Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Domestic Violence: Deliberate, often repetitive physical, verbal, and/or other types of abuse by one or more members against others of a household.Battered Women: Women who are physically and mentally abused over an extended period, usually by a husband or other dominant male figure. Characteristics of the battered woman syndrome are helplessness, constant fear, and a perceived inability to escape. (From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3d ed)Sex Offenses: Any violation of established legal or moral codes in respect to sexual behavior.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Civil Disorders: Deliberate and planned acts of unlawful behavior engaged in by aggrieved segments of the population in seeking social change.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.War: Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.Social Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Sexual Harassment: A form of discrimination in the workplace which violates the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual harassment takes two forms: quid pro quo, where the employee must submit to sexual advances in exchange for job benefits or be penalized for refusing; or a hostile environment, where the atmosphere of the workplace is offensive and affects the employee's well-being. Offensive sexual conduct may include unwelcome advances, comments, touching, questions about marital status and sex practices, etc. Both men and women may be aggressors or victims. (Slee and Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed, p.404). While civil rights legislation deals with sexual harassment in the workplace, the behavior is not restricted to this; it may take place outside the work environment: in schools and colleges, athletics, and other social milieus and activities.United StatesAnomie: A state of social disorganization and demoralization in society which is largely the result of disharmony between cultural goals and the means for attaining them. This may be reflected in the behavior of the individual in many ways - non-conformity, social withdrawal, deviant behavior, etc.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Men: Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Adult Survivors of Child Abuse: Persons who were child victims of violence and abuse including physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)IndiaSpouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Human Rights Abuses: Deliberate maltreatment of groups of humans beings including violations of generally-accepted fundamental rights as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.Masculinity: Male-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Stress Disorders, Traumatic: Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Weapons: Devices or tools used in combat or fighting in order to kill or incapacitate.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Women: Human females as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.ChicagoPeer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Forensic Psychiatry: Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.BaltimoreProstitution: The practice of indulging in sexual relations for money.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Child Reactive Disorders: Reactions to an event or set of events which are considered to be of pathological degree, that have not developed into a neurosis, psychosis, or personality disorder with fixed patterns.Sex Workers: People who engage in occupational sexual behavior in exchange for economic rewards or other extrinsic considerations.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Precipitating Factors: Factors associated with the definitive onset of a disease, illness, accident, behavioral response, or course of action. Usually one factor is more important or more obviously recognizable than others, if several are involved, and one may often be regarded as "necessary". Examples include exposure to specific disease; amount or level of an infectious organism, drug, or noxious agent, etc.Elder Abuse: Emotional, nutritional, financial, or physical maltreatment, exploitation, or abandonment of the older person generally by family members or by institutional personnel.BrazilHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.BostonAgonistic Behavior: Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Arabs: Members of a Semitic people inhabiting the Arabian peninsula or other countries of the Middle East and North Africa. The term may be used with reference to ancient, medieval, or modern ethnic or cultural groups. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Morale: The prevailing temper or spirit of an individual or group in relation to the tasks or functions which are expected.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Desensitization, Psychologic: A behavior therapy technique in which deep muscle relaxation is used to inhibit the effects of graded anxiety-evoking stimuli.Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Criminals: Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)PhiladelphiaAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)IraqChild Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Pregnancy, Unplanned: Unintended accidental pregnancy, including pregnancy resulting from failed contraceptive measures.Schools: Educational institutions.Self Psychology: Psychoanalytic theory focusing on interpretation of behavior in reference to self. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Terms, 1994) This elaboration of the psychoanalytic concepts of narcissism and the self, was developed by Heinz Kohut, and stresses the importance of the self-awareness of excessive needs for approval and self-gratification.Couples Therapy: Psychotherapy used specifically for unmarried couples, of mixed or same sex. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Marital Therapy: A form of psychotherapy involving the husband and wife and directed to improving the marital relationship.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Refugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Public Assistance: Financial assistance to impoverished persons for the essentials of living through federal, state or local government programs.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Pregnancy, Unwanted: Pregnancy, usually accidental, that is not desired by the parent or parents.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Medical Receptionists: Individuals who receive patients in a medical office.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.
  • In honor of Global 16 Days Campaign external icon , CDC examined data from the 2019 Kenya external icon and the 2018 Cote d'Ivoire external icon Violence Against Children and Youth Survey (VACS) to understand the relationship between working for wages and violence among children and adolescents. (cdc.gov)
  • The 2018 Cote d'Ivoire and 2019 Kenya VACS was supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) external icon in their continuing efforts to use data to reduce new HIV infections through preventing sexual violence against girls. (cdc.gov)
  • WATCH ABOVE: In 2018, Toronto saw two mass casualties and a rash of gun violence. (globalnews.ca)
  • To gather literature, the team searched databases of peer-reviewed journals from 1990 to 2018, for research on sex work, legislation, policing and health. (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • In 2018, we cared for 675 survivors of sexual violence in Honduras and Mexico. (doctorswithoutborders.org)
  • Lucy Platt , lead author and Associate Professor in Public Health Epidemiology at LSHTM, said: "Our important review highlights the impact of sex work laws and policing practices on the safety and health of individuals who sell sex around the world. (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • Because of the complexity of the issue, employers may be unsure how to deal with employees who exhibit unsettling behavior that could foreshadow violence in the workplace. (jdsupra.com)
  • citation needed] Children exposed to domestic violence are likely to develop behavioral problems, such as regressing, exhibiting out of control behavior, and imitating behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • A WHO multi-country study of domestic violence and women's health found that partner violence is the most common form of violence. (opendemocracy.net)
  • Her ideas have always been a bit "out there," says Charlotte Bunch, founder and former director of the Center for Global Women's Leadership at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., for whom Dutt worked as a summer intern while attending Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts. (csmonitor.com)
  • It is important to consider women's pregnancy histories in programs aimed at preventing the adverse outcomes of relationship violence and in screening for partner violence in sexual and reproductive health services. (guttmacher.org)
  • In this article, we flip the equation to consider the relationship between women's risk behaviors and pregnancy during adolescence and their exposure to intimate partner violence during their early 20s. (guttmacher.org)
  • To identify causal effects, we assume that variation in women's immune system health when HAART was introduced affected how strongly their experience of domestic violence or drug use responded to the breakthrough. (nber.org)
  • Although there were organizations such as the All-China Women's Federation (ACWF) established by the Communist Party of China, these state-established organizations did not exert much effort on domestic violence issues in the mid 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent literature has documented the magnitude of violence against children and the results are overwhelming. (brookings.edu)
  • Type 2 - Violence directed at employees by customers, clients, patients, students, inmates or any others for whom an organization provides services. (shrm.org)
  • Health care employees face the risk of all four types of violence, Warren explained, not so much from other employees, but from patients, family members and visitors. (shrm.org)
  • Employers and employees should work together to establish systems to prevent or reduce aggressive behaviour. (hse.gov.uk)
  • Many employees will have questions about their rights when they return to work after the coronavirus pandemic, especially related to safety and privacy. (nolo.com)
  • Employees who face domestic violence may be entitled to accommodations and time off work. (nolo.com)
  • actually, a doctor who observed her working at the hospital was so impressed with her 'magnetic personality' and interaction with the staff and patients that he had one of his employee's call and offer her a job at his office that only employees LPNs. (allnurses.com)
  • Young employees who have yet to reach the age of 18 and interns/trainees may in carry out work only if this poses no danger to their health or the environment. (rai.nl)
  • All employers are responsible for the working conditions of their employees and for the safety of other persons in the immediate proximity of employees in the course of their work. (rai.nl)
  • During the exhibition setup/breakdown periods, RAI employees and suppliers are strongly advised not to walk through the exhibition halls, meeting rooms and lounge areas where the work is being carried out. (rai.nl)
  • This disconnect between strong laws and persistent high levels of intimate partner violence was the impetus for Friedemann-Sánchez to launch the project in 2015. (umn.edu)
  • As well as working with social welfare agencies, Derby police are using the liquor restricted premises regulation to help house owners break the alcohol-fuelled cycle of violence. (abc.net.au)
  • Derby police officer-in-charge Dave Dench says alcohol is behind the majority of the town's domestic violence. (abc.net.au)
  • Some of us numb ourselves with alcohol and other drugs and other addictive forms of behaviour and some with work. (humanrights.gov.au)
  • Alcohol now accounts for a higher proportion of deaths worldwide than HIV, AIDS, violence and tuberculosis combined," the report warned. (nationalpost.com)
  • However, there are ways to prevent this violence. (cdc.gov)
  • He said his ministry is working with the Agricultural Ministry to set strict standards to help prevent the excessive use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers that poison the environment. (rferl.org)