Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Work Simplification: The construction or arrangement of a task so that it may be done with the greatest possible efficiency.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.United StatesCumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Computer Terminals: Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.FinlandNurses' Aides: Allied health personnel who assist the professional nurse in routine duties.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Lifting: Moving or bringing something from a lower level to a higher one. The concept encompasses biomechanic stresses resulting from work done in transferring objects from one plane to another as well as the effects of varying techniques of patient handling and transfer.SwedenGreat BritainAttitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Housekeeping: The care and management of property.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Metallurgy: The science, art, or technology dealing with processes involved in the separation of metals from their ores, the technique of making or compounding the alloys, the techniques of working or heat-treating metals, and the mining of metals. It includes industrial metallurgy as well as metallurgical techniques employed in the preparation and working of metals used in dentistry, with special reference to orthodontic and prosthodontic appliances. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p494)Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Health Facility Environment: Physical surroundings or conditions of a hospital or other health facility and influence of these factors on patients and staff.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Unemployment: The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Pensions: Fixed sums paid regularly to individuals.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Relief Work: Assistance, such as money, food, or shelter, given to the needy, aged, or victims of disaster. It is usually granted on a temporary basis. (From The American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Construction Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of building.Parental Leave: The authorized absence from work of either parent prior to and after the birth of their child. It includes also absence because of the illness of a child or at the time of the adoption of a child. It does not include leave for care of siblings, parents, or other family members: for this FAMILY LEAVE is available.Back Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the posterior part of the trunk. It includes injuries to the muscles of the back.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.NorwayProfessional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Musculoskeletal Pain: Discomfort stemming from muscles, LIGAMENTS, tendons, and bones.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Rescue Work: Activities devoted to freeing persons or animals from danger to life or well-being in accidents, fires, bombings, floods, earthquakes, other disasters and life-threatening conditions. While usually performed by team efforts, rescue work is not restricted to organized services.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Asthenopia: Term generally used to describe complaints related to refractive error, ocular muscle imbalance, including pain or aching around the eyes, burning and itchiness of the eyelids, ocular fatigue, and headaches.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Personnel Loyalty: Dedication or commitment shown by employees to organizations or institutions where they work.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)JapanWater: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)BrazilNursing Administration Research: Research concerned with establishing costs of nursing care, examining the relationships between nursing services and quality patient care, and viewing problems of nursing service delivery within the broader context of policy analysis and delivery of health services (from a national study, presented at the 1985 Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (CGEAN) meeting).Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Neck Pain: Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.EnglandOxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.DenmarkSequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Maintenance: The upkeep of property or equipment.Prostitution: The practice of indulging in sexual relations for money.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Employee Performance Appraisal: The assessment of the functioning of an employee in relation to work.Social Work, Psychiatric: Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Time Management: Planning and control of time to improve efficiency and effectiveness.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Workflow: Description of pattern of recurrent functions or procedures frequently found in organizational processes, such as notification, decision, and action.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Computer Peripherals: Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Noise, Occupational: Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Mice, Inbred C57BLOrganizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
  • The No. 1 reason for patient injuries at hospitals is falling. (npr.org)
  • But the number one reason for injuries at hospitals is much less dramatic: it's patients falling down. (npr.org)
  • PFEIFFER: Patient falls are the most common injuries reported in hospitals. (npr.org)
  • The findings are significant because interns routinely work extended shifts in teaching hospitals. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The Health Service Executive's chief clinical officer Dr Colm Henry said they are working closely with hospitals and communities to ensure patients with the greatest needs are prioritised. (rte.ie)
  • The Food and Drug Administration authorized emergency use of remdesivir on May 1, and Gilead has been supplying the drug to hospitals as part of a pledge to donate 1.5 million vials - or enough for at least 140,000 patients. (medscape.com)
  • Nurses, as the largest workforce in the nation's hospitals, are in a unique position to positively impact the safety of ICUs if systematic improvements to their working conditions can be made. (newswise.com)
  • With the looming nursing shortage, hospitals direly need to address working conditions in order to help retain current staff now and recruit people into nursing in the future. (newswise.com)
  • Hospitals are crowded with such people, as well as many other non-surgical patients who would benefit greatly from Oriental medicine. (acupuncturetoday.com)
  • More heartbreaking still are the children's hospitals which are sadly populated with patients suffering from leukemia, brain tumors, osteogenic sacoma, brittle bone disease, cystic fibrosis, juvenile cancer of the kidneys, and other severe medical conditions that are mostly found in the very young. (acupuncturetoday.com)
  • Four Maryland hospitals will be contacting patients who might have come in contact with a health care worker infected with hepatitis C when he worked in the state between 2008 and 2010, according to the state health department. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The Maryland hospitals will notify patients who underwent certain procedures such as cardiac catheterization, according to the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics did not have any specific numbers as far as injuries or visits to the ER related to the storm specifically, but staff did say they have been seeing patients with storm-related injuries, including from falls and lacerations. (kcrg.com)
  • Falls, serious lacerations from chainsaw use, and concerns over carbon monoxide poisoning have been a number of concerns from the area hospitals, but also saw a number of patients on oxygen coming into the ER because there was no electricity and their equipment needed charging. (kcrg.com)
  • Health IT Patient Safety Supplemental Items for Hospitals. (ahrq.gov)
  • 1 Only about one in ten people who present to Australian hospitals with suspected cardiac chest pain receive a final diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, and no more than 2% of patients with low to intermediate risk of cardiovascular disease are diagnosed with an acute coronary syndrome. (mja.com.au)
  • Patients with acute ischemic strokes may undergo procedures or receive special clot-busting medication in an effort to restore blood flow to the brain. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Doctors could one day use the method to quickly reverse oxygen deprivation in patients with acute loss of lung function while longer-term fixes such as heart-lung bypass support are put in place. (technologyreview.com)
  • The experience led Kheir to work toward developing a fast-acting, intravenous treatment that could help patients like her with acute, severe lung injury. (technologyreview.com)
  • Many of my patients suffered from acute abdominal problems such as appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, intestinal obstructions, bleeding or perforated peptic ulcers, or complications of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. (acupuncturetoday.com)
  • With the development of effective treatments, the most limiting factor to treating acute stroke is infrastructure -- we have to keep evolving our systems to get therapy to as many appropriate patients as possible," says Ferdinand K. Hui, M.D. , associate professor of radiology and radiological science at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. (eurekalert.org)
  • Konstantinides S, Geibel A, Olschewski M, Kasper W, Just H (1997) Acute pulmonary embolism: The value of echocardiography for identification of high risk patients. (springer.com)
  • Acute effects of deep diaphragmatic breathing in COPD patients with chronic respiratory insufficienc. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This practice violates 7 AAC 110.155 and 7 AAC 110.145, which state that IV sedation is only authorized in emergencies, stating its use is only allowed in "the immediate relief of pain or acute infection […] necessary for emergency dental care," and "if the dental services provider justifies, in writing, that the service is required for a patient who is uncontrollable under local anesthesia alone. (ktuu.com)
  • Work hardening is used as an intervention for acute and chronic lower back pain (CLBP), but it is not necessarily used in post-operative treatments. (scielo.org.za)
  • Particularly acute leukemia (AL) patients who suffer from a profound and long-lasting humoral and cellular immune deficiency [ 6 ], may benefit from tailored recommendations. (nature.com)
  • Table 1 Recommendation for management of patients with acute leukemia during the COVID-19 outbreak. (nature.com)
  • PFEIFFER: Beckwith points to one way the hospital now identifies patients at risk of falling: outside several rooms are big stars made of bright, yellow construction paper. (npr.org)
  • The collaboration among Boston Children's Hospital, Mass Open Cloud, and Red Hat is bringing together medicine, open technology, and massive compute power showing that when the right technologies, people, and organizations work together, major medical advances can be made. (redhat.com)
  • and two patients were admitted to the hospital for suspicion of leakage or tube displacement. (medscape.com)
  • Nicole Furey is looking to change that one patient at a time by bringing together the ED with community agencies to support patients after they leave the hospital. (uhn.ca)
  • Emergency, General Internal Medicine staff, and various agencies have come together at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) to help us facilitate patient discharges to their homes or residences, if safe to do so,' says Scott McIntaggart, executive lead, TGH. (uhn.ca)
  • The work of social workers in the ED is helping have better outcomes for the patient-and the hospital. (uhn.ca)
  • As one of two social workers here, she helps patients find and access support in their communities, rather than coming into the hospital unnecessarily. (uhn.ca)
  • She knew that she wanted to work in a hospital based on previous personal health experiences that got her thinking about the potential impacts of social work in healthcare. (uhn.ca)
  • A new position for her and the hospital, the role was created as the result of a six-month pilot study which looked at the benefits of a social worker for both patients and the hospital. (uhn.ca)
  • For patients who are medically stable but have social concerns, Nicole emphasizes that the hospital isn't the right place to be. (uhn.ca)
  • A review of outcomes data for more than 15,000 patients in 51 U.S. hospital ICUs showed that those with high nurse staffing levels (the average was 17 registered nurse hours per patient day) had a lower incidence of infections. (newswise.com)
  • Increased overtime hours in ICUs were associated with increased rates of another common hospital-associated infection, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, as well as increased rates of skin ulcers on patients. (newswise.com)
  • Involvement from hospital administrators, staffing professionals, legislators and consumers is needed in order to address problems in the ICU work environment. (newswise.com)
  • Our hope is that with concentrated efforts, we can prevent hospital infections and improve patient safety in ICUs. (newswise.com)
  • This video, available in English and Spanish, teaches two key points to hospital patients and visitors to help prevent infections: the importance of practicing hand hygiene while in the hospital, and that it is appropriate to ask or remind their healthcare providers to practice hand hygiene as well. (cdc.gov)
  • Modeled after the video that airline passengers are required to view prior to take-off on a flight, this new video is intended to be shown to patients upon admission to the hospital. (cdc.gov)
  • The goal is that the video will inform patients at the beginning of their hospital stay about what they can do to help prevent infections throughout the duration of their stay. (cdc.gov)
  • As a surgeon, I spent my professional medical career working in a hospital setting, because that's where major surgery is usually performed and that's where patients are admitted who are in need of such surgery. (acupuncturetoday.com)
  • Other patients admitted to the hospital on my service had a newly established diagnosis of cancer, such as carcinoma of the colon, ovarian cancer, breast cancer, thyroid cancer, or other types of malignancy. (acupuncturetoday.com)
  • For 27 years Deidre Buckley, RN, NP, of the Massachusetts General Hospital Fireman Vascular Center's Brain Aneurysm and Arteriovenous Malformations Program has made it her life mission to help patients like the 34-year-old mother of four who was diagnosed with a brain aneurysm in April. (massgeneral.org)
  • Flying a stroke specialist by helicopter to a nearby stroke patient for emergency care is feasible, saves money and, most importantly, gets critical care to patients faster than transporting the patient to a hospital first, according to a single-patient, proof-of-concept study by a Johns Hopkins Medicine research team. (eurekalert.org)
  • Patient transport time, however, can be significant and, in many cases, stroke victims are first taken to a nearby community hospital, then transported to the specialized center, often further delaying time to treatment and lowering the odds of recovery or reduced disability. (eurekalert.org)
  • To test the feasibility of a physician-to-patient model that could potentially improve outcomes for a time-sensitive procedure, investigators designed a study to fly Hui by Johns Hopkins Lifeline from Baltimore to a National Institutes of Health Stroke Center at Suburban Hospital in Washington, D.C. --39.4 miles away -- to treat a stroke victim. (eurekalert.org)
  • Katie Lorain, an art therapist at UC Davis' Children's Hospital said the festival showcases "film, music and artwork created by our patients during their hospitalization. (fox40.com)
  • This is something their friends are probably doing outside of the hospital, and i think it brings a sense of mastery, they are creating a skill and they are reframing their role from a patient to an artist," Lorain said. (fox40.com)
  • Proof Work founder David Suter said, "As somebody who walks into a doctor or a hospital, there are many moving parts that are put into place behind the scenes in order to make sure we get the right level of care, the right treatment. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) allows a patient to control their own intake of painkillers in the hospital. (sharecare.com)
  • When the emergency room at Middlesex Hospital was out of commision Thursday after Steven Ellam drove his car into the front doors workers at the Hartford Healthcare Care Logistics Center in Newington were able to help find beds for 24 patients that would have been admitted at Middlesex. (courant.com)
  • When a car crashed through the emergency room entrance of Middlesex Hospital in Middletown Thursday, putting patients in danger, officials looked for help from Hartford HealthCare's recently opened care logistics center. (courant.com)
  • Middlesex Hospital, needing to transfer two dozen patients while its emergency room was out of service, turned to the doctor, registered nurses, environmental specialists and dispatchers at the Newington facility, who worked together to meet the needs of those who were displaced. (courant.com)
  • Falcone said Middlesex Hospital is working to resume normal operations and is taking additional steps to reinforce the safety of all its facilities, including installing barriers outside its emergency department entrances in Middletown, Marlborough and Westbrook. (courant.com)
  • She said on Friday that patients who visit the hospital's temporary emergency department space should drive to the main entrance of the hospital and look for a security officer who is supposed to direct them to where they need to go. (courant.com)
  • Kwiatkowski worked in the cardiac catheterization laboratory at Exeter Hospital during an outbreak of hepatitis, a blood-borne viral infection that can cause liver damage and lead to chronic health problems. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (KCRG) - With so many people out working to clean up their yards and fallen trees, at least one hospital is now saying its emergency room saw record-high numbers. (kcrg.com)
  • Staff with UnityPoint Health - St. Luke's Hospital in Cedar Rapids said its emergency room saw 265 patients in a 24-hour span, as of Thursday morning. (kcrg.com)
  • Frederick Memorial Hospital respecte les lois fédérales en vigueur relatives aux droits civiques et ne pratique aucune discrimination basée sur la race, la couleur de peau, l'origine nationale, l'âge, le sexe ou un handicap. (fmh.org)
  • Richard not only helped her younger sister deal with the anguish of a cancer diagnosis, she pointed her to crucial resources, such as a social worker, a patient navigator and a hospital fund designed to help uninsured and underinsured women. (fredhutch.org)
  • On their first visit to the hospital, MD Anderson patients are assigned a patient advocate in their disease center. (mdanderson.org)
  • Dr. Isaiah Cochran, 26, worked 75 hours a week, including some 16-hour shifts, at Dayton Children's Hospital in Ohio for a stretch during his last year of medical school. (northbaybusinessjournal.com)
  • Patients depend on hospital teams, not just one doctor, and that may explain why doctor training time seemed to have no effect on care. (northbaybusinessjournal.com)
  • Long stay patients represent only 2% of clients, but use 25% of hospital bed days. (coursera.org)
  • Methodist Hospital in Houston began recruiting plasma donors on Friday and gave the first plasma transfusions to a COVID-19 patient the following day. (palmbeachpost.com)
  • For now though, plasma therapy is one of few options for doctors when critically ill patients "don't have much time," said Eric Salazar, principal investigator in the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at the Houston Methodist Hospital and Research Institute. (palmbeachpost.com)
  • 2 This raises the question of whether such patients need to be admitted to hospital at all. (mja.com.au)
  • Mary Tran, the report's lead author, said that although the OSHPD report does not examine the causes of hospital readmissions, it does point to areas where there is room for improvement in patient care (Kennedy, California Healthline , 6/14). (californiahealthline.org)
  • Medgadget recently covered how the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit uses 3D printing to prepare for transcatheter mitral valve repairs, but now we learn of work at Ohio State University that involves 3D printing model aortas and testing them in a special simulator that replicates hemodynamic parameters such as flow, pressure, and turbulence that blood experiences when it exits the left ventricular outflow. (medgadget.com)
  • Because I have chosen to work in a community hospital, most patients are very sick when they finally get care (because sadly they're uninsured) and have additional health issues other than the reason for admission. (allnurses.com)
  • In Germany for instance, the DRG payment per case is given only if a patient stays in the hospital for at least four days, even if he was ready to go home on the very next day. (urotoday.com)
  • Their study suggests that hospital admission and recurrent outpatient visits, inherent to cancer patients' management, are potential risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection. (nature.com)
  • You can visit your dialysis patients at dialysis, as well. (allnurses.com)
  • Having flexibility in my dialysis treatments gives me the freedom I need to live a happy and healthy lifestyle," says Julie Spreckelmeyer, a DaVita dialysis patient who has a full-time job, enjoys fly fishing, and regularly attends concerts and theater productions. (aol.com)
  • I would just have to figure out a way to do dialysis when I wasn't working. (aol.com)
  • In addition to in-center hemodialysis treatments, DaVita also supports home modalities, such as home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, which also allow patients to dialyze on a flexible schedule. (aol.com)
  • As of March 31, 2013, DaVita operated or provided administrative services at 1,991 outpatient dialysis centers located in the United States serving approximately 156,000 patients. (aol.com)
  • In-center hemodialysis is done three times per week in a clinic setting, while peritoneal dialysis and home hemodialysis can be done at a time and a location chosen by the patient. (socialworktoday.com)
  • Starting dialysis is a major life change for people with end-stage renal disease," says Joseph R. Merighi, PhD, MSW, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota School of Social Work. (socialworktoday.com)
  • For example, they may be concerned about the arteriovenous fistula, the access point for dialysis needles, which is not only noticeable to others but is also an ever-present reminder to patients of the ways in which dialysis is a part of their lives. (socialworktoday.com)
  • However, many patients on dialysis must follow dietary restrictions, making it difficult for them to get the necessary amounts of certain vitamins and minerals to stay healthy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, many dialysis patients are at risk for vitamin and mineral deficiencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since vitamins are necessary for proper metabolism, protein building, and growth it is important for the health of dialysis patients that they are supplemented with any vitamins or minerals that they may be deficient in. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most dialysis patients will need to supplement vitamin C and B vitamins to replace what is lost in the dialysis solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fat-soluble vitamins include vitamins A, D, E, and K. Excessive amounts of these vitamins can be harmful for people with kidney failure because they can build up in the body and become toxic so they are not generally supplemented in dialysis patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many foods that contain phosphorus and potassium (restricted in dialysis patients) also contain folate, niacin, riboflavin, and vitamin B6 (water-soluble vitamins). (wikipedia.org)
  • Many dialysis patients have low intakes of calcium due to avoidance of foods containing phosphorus and potassium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nutrition for patients on dialysis varies on an individual basis. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be very confusing trying to determine which vitamins and minerals need to be supplemented and which do not so it is important for dialysis patients to speak with a doctor before making any changes to their nutritional plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the other Harvard inventors, Do Hyun Kim, a 21-year-old senior, said doctors and nurses told them that a simple, reliable device could reduce the mortality rate in such patients. (bostonglobe.com)
  • If RV pressure overload is ruled out in those patients, mortality from thrombembolism seems to be low irrespective of whether pulmonary embolism is present or absent. (springer.com)
  • Despite a morbidity rate of 42.8 percent, this study showed that all patients did well with zero mortality and were satisfied with their condition during the follow-up period, suggesting that the long-term outcome of laparoscopic gastric bypass in obese patients who had previous antireflux surgery is promising. (innovations-report.com)
  • Prior studies found that the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform did not affect patient outcomes among general surgical patients.1,2 However, Dr. Rajaram said the workload changes might have affected surgical specialties differently than general surgery. (facs.org)
  • Nelson recommended that hospitalists try to find the number of billable encounters they need in a year and determining how many shifts you need to see a reasonable number of patients per day to meet that annual need. (medpagetoday.com)
  • While tradition holds that forcing young doctors to work extended-duration shifts teaches them to become better doctors, the evidence shows that this method of education is dangerous to patients. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Cross covering will decrease the number of doctors doing the on call shifts, it also leads to decrease in number of oncall shifts done by each doctor and results in decrease in working hours. (bmj.com)
  • In support of helping to keep working patients working, numerous clinics in the Metroplex - notably Houston, Sugar Land, League City, Brenham, Humble, Kingwood and College Station - have flexible evening treatment shifts designed to accommodate working patients. (aol.com)
  • The article DaVita Adds Flexible Shifts to Support Working Patients in Houston originally appeared on Fool.com. (aol.com)
  • Such overworked physicians ordered unnecessary tests, procedures, or consultations due to inadequate time with a patient, Michtalik said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Dr Henry said as the strike days progress, the accumulated number of patients cancelled grows greater and greater 'and our ability to reschedule those patients in an acceptable time interval is severely compromised. (rte.ie)
  • During this time, ABPI continue to work together with our partners to embed patient and public involvement within research. (abpi.org.uk)
  • The trial, for which final results are still trickling in, showed that recovery time for patients given remdesivir was shortened by four days, or 31%, compared to placebo patients. (medscape.com)
  • It is tough to get all of the work in, along with case managing every client monthly, but the job is extremely flexible on time and working from home never ends at 4 pm....there are days I work until 11 pm getting documentation done. (allnurses.com)
  • There is no day or night in the Emergency Department (ED). Under bright florescent lights, patients arrive at all hours and the fast-paced environment often leaves little time to reflect on how they got there in the first place. (uhn.ca)
  • Much of her time is spent simply listening to patients and their needs. (uhn.ca)
  • Doctors are expected to cross cover other specialties and do the work that used to be done by at least two doctors during the same period of time. (bmj.com)
  • On average nurses worked overtime 5.6 percent of the time. (newswise.com)
  • Buckley spends much of her time explaining the Fireman Vascular Center's treatment options and even shows patients pictures of their aneurysms. (massgeneral.org)
  • This would mean patients do not have to undergo fresh tests every time they switch doctors, which will reduce cost and expedite treatment. (indiatimes.com)
  • Proof Work is planning an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) in six months time that would create a coin that would allow data to be traded. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Most physicians won't find out patients are having trouble with medication or having symptoms for months, and they lose that time in which they can intervene. (healthcareitnews.com)
  • Aucutt stressed the importance of taking your time when out working. (kcrg.com)
  • The primary outcome variable, time to disability recurrence, was defined as "the number of days between the first day of returning to work for at least 15 consecutive days after the initial disability episode until the day before recurrence of disability. (dynamicchiropractic.com)
  • When reforms shortened working hours for U.S. doctors-in-training, some worried: Was that enough time to learn the art of medicine? (northbaybusinessjournal.com)
  • Doctors felt it freed up their time and improved working conditions. (nih.gov)
  • I only usually have 2-3 patients in NICU, but last night I barely had time to eat on the run, and I don't think I went to the bathroom all night. (allnurses.com)
  • Consider, for example, one patient in particular-a long-term chiropractic patient in her 50s who had a difficult time losing weight and felt generally sick and tired. (chiroeco.com)
  • Results: There was a positive tendency to successful RTW after work hardening for Group A, but no statistical significance between Groups A and B. The improvement of pain and functionality in Group A was highly significant from time of surgery to six months post-operatively. (scielo.org.za)
  • At present, the metabolic cart is routinely used in ALS patients at the time of feeding tube placement to calculate caloric needs. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For example, it should be ensured that outpatient transportation services bring patients to the scheduled time of their consultation, in order to minimize the time spent in the waiting area. (nature.com)
  • This schematic summarises some of the topics, themes and questions covered at the ABPI-AMRC Patients First Conference 2018. (abpi.org.uk)
  • The five bioengineering and electrical engineering students make up one of three finalists for the 2018 Astellas Oncology C3 Prize, an annual global challenge to generate ideas to improve the lives of cancer patients. (bostonglobe.com)
  • ERUS 2018: Is Minimal Invasive Surgery Truly Improving Early Return to Work of Patients? (urotoday.com)
  • I think this area should attact research studies to find out the impact of cross covering on patients safety and outcome. (bmj.com)
  • Patient outcome data came from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system and Medicare files. (newswise.com)
  • Konstantinides S, Geibel A, Kasper W, Olschewski M, Blümel L, Just H (1998) Patent foramen ovale is a major determinant of outcome in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. (springer.com)
  • Outcome measures included referral patterns, patient outcomes, patient and provider satisfaction as well as doctors' billing. (nih.gov)
  • After intervention, 60% of patients had improvement on the outcome questionnaire-45 (OQ-45). (nih.gov)
  • During the multidisciplinary intervention, the improvement of pain and functionality of patients from Group A were also evaluated from the pre-operative state to 24 weeks post-operatively with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) as additional outcome measures. (scielo.org.za)
  • In summary, laparoscopic gastric bypass appears to be a better alternative for the morbidly obese patient with GERD and previous antireflux surgery, who 1) remains symptomatic after the first fundoplication, or 2) qualifies for gastric bypass surgery. (innovations-report.com)
  • Any Case Managers who work with Medicaid patients? (allnurses.com)
  • I work for a Medicaid waiver program where we go out and visit clients in their homes. (allnurses.com)
  • Once he had more patients taking the costlier and illegal IV procedure instead of local anesthesia, prosecutors say Lookhart "devised a scheme to cut out his partners by billing Medicaid under a different provider ID and sending the money directly to his home. (ktuu.com)
  • This was achieved by over-prescribing the IV procedure to Medicaid patients, which according to the documents, were a bulk of the patients seen at the Muldoon-area practice. (ktuu.com)
  • They found that patients with the most aggressive forms of myeloma, and the patients with the poorest drug response, were those who had a high expression of the gene NEK2. (byu.edu)
  • Her work can be found here. (nbclosangeles.com)
  • Conclusion: Work hardening was found to have a positive tendency towards ensuring RTW for work-injured patients after lumbar surgery, with a highly significant effect on pain and functionality. (scielo.org.za)
  • reported that 1% of COVID-19 patients had a history of cancer, higher than that of the overall Chinese population (0.29%), with lung cancer being the most frequently found. (nature.com)
  • The ABPI wants to support relationships that are in the interests of patients and within the law and the ABPI Code of Practice . (abpi.org.uk)
  • PARADIGM is also working to develop metrics to evidence why public and patient involvement in research and is beneficial, and how to embed best practice in a sustainable manner. (abpi.org.uk)
  • You can read the ABPI's latest PARADIGM blog and some best practice examples from the pharmaceutical industry and others, on embedding patient and public involvement in research on the PARADIGM website . (abpi.org.uk)
  • And working patiently is something the group helping Maher is putting to practice. (kcrg.com)
  • We dare to speculate that for the purpose of preventing disability recurrence in cases of work-related LBP, the main advantage of chiropractors could be based on the dual nature of their practice. (dynamicchiropractic.com)
  • Once the patient is stable, doctors will concentrate on keeping him or her as healthy as possible. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The team is also working on making the microspheres more stable, with the ultimate goal of creating an off-the-shelf solution that could be ready for quick use in emergency situations. (technologyreview.com)
  • Included were adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving tocilizumab and glucocorticoids 5 to 15 mg per day for 24 weeks who had received prednisone 5 mg per day for 4 weeks or more and had stable low disease activity, confirmed by a Disease Activity Score for 28 joints-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) of 3.2 or less 4 to 6 weeks before and on the day of randomization. (uspharmacist.com)
  • In 10 stable patients with COPD, the dynamic Wi was measured during incremental bicycle exercise to exhaustion. (biomedsearch.com)
  • SACRAMENTO - A red carpet entrance fit for the stars rolled out for UC Davis pediatric patients all showcasing their artwork at the hospital's second annual Creative Arts Festival. (fox40.com)
  • Middlesex still not was not taking patients who arrived via ambulance, and the hospital's normal emergency department location in Middletown was still closed Friday night until further notice, Falcone said. (courant.com)
  • ABPI is committed to embedding system-wide patient and public involvement across the life sciences research sector. (abpi.org.uk)
  • In response to COVID-19, we thought it would be helpful to summarise some practical guidance from the ABPI Sourcebook , with the aim of supporting companies to work compliantly with patients and patient organisations. (abpi.org.uk)
  • This forum is open to ABPI member companies and to registered charitable patient organisations only. (abpi.org.uk)
  • ABPI have worked with member companies and a number of charities and patient organisations to develop a Sourcebook for industry . (abpi.org.uk)
  • The ABPI has also contributed towards the Shared Learning Group (SLG) guidance for charities on supporting patient and public involvement in industry-led research. (abpi.org.uk)
  • The ABPI is committed to embedding system-wide patient and public involvement in research and works across a range of stakeholders to drive policy change to address this. (abpi.org.uk)
  • One way in which the ABPI is working towards this ambition, is through partnership on the EU-funded Innovative Medicines Initiative - PARADIGM (Patients Active in Research and Dialogues for an Improved Generation of Medicines). (abpi.org.uk)
  • The ABPI will continue to work with key stakeholders in the UK and Europe to define policies to support patient and public involvement across the research environment. (abpi.org.uk)
  • A secret team within Apple is working on better methods for monitoring glucose levels in blood through optical sensors, a new report said. (zdnet.com)
  • Apple working on light-beam tech to treat diabetes A secret team within Apple is working on better methods for monitoring glucose levels in blood through optical sensors, a new report said. (zdnet.com)
  • Apple has formed a small team of biomedical engineers to work on noninvasive blood sugar monitoring to better treat diabetes, according to CNBC. (zdnet.com)
  • Students' team from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) is working on a development of dissolving contact eye lenses, which can be of great assistance for those suffering from glaucoma. (news-medical.net)
  • Bearss and his BYU undergraduate student team are now working toward the development of drugs that specifically target NEK2. (byu.edu)
  • This was a big win because the team was able to place all the patients," Turek said of Thursday's incident. (courant.com)
  • They are working as a team to keep one person from overworking. (kcrg.com)
  • It works by boosting the activity of the CFTR protein at the cell surface - a possibility first observed by Dr. Drumm and his team. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Group A received multidisciplinary intervention, including a work hardening programme with ergonomic adaptations, while Group B received only physiotherapy after surgery as a multidisciplinary team was not available. (scielo.org.za)
  • As part of the program, a geriatrician, occupational therapist, physical therapist and nutritionist provide consultations to the patient, who is accompanied by a student from the University of California Berkeley. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • That's because a full bladder might tempt patients to make a nighttime bathroom trip by themselves - a classic scenario for a fall. (npr.org)
  • We've also been working closely with the INMO in seeking exceptions, again to make sure those cases with the greatest need are exempted from industrial action. (rte.ie)
  • Want to Make an Appointment or Need Patient Information? (upmc.com)
  • They make some patients unable to concentrate or remember words, and are linked to muscle and neurological problems, including Lou Gehrig's Disease . (anh-usa.org)
  • The goal] is not to make ventilators obsolete, but to make patients healthier," says Kheir. (technologyreview.com)
  • At DaVita we're doing everything we can to make life a little easier for patients who want to keep working and maintain their quality of life. (aol.com)
  • From a patient perspective, current portals are often a burden and make very little sense because each provider organization that touches a patient is likely to have a separate portal, with each requiring different registrations, log-ins and passwords, and showing a wide range of data displayed differently. (healthcareitnews.com)
  • The sonographers and staff physicians at West Coast Ultrasound Institute are working to make radiologic imaging available to every patient. (bhcourier.com)
  • They would make the mutant protein work a little bit more like a normal protein. (uhhospitals.org)
  • For either type of toxic exposure, it's important to conduct routine blood work throughout the process to see how the patient is responding and make adjustments as needed. (chiroeco.com)
  • This research revealed that work disability -that is, difficulty to perform normal job duties- in these patients was associated to high recurrence of maniac episodes, as well as to recurrent psychiatric hospitalization -high-intensity episodes-, depression and low educational levels. (thaindian.com)
  • Luis Gutiérrez Rojas, a member of the Research Group of Psychiatry Research and Neuroscience of the University of Granada states that social disability -difficulty to establish relations out of the family and to achieve social integration- in these patients is associated to higher hospitalization rates, episodes of depression and active depression symptoms. (thaindian.com)
  • In people with type 1 diabetes, glucagon does not work properly. (reuters.com)
  • With one day of strike action, we are able to absorb all the extra cancellations into further normal working days, and give people assurances that we will reschedule them in a number of weeks. (rte.ie)
  • Nevertheless, my admiration for the noble work of doctors in helping people and relieving the suffering of others was one of my primary reasons for wanting to pursue a career in medicine. (bartleby.com)
  • We don't know whether she has that (Ebola) but she's been exposed to people with the disease while working in Sierra Leone and she now has a low-grade fever. (medindia.net)
  • Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease that affects people who are bitten by infected ticks or those in direct contact with blood or tissues of infected animals or patients. (medindia.net)
  • With the implementation of the work ability reform, the Estonian Unemployment Insurance Fund (EUIF) no longer designates a percentage of loss of work capacity for individuals who have contracted an occupational disease or suffered in an occupational accident, however without this indicator, one's incapacity for work cannot be proven and thus people are often left without employer compensation, reported ERR's radio news. (err.ee)
  • In contrast, patients with prior antireflux surgery enjoyed a 70.7 percent excess weight loss after laparoscopic gastric bypass at a mean follow-up of 24 months, which translated into a postoperative reduction of body mass index from 37.5 kg/m2 to 26.8 kg/m2. (innovations-report.com)