Stiff-Person Syndrome: A condition characterized by persistent spasms (SPASM) involving multiple muscles, primarily in the lower limbs and trunk. The illness tends to occur in the fourth to sixth decade of life, presenting with intermittent spasms that become continuous. Minor sensory stimuli, such as noise and light touch, precipitate severe spasms. Spasms do not occur during sleep and only rarely involve cranial muscles. Respiration may become impaired in advanced cases. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1492; Neurology 1998 Jul;51(1):85-93)Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Muscle Rigidity: Continuous involuntary sustained muscle contraction which is often a manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES. When an affected muscle is passively stretched, the degree of resistance remains constant regardless of the rate at which the muscle is stretched. This feature helps to distinguish rigidity from MUSCLE SPASTICITY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p73)Mechanical Processes: The behaviors of materials under force.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Periarthritis: Inflammation of the tissues around a joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)Connectin: A giant elastic protein of molecular mass ranging from 2,993 kDa (cardiac), 3,300 kDa (psoas), to 3,700 kDa (soleus) having a kinase domain. The amino- terminal is involved in a Z line binding, and the carboxy-terminal region is bound to the myosin filament with an overlap between the counter-connectin filaments at the M line.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Glutamate Decarboxylase: A pyridoxal-phosphate protein that catalyzes the alpha-decarboxylation of L-glutamic acid to form gamma-aminobutyric acid and carbon dioxide. The enzyme is found in bacteria and in invertebrate and vertebrate nervous systems. It is the rate-limiting enzyme in determining GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID levels in normal nervous tissues. The brain enzyme also acts on L-cysteate, L-cysteine sulfinate, and L-aspartate. EC 4.1.1.15.Contracture: Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.Elastic Modulus: Numerical expression indicating the measure of stiffness in a material. It is defined by the ratio of stress in a unit area of substance to the resulting deformation (strain). This allows the behavior of a material under load (such as bone) to be calculated.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Joint DiseasesModels, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Elasticity Imaging Techniques: Non-invasive imaging methods based on the mechanical response of an object to a vibrational or impulsive force. It is used for determining the viscoelastic properties of tissue, and thereby differentiating soft from hard inclusions in tissue such as microcalcifications, and some cancer lesions. Most techniques use ultrasound to create the images - eliciting the response with an ultrasonic radiation force and/or recording displacements of the tissue by Doppler ultrasonography.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Acrylic ResinsWork Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.Vascular Access Devices: Devices to be inserted into veins or arteries for the purpose of carrying fluids into or from a peripheral or central vascular location. They may include component parts such as catheters, ports, reservoirs, and valves. They may be left in place temporarily for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Elastomers: A generic term for all substances having the properties of stretching under tension, high tensile strength, retracting rapidly, and recovering their original dimensions fully. They are generally POLYMERS.Encephalomyelitis: A general term indicating inflammation of the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD, often used to indicate an infectious process, but also applicable to a variety of autoimmune and toxic-metabolic conditions. There is significant overlap regarding the usage of this term and ENCEPHALITIS in the literature.Mechanotransduction, Cellular: The process by which cells convert mechanical stimuli into a chemical response. It can occur in both cells specialized for sensing mechanical cues such as MECHANORECEPTORS, and in parenchymal cells whose primary function is not mechanosensory.Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Hydrogels: Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gait: Manner or style of walking.Gait Disorders, Neurologic: Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.Joint Capsule: The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bursitis: Inflammation or irritation of a bursa, the fibrous sac that acts as a cushion between moving structures of bones, muscles, tendons or skin.Biomimetic Materials: Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Pliability: The quality or state of being able to be bent or creased repeatedly. (From Webster, 3d ed)Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Gels: Colloids with a solid continuous phase and liquid as the dispersed phase; gels may be unstable when, due to temperature or other cause, the solid phase liquefies; the resulting colloid is called a sol.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Biopolymers: Polymers synthesized by living organisms. They play a role in the formation of macromolecular structures and are synthesized via the covalent linkage of biological molecules, especially AMINO ACIDS; NUCLEOTIDES; and CARBOHYDRATES.Sarcomeres: The repeating contractile units of the MYOFIBRIL, delimited by Z bands along its length.Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Cell Shape: The quality of surface form or outline of CELLS.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Actin Cytoskeleton: Fibers composed of MICROFILAMENT PROTEINS, which are predominately ACTIN. They are the smallest of the cytoskeletal filaments.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Protein Kinases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Work Simplification: The construction or arrangement of a task so that it may be done with the greatest possible efficiency.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.United StatesCumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Computer Terminals: Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.FinlandNurses' Aides: Allied health personnel who assist the professional nurse in routine duties.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Lifting: Moving or bringing something from a lower level to a higher one. The concept encompasses biomechanic stresses resulting from work done in transferring objects from one plane to another as well as the effects of varying techniques of patient handling and transfer.SwedenGreat BritainAttitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Housekeeping: The care and management of property.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Health Facility Environment: Physical surroundings or conditions of a hospital or other health facility and influence of these factors on patients and staff.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Pensions: Fixed sums paid regularly to individuals.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Relief Work: Assistance, such as money, food, or shelter, given to the needy, aged, or victims of disaster. It is usually granted on a temporary basis. (From The American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)
He worked with James McAvoy again, playing a total of seven different characters, in the revival of Peter Barnes "The Ruling ... Dougall was the musical director for the Forbes Masson shows Crackers, Stiff! and Mince. Masson is an Artistic Associate with ... He has also worked with Gordon Dougall's Sounds of Progress music theatre company (renamed Limelight in 2010), promoting ... Masson met Cumming during this time, and the pair performed some cabaret work together in order to earn Equity cards. He lives ...
He is succeeded by Lennie Briscoe (Jerry Orbach). "The Working Stiff". Law & Order. Season 2. Episode 22. May 12, 1992. NBC. " ... Believing that he could no longer function as a street cop, Cerreta reluctantly tells Logan that they can no longer work ... In later episodes, however, the two develop a close working relationship. Like most detective characters on Law & Order during ...
We worked stiff. We made contact." Finlay began working on a comeback in 2004, wrestling in a match against Jamie Noble at a ... By the time he was 18, he was already working in England." - Finlay's dad reflects back on his own career Brian Elliot SLAM ... When WCW was purchased by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), Finlay began working for the company as a trainer for new ... At Uncensored, Bruiser won a stiff encounter with Regal by disqualification when the Blue Bloods again rushed the ring and ...
He continued to publish work on hobos and the homeless under the alias Dean Stiff. In an autobiographical sequence of articles ... He worked as a public servant both in Washington, D.C. and abroad, mainly with agencies for work and welfare until 1953. ... Anderson, Nels (1964). Dimensions of Work: The Sociology of a Work Culture. New York: David McKay. Anderson, Nels (1964). ... he wrote that no matter where he was working during these 30 years of being in non-academic sociology work, he always felt he ...
LECTURE IN THE EVENING Coach Discusses Strength and Weaknesses of Badgers; Stiff Work for "Subs." Saves Men for Big Game. Stagg ... He later worked as a judge in Utah. [1] [2] Hard Practice in Mid Way Camp; Stagg Drills Maroons for More than Three Hours at ...
"Mozart as Working Stiff". In James M. Morris, ed. On Mozart,[page needed]. Washington: Woodrow Wilson Center Press. Zaslaw, ... Work on the symphony occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks during which time he also completed the ... The second movement is a lyrical work in 6 8 time. It is in the subdominant key of the relative major of G minor (B♭ major): E ... The work is in four movements, in the usual arrangement for a classical-style symphony (fast movement, slow movement, minuet, ...
He is old and stiff... he moves with a stoop". By 1838, he was capable only of working in a small format. He and his family ... Quistorp introduced Friedrich to the work of the German 17th-century artist Adam Elsheimer, whose works often included ... Friedrich's work lay in near-oblivion for decades. Yet, by 1890, the symbolism in his work began to ring true with the artistic ... his work was too original and personal to be well understood. By 1838, his work no longer sold or received attention from ...
Steering was stiff at low speed. The back axle was quiet, the only noise when running was a slight hum when using the indirect ... The engine was very flexible in traffic though the sensitive throttle lever must be worked smoothly. The car tested had the old ...
Peters' terms were stiff; he became Deputy Prime Minister and was also made Treasurer, a newly created position superior to but ... Work and Income Following National's coalition with New Zealand First in 1996, the Department of Social Welfare and the New ... Bolger and Peters appeared to have put their previous differences aside, and initially worked very well together. However, ... By contrast, Labour had established a friendly working relationship with the Alliance. Labour leader Helen Clark had improved ...
Burawoy, Michael (September 2001). "Review: Donald Roy: Sociologist and Working Stiff". Contemporary Sociology. American ... Well known for his field work into industrial working conditions, workplace interactions, social conflict, and the role of ... Roy's work surveys much of blue-collar America (beginning in 1934 he took employment in around 24 "bottom rung" jobs in 20 ... Banana Time describes Roy's experience working in a factory. As well known is a series of papers arising from his PhD examining ...
The winding engine worked at a pressure of 25 lb. per sq. in., and the speed on the incline was about 5 m.p.h. The Taff Vale ... The Act also limited the speed of the trains on the line to 12 mph (19 km/h), with stiff penalties for any speeding. (These two ... It was worked by the Taff Vale from the outset and leased to it from 1 January 1847. It opened for passenger and goods and ... The line was worked by and leased to the TVR. Iron production in South Wales peaked in 1871, after which the process was ...
Stone work is done in the San Miguel neighborhood of San Pable del Monte, including working with black marble and onyx to make ... Various communities make items from stiff fibers. Two communities noted for their basketry are San Vicente Xiloxochitla and ... Modern work working techniques were introduced by the Spanish, and along with furniture, a number of smaller wood items are ... This work is also done in Zitlaltepc de Trinidad Sanchez Santos. In the Escuela de Platería (Silver School) in Tlaxco they ...
2016). Can You Stiff Your Divorce Lawyer? Tales of How Cunning Clients Can Get Free Work, as Told by an Experienced Divorce ... This action culminated a two-year effort to expand the Committee's work to a much wider lawyer population. The organizational ...
Both Guerrero-Espinoza and De La Rosa-Loera, after being released from jail, have gone back to work at the meatpacking plant ... "USA - Stiff penalties for Kosher plant executives". Meat Trade News Daily. 2010-06-03. Retrieved 2010-07-27. Jens Manuel ... Getzel Rubashkin, one of his grandsons who worked at the plant, was reported as saying: "Obviously some of the people here were ... "Rebuild Iowa Office: Working to recover: Winneshiek-Allamakee LTRC. Committee Gives Support to New 'Postville First' ...
He later worked as a businessman and entrepreneur, and founded and managed several companies. Before being elected National ... Abdul Salam Sule (May 28, 2009). "Mac Manu faces stiff opposition in NPP". Ghanadot.com. Retrieved June 10, 2009. Nathan ...
"Vancouver's Suite101.com faces stiff new competition". The Vancouver Sun. "Canada's Suite101 Writers Profit, Expanding to ... In March 2013, Suite101 ceased publishing articles as the team behind the site works on a new project. https://suite.io/ ...
They had one daughter, Elizabeth Wood (Whitaker) Stiff. During his time working for his uncle the engraver in New York City, ... George Whitaker worked in New York as an engraver until he was 31 years old. Whitaker married Sarah L. Hull, daughter of John ... His work is in the permanent collections at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence Art Club, Rhode Island ... Whitaker was an active Democrat, working to reform Providence's corrupt Republican party. He was a candidate for Senate several ...
Works by Alexander Barclay at Project Gutenberg Works by or about Alexander Barclay at Internet Archive Works by Alexander ... His style is stiff and his verse uninspired. Nichols, John Gough, ed., The Chronicle of Calais, Camden Society (1846), 83 ... Thus, the work is of interest as throwing light on the manners and customs of the times to which it refers. Barclay also ... From the numerous incidental references in his works, and from his knowledge of European literature, it may be inferred that he ...
... "while Marcio Takara's art works very well in this trade, sometimes it wears thin for me. The characters are a little stiff at ... Max has been working on a plan to stop Plutonian, forgoing sleep for days and becoming erratic. Annie sneaks away and fights ... Though reluctant to work with Max due to his criminal past, Armadale comes to consider Max his friend. He relapses into alcohol ... Alana works with Max in his efforts to rebuild Coalville, but wary of his instability from lack of sleep, unwittingly provides ...
"Stiff Penalty Asked For Assault on Working Newsmen". The Daily Boston Globe. February 17, 1958. p. 2. "Consumers' Council Plan ... He was regarded as being hard working and had a moderate to liberal record. While in the legislature he sponsored a bill to ...
Givin Stiff to the Stiff' at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 23 October 2017. ... Note: For additional work user may have to select 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' or 'Performer:'. ... Stiff to the Stiff" (Finn Allman, F McCarthy, Jason Fuller) - 1:59 "Hippie Kill Team" (Allman, McCarthy, Fuller) - 0:27 "Metal ...
... and a frame that is not stiff enough will be slower. Frame stiffness also works along with boot and wheel stiffness, so there ... Very "stiff" frames are usually favoured by heavy skaters. A frame which is too stiff for a particular skater may feel unstable ... Those who never "take a pull" at the front will likely find other skaters tactically working together to defeat them. During ...
The colors in her work became sharper and stiff. Cracks and wedges in walls became common as a symbol of pent up frustration. ... Her first works from this time are four gouache paintings which mark the transition of her work. One of these paintings shows a ... However, Laville's work is more reflective and more sensuous. There are two main phases to Laville's work, separated by the ... Eventually she established her own style and this is when galleries began to be interested in her work. To live, she worked at ...
Jeeves works there temporarily in Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves. Brinkley is said to be modeled on Lechmere House at Severn End, ... The bank is perhaps inspired by the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, where Wodehouse himself worked for a time before his writing ... Totleigh Towers is a fictional location in two Jeeves stories, being the setting of The Code of the Woosters and Stiff Upper ... Many characters in later works are old boys, including Ukridge, his friends Jimmy Corcoran, George Tupper, and "Looney" Coote, ...
The strategy works on the expectation that customers will switch to the new brand because of the lower price. Penetration ... The product will face stiff competition soon after introduction. There is not enough demand amongst consumers to make price ... skimming work. In industries in which standardization is important. The product that achieves high market penetration often ...
Symptoms include stiff neck, fever, headache, confusion, and photophobia. Sepsis is caused by overwhelming response to an ... Avery's work marked the birth of the molecular era of genetics.[14] ...
Click through to see how Stiff Person Syndrome has changed her life. ... This is Ambers story about living with Stiff Person Syndrome. ... I have not worked since 2008 and I have been on permanent ... Living with Stiff Person Syndrome: Ambers Story. 2 Comments on Living with Stiff Person Syndrome: Ambers Story ... Im mostly housebound during the week while my husband is at work. I try to stick to a routine and I have found out the routine ...
Stiff Man Syndrome. Meinck, H-M. // CNS Drugs;2001, Vol. 15 Issue 7, p515 Stiff man syndrome (SMS), an uncommon neurological ... Stiff limb syndrome (SLS) is a rare "focal" variant of stiff person syndrome which presents with rigidity and painful spasms of ... The stiff limb syndrome - a new case and a literature review. Bartsch, T.; Herzog, J.; Baron, R.; Deuschl, G. // Journal of ... Stiff-man syndrome (SMS) is a rare disorder characterized by continuous muscle spasms, axial muscle rigidity,"tin soldier gait ...
People with SPS have elevated levels of GAD, an antibody that works against an enzyme involved in the synthesis of an important ... What is Stiff-Person Syndrome?. Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neurological disorder with features of an autoimmune ...
Working Stiffs may refer to: Working stiff, an American slang term for a member of the working class Working Stiffs (TV series ...
Repetitive-strain injuries account for more than 60 percent of workplace ailments. Early diagnosis is key, but prevention is always the best measure. If you dont have time for a yoga class, performing these simple stretches several times a day is not only refreshing, but can also prevent chronic muscle and joint fatigue. Dont forget to breathe!
Whatever the logic may be, youll hear few rumblings from the working stiffs of the world if cube and office sizes are trending ... Yet the IFMA feels that this shrinking work space trend may be leveling off, citing a range of factors. Collective work spaces ... "Third offices," such as coffee shops and at-home work setups are also gaining ground, as technology has enabled large numbers ... But the final, and perhaps most amusing reason the report uses to support an argument that company-sponsored work spaces wont ...
Black Gold and Coal and a resurgent interest in working bodies at a time when the working class in the US seems all but ... This essay traces some of the narratives and cultural politics of work on reality television after the economic crash of 2008. ... during the Great Recession these programs present an imagined revival of manliness through the valorization of muscle work, ... We dont work at the fucking mall. We work in living hell." As Swados pointed out long ago, the working class may earn, vote, ...
"Working Stiff is a page-turning, engrossing book that reveals a hidden world and shows that the work of understanding death is ... "Working Stiff is an eye-opening, gripping account of the life of a forensic pathologist working in New York City. Whether ... Praise For Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner…. "Far from the magic we see on TV, ... "Working Stiff is an engrossing and revealing glimpse into the making of a medical examiner with a searing insiders view into ...
Working stiff: How obesity boosts cancer risk Message Subject. (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Science ...
Working stiffs: New study reveals macrophages react to physical sensations. Monday, July 30, 2018 - 4:59pm ... "Most of the existing work that has looked at macrophage function regulation has ignored the potential of the physical ... while those grown on stiffer surfaces - modeled after scar tissue - did not respond as strongly to the same stimulus. ...
... Several years ago, I had developed a course at ... Anyone whos ever worked at a fast food restaurant knows this story! Its the story of working at a smelly, degrading, dull, ... too many work hours, and dangerous working conditions? Or are we to surmise that in the fantasy future unions simply dont ... Having myself worked as a secretary to a couple of bosses from hell, I let out more than a few chuckles watching this episode. ...
Do Not Buy Stiff 4 Hours Male Enhancer Until You Read This SHOCKING Stiff 4 Hours Review And Find Out If It Really Works! ... Stiff 4 Hours Review - Read The Shocking Truth About Stiff 4 Hours. Cheryl Powers 2.7 / 5.0 Editor Review by: ... How Should You Take Stiff 4 Hours?. Stiff 4 Hours should be taken 2-6 hours before having sex. One capsule is all thats needed ... What Are The Ingredients In Stiff 4 Hours?. Stiff 4 Hours contains L-Arginine, an ingredient that supports the levels of nitric ...
Working Stiffs Working hard at creating stiffs since 2006.. View my complete profile ... Working Stiffs at 7:13 AM Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest. ... I would like to commend you for the work you have put into your website and offer you the possibility of being included as a ... I would love to see work capitalizing on the humor that a bipolar person may experience living with the disease. Being bipolar ...
Working Stiffs Working hard at creating stiffs since 2006.. View my complete profile ... Working Stiffs at 1:07 AM 3 comments: Links to this post Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest ... Working Stiffs at 5:00 AM 6 comments: Links to this post Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest ... Working Stiffs at 7:00 AM 8 comments: Links to this post Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest ...
Two are working gundogs that do a lot of hard work (they do enjoy it).. So if someone is going to be Charlie Roses dog, they ... "Lucy Bickerton... sued the hightone chatterbox... claiming she worked like a dog, but got stiffed on the pay." ... That is, they get a job either at the org they worked for or directly as a result of working there.]. So far almost all of them ... How can you get stiffed on pay that was never owed in the first place? I see nothing to indicate she worked outside a defined ...
May 14, 2010 Lori Acken Comedy, Reality TV Comments Off on Martha Stewart, Nick Jonas, Tim Gunn and others play working stiffs ... Martha Stewart, Nick Jonas, Tim Gunn and others play working stiffs in CBSs latest "I Get That A Lot" special ... Wayne Brady working the desk at a fancy hotel. Tune in Wednesday, May 19, to find out which of the celebrity jesters proves ...
All about Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for ... Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner by Judy Melinek (BookshelfMonstrosity) ... Smoke Gets in Your Eyes wittily relates the work of an assistant in a crematorium, while Stiff presents an entertaining account ... Work details. Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach (2003) ...
Download the app and start listening to Stiff today - Free with a 30 day Trial! Keep your audiobook forever, even if you cancel ... Working Stiff chronicles Judys two years of training, taking listeners behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing ... Working Stiff chronicles Judys two years of training, taking listeners behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing ... One of the cadavers that I worked on was a physician (in his former life), one was a woman, and one was a man of no particular ...
This is one of several posts about a stiff, fragile low back. A stiff low back is usually a combination of a binding ... This is one of several posts about a stiff, fragile low back. A stiff low back is usually a combination of a binding ... Stiff Low Back with Pain in the Lower Hip. clients, hip, low back, neuromuscular, oitf-multifidi-rotatores, oitf-quadratus- ... Pain in Calf or Groin with Stiff Hip. calf, glutes, groin, hip, oitf-iliolumbar-ligament, oitf-pelvic-ligaments, referral ...
Working Stiff chronicles Judys two years of training, taking listeners behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing ... In this masterful work, Beth Macy takes us into the epicenter of Americas 20-plus year struggle with opioid addiction. From ... The difference between these two doctors left a lasting impression on Epstein and set the stage for his lifes work - to ... The difference between these two doctors left a lasting impression on Epstein and set the stage for his lifes work - to ...
UQ student whisking stiff peaks. The ovens are preheated and a fresh batch of Australias best amateur bakers is ready to knead ... University of Queensland work to reduce the risk of alcohol, tobacco and other drug-related harm among young people has ... Is variety the spice of working life?. A team of researchers at The University of Queensland are looking for participants to ...
Working Stiff Judy Melinek 02 Jul 2015. Paperback. US$8.31 US$16.00 ...
Gradually work yourself up to your full potential to avoid over-extending yourself and irritating the painful tendon even more. ... Working out with tendinitis is challenging, and you may need to adjust your workout to avoid re-injury. ... The Mayo Clinic discourages you from working through the pain of tendinitis, because the tendon does not have adequate time ... How to Reduce the Pain From a Pulled Forearm Muscle During a Work-Out ...
Self Care - Stiff, Swollen Hands in the Morning. Self-Care includes. Activities to avoid and change,. Strategies for quick ... on how this works for you and any suggestions you might have.. Email me at [email protected] ... This is usually perpetuated by pulling ones head forward to read, work on a laptop, drive while the seat is leaned back, etc. ... It will be worth it to take the time to learn to do them properly and work with them regularly. ...
... the competition is stiff - in more ways than one. Cougars appear to dive off their stands. A giant tiger looks ready to pounce ... Christensen worked doing taxidermy for 35 years at the Milwaukee Public Museum and has a handful of world titles herself. ... "I know its a little weird," she says as she feels around for the detail work. "I have to feel them up a bit." ... And the competition is stiff - in more ways than one. Cougars appear to dive off their stands. A giant tiger looks ready to ...
  • Gradually work yourself up to your full potential to avoid over-extending yourself and irritating the painful tendon even more. (livestrong.com)
  • Smoke Gets in Your Eyes wittily relates the work of an assistant in a crematorium, while Stiff presents an entertaining account of what happens with cadavers. (librarything.com)
  • The work Stiff : the curious lives of human cadavers represents a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in Arapahoe Library District . (arapahoelibraries.org)
  • The work Stiff : the curious lives of human cadavers represents a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in Noble County Public Library . (in.us)
  • Most people want to avoid thinking about death, but Caitlin Doughty - a 20-something with a degree in medieval history and a flair for the macabre - took a job at a crematory, turning morbid curiosity into her life's work. (audible.com)
  • The difference between these two doctors left a lasting impression on Epstein and set the stage for his life's work - to identify the qualities and habits that distinguish masterful doctors from those who are merely competent. (audible.com)
  • Aroused by the thought of muscle work and hoping her husband might warm to the idea, Maggie attempts to seduce Bobby, who turns a cold shoulder to end the conversation. (mdpi.com)
  • For the elephant in the room… We can't shy away from the uncomfortable reality /conversation, injuries and burnout rates are insanely high (our gym included) As a medical provider I have worked with… 34 gymnasts who had serious stress fractures/overuse tears 20 who lost their entire competitive year 4 with major hip/shoulder surgery 8 who quit gymnastics This season. (slideshare.net)
  • Specifically, it discusses the emergence of paid labor shows like Ax Men , Black Gold and Coal and a resurgent interest in working bodies at a time when the working class in the US seems all but consigned to the dustbin of history. (mdpi.com)
  • This particular scene captures the subtext of a film in which physical labor and working-class bodies are an absent presence, marginalized as characters but romanticized as a site of moral and masculine renewal. (mdpi.com)
  • In other words, working-class bodies produce a cinematic surplus value of sorts through which middle-class men find recovery and redemption. (mdpi.com)
  • It participates in a wider discursive field that includes not only narratives of the Great Recession and the crisis of middle-class masculinity but also a resurgent interest in working-class bodies, especially on reality television. (mdpi.com)
  • To understand the symbolic significance of working-class bodies, both on reality television and in the wider culture, it is imperative to account for the ways in which narratives of the Great Recession are heavily gendered. (mdpi.com)
  • Stiff is an oddly compelling, often hilarious exploration of the strange lives of our bodies postmortem. (in.us)
  • Mary Roach's Stiff lifts the lid off what happens to our bodies once we have died. (bookcrossing.com)
  • Bobby eventually finds work with Jack, who teaches the green horn the value of both physical labor and family. (mdpi.com)
  • Most of the existing work that has looked at macrophage function regulation has ignored the potential of the physical environment to affect cells of the immune system, and has focused on chemical signals," says Gruber, who is first author on the study. (cornell.edu)
  • Do physical conditioning programmes reduce work absenteeism related to back pain? (bmj.com)
  • The name is accurate: by keeping information in short-term storage, where it can be consciously contemplated, working memory allows us to "work" with all the sensations and ideas streaming in from the various parts of the brain. (scienceblogs.com)
  • I assume libertarians and conservatives don't worry about free citizens freely choosing to work for free. (blogspot.com)
  • The hours of labor exacted by some of the Brooklyn railroad companies are so many and the work is so severe that it is astonishing that men can perform the labor and live. (scientificamerican.com)
  • This combination might work better in people with mild-to-moderate osteoarthritis than in people with severe osteoarthritis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The Guardian awarded Stiff four out of five stars, praising the soul influence on the songwriting - "Live, they may make your knees shake like Robert Plant, but on record the musicianship often eclipses the songs, resulting in a lack of truly memorable bangers. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the entries are all in and every hair settled in place, judges get to work prodding noses and running their fingers through the fur that competitors just obsessively combed. (thestar.com.my)
  • And so we have the "shows" and the erudite articles such as Jesse Hamlin 's piece in the June 21 Datebook, a piece I was reading with interest until I came upon the part about mummies and medicine, wherein Hamlin writes: "and images from a CT scan that will be done on the ancient stiff by Stanford researchers this summer. (sfgate.com)
  • If you have the means to assist in this work, I'd appreciate any stress testing scripts and stacktraces you can contribute. (sourceforge.net)
  • An unvarnished portrait of the daily life of medical examiners-complete with grisly anecdotes, chilling crime scenes, and a welcome dose of gallows humor- Working Stiff offers a glimpse into the daily life of one of America's most arduous professions, and the unexpected challenges of shuttling between the domains of the living and the dead. (indiebound.org)
  • But it's unclear what dose or form of glucosamine might work best. (medlineplus.gov)
  • People have pain in their calf or groin with a stiff hip. (integrativeworks.com)
  • The Mayo Clinic discourages you from 'working through the pain' of tendinitis, because the tendon does not have adequate time to heal. (livestrong.com)
  • any one have pelvic and low back pain with temporary paralysis, so stiff that its? (drugs.com)
  • Chronic Pain - any one have pelvic and low back pain with temporary paralysis, so stiff that its? (drugs.com)
  • In medical terms, acupuncture is thought to work by blocking your pain receptors, & stimulating your nervous system and the production of your endorphins (pain relieving hormones) & promoting your blood circulation. (naturaltherapypages.com.au)
  • There are many products out there that promise quick and safe results for hopeful men, but when they don't work, it becomes an even bigger problem. (performanceinsiders.com)
  • And, it turns out, he has found much to bless-not in quiescent benediction but in eloquent requital of society's throw-aways, the voiceless legion of factory stiffs and others made marginal by various depredations of the 20th century. (artsjournal.com)
  • In recent years, neuroscientists have made some important progress uncovering the electrical circuits that make working memory possible. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Hand cream is made to sit on the surface or work its way into the top layer of skin. (diynatural.com)
  • Working Stiff is an eye-opening, gripping account of the life of a forensic pathologist working in New York City. (indiebound.org)
  • Is variety the spice of working life? (edu.au)
  • The quotations below, collected by Al Graham, show how we think the Bard of Avon might respond to modern life, work, and recreation. (saturdayeveningpost.com)
  • Complete with poignant anecdotes, The Education of a Coroner provides a firsthand and fascinating glimpse into the daily life of a public servant whose work is dark and mysterious yet necessary for society to function. (goodreads.com)
  • In my search for genre union- and worker-oriented stories, I have included shows that have portrayed the daily struggles of working people, strikes and union activity, and stories with class struggle as the backdrop. (scifipulse.net)
  • Working Stiff chronicles Judy's two years of training, taking readers behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing deaths in the Big Apple, including a firsthand account of the events of September 11, the subsequent anthrax bio-terrorism attack, and the disastrous crash of American Airlines Flight 587. (indiebound.org)
  • I was not rich, and I worked *many* different part-time jobs in my college years (most quite so-called 'lowly' and in some cases even 'grimy. (blogspot.com)
  • Working Stiff chronicles Judy's two years of training, taking listeners behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing deaths in the Big Apple. (audible.com)
  • Christensen worked doing taxidermy for 35 years at the Milwaukee Public Museum and has a handful of world titles herself. (thestar.com.my)
  • Although William Shakespeare died 400 years ago, his work lives on today. (saturdayeveningpost.com)
  • The more work experience they have, the higher the wage when they reach ages 20 to 25 years," says Andrew Sum , director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston . (csmonitor.com)
  • will have to juggle work with caring for her two children, ages 4 months and 2 years. (csmonitor.com)
  • After all those years of hard evolutionary work, why are we cruelly interfering with our foot s brilliant natural biomechanics? (care2.com)
  • The union's peer-intervention program has worked with just 400 teachers in nine years, only 20 percent of whom actually left teaching. (edweek.org)
  • She has 15 years of good experience in her line of work. (kiva.org)
  • Ken Holmes worked in the Marin County Coroner's Office for thirty-six years, starting as a death investigator and ending as the three-term, elected coroner. (goodreads.com)
  • As an implicit response to the crisis of masculinity during the Great Recession these programs present an imagined revival of manliness through the valorization of muscle work, which can be read in dialectical ways that pivot around the white male body in peril. (mdpi.com)
  • Fascinating case studies and a refreshing irreverence toward death and autopsies make Working Stiff a funny and engrossing read. (indiebound.org)
  • This is usually perpetuated by pulling one's head forward to read, work on a laptop, drive while the seat is leaned back, etc. (integrativeworks.com)
  • Few shows ever really address the topic, instead either going for broader, less specific "man's inhumanity to man" issues, or side-stepping the fact that no matter where we are in time and space, work pretty much sucks. (scifipulse.net)
  • T.J. Mitchell graduated with an English degree from Harvard and worked in the film industry before becoming a full-time stay-at-home dad in 2000. (indiebound.org)
  • Both chilling and heart-warming at the same time, Judy Melinek's account explains how empathy and humanity are as important working with the dead as they are with the living. (indiebound.org)
  • It will be worth it to take the time to learn to do them properly and work with them regularly. (integrativeworks.com)
  • Here's where things get interesting: even when the stimulus disappears - you've now started listening to a different song, perhaps that Boston song "Foreplay/Long Time" - those working memory cells continue to fire. (scienceblogs.com)
  • He required all his lawyers to work full-time for the state, built the office's first law library, and styled himself a people's lawyer, crusading for consumer rights and clean water. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Doing this requires working out as hard as you can, every time. (wikihow.com)
  • Exhausted all the time, can't stay after work. (empowher.com)
  • Senior professionals are also feeling the squeeze, with an average work space of 98 square feet. (eweek.com)
  • In fact, wearing shoes encourages our feet to become stiffer and narrower, which interferes with the stability and power which fanned out toes and a wide, sturdy big toe can provide. (care2.com)
  • Can an endocronologist help with diagnosing my "stiff feet" feeling of legs filled with concrete, exhaustion or should I pursue with OBYGN with menopause? (empowher.com)
  • My feet feel stiff, especially in the am. (empowher.com)
  • Peter Steinberg, a retired high school teacher who now works for New Visions, wants the union to spread the word about successful techniques the small schools have developed. (edweek.org)
  • In the vein of Dr. Judy Melinek's Working Stiff , an account of the hair-raising and heartbreaking cases handled by the coroner of Marin County, California throughout his four decades on the job-from high-profile deaths to serial killers, to Golden Gate Bridge suicides. (goodreads.com)
  • Mark Demig, who reviewed the album for AllMusic said "The edgy energy that's long been the band's trademark is present in abundance here, which is welcome news since Stiff debuts a new White Denim lineup. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facing imminent foreclosure on their sprawling home, Maggie suggests to Bobby the possibility of working with her brother Jack, a tradesman who specializes in drywall installation. (mdpi.com)
  • Versatile hair spray with spray-strong complex for working, shaping, and finishing styles. (ulta.com)
  • Everything they had saved was used when my dad's illness prevented him from being able to work, and she was laid off from her teaching job due to her incapacity to perform her duties there. (go.com)