Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Hysterosalpingography: Radiography of the uterus and fallopian tubes after the injection of a contrast medium.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Admitting Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the flow of patients and the processing of admissions, discharges, transfers, and also most procedures to be carried out in the event of a patient's death.Neoplasms, Unknown Primary: Metastases in which the tissue of origin is unknown.Unnecessary Procedures: Diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative procedures prescribed and performed by health professionals, the results of which do not justify the benefits or hazards and costs to the patient.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Clinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Curettage: A scraping, usually of the interior of a cavity or tract, for removal of new growth or other abnormal tissue, or to obtain material for tissue diagnosis. It is performed with a curet (curette), a spoon-shaped instrument designed for that purpose. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Dorland, 27th ed)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Delayed Diagnosis: Non-optimal interval of time between onset of symptoms, identification, and initiation of treatment.Pathology, Surgical: A field of anatomical pathology in which living tissue is surgically removed for the purpose of diagnosis and treatment.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Infertility, Female: Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Histamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Endometriosis: A condition in which functional endometrial tissue is present outside the UTERUS. It is often confined to the PELVIS involving the OVARY, the ligaments, cul-de-sac, and the uterovesical peritoneum.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.United States
"Hemochromatosis Workup". Medscape. Retrieved 2016-07-14. Updated: Jan 02, 2016 Molar concentration is derived from mass value ...
"Sarcoidosis Workup". Medscape Reference. WebMD. Archived from the original on 1 March 2014. Retrieved 19 February 2014. ...
"Achlorhydria Workup". Medscape. Retrieved 13 September 2014. Iijima, K.; Sekine, H.; Koike, T.; Imatani, A.; Ohara, S.; ...
"Hemochromatosis Workup". Medscape. Retrieved 2016-07-14. Updated: Jan 02, 2016 Derived from mass values using molar mass of ...
Hidalgo JA, Vazquez JA (18 August 2015). "Candidiasis: Workup". Medscape. WebMD. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. ...
"Scleroderma Workup". Medscape Reference. WebMD. Archived from the original on 6 March 2014. Retrieved 6 March 2014. Jimenez, SA ...
"Cervical Radiculopathy Workup". Retrieved 2017-06-29. Updated: Dec 14, 2016 American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine ... For further workup, the American College of Radiology recommends that projectional radiography is the most appropriate initial ...
"Goodpasture Syndrome Workup". Medscape Reference. WebMD. Retrieved 14 March 2014. Kathuria, P; Sanghera, P; Stevenson, FT; ...
Myocardial Infarction Workup. Archived 2016-06-09 at the Wayback Machine. Antman EM, Tanasijevic MJ, Thompson B, et al. ( ...
"Lutembacher Syndrome Workup". "Atrial Septal Defect (ASD)". Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved May 2, 2014. "Diseases & Conditions". ...
Owens, Brett D; Moriatis Wolf, Jennifer; Murphy, Kevin P (2009-11-03). "Lateral Epicondylitis: Workup". eMedicine Orthopedic ...
"Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Workup". eMedicine. 25 October 2011. Archived from the original on 17 November 2011. Retrieved 19 ...
"Imaging Studies - Echocardiography". Patent Foramen Ovale Workup. Medscape. Retrieved 19 February 2017. Brunicardi, F. ...
"Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Workup". eMedicine. 25 October 2011. Retrieved 19 November 2011. Vaudry H, Do Rego J-L, Burel D, et ...
If diagnostic work-up has been unyielding so far or the aforementioned risk factors are present, it is important to begin a ... "Work-up of Hematuria". Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice. 41 (4): 737-748. 2014-12-01. doi:10.1016/j.pop.2014.08.007. ... Non-glomerular source of bleeding will usually require further work-up by a urologist. In people with microscopic hematuria, it ... it is highly suggestive of a urinary tract infection and additional work-up with urine cultures should be done to further ...
May 2009 Nazi workup. Nazi hunter with the past . In: a day November 28, 2008 http://rt.com/news/germany-nazi-commander-us-189 ...
"Rabies: Differential Diagnoses & Workup". eMedicine Infectious Diseases. 2008-10-03. Archived from the original on 2010-11-28. ...
"workup". The Free Dictionary. Bilton, Nick (June 23, 2013). "Disruptions: Medicine That Monitors You". The New York Times. ... This is often referred to as a "diagnostic workup". Use of a sensory pill that collects and transmits physiological information ...
"Acute Coronary Syndrome Workup". Medscape. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 14 August 2016. Davidson's ...
The diagnosis is often one of exclusion found during the workup of delayed puberty. One of the biggest challenges in the ... ISBN 3-89599-748-X. Chapter 3. Diagnostic work up of hypogonadism. Pitteloud N. (2012). "Managing delayed or altered puberty in ...
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The workup should include: a. Scoring on the Glasgow Coma Scale. b. Checking Pupils c. Checking Vital signs, such as blood ...
ISBN 3-89599-748-X. Chapter 3. Diagnostic work up of hypogonadism. Traggiai C, Stanhope R (2003). "Disorders of pubertal ...
Kim, Lawrence (2006-06-05). "Parathyroid Carcinoma: Differential Diagnoses & Workup". eMedicine. Retrieved 2009-01-28. Arabi, A ...
Patients deserve a thorough workup". Postgraduate Medicine. 107 (7): 165-168, 171. doi:10.3810/pgm.2000.06.1129. PMID 10887453 ...
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Biomarker Diagnostic work-up Alzheimers Disease Frontotemporal Dementia Cerebrospinal fluid PET imaging This is a preview of ... In AD, regardless of the undertaken diagnostic work-up, a significant gain in accuracy was reached by both neurologists after ... This study introduces a proof of diagnostic work-up that combines imaging and CSF biomarkers and suggests distinct ways to ... Evaluate the utility and reproducibility of biomarkers and propose an "optimal" diagnostic work-up in atypical dementia. ...
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If the laboratory work-up does not diagnose a bleeding disorder, but there is still high suspicion based on personal and family ... A positive family history increases the risk of a bleeding disorder and is reason to initiate a work-up,10,11 especially in ... A thorough history, including a family history, will guide the appropriate work-up, and a physical examination may provide ... Consider in a patient with a lifelong history of bleeding despite negative laboratory work-up Consider glycoprotein disorders ( ...
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  • Following six years specialising in liquid handling robotics Jason then moved into technical sales within the chemistry and analytical chemistry environment - covering all aspects from solid supported reagents, workup and purification, to final stage compound polishing. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Are CT Scans Overutilized in the Workup of Vertebral Compression Fractures? (medworm.com)
  • There might be ingredients used in this cure workup for isolated thrombocytopenia for photoaging and the deficiency of spleen causes indigestion (the oxidation of fluid intake is restrictive clothing and above all other health related issues connective tissue called the pacemaker of aging. (mythrombocytopenia.net)
  • Which imaging studies are indicated in the workup of platelet disorders? (medscape.com)
  • Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. (hindawi.com)
  • Montesi A., Matei M., Pisani A., Provinciali L., Ceravolo M.G., Mari F. (1996) Radiological Workup in Oral-pharyngeal Dysphagia: Costs and Clinical Results. (springer.com)
  • We report on seven young asymptomatic athletes with isolated subepicardial DGE detected during workup of abnormalities on their regular screening examination, that is, pathological T-wave inversions on ECG (n=4) or ventricular arrhythmias on exercise test (n=3). (readbyqxmd.com)
  • A quick and easy guide to developing accurate workups for the most common medical problems. (apea.com)
  • The period culminated in a workup and operational readiness evaluation that took place in the Northern Australia exercise area in October. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Influences of gender on complication rate and outcome after roux-en-y gastric bypass: data analysis of more than 10,000 operations from the German Bariatric surgery Registry. (springer.com)
  • Gender differences in early outcomes following hand-assisted laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: gender differences in bariatric surgery. (springer.com)
  • This can be done only if the antibody workup is completed prior to the initiation of surgery. (oxforddictionaries.com)
  • Practical and easy to use, it provides clear workup plans for the 70 most commonly encountered medical conditions, providing you with quick, focused guidance with the flexibility to adapt to each unique patient. (apea.com)
  • Reminder: use FlightPhysical.com to familiarize yourself with aviation medical regulations and guidelines, but always discuss your specific situation with one or more AMEs before dedicating resources toward expensive clinical workups. (flightphysical.com)