, Yusuf S, Azhar M, Jamall S (2008). "Is pegylated interferon ... Kidd, P. "Th1/Th2 Balance: the hypothesis, its limitations, and implications for health and disease". Alternative Medicine ... Health technology assessment (Winchester, England). 4 (33): 1-67. PMID 11134916. Ge D, Fellay J, Thompson AJ, Simon JS, Shianna ...
Health and fitness portal Prevalence of tobacco consumption "WCR"= World Cancer Report 2014. World Health Organization. 2014. ... 2007). World Cigarettes 1: The 2007 Report. ERC Statistics Intl PIc. Dead Link Population data is from Central Intelligence ... Cigarettes are smoked by over 1 billion people, which is nearly 20% of the world population in 2014. About 800 million of these ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Australian Bureau of Statistics Smoking Profiles of Health, Australia, 2011-13, 07/ ...
... particularly in Third World countries, are considered fire hazards and worse: according to the World Health Organization, a ... The World Health Organization has documented the significant number of deaths caused by smoke from home fires. Increases in ... World Health Organization. Retrieved October 18, 2011. "corn pellet stove". The Encyclopedia of Alternative Energy and ... The three-stone stove is still widely used around the world. In some areas it developed into a U-shaped dried mud or brick ...
World Health Organization. ISBN 978 92 4 154924 0. Tilley, E.; Ulrich, L.; Lüthi, C.; Reymond, Ph.; Zurbrügg, C. (2014). ... Post-World War II Chinatown, Singapore, before the independence of Singapore, utilized night-soil collection as a primary means ... Selling human waste products as fertilizers became much less common after World War II, both for sanitary reasons and because ... A later response was the passage of the Public Health Act 1875, which led to the creation of byelaws regarding housing, ...
World Health Organisation. Retrieved 22 April 2010. Reddy, K. C. S.; Kasiviswanath, I. V. (2013). "Racimisation of (R)-Alpha- ...
It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health ... The World Health Organization recommends the vaccine between the ages of 9 and 12 months in areas where the disease is common. ... The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends routine immunization in all countries where the disease is common. This should ... World Health Organization (23 June 2017). "Yellow fever vaccine: WHO position on the use of fractional doses - June 2017 ...
It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health ... "WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (19th List)" (PDF). World Health Organization. April 2015. Archived (PDF) from the ... It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, a list of the most important medications needed in a ... The wholesale price in the developing world as of 2014 is US$148-496 per 100 mg. In the United Kingdom this amount costs the ...
Bitopertin World Health Organization (2013). "International Nonproprietary Names for Pharmaceutical Substances (INN): Proposed ...
World Health Organization. 2006. p. 966. ISBN 978-92-4-156301-7. Retrieved 1 July 2013. Campbell, W. A. (June, 1966) James ... These salts were found in mineral springs, which, since the Roman Empire, had been used as health spas, where people would go ... W. A. Campbell (June, 1966) James Crossley Eno and the Rise of the Health Salts Trade. University Of Newcastle Upon Tyne ... Newcastle upon Tyne, July 1971 "The History of Plumbing - Roman and English Legacy". Plumbing World. Archived from the original ...
World Health Organization. 2008. p. 50. Retrieved 15 November 2016. "Statement on a Nonproprietary Name Adopted by the USAN ...
"African trypanosomiasis". World Health Organization. August 2006. Trykipedia, Trypanosomatid specific ontologies Tree of Life: ...
"Are the Ebola outbreaks in Nigeria and Senegal over? Ebola situation assessment". World Health Organization. Retrieved 17 ... Nigeria was identified by the World Health Organization through the summer of 2014 with multiple confirmed cases of Ebola, but ... The first campus of Navarro College was the site of the Air Activities of Texas, a World War II primary flight school located ... Most of the 238 members of that first student body were returning veterans from World War II taking advantage of assistance ...
... a very practical problem accessing fetal DNA without creating a major health risk for the unborn child."[3] In December 2015, ... "nothing in the physical universe would be patent-eligible," and thus it was "unsound to have a rule that takes inventions of ...
"In a world that needs vigorous control of population growth, concerns about infertility may seem odd, but the adoption of a ... UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction has ... National, regional, and global trends in infertility: a systematic analysis of 277 health surveys ... when an evaluation of responses from women in Demographic and Health Surveys from 1990 was completed in collaboration with WHO ...
World Health Organization: The world health report 2010 - Health systems financing: the path to universal coverage World Health ... The World Health Report 2008 - Primary Health Care (Now More Than Ever) World Health Organization: The world health report 2007 ... The World Health Report 2006 - working together for health World Health Organization: The World Health Report 2005 - make every ... The world health report 2004 - changing history World Health Organization: The world health report 2000 - Health systems: ...
"IMA World Health". NT Denvision. Retrieved 7 August 2013. "IMA World Health". Trachoma Coalition. Retrieved 5 August 2013. ... IMA World Health is an international, nonprofit health care service organization. The faith-based charity specializes in ... IMA World Health Official Site "Charity Navigator Guide". Charity Navigator. Retrieved 1 July 2013. "Forbes List of Charities ... In addition, IMA is registered with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). IMA World Health, also known as ...
Information for people interested in enrolling the World Trade Center Health Program or those who are currently in the Program ... The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program provides medical monitoring and treatment for responders at the WTC and related ... Federal Register Notice: World Trade Center Health Program Research Agenda; Request for Information.. ... Information concerning suspected fraud related to the WTC Health Program by contractors, grantees, health care providers, or ...
"The message on this World Health Day is loud and clear. The world is on the brink of losing these miracle cures," said WHO ... "On this World Health Day, WHO is issuing a policy package to get everyone, especially governments and their drug regulatory ... World Health Day 2011. Urgent action necessary to safeguard drug treatments. News release ... Health professionals can help rapidly reduce the spread of infection in health care facilities. ...
Information for people interested in enrolling the World Trade Center Health Program or those who are currently in the Program ... Denial of certification of a health condition as a health condition medically associated with a WTC-related health condition; ... The Overview of the Appeal Process for Denial of Authorization of Treatment for a Certified Health Condition provides World ... Appeal Process For Denial of Health Condition Certification or Decertification of a Health Condition. Download as a PDF [10 ...
World Federation for Mental Health - Official website. *. Brody EB (February 2004). "The World Federation for Mental Health: ... merged with the World Federation. The World Federation has close ties with the World Health Organization. For many years after ... 2009 World Congress of the WFMH, Greece. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e Brody EB (February 2004). "The World Federation for ... Mental health day is celebrated at the initiative of the World Federation of Mental Health and WHO supports this initiative ...
World Health Day 2014 banner. World Health Day 2014: Infographic. The infographic "Vector-borne diseases", created for World ... World Malaria Report 2013 shows major progress in fight against malaria. 11 December 2013 ... Health Day 2014, highlights a number of measures people can take to protect themselves from vector-borne diseases. ...
The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is an intergovernmental organization coordinating, supporting and promoting ... In May 2003 the Office became the World Organisation for Animal Health but kept its historical acronym OIE. In January 2017, ... The WAHID Interface provides access to all data held within OIEs new World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS). It ... OIE official website OIE Mission Statement World Animal Health Information System Interface. ...
... as a specialized agency with a broad mandate for health. The WHO is the worlds leading health organization. ... WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION The World Health Organization (WHO) was created in 1948 by member states of the United Nations [1] ( ... World Health and World Politics (1995); G. L. Burci and C.-H. Vignes, World Health Organization (2004); K. Lee, The World ... World Health and World Politics: The World Health Organization and the UN System. Columbus: University of South Carolina Press. ...
WORLD-WIDE PUBLIC HEALTH. Br Med J 1962; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.5274.303-a (Published 03 February 1962) Cite this ...
Mental Health Net. Mental Health Net claims to be the "oldest and largest online mental health directory guide and community." ... A great online book from Mental Health.net Disorders and Treatments. A comprehensive listing of resources from Mental Health ... Parents Community Mental Health Page. Information and resources for parents. Assessment. This section of the Counseling ... Today, Education World talks to educators and psychologists who have helped students and teachers deal with death, suicide, and ...
The Singapore Mental Health Study 2010). Taking care of your mental & physical health are equally important. Each of us can ... In Singapore, 1 in 10 adults suffer from a mental health disorder.* Those afflicted are often prevented from seeking help ... University Health Centre. *20 Lower Kent Ridge Road. Level 1, Singapore 119080 ... because of stigma attached to mental health concerns. *( ... General Health * Medical Care *Primary Care. *Specialist Clinic ...
Allied Health and Health-Related Professions. Delmar Publishers Allied Health site for students, instructors and professionals ... Check Education Worlds Site Reviews on the topic of Nutrition. Health : Nutrition. This is the archive of all our Teacher ... Snapshots of Medicine and Health. Part of the National Institutes of Health Web site, this section focuses on research, ... HIV/AIDS Education Isnt Only for Health Class!. A special multidisciplinary curriculum has transported HIV/AIDS education out ...
China broke the record for the worlds thinnest condom when a Hong Kong-funded brand announced its latex rubber condom ... Health‎ , ‎ China Breaks Record For Worlds Thinnest Condom posted 20 Feb 2014, 08:38 by Mpelembe Admin [ updated 20 Feb 2014, ... HONG KONG, CHINA (FEBRUARY 20, 2014) (REUTERS) - China broke the record for the worlds thinnest condom when a Hong Kong-funded ... Mary Ann Chan, a 33-year-old business owner said: "I wont use the worlds thinnest condom. I dont think the feeling is good. ...
It claims that research into less publicised causes of death and disability might bring greater improvements in public health. ... Editorial : Hopes for a healthier world - ANYONE who tries to put the health research priorities of the world for the next 25 ... after a 1993 World Bank report suggested that relatively small investments could. bring major improvements in public health. ... worlds biggest killers. It also argues that the case for developing some. vaccines is weak if, as in the case of leprosy, an ...
30.8 million credit to the Republic of Moldova for the Health Transformation Operation, which will contribute to reducing key ... The World Banks Board of Executive Directors today approved a US$ ... risks for non-communicable diseases and improving efficiency of health. ... World Bank Group. Other. How often do you visit the World Bank website? This is my first time. Daily. About once a week. About ...
According to the World Health Organization, 20 children under the age of five die every minute -- almost 11 million children ... On this World Health Day 2005, when every mother and child should count, experts say that for too many women in too many ... The World Health Organization and many other institutions, are trying to promote simple and economic ways to save millions of ... And so the projection is that if the world is not focused on fighting a little more for equity and equity in the health outcome ...
Innovators in digital health will meet end-users (clinicians and patients) to understand and discuss the needs and challenges ... About the GSMA Environmental Programme Contact Us Mobile World Capital FAQs Legal Sitemap ... A free shuttle operates continuously between the two Mobile World Congress venues, Fira Gran Via and Fira Montjuïc, during ... in the health industry. They will provided matchmaking between the solutions suppliers and their customers (policy-makers, ...
At least 41 million children across the globe who are under the age of 5 are obese or overweight, according to the World Health ... The public health arm of the United Nations released the latest figures on Monday in a report meant to help governments reverse ... Sign up to receive the top stories you need to know now on politics, health, money and more ... Sign up to receive the top stories you need to know now on politics, health, money and more ...
... according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health Organization (WHO). An alarming 7 million people die each year ... New Delhi is the worlds most polluted big city. ... Nine out of 10 people around the world breathe polluted air, ... Nine out of 10 people around the world breathe polluted air, according to a report released Wednesday by the World Health ... representing a major risk to peoples health," said Maria Neira, the WHO director for environment and public health. ...
10 Health Advances That Changed the World. From vaccines to clean water, health advances have changed the world.. By DAN CHILDS ... drastically lowering the health impacts of parasitic infections and other health conditions related to the environment. ... Considering the progress that has been made in years past, it is tempting to view the state of health and medicine today as an ... Its something thats so important around the world and in America, Baker said. It used to be that 15 percent of infants ...
The theme, One World: One Health in Spatial Statistics will highlight trends in various topics such as disease mapping, ... Welcome to Spatial Statistics, which will be held in Lancaster, UK, from the 4-7 July 2017 under the theme One World: One ... Peter Diggle, who is a world-leading proponent of spatial statistics, with the University of Lancaster as his home base. ... one health.. At the same time, the conference will also offer opportunities to address developments in environmental ...
  • When you experience the feeling of gratitude, your brain releases a combination of dopamine, oxytocin, and endorphins," Fox told Runner's World . (bicycling.com)
  • Psychologists will tell you that positive thoughts lead to positive emotions and that often leads to positive outcomes," running coach Janet Hamilton, C.S.C.S., owner of Atlanta-based company Running Strong previously told Runner's World . (bicycling.com)
  • In a Runner's World Instagram post from August that asked how runners got through the rest of their long runs if they hit the wall, one person, Melissa Emery , talked about the importance of gratitude . (bicycling.com)
  • See excerpts and recipes from the new Runner's World Cookbook. (runnersworld.com)
  • A Part of Hearst Digital Media Runner's World participates in various affiliate marketing programs, which means we may get paid commissions on editorially chosen products purchased through our links to retailer sites. (runnersworld.com)
  • Scott Douglas Scott is a veteran running, fitness, and health journalist who has held senior editorial positions at Runner's World and Running Times. (runnersworld.com)
  • The topic of the World Health Report 2004 was the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. (wikipedia.org)
  • And in the U.S. a spokesperson for the Department of Health and Human Services defended WHO's handling of the pandemic. (go.com)
  • But it had to "disassociate" itself from the references in the pandemic resolution to intellectual property under the so-called "TRIPS" agreement that allows for compulsory licensing of medicines and vaccines during a health emergency. (news.com.au)
  • World Health Day 2020 celebrates nurses and midwives' role and dedication at a very particular time, when half of humanity is confined due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (iaea.org)
  • Four cases of the virus have been confirmed in Maryland, up from three last week, according to Maryland health officials. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Health officials have emphasized that the majority of people do not face a major risk from the Zika virus and that, given the potential link to birth defects, the people at greatest risk are women who are pregnant or trying to become pregnant. (ibtimes.com)
  • The move was immediately assailed by health officials and critics of the administration, including numerous Democrats who said it would cost the U.S. influence in the global arena. (startribune.com)
  • Second, to improve the efficiency of the health sector, the Operation will support the rationalization of hospitals and the use of performance-based incentives for health workers. (worldbank.org)
  • This year, the World Day for Safety and Health at Work (SafeDay) and the World Day Against Child Labour (WDACL) are coming together in a joint campaign to improve the safety and health of young workers and end child labour. (ilo.org)
  • A national occupational safety and health culture is one in which the right to a safe and healthy working environment is respected at all levels, where governments, employers and workers actively participate in securing a safe and healthy working environment through a system of defined rights, responsibilities and duties, and where the highest priority is accorded to the principle of prevention. (ilo.org)
  • Then, show them the approximately 20-minute FRONTLINE/World video, " India: The Sex Workers. (pbs.org)
  • Indeed, since 1963, Cuba has sent doctors and other health workers throughout the Third World to treat the poor. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • As the Ebola virus ravages West Africa, two American health workers who contracted the disease in Liberia were airlifted back to the United States to be treated with an experimental drug. (baltimoresun.com)
  • This World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, families and health workers are celebrating that child HIV rates dropped 60 percent between 2009 and 2015 in 21 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. (worldvision.org)
  • Its purpose is to establish a comprehensive and structured mechanism for joint action of management and workers in the implementation of safety and health measures. (ilo.org)
  • They've developed an alert system for early detection of distrust, using reports from local media and "informants," including local health workers. (npr.org)
  • A meta-analysis of all the relevant epidemiologic studies was conducted by IARC staff scientists in 2014 that reported an overall lack of data, particularly in low- and middle-income regions of the world where the health of agriculture workers is poorly documented, if at all. (nrdc.org)
  • This year's theme, "Generation Safe & Healthy", focuses on the need to end child labour and to improve the safety and health of young workers. (iso.org)
  • Earlier this year, ISO launched ISO 45001 , Occupational health and safety management systems - Requirements with guidance for use , a standard designed to help organizations implement a management system to improve the health and safety of all workers, regardless of age or gender. (iso.org)
  • Matchboxes with an image of a mosquito and a slogan 'Wanted Dead or Alive' lie in a pile awaiting distribution by health workers, in Peru, February 1, 2016. (haaretz.com)
  • Next, tell students that India is the second-largest HIV-positive population in the world, behind South Africa. (pbs.org)
  • During two months of trial, Pistorius' lawyers have sought to portray the world-famous athlete as almost manically obsessed with safety after a difficult childhood and in the face of high crime levels in South Africa. (hindustantimes.com)
  • A substantial part of the growth in LCD screen sales in 2010 can be attributed to the World Cup in South Africa. (worldbank.org)
  • India has 14 of the 15 top polluted cities in the world, in terms of the dangerous PM2.5 particles, the report said. (usatoday.com)
  • WRI's Claudia Adriazola-Steil (director, health & road safety) and Amit Bhatt (director, integrated urban transport, WRI India) talk with our host, VP for Communications Lawrence MacDonald, about a life-saving new law in India. (wri.org)
  • India Has the Worst Road Safety Record in the World. (wri.org)
  • Straif said there were dramatic differences in air quality between cities around the world and that the most polluted metropolises were in China and India, where people frequently don masks on streets to protect themselves. (cbsnews.com)
  • According to Margaret Chan, the world should follow the example of the island in this arena and replace the curative model, inefficient and more expensive, with a prevention-based system. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The 2011 World Day for Safety and Health at Work focuses on the implementation of an Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS) as a tool for continual improvement in the prevention of workplace incidents and accidents. (ilo.org)
  • A new partnership which harnesses world-class expertise will ensure patients in the North East will benefit sooner from new treatments, diagnostics and prevention strategies. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Working across the two trusts, Newcastle Academic Health Partners will translate clinical research into practice developing improved diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies as well as an innovative health education programme. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • What we want to do is set a new standard of what the World Cup can bring, bringing the whole issue of health and prevention to the World Cup is a tremendous opportunity," Ferro said. (foxnews.com)
  • Moldova spends relatively more on health than comparable countries but its health outcomes are not as good as expected for its level of expenditures. (worldbank.org)
  • World Vision's experience with HTSP programs has demonstrated that holistic community and family-based approaches that stress the health, livelihood, and educational outcomes of better birth spacing are highly effective and can improve access by women and girls to education and income-generating activities, reduce birth-related physical impairment and stigma (such as fistula), and improve infant and child nutrition-the cornerstone of lifetime health. (worldvision.org)
  • The number of confirmed cases in Congo's new outbreak of the Ebola virus has risen to 13, including three deaths, the health ministry said late Saturday. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Malaria Elimination initiatives officially have been declared by the Ministry of Health, Republic of Indonesia, on 25th April 2009, coinciding with the second World Malaria Day celebration. (who.int)
  • Malaria Elimination Performance guidance in Indonesian was stated in the decree of Ministry of Health Indonesia Republic number 293/ Menkes/ SK/ IV/ 2009, date of 28th April 2009. (who.int)
  • In round 1, Ministry of Health (MoH) aimed to reduce malaria morbidity in area with 5 highest endemicity areas, which are all in the eastern Indonesians provinces. (who.int)
  • A Memorandum of Understanding between the Ministry of Health and WVTL covers coordination and joint health messaging. (wvi.org)
  • We engage in policy dialogue and strategy development at the national level by taking part in Ministry of Health working groups. (wvi.org)
  • Ministry of Health, Bahrain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Part of the National Institutes of Health Web site, this section focuses on research, discoveries, and developments in biomedicine. (educationworld.com)
  • The m-PESA Foundation, in partnership with the African Medical Research Foundation, has also begun implementing online training of community health volunteers and complementing these trainings with bulk SMS/WhatsApp group messages to keep the group connected and share important updates. (weforum.org)
  • Your support enables the Guttmacher Institute to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights in the United States and globally through our interrelated program of high-quality research, evidence-based advocacy and strategic communications. (guttmacher.org)
  • Established in 1948, WHO provides leadership on global health matters, shapes the health research agenda, sets norms and standards, articulate evidence-based policy options, provides technical support to countries, and monitors and assesses health trends. (tsoshop.co.uk)
  • Research has shown that practicing gratitude on a regular basis can help improve your overall long-term health by helping reduce your risk of problems like heart disease and high blood pressure. (bicycling.com)
  • By investing in more cutting-edge genome-sequencing hardware and training more analysts to make sense of reams of data output than any research institution or university in the world, BGI has turned itself into a go-to destination for global scientists seeking to collaborate on ambitious projects to unlock the mysteries of plant, animal, and human DNA. (fastcompany.com)
  • For this reason, a great deal of research has been dedicated to what the health effects of long-duration missions to the Moon may be - particularly the effects a lower gravity environment would have on the human body. (universetoday.com)
  • It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries, and monitoring and assessing health trends. (google.com)
  • Builds country and regional health systems research and evidence-informed policy capacity. (who.int)
  • The IAEA is currently running several hundred technical cooperation projects and coordinated research projects in the field of human health. (iaea.org)
  • The Liberal National Government will invest in world leading cancer research that will focus on more accurate diagnosis, more effective treatments and improved survivorship of a broad range of cancers. (health.gov.au)
  • It is the world's largest network of patient thought leaders, influencers and advocates, comprising of more than 100,000 individuals across 150 health conditions. (prweb.com)
  • and (d) participate in the Asia Malaria Campaign in 2007 that should be scheduled during the same week as the World Malaria Day on 25 April 2007. (who.int)
  • This work can lead to community health volunteers or WV staff making follow-up home visits to vulnerable households. (wvi.org)
  • The health of tournament volunteers - and the surrounding community in Brazil - is also getting special treatment. (foxnews.com)
  • Volunteers can opt in and pre-register for free health screenings during their downtime, including oral health, glucose and body mass index checks and cardiac health screenings. (foxnews.com)
  • As the tournament goes on, health screenings among the 14,000 volunteers will continue - and Ferro hopes that every person screened will bring messages and literature about health and wellness back to their community. (foxnews.com)
  • Serious infections acquired in hospitals can become fatal because they are so difficult to treat and drug-resistant strains of microorganism are spread from one geographical location to another in today's interconnected and globalized world. (who.int)
  • HCA and its affiliates own or manage more than 420 hospitals and other health facilities in the United States and seven other countries. (latimes.com)
  • In Washington DC, Dr. Elizabeth Lule is an adviser for Maternal and Child Health at the World Bank. (voanews.com)
  • We focus on ensuring child and maternal health by promoting health and nutrition practices and preventing major causes of disease. (worldvision.org)
  • Previously, the rate of maternal mortality was high due to pregnant complications and not having a health facility nearby and so they had to walk or drive for a long time to reach a health facility. (wvi.org)
  • Health spending however must be rather non-linear in the sense that there are phases in people's lives where they spend a lot and phases were they spend little. (washingtonpost.com)
  • This probably has to do with both progress in medical science, because of which it has been easy to diagnose health problems, and also people's lifestyle, which is becoming increasingly unhealthy. (lifehack.org)
  • It also further states that, whenever and wherever health is threatened, it would be there to restore the people's well being. (worldatlas.com)
  • This partnership with the World Congress will strengthen our ability to not only recognize inspiring and impactful Patient Leaders, but it also provides us with the platform to really bring to light the importance of patient advocacy. (prweb.com)
  • WEGO Health CEO Jack Barrette shared his excitement about the union with the World Congress, "This partnership with the World Congress will strengthen our ability to not only recognize inspiring and impactful Patient Leaders, but it also provides us with the platform to really bring to light the importance of patient advocacy and the power of patient-centricity. (prweb.com)
  • This report is really a breakthrough in terms of reshaping the priority order of health issues," he says. (newscientist.com)
  • For economists, however, the answer is clear: The next chapter of development strategy should assign a high priority to better health - and must leave no one behind. (weforum.org)
  • This discrepancy points to the need to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of health spending. (worldbank.org)
  • We must improve the health of mothers and children for the future of the world, for the future of peace," says Ann Tinker. (voanews.com)
  • And can laughing improve your health? (pri.org)
  • Supported by Johnson & Johnson, and HAX as part of the Joint Consumer Health Device Program, Raybaby safely monitors vitals, breathing rates and sleeping habits all from a 'Smart Journal' app while even making recommendations to improve the baby's sleep. (kickstarter.com)
  • A comprehensive range of information is available from: Immediate notifications and follow-up reports submitted by Member Countries in response to exceptional disease events occurring in these countries as well as follow-up reports about these events, Six-monthly reports describing the OIE-listed disease situations in each country Annual reports providing further background information on animal health, on laboratory and vaccine production facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • But from the global health standpoint, Baker said Jenner's introduction of the smallpox vaccine may have had an even more significant impact in terms of lives saved. (go.com)
  • Vaccine distrust in the developing world can evolve out of cultural, religious, or sometimes economic or political reasons, says Larson. (npr.org)
  • the same companies accused of providing tainted vaccine and the same companies with monumental political lobby force across the world. (bellaonline.com)
  • The 2012 World Day for Safety and Health at Work focuses on the promotion of occupational safety and health (OSH) in a green economy. (ilo.org)
  • During the last decade, occupational safety and health management systems have been widely implemented in both industrialized and developing countries. (ilo.org)
  • The incorporation of an occupational safety and health management system in the application of preventive and protective measures at the workplace has proven to be essential for the improvement of working conditions and the working environment. (ilo.org)
  • The ILO 2001 Guidelines on occupational safety and health management systems (ILO-OSH 2001) became a widely used model for developing national standards in this area. (ilo.org)
  • The leaflet opens a conversation on what the future of work holds for occupational safety and health and how this field is effectively rising to these transformational challenges and opportunities. (ilo.org)
  • The principal causes for common health issues are unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, environmental degradation, high stress levels and genetics. (lifehack.org)
  • Below, we discuss the most prevalent health issues in the world today along with their symptoms, causes and preventive measures. (lifehack.org)
  • The leaflet attempts to highlight key issues raised in the ILO report: Safety and health at the heart of the future of work: Building on 100 years of experience. (ilo.org)
  • While other health issues can be detected easily, depression is not so common to understand. (newkerala.com)