New YorkNew York CityRaffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Allopurinol: A XANTHINE OXIDASE inhibitor that decreases URIC ACID production. It also acts as an antimetabolite on some simpler organisms.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.IllinoisNew JerseyRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.September 11 Terrorist Attacks: Terrorism on September 11, 2001 against targets in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia, and an aborted attack that ended in Pennsylvania.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Blastomycosis: A fungal infection that may appear in two forms: 1, a primary lesion characterized by the formation of a small cutaneous nodule and small nodules along the lymphatics that may heal within several months; and 2, chronic granulomatous lesions characterized by thick crusts, warty growths, and unusual vascularity and infection in the middle or upper lobes of the lung.Procaine: A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a slow onset and a short duration of action. It is mainly used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and spinal block. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1016).Dominican Republic: A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Santo Domingo. With Haiti, it forms the island of Hispaniola - the Dominican Republic occupying the eastern two thirds, and Haiti, the western third. It was created in 1844 after a revolt against the rule of President Boyer over the entire island of Hispaniola, itself visited by Columbus in 1492 and settled the next year. Except for a brief period of annexation to Spain (1861-65), it has been independent, though closely associated with the United States. Its name comes from the Spanish Santo Domingo, Holy Sunday, with reference to its discovery on a Sunday. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338, 506 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)Ehrlichiosis: A tick-borne disease characterized by FEVER; HEADACHE; myalgias; ANOREXIA; and occasionally RASH. It is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; HORSES; and humans. The primary species causing human disease are EHRLICHIA CHAFFEENSIS; ANAPLASMA PHAGOCYTOPHILUM; and Ehrlichia ewingii.United StatesPublic Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.West Nile Fever: A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Ehrlichia: Small, often pleomorphic, coccoid to ellipsoidal organisms occurring intracytoplasmically in circulating LYMPHOCYTES. They are the etiologic agents of tick-borne diseases of humans; DOGS; CATTLE; SHEEP; GOATS; and HORSES.West Nile virus: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.Great Lakes Region: The geographic area of the Great Lakes in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. It usually includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Mannitol: A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cold Ischemia: The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Terrorism: The use or threatened use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of criminal laws for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom, in support of political or social objectives.Tobacco Use Cessation: Ending the TOBACCO habits of smoking, chewing, or snuff use.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.MichiganAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Hospitals, Municipal: Hospitals controlled by the city government.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Glutathione: A tripeptide with many roles in cells. It conjugates to drugs to make them more soluble for excretion, is a cofactor for some enzymes, is involved in protein disulfide bond rearrangement and reduces peroxides.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Set (Psychology): Readiness to think or respond in a predetermined way when confronted with a problem or stimulus situation.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Camping: Living outdoors as a recreational activity.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.NebraskaCase-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Rescue Work: Activities devoted to freeing persons or animals from danger to life or well-being in accidents, fires, bombings, floods, earthquakes, other disasters and life-threatening conditions. While usually performed by team efforts, rescue work is not restricted to organized services.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Public Housing: Housing subsidized by tax funds, usually intended for low income persons or families.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)ExplosionsEnvironmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Trimetazidine: A vasodilator used in angina of effort or ischemic heart disease.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.MaineRegistries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Substance Abuse, Intravenous: Abuse, overuse, or misuse of a substance by its injection into a vein.La Crosse virus: A serotype of the species California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA), in the genus ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS, causing human MENINGOENCEPHALITIS. This is the agent most responsible for California encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, CALIFORNIA), the most prevalent mosquito-borne disease recognized in the United States.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Encephalitis, California: A viral infection of the brain caused by serotypes of California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA) transmitted to humans by the mosquito AEDES triseriatus. The majority of cases are caused by the LA CROSSE VIRUS. This condition is endemic to the midwestern United States and primarily affects children between 5-10 years of age. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; VOMITING; HEADACHE; and abdominal pain followed by SEIZURES, altered mentation, and focal neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13)Genetic Services: Organized services to provide diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of genetic disorders.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Hospitals, Voluntary: Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Asia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.IndianaHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.DairyingCryptosporidiosis: Intestinal infection with organisms of the genus CRYPTOSPORIDIUM. It occurs in both animals and humans. Symptoms include severe DIARRHEA.Syringes: Instruments used for injecting or withdrawing fluids. (Stedman, 25th ed)Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Somalia: Somalia is located on the east coast of Africa on and north of the Equator and, with Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, and Kenya, is often referred to as the Horn of Africa. It comprises Italy's former Trust Territory of Somalia and the former British Protectorate of Somaliland. The capital is Mogadishu.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Encephalitis, Tick-Borne: Encephalitis caused by neurotropic viruses that are transmitted via the bite of TICKS. In Europe, the diseases are caused by ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, TICK-BORNE, which give rise to Russian spring-summer encephalitis, central European encephalitis, louping ill encephalitis, and related disorders. Powassan encephalitis occurs in North America and Russia and is caused by the Powassan virus. ASEPTIC MENINGITIS and rarely encephalitis may complicate COLORADO TICK FEVER which is endemic to mountainous regions of the western United States. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp14-5)Housing: Living facilities for humans.Chemistry, Analytic: The branch of chemistry dealing with detection (qualitative) and determination (quantitative) of substances. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)New HampshireCardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Polybrominated Biphenyls: Biphenyl compounds which are extensively brominated. Many of these compounds are toxic environmental pollutants.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Monkeypox virus: A species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS causing an epidemic disease among captive primates.Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Bioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.Blastomyces: A genus of onygenacetous mitosporic fungi whose perfect state is Ajellomyces (see ONYGENALES). The species Blastomyces dermatitidis (perfect state Ajellomyces dermatitidis) causes blastomycosis.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Hotlines: A direct communication system, usually telephone, established for instant contact. It is designed to provide special information and assistance through trained personnel and is used for counseling, referrals, and emergencies such as poisonings and threatened suicides.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.OhioConnecticutFresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.KansasHIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Ixodes: The largest genus of TICKS in the family IXODIDAE, containing over 200 species. Many infest humans and other mammals and several are vectors of diseases such as LYME DISEASE, tick-borne encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, TICK-BORNE), and KYASANUR FOREST DISEASE.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.RestaurantsMassachusettsFloridaSubstance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Potassium Chloride: A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Wasting Disease, Chronic: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (prion disease) of DEER and elk characterized by chronic weight loss leading to death. It is thought to spread by direct contact between animals or through environmental contamination with the prion protein (PRIONS).Abortion, Legal: Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Telefacsimile: A telecommunication system combining the transmission of a document scanned at a transmitter, its reconstruction at a receiving station, and its duplication there by a copier.Public Assistance: Financial assistance to impoverished persons for the essentials of living through federal, state or local government programs.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 2. The H3N2 subtype was responsible for the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968.Raccoons: Carnivores of the genus Procyon of the family PROCYONIDAE. Two subgenera and seven species are currently recognized. They range from southern Canada to Panama and are found in several of the Caribbean Islands.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Epidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.HIV Seroprevalence: Studies of the number of cases where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is present in a specific population at a designated time. The presence in a given individual is determined by the finding of HIV antibodies in the serum (HIV SEROPOSITIVITY).Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.
New-York. Massachusetts. Illinois. Michigan. Iowa. New-Jersey. Minnesota. Wisconsin. Delaware". The New York Times. 1860-11-05 ... THE REPUBLICAN STATE CONVENTION AT LANSING THE STATE TICKET AND PLATFORM , The New York Times, August 27, 1874 MICHIGAN FOR ... "Cleveland's Name Cheered.; Enthusiastic Convention Of The Michigan Democrats". The New York Times. 1890-09-11. Lawrence ... The New York Times. Lawrence Kestenbaum. "Index to Politicians: Ellis". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 2011-01-07. " ...
With the first offices located in Los Angeles and New York, The Cochran Firm expanded into a national law firm with regional ... Wisconsin; Tennessee; and Washington, D.C. The firm maintains a massive civil law division representing plaintiffs who have ... In 2014, the firm had 26 offices in 15 states: including Alabama; Florida; California; New York; Georgia; Illinois; Texas; ...
Madison, Wis. 1909. pp. 1124-1125. Ellis Baker Usher (1914). WISCONSIN. Chicago and New York: The Lewis Publishing Company. p. ... F. W. Kubasta was a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly. Kubasta was born on June 8, 1877 in New Lisbon, Wisconsin. In 1882 ... Wisconsin. THE BLUE BOOK OF THE STATE OF WISCONSIN. ... he moved with his parents to Merrill, Wisconsin. On August 30, ...
A Wisconsin newspaper noted that, "when it comes time to write a resume of the 1914 football season", Maulbetsch's play "will ... When the giant woke, he wanted to know if the boat hit a rock." As the season started, The New York Times wrote: "Michigan's ... Wisconsin. 1912-10-30. ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) "'We'll Meet 'Em At the Cross Roads,' Says Hurry-Up Yost". The ... Maulbetsch's next find was future Pro Football Hall of Famer Steve Owen, who later spent 23 years with the New York Giants. ...
Wisconsin. "Put a ring on it". RedEye. Columbia News Service. 4 April 2009. Archived from the original on 5 April 2009. ... "With Engagement Rings, Love Meets Budget". New York Times. 31 January 2014. "Frequently asked questions about buying a cheap ... Sullivan, J. Courtney (2013-05-03). "How Americans Learned to Love Diamonds". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved ...
Wisconsin; and Virginia During winter in the Ozarks of Missouri, its twigs are sought as food by the local deer; and white- ... New York; North and South Carolina; Ohio; Oklahoma; Pennsylvania; Rhode Island; eastern and central Texas; Vermont; West ...
Wisconsin. UPI. April 14, 1975. p. part 2-11. "Nevil Wins 'Satellite' Magnolia". Schenectady Gazette. New York. AP. April 15, ...
New York City. 94 (4): 17. Eastman 2004, p. 17-18. Haven 2002, p. xiv. Kenyon 2008, p. 105. Cowley & Parker 2001, p. 68. ... "Wisconsin". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Naval History & Heritage Command. 9 April 2014. Retrieved 27 June 2015 ...
Madison, Wisconsin. Margolick, David (6 August 1990). "In child deaths, a test for Christian Science". The New York Times. ... New York: Routledge Press. pp. 475-483. ISBN 9780203942215. Swan, Rita. "Religious Attitudes Toward Corporal Punishment". Ibid ... Fraser, Caroline (1999), God's Perfect Child: Living and Dying in the Christian Science Church, New York: Henry Holt and ... Oregon Senate Judiciary Committee, 26 April 2011 Oregon House Judiciary Committee, 21 February 2011 Wisconsin Assembly ...
The New York Times Learning Network. New York Times. Web. December 5, 2015.. ... Schweitzer "Greatest Man in the World"". Milwaukee, Wisconsin. pp. 1, 3. ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) "Schweitzer ... Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press, 2015. Monfried, Walter (February 10, 1947). "Admirers Call Dr. ...
His 2017 book "The Storm Before the Storm, the Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic" entered the New York Times ... Mike and Brandi currently live in Madison, Wisconsin, with their son and daughter and two pets. Brandi is a dedicated runner ... It entered the New York Times best seller list Hardcover Non-Fiction on the eighth place during its first week. "Hardcover ... Nonfiction Books - Best Sellers - The New York Times". Retrieved 13 December 2017. "About The History of Rome". "EyeonItaly ...
Without the money to pay Nolen, Olin enlisted the support of the city, the University of Wisconsin, and the state. Together, ... New York. After his success with Mariemont, Ohio, Nolen moved on to Florida to plan what he called, "the last frontier." In ... Nolen completed a number of projects in Wisconsin as well as earlier efforts in Virginia, Georgia, and particularly, San Diego ... Having seen the rapid deforestation of northern Wisconsin, the depletion of mineral resources in the southwest, and increasing ...
Schenectady, New York. Associated Press. August 10, 1970. p. 42. Retrieved July 9, 2010. "Wounded Aide of DA at Work in ... Milwaukee, Wisconsin. AP. October 8, 1970. p. 2 in Accent. Retrieved July 7, 2010. "Paralyzed lawyer wins award". The Miami ... New York Times Service. p. 12-D. Retrieved July 7, 2010. "Support Case Hits Yarbrough". The Modesto Bee. Modesto, California. ... Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Associated Press. April 7, 1975. p. 3 in The Greensheet. Retrieved July 7, 2010. "Singer on probation". ...
Brown, Clifton (January 25, 1999). "A Round for the Ages: Duval wins With a 59". The New York Times. New York, New York. ... Milwaukee, Wisconsin. June 6, 1998. p. 6C. Retrieved 2010-05-26. ...
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 10 October 2009. Dougherty, John (11 October 2009). "Deaths at Sweat Lodge Bring Soul-Searching". The New ... York Times. Fonseca, Felicia. "Motivational speaker charged in sweat lodge deaths". Associated Press (3 February 2010). " ... WI (died October 9, 2009) In October 2009, during a New Age retreat organized by James Arthur Ray, three people died and 21 ...
"John P. Killilea, Basketball Coach, 67". The New York Times. New York, New York. Associated Press. February 1, 1996. John ... Milwaukee, Wisconsin. "John Killilea, assistant coach of the Milwaukee Bucks, Saturday.." UPI.com. East Rutherford, New Jersey ... After the season a New York Post report cited several anonymous Nets players who blamed their poor performance on an ongoing ... New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 30. ISBN 1416552073. Retrieved 24 January 2017. Uschan, Michael V. (March 20, 1981). "Nelson ...
Louis, Missouri; Janesville, Wisconsin; Buffalo, New York; Norwood, Ohio; Flint (#2), Michigan; Oakland, California; Tarrytown ... New York; Lakewood, Georgia; Leeds, Missouri; Baltimore, Maryland; Los Angeles (Van Nuys), California; Ypsilanti (Willow Run), ...
1; Flom, G.T., Editor; Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study; Wisconsin, USA; 1918, pp. 165-166. Works by Mathilda ... Daybreak in Transatlantic Tales, by Malling, Mathilda; Ales Publishing Co.; New York; 1906, pp. 7 & 31, (Malling Bio: p. 159). ... virtuous New York matrons bowing and cringing to the 'housekeeper' in the great drawing room...'" - Mathilda Malling, ...
"Europe's Latest Treaty". New York Times. 24 July 1878. p. 1. "Orth Officially Dead". New York Times. 28 May 1911. p. 1. ... Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 26 February 1911. p. 1. Retrieved 28 July 2015. "John Orth Declared Dead". The Gazette Times. Pittsburgh ... "The Missing Archduke". New York Times. 26 December 1890. p. 1. "Will Be Declared Dead". The Milwaukee Sentinel. ...
New York City: privately published. ASIN B0096U441Q. Cudahy, John (1941). The Armies March: A Personal Report. New York City: ... Cudahy was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Patrick Cudahy the meat packing industrialist and Anna Cudahy. He graduated ... New York City: Duffield & Co. ASIN B000JBZYXS. Cudahy, John (1930). African Horizons. New York City: Duffield & Co. ASIN ... New York City: Simon & Schuster. pp. 13-14. ASIN 0739415956. ISBN 978-0739415955. CS1 maint: ASIN uses ISBN (link) Dietrich, ...
Garvey graduated from the University of Wisconsin (now the University of Wisconsin-Madison) and spent two years in the U.S. ... Sandomir, Richard (2017-02-22). "Ed Garvey, Leader of N.F.L. Players' Union, Dies at 76". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. ... In 1986, Garvey ran for the U.S. Senate from Wisconsin, losing to Republican incumbent Bob Kasten by a small margin after a ... Garvey died in a nursing home in Verona, Wisconsin. Ed Garvey (D) Matt Flynn (D) Bob Kasten (R) (inc.), 50.9% (754,573 votes) ...
State of Wisconsin 1927, p. 431. State of Wisconsin 1927, p. 438. State of Wisconsin 1927, p. 432. "Army & Navy Union USA". ... Brooklyn, New York - via Newspapers.com . "Army-Navy Union". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Brooklyn, New York. September 27, 1947 ... State of Wisconsin (1927). State of Wisconsin Blue Book. Legislative Reference Bureau. UOM:39015073354774. US Congressional ... Brooklyn, New York. May 25, 1946 - via Newspapers.com . "Brooklyn Navy Yard Garrison". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Brooklyn, New ...
Amsterdam, New York. p. 16. Retrieved September 13, 2013. Martin, Gregory (June 19, 1967). "More Junior Golf". Florence Morning ... Racine, Wisconsin. July 15, 1969. p. 18. ...
Classes on the Bahá'í Faith were organized in Chicago, and later in Enterprise, Kansas; Kenosha, Wisconsin; Ithaca, New York; ... "In U. S. steam transport…". The New York Times. New York, NY. 3 November 1864. p. 8. Archived from the original on 10 September ... A letter from some family in New York looking for him was published looking for him some years later in South Dakota. Meanwhile ... New York Correction History Society. Archived from the original on 2016-07-07. Retrieved Sep 11, 2017. Stockman 2002, p. 41-42 ...
New York, 1807; Rhode Island, 1812; Vermont, 1813; Michigan, 1819; Virginia, 1821; Tennessee, 1830; Wisconsin, 1841; and ...
Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, 1974; pg. 24. *^ Peterson, The Young Socialist Movement in America from 1905 to 1940, pg ... Julia L Mickenberg and Philip Nel, Tales for Little Rebels: A Collection of Radical Children's Literature. New York: New York ... "The Williamsbridge Socialist Sunday School of New York," The Young Socialists' Magazine, vol. 4, no. 7 (July 1911), pg. 11. ... The earliest known Socialist Sunday Schools (SSS) in the United States of America was launched on March 1, 1880 in New York ...
York, Clark County, Wisconsin, a town York, Dane County, Wisconsin, a town York, Green County, Wisconsin, a town York, Jackson ... County, Wisconsin, an unincorporated community York Center, Wisconsin, an unincorporated community York (disambiguation). ... York is the name of some places in the U.S. state of Wisconsin: ...
York Island is one of the Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin, in Lake Superior, and is part of the Apostle Islands National ...
Wisconsin where governor Scott Walker presents his budget, as the collective bargaining standoff continues. ... Wisconsin Standoff. Mark Scheffler. •March 1, 2011. Monica Davey reports from Madison, Wisconsin where governor Scott Walker ... Were Coming Back as the Smartest, Cuomo Says of New York State. ...
The great La Crosse and Milwaukee Railroad Swindle has received a touch from the hands of the directors within the last few days, which was all that it wanted to convert It into a masterpiece of the art of impudent fraud. They commenced by doing what has never been attempted even since the days of Jugurtha--buying up the whole government ...
Human Rabies ---California, Georgia, Minnesota, New York, and Wisconsin, 2000. On September 20, October 9, 10, 25, and November ... New York On September 22, a 54-year-old man who had resided in Ghana arrived in the United States, and on September 26, ... Wisconsin On October 14, a 69-year-old man with a 2-day history of chest discomfort and numbness, tingling, and tremors of the ... New York State Dept of Health. L Ahadzie, MD, Ghana Ministry of Health, Accra, Ghana. HP Katner, MD, Mercer Univ School of ...
... but the primary in Wisconsin on Tuesday may be the last act of its competitive stage. ... East-Central Wisconsin includes the Fox River Valley, which is less affluent and less educated than Southeast Wisconsin. Paper ... Romney and Rick Santorum can point to aspects of Wisconsins profile that should prove favorable to them. Wisconsin has fewer ... Voters in Wisconsin have a penchant for applying a final coat of paint onto winning primary campaigns. The state marked an ...
New Yorks first LinkNYC public Wi-Fi kiosks are now up and running, and users can now enjoy speeds upwards of 300Mbps for free ... New Yorks free public Wi-Fi offers screaming fast 300Mbps speeds. by Abhimanyu Ghoshal - in United States ... New Yorks first LinkNYC public Wi-Fi kiosks, called Links, are now up and running, and users can now enjoy speeds upwards of ... New Yorks first public Wi-Fi hubs are now live [The Verge] ... In addition to Wi-Fi, you can also take advantage of the two ...
New York Comic Con 2012 was largely a success, but an absolute failure in one particular department: Its ability to provide a ... New York Comic Con 2012: Wi-Fi Issues Persist At Tech-Driven Convention. By Dave Smith @redletterdave On 10/13/12 AT 5:15 PM. ... New York Comic Con 2012 was largely a success, but an absolute failure in one particular department: Its ability to provide a ... This lack of suitable Wi-Fi is an issue typical of most conventions, but the fact that Reed Operations and the Javits Center ...
Important exceptions include students transferring into York College with credit for all Gen Ed courses and students who have ... WI courses for graduation, two in the lower-division (100- and 200-level courses) and one in the upper-division (300- and 400- ... SOC 201 Sociological Analysis WI 71659 V-LEC Xiaodan Zhang. SOC 202 Major Ideas and Issues in Education 74463 G-LEC Casandra ... York College / CUNY. 94 - 20 Guy R. Brewer Blvd.. Jamaica, NY 11451. P: 718-262-2000 ...
... marking the second such case of the infection reported in Wisconsin this summer. Sharon... ... Wisconsin Woman Dies After Rare Infection Possibly Caused by Nip From Puppy: Family. It is the same bacterial infection doctors ... It is the same bacterial infection doctors believe a Wisconsin man contracted from a dog lick in late June. Surgeons have had ... Silvia Munoz-Price, an infectious disease specialist with Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin, told TMJ4 ...
... to New York City, NY (LGA) at Airfarewatchdog. Let our fare experts find you the lowest fare to New York City, NY (LGA)! ... Home Fares From A City Appleton, WI Appleton, WI (ATW) To New York City, NY (LGA) ... Youll now receive email alerts on fares from Appleton, WI (ATW) to New York City, NY (LGA). ... Youll now receive email alerts on fares from Appleton, WI (ATW) to New York City, NY (LGA). ...
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WI. See how the weather will impact your daily respiratory health. ... Wausau, WI33° * New York, NY36° * Miami, FL71° * Los Angeles, CA55° ...
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Extended forecast in Silver Lake, WI 53170 for up to 25 days includes high temperature, RealFeel and chance of precipitation ... Silver Lake, WI34° * New York, NY43° * Miami, FL73° * Los Angeles, CA56° ...
Wisconsin looked like a beaten team for much of the game. Frank Kaminsky got off to a slow start, his team couldnt make a shot ... News 12 am New York Newsday Cars Newsday Homes Newsday Jobs Newsday Connect Hometown Shopper News12 Varsity News. Long Island ... Top-seeded Wisconsin hangs on to beat North Carolina. Traevon Jackson #12 celebrates with Frank Kaminsky #44 of the Wisconsin ... Wisconsin The top-seeded Badgers again proved their grit, rallying in the final 10 minutes to hold off North Carolina 79-72 ...
WI 54895 and browse our platform. Apply now for jobs that are hiring near you. ... New York, NY, USA Save Job Saved Job (View Saved Jobs) Email Job ... Never miss the latest Engineering Jobs in Weyerhaeuser, WI ... You will be receiving job alerts for Engineering Jobs in Weyerhaeuser, WI 54895. ...
This catalog is available in many locations throughout the New York Public Library, and in many other libraries around the ... The 800-volume Dictionary Catalog of the Research Libraries of the New York Public Library, 1911-1972, also known as the black ... Wisconsin. University of Wisconsin, Madison Foreign. Australia. National Library of Australia, Canberra* Canada. McGill ... New York State Library. New York University (Bobst Library). Queens College. SUNY Buffalo (Lockwood Library). SUNY Purchase*. ...
This year, New York could be the first state in the nation to pass the Fair Repair Act, A8192 and S618. We have a chance to ... New York,. New Yorkers stand up for what they believe in. And were asking you to stand up for repair. ...
This year, New York could be the first state in the nation to pass the Fair Repair Act, A8192 and S618. We have a chance to ... iPad 4 Wi-Fi Repair Fourth generation of iPad, released November 2, 2012, available in 16, 32, or 64 GB models. Model Number ... New York,. New Yorkers stand up for what they believe in. And were asking you to stand up for repair. ...
New York and Erie Railroad. Moving a House Across the Connecticut River. ...
Xconomy covers information technology, biotech, energy, and other sectors of the New York economy. ... Local New York business, science and technology news. ... Wisconsin NorthStar, Fiserv, CUNA & More: This Weeks Wisconsin ... Leaders in the New York life sciences industry will discuss why they left New York, what would entice them to take a shot on ... The New York-based group now has six chapters around the country who have invested $150 million in 105 companies since it was ...
Inside the massive, new Starbucks Roastery in New York City. Yahoo Finance Video ... Representatives from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services and the Milwaukee Health Department did not return Yahoo ...
New York attorney general sets her sights on disbanding the NRA. Yahoo News ...
Some pundits have already called it Wi-Fi on steroids. ... Nanny found guilty of stabbing 2 children to death in New York ... Thered be no need to scurry off to find a Starbucks, or a McDonalds, or any other place with a Wi-Fi hotspot. Youd be in a Wi ... Super Wi-Fi Would Advance Innovation. The "white space" is to be made available to broadband users at no cost. It would mean ... Wi-Fi technology is designed for very short-range use; in your home, office or at the local coffee shop. Signals at the lower- ...
  • Traevon Jackson #12 celebrates with Frank Kaminsky #44 of the Wisconsin Badgers in the second half against the North Carolina Tar Heels during the West Regional semifinal of the 2015 NCAA Tournament at Staples Center on March 26, 2015 in Los Angeles. (newsday.com)
  • High school students from Parkland, Florida are in Wisconsin to advocate for stricter gun control laws and to register young people to vote. (wpr.org)
  • This new research indicates that Florida, Oregon, and New York report the most calories consumed on Halloween compared to other states,' Tom Quisel, a data scientist for Achievement, told The Daily Meal. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • With his local team now in place, Aronoff spoke to Xconomy about expanding Flybridge's presence in New York-though he plans to maintain his love of the Red Sox while cheering for the Mets a little. (xconomy.com)
  • This is the second in a three-part series profiling aspects of the 2016 presidential recount in Wisconsin. (alternet.org)
  • Over the weekend, a liberal journalism group reported that Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice David Prosser 'allegedly grabbed fellow Justice Ann Walsh Bradley around the neck in an argument in her chambers last week. (freerepublic.com)
  • Hours after Democratic Gov. Tony Evers issued an order postponing the election for two months, the conservative-controlled Wisconsin Supreme Court on Monday sided with Republicans who said he didn't have the authority to reschedule the race on his own. (ap.org)
  • The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled 4-2, with four conservatives in support and two liberals against, that Evers lacked the authority to move the election on his own. (ap.org)
  • Dr. Miso Miloslavic, MD is a family medicine specialist in Kenosha, WI and has been practicing for 23 years. (healthgrades.com)
  • With over 220 offices and 14,000 employees, WIS International provides Inventory Counting and Merchandising Services to the majority of leading retailers across all classes of trade. (snagajob.com)
  • After investing in New York startups such as social targeting technology company 33Across , database software developer 10gen , and social media management system developer tracx, Boston's Flybridge Capital Partners quietly set up an office on Broadway in February, led by general partner David Aronoff. (xconomy.com)
  • In fact, the stories of the recent Wisconsin startups fit the classic scenario of frustrated entrepreneurs setting out to fix an issue they experienced personally. (xconomy.com)
  • All iPad Pro models, iPad (6th generation), iPad (5th generation), iPad Air (3rd generation), iPad Air 2, iPad mini 4, iPad mini 3, and iPad mini (5th generation) with Wi-Fi + Cellular can use either the Apple SIM card with an activated account or a carrier-supported nano-SIM card. (apple.com)
  • iPad Air (3rd generation), iPad mini 2, and iPad mini (5th generation) with Wi-Fi + Cellular use a carrier-supported nano-SIM card. (apple.com)
  • Despite knowing how many thousands of press members would attend this convention, the Javits Center and Reed Operations simply neglected to create enough Wi-Fi hotspots for writers, analysts and reporters to publish articles and news stories throughout the day. (ibtimes.com)
  • A large university, with dozens of Wi-Fi hotspots, might need only one. (go.com)
  • Voters in Wisconsin have a penchant for applying a final coat of paint onto winning primary campaigns. (nytimes.com)
  • Republican voters are concentrated in eastern Wisconsin, and particularly in the Southeast. (nytimes.com)
  • And when the Marquette pollsters asked whether Wisconsin was better off or worse off as a result of Walker's changes, voters said better off, 54 percent to 42 percent. (freerepublic.com)
  • AP) - Voters in Wisconsin will face a choice Tuesday of participating in a presidential primary election or heeding warnings from public health officials to stay away from large crowds during the coronavirus pandemic. (ap.org)
  • The conservatives said "the dissent's rhetoric is entirely misplaced and completely overlooks the fact that the deadline for receiving ballots was already extended to accommodate Wisconsin voters, from April 7 to April 13. (ap.org)
  • The Republican campaign for president will technically continue into May and June , but the primary in Wisconsin on Tuesday may be the last act of its competitive stage. (nytimes.com)
  • Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, of Wisconsin, says Congress must act on immigration legislation to address what he calls a "flood of people trying to get into this country illegally. (wpr.org)
  • Wisconsin Public Radio has a broadcast and online news staff of more than 20 journalists and web professionals located in seven regions. (wpr.org)
  • This catalog is available in many locations throughout the New York Public Library, and in many other libraries around the world. (nypl.org)
  • New York Attorney General Barbara D. Underwood announced a lawsuit last week alleging President Trump and his children--Ivanka and Eric--used their family's charitable foundation for personal and political uses. (wpr.org)
  • According to two NYCC crew members in the Press Lounge, there are three Wi-Fi options available to all patrons, press included: You can log onto the Javits Center's free Wi-Fi network, which is available for the entire convention center to use -- "Good luck with that," said one NYCC crew member, since that option only carries enough bandwidth for about 150 users total. (ibtimes.com)
  • The second option: Users can log onto another Javits' Center Wi-Fi hotspot, which is not only extremely sluggish but only available with an eight-digit user name and password combination that's only good for one-hour use before it expires, and it can never be used again. (ibtimes.com)
  • The third option is to purchase Wi-Fi connectivity from Javits' Center -- not guaranteed to work, by the way -- which costs $4.95 for one hour, $29.95 for one full day of access, $69.95 for three days of access, and $650 for seven days of Internet access. (ibtimes.com)
  • This lack of suitable Wi-Fi is an issue typical of most conventions, but the fact that Reed Operations and the Javits Center did not think ahead of time to provide press with their own unique Wi-Fi hotspot (with passwords only available in the Press Lounge) or a Wi-Fi hotspot for exhibitors-only, shows a real lack of planning and thoughtfulness when it comes to this massive culture convention. (ibtimes.com)
  • Some of the Library's holdings are not included--neither those of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture nor those of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (except for books and serials). (nypl.org)
  • The report was done by the liberal Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, working with Wisconsin Public Radio. (freerepublic.com)
  • To complement these bare-bones services, Starz and its new show, "Da Vinci's Demons," released hundreds of cards to the Comic Con audience, granting them unique user names and passwords to access the paid Wi-Fi network for one hour. (ibtimes.com)
  • WIS International specializes in providing inventory services and solutions to the nation's largest retailers. (snagajob.com)
  • WIS Merchandising and Retail Services Division works with leading retailers and suppliers to quickly and effectively implement a wide variety of services at retail. (snagajob.com)
  • We provide rehabilitation services for those in Chilton, WI. (drugstrategies.org)
  • According to quotes from officials included in the article, the new rules would require all users of any device with wireless networking capabilities, not just public Wi-Fi routers, to register their equipment with either their Internet service providers or the Kenya Network Information Centre (KENIC). (eff.org)
  • Dr Povey's group is already up to 130 megabits a second (faster than some older Wi-Fi routers) over a distance of about two metres, using standard LEDs. (innovationtoronto.com)
  • Imagine popping open your laptop or firing up your hand-held anywhere you happen to be and, presto, instantly showing five full bars of muscular Wi-Fi service . (go.com)
  • A final written order from the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin is expected in December 2015 with new rates effective Jan. 1, 2016. (businesswire.com)
  • In the context of merger provisions, WPS and its sister utility affiliate Wisconsin Electric Power Co. filed before the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin a joint integrated resource plan (IRP) for the utilities combined loads to evaluate the need for new generation capacity. (businesswire.com)
  • To turn a light into a Li-Fi router involves modulating its output, to carry a message, and linking it with a network cable to a modem that is connected to a telephone or cable-broadband service, just like a Wi-Fi router. (innovationtoronto.com)
  • WIS International is one of the most experienced and most trusted inventory service companies in the world. (snagajob.com)
  • For some so-called progressives in Wisconsin, the threat posed by Gov. Scott Walker's policy limiting the collective-bargaining powers of some public employees has justified almost any response. (freerepublic.com)
  • WIS International provides an entrepreneurial, decision-making environment where employees are able to significantly impact the company's overall success. (snagajob.com)
  • Dr. Silvia Munoz-Price, an infectious disease specialist with Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin, told TMJ4 the number of such cases are not reported "because they are fairly infrequent. (nbcnewyork.com)
  • Dr. Gregg Gaylord, MD is a Vascular & Interventional Radiology Specialist in Wauwatosa, WI and has over 39 years of experience in the medical field. (healthgrades.com)
  • In a "catch-22" scenario, municipal courts often have denied Wisconsin residents unable to pay or delinquent in paying court judgments for municipal citations their right to drive for one to two years -- jeopardizing workers' employment options and placing them at risk in the criminal justice system if found "driving while suspended. (uwm.edu)