Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Antitrust Laws: Those federal and state laws, and their enforcement, that protect trade and commerce from unlawful restraints and monopolies or unfair business practices.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Return to Work: Resumption of normal work routine following a hiatus or period of absence due to injury, disability, or other reasons.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.RestaurantsMinors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Abortion, Legal: Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)Motorcycles: Two-wheeled, engine-driven vehicles.United StatesOccupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Patient Freedom of Choice Laws: Laws requiring patients under managed care programs to receive services from the physician or other provider of their choice. Any willing provider laws take many different forms, but they typically prohibit managed-care organizations from having a closed panel of physicians, hospitals, or other providers.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Smoke-Free Policy: Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Police: Agents of the law charged with the responsibility of maintaining and enforcing law and order among the citizenry.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Parental Notification: Reporting to parents or guardians about care to be provided to a minor (MINORS).Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Fractals: Patterns (real or mathematical) which look similar at different scales, for example the network of airways in the lung which shows similar branching patterns at progressively higher magnifications. Natural fractals are self-similar across a finite range of scales while mathematical fractals are the same across an infinite range. Many natural, including biological, structures are fractal (or fractal-like). Fractals are related to "chaos" (see NONLINEAR DYNAMICS) in that chaotic processes can produce fractal structures in nature, and appropriate representations of chaotic processes usually reveal self-similarity over time.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Legislation, Pharmacy: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of pharmacy, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Supreme Court Decisions: Decisions made by the United States Supreme Court.Great BritainCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Abortion, Criminal: Illegal termination of pregnancy.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).KentuckyWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.United States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Surrogate Mothers: Women who allow themselves to be impregnated with the understanding that the offspring are to be given over to the parents who have commissioned the surrogate.Insanity Defense: A legal concept that an accused is not criminally responsible if, at the time of committing the act, the person was laboring under such a defect of reason from disease of the mind as not to know the nature and quality of the act done or if the act was known, to not have known that what was done was wrong. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed)Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Infanticide: The killing of infants at birth or soon after.Lobbying: A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Women, Working: Women who are engaged in gainful activities usually outside the home.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Reproductive Rights: Reproductive rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health. They also include the right of all to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.Human Rights Abuses: Deliberate maltreatment of groups of humans beings including violations of generally-accepted fundamental rights as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Mandatory Reporting: A legal requirement that designated types of information acquired by professionals or institutions in the course of their work be reported to appropriate authorities.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Defensive Medicine: The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Euthanasia, Active, Voluntary: Active euthanasia of a patient at the patient's request and/or with the patient's consent.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Ethical Analysis: The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Physical Phenomena: The entities of matter and energy, and the processes, principles, properties, and relationships describing their nature and interactions.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.MassachusettsRight to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Embryo Research: Experimentation on, or using the organs or tissues from, a human or other mammalian conceptus during the prenatal stage of development that is characterized by rapid morphological changes and the differentiation of basic structures. In humans, this includes the period from the time of fertilization to the end of the eighth week after fertilization.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Nonlinear Dynamics: The study of systems which respond disproportionately (nonlinearly) to initial conditions or perturbing stimuli. Nonlinear systems may exhibit "chaos" which is classically characterized as sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems, while distinguished from more ordered periodic systems, are not random. When their behavior over time is appropriately displayed (in "phase space"), constraints are evident which are described by "strange attractors". Phase space representations of chaotic systems, or strange attractors, usually reveal fractal (FRACTALS) self-similarity across time scales. Natural, including biological, systems often display nonlinear dynamics and chaos.Child Restraint Systems: Devices used to protect and restrain infant and child automotive passengers.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Hippocratic Oath: An oath, attributed to Hippocrates, that serves as an ethical guide for the medical profession.European Union: The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Parental Leave: The authorized absence from work of either parent prior to and after the birth of their child. It includes also absence because of the illness of a child or at the time of the adoption of a child. It does not include leave for care of siblings, parents, or other family members: for this FAMILY LEAVE is available.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.New YorkWithholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Stochastic Processes: Processes that incorporate some element of randomness, used particularly to refer to a time series of random variables.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Work Simplification: The construction or arrangement of a task so that it may be done with the greatest possible efficiency.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
  • About a dozen members of the Michigan Nurses Association stand on the state Capitol steps in Lansing, Mich., Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, protesting right-to-work legislation. (yahoo.com)
  • Organizers say the gathering was meant to symbolize the silencing of unions that nurses say will happen should the legislation become law. (yahoo.com)
  • Boucher said that he and Florida's Cliff Stearns, the ranking Republican on the panel, plan to work on the bill together, reprising an unsuccessful earlier effort by the pair in 2005 to advance online privacy legislation. (internetnews.com)
  • Business interests represented by the United States Chamber of Commerce have lobbied extensively to pass right-to-work legislation. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a little more time and the benefit of reaction to the new law, the New York legislation can be justifiably improved and made even more effective. (timesunion.com)
  • Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said the new House Republican health care legislation is a "work in progress" that represents a step in the "right direction. (wmur.com)
  • Wolk said he would like to work with education officials and lawmakers on legislation that would create enforceability. (denverpost.com)
  • A year after the General Assembly passed and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy signed historic gun legislation inspired by the killings in Newtown, there are strong indications the new law is doing what it was meant to do. (theday.com)
  • A year ago, shortly after the gun law was signed, a report by the Brookings Institution noted that contrary to the gun advocates' hopes, "The Connecticut legislation may be a success. (theday.com)
  • Preemptive legislation at the state level prohibits localities from enacting laws that vary from state law or are more stringent. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC monitors state laws that preempt local smoking restrictions ( Table ) using the CDC State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) system, an online electronic database that includes information on state tobacco-related legislation. (cdc.gov)
  • The creators of P.L. 94-142 did not specify how the intent of the law was to be carried out in individual cases, perhaps in part because the philosophy underlying the legislation precluded such a mandate: How can curriculum and services for handicapped children be uniformly prescribed if we simultaneously require that these be tailored to the individual child's needs? (edweek.org)
  • The new legislation limits overtime work to less than 100 hours per month and 720 per year, and companies will be punished if they exceed the limits. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • On the day the reform legislation was enacted, Panasonic said it introduced a system allowing employees to work at other companies for a certain period of time to help them broaden their perspectives and gain new abilities and skills. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • In this paper, the average differences in business conditions, employment, personal income, wages and salaries, and proprietors' income across states that have enacted right-to-work laws versus those states that did not are examined assuming the legislation to be endogenous and using a Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA). (ssrn.com)
  • Luchini - supported by seven democrats and one republican - submitted emergency legislation this week to change the old alcohol law. (mainetoday.com)
  • TRENTON - Firing or discriminating against women who breastfeed at work is now prohibited under state legislation signed by Gov. Chris Christie on Monday. (nj1015.com)
  • The Damalos case is a good example of why this country still needs strong laws to protect workers and courts that will lower the boom when companies thumb their noses at the law. (sptimes.com)
  • The model Work Health and Safety (WHS ) laws require you to take care of the health, safety and welfare of your workers, including yourself and other staff, contractors and volunteers, and others (clients, customers, visitors) at your workplace. (safeworkaustralia.gov.au)
  • You must maintain your workplace to ensure the work environment does not put workers and others at risk of contracting COVID-19. (safeworkaustralia.gov.au)
  • You must provide your workers with any information or training that is necessary to protect them from the risk of exposure to COVID-19 arising from their work. (safeworkaustralia.gov.au)
  • One of the major reasons for private sector unionization's 80% collapse to only 6.7% of American workers is the availability of Right to Work states and the auto industry's enthusiasm to relocate. (breitbart.com)
  • This may have been due in part to 'brain drain' from Michigan" as workers followed the jobs to Right to Work states. (breitbart.com)
  • Notification is also required for layoffs involving 50 or more full-time workers who make up at least a third of the work force or for "mass layoffs" of 500 or more workers. (nytimes.com)
  • The G.A.O., a polite and cautious institution, stopped far short of accusing companies of playing fast and loose with the exceptions to the law, but it indicated that few workers are getting the notice to which they are entitled. (nytimes.com)
  • The G.A.O. acknowledged that thousands of workers have received the notices due them, but it pointed out that the law excludes more than half the employers with more than 100 workers in the 11-state sample it reviewed. (nytimes.com)
  • The law," she said, "was very much a compromise between needs of workers and local government and the needs of business. (nytimes.com)
  • It's not so much that employers would fire workers as that the new generous government benefits in the law will entice more people to drop out of the labor market altogether. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The law bars labor contracts requiring all workers to pay union dues as a condition of employment. (wsws.org)
  • They have spent the last three decades working to suppress and betray workers' struggles and impose the demands of the corporations for one round of wage and benefit cuts after another. (wsws.org)
  • Meanwhile, young workers in UAW plants are forced to work for poverty-level wages of $15 an hour, endure back-breaking speedup, work ten- and even 12-hour days with no overtime pay, and watch as "their" union reps police the shop floor on behalf of the bosses. (wsws.org)
  • Right-to-work laws are statutes in 28 U.S. states that prohibit union security agreements between companies and workers' unions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Right-to-work laws do not aim to provide general guarantee of employment to people seeking work, but rather are a government regulation of the contractual agreements between employers and labor unions that prevents them from excluding non-union workers, or requiring employees to pay a fee to unions that have negotiated the labor contract all the employees work under. (wikipedia.org)
  • For workers without these severe problems, you may still find yourself having to stop work while you recover from your back problem. (odglawgroup.com)
  • For most US workers, being unable to work and facing mounting medical bills can be a terrifying prospect. (odglawgroup.com)
  • Like most US workers, you probably won't have enough saved up to cover the physiotherapy you need, plus cover your co-pay and any other bills that occur because you can't work. (odglawgroup.com)
  • The law also emphasizes "equal pay for equal work" for regular and nonregular workers, and includes the so-called white collar overtime exemption system. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Too many applications, however, are causing employees to lose focus, increasing stress, and ultimately leading workers to seek more tranquil work environments. (bna.com)
  • It found that 18 percent of millennials, 12 percent of Generation X workers, and 8 percent of baby boomers had quit a job out of frustration due to lack of operational efficiency at work. (bna.com)
  • Older workers appreciate technology that makes their work easier-despite the disruptions-while digital natives want technology to work seamlessly all the time, McCullough said. (bna.com)
  • Although right-to-work states may be more attractive to business, this does not necessarily translate into enhanced economic verve in the right-to-work state if there is little "trickle-down" from business owners to the non-unionized workers. (ssrn.com)
  • The stigma associated with sex work, combined with the prosecution of sex workers and the socioeconomic and physical threats many sex workers face, contribute to these barriers. (hivlawandpolicy.org)
  • Against this backdrop of the shrinkage of jobs providing middle-class incomes, Republican governors, state legislators and presidential candidate Mitt Romney promote a fatal "cure" for the incomes of working families: "right-to-work" laws, which outlaw the union shop (allowing workers to benefit from collective bargaining without paying union dues) and by doing so diminish unions as a bulwark of decent living standards for all. (inthesetimes.com)
  • While it is vital not to isolate the diminished wages from other outcomes inextricably linked to right-to-work laws, lower pay is a certain result of them: Workers in right-to-work states (there are now 23, after Indiana joined the club this year) earn significantly less than in states that permit union shops, with the differential estimated to range from $1,500 to more than $5,300 per year. (inthesetimes.com)
  • SB 1063 (Hall) has also gone into effect, strengthening protections against discrimination by making it illegal for employers to pay workers doing substantially similar work different wages based on their race or ethnicity. (calaborfed.org)
  • The bill to end rape on the night shift - AB 1978 (Gonzalez) - also protects janitorial workers from fly-by-night contractors who routinely dodged workplace protections and laws. (calaborfed.org)
  • Another bill, SB 1167 (Mendoza) addressed the growing need for new health safety standards to protect workers from excessive heat while working indoors. (calaborfed.org)
  • Previous standards only applied to outdoor workers and Cal/OSHA is now working to expand the regulations to apply to indoor workers, as well. (calaborfed.org)
  • So much of Workers' Compensation law tends to focus on injuries sustained by employees - entry-level and mid-level personnel who are unfairly hurt on the job. (malmanlaw.com)
  • If you have suffered a spinal cord injury related to your job, you may be entitled to workers' compensation under Illinois law. (malmanlaw.com)
  • In most cases, victims of work-related injuries can seek medical and disability benefits through workers' compensation . (malmanlaw.com)
  • If you suffered disease-related spinal cord injury at work, you may be entitled to workers' compensation. (malmanlaw.com)
  • To find out if you may be entitled to workers' compensation for your spinal cord injury, we invite you to schedule a complimentary consultation at Malman Law. (malmanlaw.com)
  • Contact Malman Law today to put a team of skilled, knowledgeable, and committed workers' compensation attorneys on your side. (malmanlaw.com)
  • Low-caste workers often find it difficult to obtain any other form of work, with some toilet cleaners facing threats and harassment from local officials and residents if they try to quit, HRW said. (abc.net.au)
  • Were you injured at work, but your employer does not subscribe to workers' compensation insurance? (jrlawfirm.com)
  • If someone is injured or killed on the job in Texas and the employer subscribes to state-run workers' comp, the victim and/or their family is barred from filing a negligence claim against the company (except when gross negligence is involved) by law. (jrlawfirm.com)
  • If you were injured at work and your employer does not carry workers' comp, we urge you to call us as soon as possible. (jrlawfirm.com)
  • In a society where capital has an inordinate share of power, workers may feel as though they are living in a Dickensean world where their wages are subject to an 'iron law' that keeps them as low as possible while the government is the creature of the monied classes. (legalinsurrection.com)
  • Treating workers well usually results in better work output than treating them like dirt! (legalinsurrection.com)
  • This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. (bmj.com)
  • Consequently, in these cases of creative consumption, the recognition of exclusive exploitation rights may trump innovation, creativity and freedom of expression as transformative use and derivative works cannot be made unless the holder permits its creation and future exploitation. (igi-global.com)
  • In fact, in the first case, broader than the computer games context, adaptation and improvement of software can only be developed if (and in the terms) the holder wishes it, since he/she doesn't disclosure the source code that is necessary to create adapted or derivative works. (igi-global.com)
  • Henrik teaches on independent courses in Criminology, both on the basic and advanced level, as well as on the Criminology programme, the Clinical Psychology programme, and the Law program at Örebro University. (oru.se)
  • With the new law not going into affect until April-and at workplaces only after the expiration of current agreements-the UAW bureaucrats at Solidarity House and officials at union headquarters all over the state will work overtime to push through new concessions contracts to lock in their dues income for the next several years. (wsws.org)
  • Under these laws, employees in unionized workplaces may not be compelled to join a union, nor compelled to pay for any part of the cost of union representation, while generally receiving the same benefits as union members who do contribute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Margaret Zhang L'15 works as a legal fellow at the Women's Law Project advocating for pregnant and breastfeeding women in PA workplaces, schools, and prisons. (upenn.edu)
  • As progress continues with the general harmonisation of Australian Work, Health and Safety (WHS) laws, determining the laws that apply to offshore and maritime workplaces and activities in Australian waters remains riddled with complexity. (mondaq.com)
  • During my term, I have done all I could do to support a welcoming environment to working mothers in New Jersey workplaces. (nj1015.com)
  • Through 2002, the federal budget law will shrink projected Medicare spending growth by more than $115 billion, with $39 billion of that coming from hospitals. (modernhealthcare.com)
  • Virtual mailrooms allow attorneys to have immediate digital access to all paper mail and reduces an unnecessary task for staff so that they can focus on better supporting the firm's work for clients. (earthclassmail.com)
  • Working virtually can drastically reduce the opportunities available for connection with other attorneys - to bounce ideas around or to develop referral partners. (earthclassmail.com)
  • Justice Perverted' is informative, readable and should be required reading for attorneys, judges and forensic psychologists and psychiatrists working in this area. (healthcanal.com)
  • You can rely on the compassionate San Francisco personal injury attorneys at Alexander Law Group, LLP to guide you through the difficult time that follows a crash with a big rig. (alexanderlaw.com)
  • Call the attorneys at Grossman Law Offices for help. (injuryrelief.com)
  • In his speech, Obama criticized the right-to-work law on the grounds that the UAW had demonstrated its usefulness by collaborating with the government and the auto companies in slashing wages and benefits and returning the US auto industry to profitability. (wsws.org)
  • Findings are that the number of businesses and self-employed are greater on average in right-to-work states, but employment, wages, and per-capita personal income are all lower on average in right-to-work states. (ssrn.com)
  • Right-to-Work' Laws a Fatal 'Cure' for Wages. (inthesetimes.com)
  • She certainly couldn't count on the wages her husband, Tom Phillips, got from working as a mechanic. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Don't worry, we can still help you recover money for medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and more through a non-subscriber work injury claim. (jrlawfirm.com)
  • clarification needed] Right-to-work provisions (either by law or by constitutional provision) exist in 28 U.S. states, mostly in the southern and western United States, but also including the Midwestern states of Michigan, Indiana, and Wisconsin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The proposed law will have specific provisions for collection, storage and dissemination of individual health data. (indiatimes.com)
  • The proposed law will also have provisions for action against any breach of data, which is in huge demand mainly in the drug manufacturing industry. (indiatimes.com)
  • The system tracks state statutes and court rulings for preemption provisions affecting local smoking restrictions in government work sites, private work sites, and restaurants. (cdc.gov)
  • The number of states with preemptive provisions covering government work sites, private work sites, and restaurants decreased from 16 to nine, from 15 to nine, and from 18 to 12, respectively. (cdc.gov)
  • Differences are found in almost all provisions of the law: who is identified, how they are evaluated, where they are placed, and which services they receive. (edweek.org)
  • The brief outlines key provisions of the new law that expand HCBS benefit options, broaden financial and functional eligibility criteria, and provide additional financial incentives for states to further shift their Medicaid long-term services budgets to non-institutional settings' (June 2010). (news-medical.net)
  • The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracked report distributions of white nationalist, KKK and anti-Semitic posters and flyers on campus, found that Identity Evropa, American Vanguard, and TheRightStuff were behind the majority of incidents. (splcenter.org)
  • ATLANTA, Ga - The Southern Poverty Law Center submitted comments to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services opposing a proposed Medicaid waiver which mandates work and other requirements to secure Medicaid coverage. (splcenter.org)
  • The authors' contributions build upon one another to create the first integrated account of the important policy issues at stake when law deals with the rights of mentally disordered citizens to work when they are able to, and to receive benefits when they are not. (uchicago.edu)
  • If the Law of Attraction is working for you, you search for solutions to your problems when they arise, instead of spending your time sulking or complaining about your unfortunate circumstances. (davidwolfe.com)
  • We work hard every day to put quality content out there for our community. (techdirt.com)
  • This was the chalk board at Three Tides in Belfast before an inspector told them they had to erase the alcohol content of each beer, per a 1937 law. (mainetoday.com)
  • In fact, considering that recent digital technology allows several usages of copyrighted works that give the consumer the power to leave a merely passive and consumptive role and to easily become a content creator, it is today relatively simple, not only for professional programmers, but also for game players to change the game's content, its characters and narrative. (igi-global.com)
  • But France's "three strike" piracy policy, though still controversial to this day, does appear to be working. (zdnet.com)
  • Indeed, gun crime has risen along with the availability of guns not vice versa - restricting acess to them has consistently worked as a policy. (metafilter.com)
  • In the early development of the right-to-work policy, segregationist sentiment was used as an argument, as many people in the South felt that it was wrong for blacks and whites to belong to the same unions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vance Muse, one of the early developers of the policy in Texas, used that argument in the development of anti-union laws in Texas in the 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • But can the progressive policy of a tiny island nation work in a country as diverse and politically complex as the U.S. (upenn.edu)
  • The government worked with various social partners to achieve a policy that appealed to both liberals and conservatives, and a lot of pressure came from women's advocacy groups. (upenn.edu)
  • Throughout its history, WLP has worked to eliminate sex discrimination through policy advocacy, high-impact litigation, and community education. (upenn.edu)
  • This HIV Policy Resource Bank category includes materials on sex work related to human rights, HIV prevention and treatment, and HIV criminalization, and incorporate issues related to gender, violence, race, and LGBT rights. (hivlawandpolicy.org)
  • This book will be of great value to scholars in law and the mental health professions and to policy makers and the administrators of disability programs. (uchicago.edu)
  • The Law has strengthened the rights of employees, giving them the opportunity to take their disputes to low-cost employment tribunals. (brighttalk.com)
  • provided, however, that the law also permits an "agency shop" where employees pay their share for representation (less than union dues), while not joining the union as members. (wikipedia.org)
  • Employees who stay late are still praised for hard work while others are frowned upon for leaving before their bosses do. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Some are staying ahead of the curve by introducing reforms that allow employees to work less while contributing to improvements in productivity. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • With the introduction of overtime caps under the law, more companies are expected to shed overtime hours and have their employees rest on weekends properly," said Mikio Mizobata, a senior researcher at Daiwa Institute of Research. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Every year across the GCC countries, annual summer time working hours are implemented to protect the health and safety of employees pursuant to applicable Ministerial Resolutions. (dlapiper.com)
  • In most cases, they're employees like anyone else, and they generally have the same rights under the law. (malmanlaw.com)
  • Both employees and customers can "take their business (or labor) across the street" to a competing company if they're unhappy with the quality of the goods or services (a customer) or unhappy with the working conditions, treatment by your bosses, or the pay (if you're a worker). (legalinsurrection.com)
  • The Education Department sends out a letter once a year to school officials re-emphasizing the importance of compliance with state law requiring record of immunization or exemption, said Kathy Patrick, a former school nurse and assistant director of Health & Wellness at the department. (denverpost.com)
  • A draft on the new international humanitarian order will have the Assembly urge all actors to support the Secretary-General's initiatives for promoting compliance with international humanitarian laws in situations of armed conflict and complex emergencies. (un.org)
  • They either have jobs, are looking for work or attend school. (latimes.com)
  • While the ministry has roped in National Law School, Bengaluru, to put together the first draft of the law, it also plans to set up an e-health authority for standardisation of such data and to ensure confidentiality. (indiatimes.com)
  • The law bans the possession and sale of assault weapons, including the type used by Adam Lanza to kill 20 children and six adults in their school in a five-minute massacre. (theday.com)
  • Today, 11 percent of all elementary- and secondary-school students are receiving specialized instruction or services under the law. (edweek.org)
  • Simply stated, P.L. 94-142 is in place, and is 'working' in the sense that every school system has devised a set of operating procedures to ensure its due-process guarantees. (edweek.org)
  • To assist pregnant and breastfeeding students, I work alongside community agencies who support them, I travel to area schools to educate them about the laws, and I am available to advise and represent students who wish to file a complaint against their school. (upenn.edu)
  • How did your experiences before and during law school lead you to this project or public interest generally? (upenn.edu)
  • My experiences in law school continued to draw me toward public service on behalf of pregnant and breastfeeding women. (upenn.edu)
  • Yet even as a privileged law school graduate, I still encountered challenges: resistance to a breastfeeding accommodation from bar exam administrators, childcare expenses that equaled my housing expenses, and the day-to-day challenges of juggling a newborn's medical, physical, and emotional needs with my workplace demands. (upenn.edu)
  • Ewing is a nationally known expert on the criminal mind, a SUNY Distinguished Service Professor who has taught at the UB Law School for 25 years. (healthcanal.com)
  • You went to law school to practice law, that's your passion. (attorneyatwork.com)
  • JO: Sharing Law… I guess it was a phrase I put together in my head when as I was a third year in law school. (globalresearch.ca)
  • Does Law School Work Correspond w/ LSAT Skills? (top-law-schools.com)
  • A forum for applicants and admitted students to ask law students and graduates about law school and the practice of law. (top-law-schools.com)
  • How much do LSAT skills correspond with the work and what's required in law school? (top-law-schools.com)
  • My law school exams all consisted of old LSAT questions. (top-law-schools.com)
  • People who cannot effectively identify the underlying assumptions will not be able to draw proper analogies from case law, which is major skill tested on all law school exams. (top-law-schools.com)
  • Essentially this, though some of the skills that help on the LSAT help on law school exams (e.g. dealing with time pressure). (top-law-schools.com)
  • PoliceOne is revolutionizing the way the law enforcement community finds relevant news, identifies important training information , interacts online and researches product purchases and manufacturers . (policeone.com)
  • Rich Studley, president and CEO of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, said his phone has been "ringing off the hook" for the past week with calls from out-of-state business owners and economic development officials seeking confirmation of news accounts they read about the right-to-work law. (legalinsurrection.com)
  • Federal authority is important to control the interstate and international movement of persons who are potentially infectious, but most isolation and quarantine orders will be performed by state and local officials, using state and local law. (ssrn.com)
  • While the new law lists most of the categories of officials who are appropriately afforded a statutory right to privacy, there are others who should be protected. (timesunion.com)
  • It will also highlight the specific instances when disclosure to law enforcement officials are required or permitted, and the specific steps that medical record custodians should take to ensure that the rules are followed. (lorman.com)
  • For - as officials of President Yoweri's Museveni's three-year-old government point out - restoring the rule of law, as well as respect for human rights, is an integral part of rehabilitating this nation, which has hardly know a day of peace since its independence nearly three decades ago. (csmonitor.com)
  • Meanwhile, my internship at the Philadelphia Commission for Human Relations and my litigation courses at Penn Law showed me that administrative and judicial action can help rectify violations of pregnant and breastfeeding women's rights, but that these processes take time and provide retrospective relief at best. (upenn.edu)
  • Even before the law was enacted, there were companies taking measures to reduce overtime and make it easier to take paid holidays. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • A Healthy People 2010 objective (27-19) is to eliminate state laws that preempt stronger local tobacco control laws ( 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • A 2005 CDC review found that little progress was being made toward reducing the number of state laws preempting local smoking restrictions in three indoor settings: government work sites, private-sector work sites, and restaurants ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • This report updates the previous analysis and summarizes changes that occurred from December 31, 2004, to December 31, 2009, in state laws that preempt local smoke-free laws for the same three settings. (cdc.gov)
  • In contrast with the 2005 findings, this decrease indicates progress toward achieving the goal of eliminating state laws preempting local smoking restrictions. (cdc.gov)
  • Just one day before the passage of the right-to-work law, the UAW hosted President Obama at a Detroit-area factory and cheered his plans to slash and ultimately dismantle Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security. (wsws.org)
  • The report, by Brookings Fellow John Hudak, pointed out that the passage of the strict Connecticut law "exemplifies one of the most beautiful attributes of the American Constitution: Federalism. (theday.com)
  • After the amendment's passage, twelve (12) states passed "right-to-work" laws--as did ten (10) more states in the intervening years. (ssrn.com)
  • He offers these insights as to what the "Right to Work" passage means in a larger context. (legalinsurrection.com)
  • She is interested in Law, but I'm inclined to think that solicitors' firms would be hard pressed to find much for a 16 year-old to do because of client confidentiality. (mumsnet.com)
  • Not very helpful, but ds tried this route and all the solicitors firms said no because of client confidentiality (in other words, couldn't be bothered to have 15-year-old hanging round office) and the local courts said they used to offer work experience, but were no longer permitted because of 'elf 'n' safety. (mumsnet.com)
  • Law practices around the world are hustling to transition their teams to remote work - identifying ways to ensure they continue to meet ethics and confidentiality standards, comply with statutory requirements, and keep clients front and center during a time of uncertainty. (earthclassmail.com)
  • In Mental Disorder, Work Disability and the Law, the editors bring together original work by leading scholars who have studied mental disorder and work disability from the fields of sociology, psychology, psychiatry, law, and economics. (uchicago.edu)
  • In "Justice Perverted," Ewing examines what he calls "radically reshaped" laws dealing with the country's sex offenders. (healthcanal.com)
  • In this update we highlight recent Australian Government proposals that would bring about greater harmony with the country's general WHS laws and long overdue clarity for vessel operators and seafarers. (mondaq.com)
  • Florida was the first state to pass the Right to Work law in 1943. (breitbart.com)
  • The executives who run the UAW and the other unions oppose the right-to-work law only because it threatens the flow of dues that sustains their apparatuses. (wsws.org)
  • In Indiana, Republicans rammed through a right-to-work law just before the Super Bowl despite strong displays of opposition led by labor. (inthesetimes.com)
  • Since the mid-1970s, when the Missouri labor movement fought off a right-to-work law by building a big coalition and creating the awareness of what "right-to-work" is a euphemism for and means in practice, labor has not truly engaged in fighting the laws laws at a national level. (inthesetimes.com)
  • Lontine said that legislators, weary of "vaccine wars" fought against a vocal minority, haven't had the appetite to draft more law. (denverpost.com)
  • This stems from the draft amendment to the law on consumer loans, which the Finance Ministry submitted to interdepartmental review. (sme.sk)
  • The great tragedy of this movement was that it remained under the control of a right-wing, pro-capitalist bureaucracy, which from the earliest stages worked to subordinate the newly organized unions to the corporations, the Democratic Party and American imperialism. (wsws.org)
  • RTW laws buttress hierarchy and power imbalance which unions minimize at the worksite and by encouraging higher educational attainment, social mobility, and individual empowerment through group validation. (springer.com)
  • Unions challenge hierarchy directly at work-sites and indirectly through encouraging college education, social mobility, and community and political engagement. (springer.com)
  • These questions dealt with collective bargaining, the Law Enforcement Officer's Bill of Rights, residency requirements, and high-speed pursuit policies and procedures. (umich.edu)
  • But as one probes deeper into the law, looking for guidance on specific issues and on the treatment of specific handicapping conditions, what was clear in the distance becomes clouded under the microscope. (edweek.org)
  • "ALEC [American Legislative Exchange Council] has really been a driving force, boring from within among state legislators for decades," observed labor historian Prof. Stephen Meyer, author of Stalin Over Wisconsin and other works. (inthesetimes.com)
  • In progressive Minnesota, polling shows majority support for a RTW law that Republican legislators want to pass in a November referendum. (inthesetimes.com)
  • In a dizzyingly short time span, Republicans have converted Michigan from a seemingly impregnable fortress of organized labor into a right-to-work state, leaving outgunned Democrats and union activists with little recourse but to shake their fists and seek retribution at the ballot box. (yahoo.com)
  • For the Democrats, it's been that vaccines work, are safe and we should require them. (denverpost.com)
  • President Ronald Reagan, who vetoed the measure once and only reluctantly let it slip through on a second pass, used to refer to the law -- known formally as the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Act, or WARN -- as "a ticking time bomb in the back seat of any medium-sized or larger company. (nytimes.com)
  • In addition, the phaseout of the subsidies as income rises will effectively increase marginal tax rates, which will also discourage work," CBO said at the time. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The model laws are amended from time to time. (safeworkaustralia.gov.au)
  • the independent variables are a constant, a time trend, and a dummy variable that equals 1 during the years that the Anti-Socialist Laws were on the books (1878-1889), and 0 otherwise. (econlib.org)
  • All works are unpublished between the time they're created and the time they're published. (techdirt.com)
  • A book intended for simultaneous publication worldwide will not get published once the native language MS is set, in order to give the translators time to work. (techdirt.com)
  • Iceland's law was a long time in the making. (upenn.edu)
  • The law took force at a time when the issue of karōshi was dragged back into the spotlight by the 2015 Christmas Day suicide of a 24-year-old employee who was overworked by advertising giant Dentsu Inc. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Some GCC countries have implemented limited exceptions to the summer time working hours and the additional requirements highlighted above. (dlapiper.com)
  • The economic costs of these laws are staggering and seem indefensible at a time when other valued government programs are being cut to avoid fiscal disaster," says Ewing. (healthcanal.com)
  • These drivers are also required to be tested if they have been off of work for an extended time and are returning to work. (alexanderlaw.com)
  • Like I got to know People's Grocery, the nonprofit in West Oakland that was creating community gardens, and was also working to create a worker-owned grocery store at the time. (globalresearch.ca)
  • The aim is to encourage the Attorney-General to look at changing the law so that unpublished works are treated the same way as published ones. (techdirt.com)
  • I would imagine (and I have no figures to back this up) that since the new laws were introduced there has been in a fall in other gun-related deaths e.g. suicides, domestic arguments, accidents etc. (metafilter.com)
  • While his latest research suffers from some of the same weaknesses as his previous work, such as the fact that it consists only of observational case studies rather than being part of a rigorous clinical trial, it provides numbers sure to add to the abortion debate. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Delgado acknowledged that the journal in which his work appeared is co-sponsored by the Watson Bowes Research Institute, which is focused on antiabortion issues and therefore may be viewed more skeptically than other peer-reviewed journals. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Although there has been considerable research on the effect of right-to-work laws on union density, organizing efforts, industrial development and some study of wage differences, there has been little or no examination of the legislation's influence on business and economic conditions across states. (ssrn.com)
  • The AQ survey was developed based on information collected from previous research efforts, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Part W-Family Support, subsection 2303 [b]), and from information gained from the POQ. (umich.edu)
  • With all due respect to the six Justices who ruled in favor of stripping works from the public domain, the Constitution does not support this decision and any attempts to argue to the contrary are insulting and show a contemptuous understanding of the history and role of intellectual property in America. (ipwatchdog.com)
  • As members of a conservative industry that - literally - wrote the rule book on sexual harassment, law firms need to be ready for a day of reckoning that seems inescapable. (attorneyatwork.com)
  • Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Employment law experience. (yahoo.com)
  • Published works get the life-plus-70-years deal that we're familiar with. (techdirt.com)
  • We've compiled SOPHIA's earlier work from the years 2000 till 2003 which saw 3 full lenght albums and 3 eps released over a 3 year period. (chaindlk.com)
  • Demographic information in this Work and Family Issues in Law Enforcement (WFILE) questionnaire included the age, gender, ethnicity, marital status, highest level of education, and number of years in law enforcement of each respondent. (umich.edu)
  • 17 What I mean is this: The law, introduced 430 years later, does not set aside the covenant previously established by God and thus do away with the promise. (biblegateway.com)
  • Damigo is a former Marine corporal who discovered his inner white nationalist by reading the work of Holocaust-denying ex-Klansman David Duke while serving five years for armed robbery (while drunk, he put a gun to the head of a cab driver he thought was Iraqi and stole $43). (splcenter.org)
  • If that SAP approves the driver to return to work after a positive test, the driver will be required to participate in continued follow-up testing for at least 12 months and up to five years. (alexanderlaw.com)
  • But we've been doing this kind of work for 25 years, and we've not seen more than a handful of cases where a true new and independent cause occurred. (injuryrelief.com)
  • China Law & Practice editor Phil Taylor speaks exclusively with Ferheen Mahomed, regional general counsel for Asia at Societe Generale, whose team recently won CLP's 2009 International In-house Team of the Year award. (brighttalk.com)
  • DD1 is in year 10 and is trying to sort out work experience for this autumn. (mumsnet.com)
  • The company regularly holds meetings between women who are returning to work a year or two after giving birth and veteran working mothers so they can exchange information. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Low-caste Indians are still routinely forced into manually removing human excrement from toilets despite a highly-publicised law introduced last year to end the "discriminatory practice", a human rights group says. (abc.net.au)
  • Akay's passport is 'forfeit' and he may not leave Turkey, but now that the UN court and its judges are in direct contact with Akay, it has resumed its work on Augustin Ngirabatware's appeal against a 30-year sentence for crimes that include organisation of a genocide. (lawgazette.co.uk)
  • They expect first year associates to work 60 whole hours a week in return for 160 grand? (top-law-schools.com)
  • Both participated in Professor Suzanne Goldberg's Sexuality and Gender Law Clinic, which this spring won an unprecedented grant of asylum for a woman from Turkmenistan. (columbia.edu)
  • Ms. Hollinshead is a member of Professor Ed Lloyd's and Reed Super's Environmental Law Clinic, which recently led a successful challenge against the EPA and the electric power industry in a Clean Water Act case. (columbia.edu)
  • The Jean Marks Murphy Prize, given by donor Arthur Murphy, the Joseph Solomon Professor Emeritus in Wills, Trusts, and Estates, is presented annually to recognize outstanding clinical work. (columbia.edu)
  • His paper - appearing Wednesday in Issues in Law and Medicine, a journal with ties to an antiabortion group - looks at 754 patients who called an informational hotline in the United States from 2012 to 2016 after taking mifepristone, the first drug in a medical abortion, but before taking misoprostol, the second drug. (washingtonpost.com)

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