Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Consumer Health Information: Information intended for potential users of medical and healthcare services. There is an emphasis on self-care and preventive approaches as well as information for community-wide dissemination and use.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Databases, Nucleic Acid: Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Patient Safety: Efforts to reduce risk, to address and reduce incidents and accidents that may negatively impact healthcare consumers.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Near Drowning: Non-fatal immersion or submersion in water. The subject is resuscitable.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Schistosoma haematobium: A species of trematode blood flukes of the family Schistosomatidae which occurs at different stages in development in veins of the pulmonary and hepatic system and finally the bladder lumen. This parasite causes urinary schistosomiasis.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Solar Energy: Energy transmitted from the sun in the form of electromagnetic radiation.Fireflies: The family Lampyidae, which are bioluminescent BEETLES. They contain FIREFLY LUCIFERIN and LUCIFERASES. Oxidation of firefly luciferin results in luminescence.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Chromatophores: The large pigment cells of fish, amphibia, reptiles and many invertebrates which actively disperse and aggregate their pigment granules. These cells include MELANOPHORES, erythrophores, xanthophores, leucophores and iridiophores. (In algae, chromatophores refer to CHLOROPLASTS. In phototrophic bacteria chromatophores refer to membranous organelles (BACTERIAL CHROMATOPHORES).)Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Air Bags: Automotive safety devices consisting of a bag designed to inflate upon collision and prevent passengers from pitching forward. (American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Buffaloes: Ruminants of the family Bovidae consisting of Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer. This concept is differentiated from BISON, which refers to Bison bison and Bison bonasus.Potassium Dichromate: Chromic acid (H2Cr2O7), dipotassium salt. A compound having bright orange-red crystals and used in dyeing, staining, tanning leather, as bleach, oxidizer, depolarizer for dry cells, etc. Medically it has been used externally as an astringent, antiseptic, and caustic. When taken internally, it is a corrosive poison.Chromates: Salts of chromic acid containing the CrO(2-)4 radical.Todralazine: An antihypertensive agent with both central and peripheral action; it has some central nervous system depressant effects.Chromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Caustics: Strong alkaline chemicals that destroy soft body tissues resulting in a deep, penetrating type of burn, in contrast to corrosives, that result in a more superficial type of damage via chemical means or inflammation. Caustics are usually hydroxides of light metals. SODIUM HYDROXIDE and potassium hydroxide are the most widely used caustic agents in industry. Medically, they have been used externally to remove diseased or dead tissues and destroy warts and small tumors. The accidental ingestion of products (household and industrial) containing caustic ingredients results in thousands of injuries per year.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Laser Therapy, Low-Level: Treatment using irradiation with LASER light of low power intensity so that the effects are not due to heat, as they are in LASER THERAPY.Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Societies, Nursing: Societies whose membership is limited to nurses.Therapies, Investigational: Treatments which are undergoing clinical trials or for which there is insufficient evidence to determine their effects on health outcomes; coverage for such treatments is often denied by health insurers.Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Device Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.Biosimilar Pharmaceuticals: BIOLOGIC PRODUCTS that are imitations but not exact replicas of innovator products.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.RestaurantsTaxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.National Health Insurance, United StatesConsumer Product SafetyCost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.
  • Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article ! (thefullwiki.org)
  • In focus groups and surveys, low-income people and people of color cite concerns about safety and lack of bike lanes as a main reason not to ride. (bikeportland.org)
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is launching a yearlong Wikipedia campaign to better provide free public information on the harmful effects of noise as a major contribution to the International Year of Sound 2020. (cdc.gov)
  • In honor of a global initiative, International Year of Sound 2020 (IYS2020) external icon , a team of NIOSH researchers are launching a yearlong Wikipedia campaign, Wiki4YearOfSound2020, to write, update, and maintain articles pertaining to sound. (cdc.gov)
  • Rencana ini mungkin boleh dikembangkan melalui teks yang diterjemah daripada rencana yang sepadan dalam Wikipedia Bahasa Inggeris . (wikipedia.org)
  • Terjemahan mesin Google adalah permulaan yang berguna untuk terjemahan, tetapi penterjemah harus membaiki kesalahan-kesalahan mengikut keperluan dan mengesahkan bahawa terjemahan itu adalah tepat, bukan sahaja salin dan tampal teks keterjemahan mesin ke dalam Wikipedia Bahasa Melayu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Den mengden av aspartam vi kan konsumere per dag uten negative helseeffekter er satt til 40 mg/kg kroppsvekt ifølge EFSA (The European Food Safety Authority), som regulerer tilsetningstoffer i matvarer i Den europeiske unionen. (wikipedia.org)
  • European Food Safety Authority. (steunmijnclub.nl)
  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 80% of cars sold in the world are not compliant with main safety standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recognizing that healthcare errors impact 1 in every 10 patients around the world, the World Health Organization calls patient safety an endemic concern. (salary.com)
  • In response to a 2002 World Health Assembly Resolution, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the World Alliance for Patient Safety in October 2004. (academic.ru)
  • The focus of this appendix is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the vaccine industry control vaccine safety assessments, control the science of vaccines and control the scientific and mass channels of information about vaccines. (ahrp.org)
  • In the United States, the Institute of Medicine report (1999) called for a broad national effort to include the establishment of patient safety centers, expanded reporting of adverse events and development of safety programs in health care organizations. (academic.ru)
  • GM Williams, MJ Iatropoulos, J Whysner (1999) Safety assessment of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene as antioxidant food additives. (steunmijnclub.nl)
  • All of these institutions became de facto stakeholders in promoting vaccination policies while presenting themselves as independent authoritative sources of information about vaccine safety. (ahrp.org)
  • The entire web of vaccine stakeholder- collaborations is geared toward issuing uniform vaccine safety pronouncements that promote vaccination policies crafted to ensure high vaccination rates, translating to ever higher profit margins. (ahrp.org)
  • Patient safety is a discipline and responsibility that emphasizes safety in health care through the prevention, reduction, reporting, and analysis of medical error that often leads to adverse effects. (salary.com)
  • The project emphasizes the central role patients and consumers can play in efforts to improve the quality and safety of healthcare around the world. (academic.ru)
  • The inventor did not consider pedestrian safety when creating the first reflectors: he simply wished to protect his horse carts and carriages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each year, the Alliance delivers a number of programmes covering systemic and technical aspects to improve patient safety around the world. (academic.ru)
  • Automotive safety is the study and practice of design, construction, equipment and regulation to minimize the occurrence and consequences of traffic collisions involving motor vehicles . (wikipedia.org)
  • Are you sure you want to remove Works safety committees in practice--some case studies from your list? (openlibrary.org)
  • Aaron I agree to disagree with you that ALARP is much more about the cost involved in safety measures because it's obvious that it is a common practice of judgment of the balance of risk and societal benefit, although the risk involved is quantified in terms of cost, time etc. (imechanica.org)
  • [ 2 ] The Alliance raises awareness and political commitment to improve the safety of care and facilitates the development of patient safety policy and practice in all WHO Member States. (academic.ru)
  • Copy and paste this code into your Wikipedia page. (openlibrary.org)
  • This page allows users to sign up to join the Wikipedia campaign and describes the different ways to participate, including suggesting or writing new articles, improving existing articles, and translating articles. (cdc.gov)
  • Click on the first link on a line below to go directly to a page where "safety" is defined. (onelook.com)
  • Truck drivers tend to endure higher fatality rates than workers in other occupations, but concerns about motor vehicle safety in the workplace are not limited to those surrounding the operation of large trucks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also called social safety or public safety, security addresses the risk of harm due to intentional criminal acts such as assault, burglary or vandalism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Safety is generally interpreted as implying a real and significant impact on risk of death, injury or damage to property. (wikipedia.org)
  • I would definitely say that ALARP principle is the "Friend" of safety and risk management. (imechanica.org)
  • ALARP seems a very reasonable way to approach the risk management since it acknowledges that never will we achieve 100% absolute safety and it is indeed an essential part of goal setting legislation. (imechanica.org)
  • Some provinces may require high-risk professions to be screened to ensure public safety. (google.com)
  • Local authorities charged with fire safety may conduct regular inspections for such items as usable fire exits and proper exit signage, functional fire extinguishers of the correct type in accessible places, and proper storage and handling of flammable materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Design and conduct pilot projects to study safety initiatives, including monitoring of results. (academic.ru)
  • Check out our new podcast for insight and analysis about the latest patient safety and quality issues! (psqh.com)
  • The average salary for jobs that require the skills of Patient Safety is $104,938 based on United States National Average. (salary.com)
  • A patient safety organization (PSO) is a group, institution or association that improves medical care by reducing medical errors. (academic.ru)
  • Common functions of patient safety organizations are data collection and analysis, reporting, education, funding and advocacy. (academic.ru)
  • The goal was to develop standards for patient safety and assist UN member states to improve the safety of health care. (academic.ru)
  • At the Fifty-Ninth World Health Assembly in May 2006, the Secretariat reported that the Alliance held patient safety meetings in five of the six WHO regions and 40 technical workshops in 18 countries. (academic.ru)
  • The First Global Patient Safety Challenge, which for 2005-2006 (addressing health care-associated infection) developed the WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care . (academic.ru)
  • A patient involvement group, Patients for Patient Safety, built networks of patients' organizations from around the world, through regional workshops. (academic.ru)
  • A patient safety taxonomy was developed to classify data on patient safety problems. (academic.ru)
  • Patients for Patient Safety is part of the World Alliance for Patient Safety lunched in 2004 by the WHO. (academic.ru)
  • PFPS works with a global network of patients, consumers, caregivers, and consumer organizations to support patient involvement in patient safety programmes, both within countries and in the global programmes of the World Alliance for Patient Safety. (academic.ru)
  • Those who inspect buildings for violations of the Fire Code and go into schools to educate children on Fire Safety topics are fire department members known as Fire Prevention Officers . (wikipedia.org)
  • Active safety " is used to refer to technology assisting in the prevention of a crash and "passive safety" to components of the vehicle (primarily airbags, seatbelts and the physical structure of the vehicle) that help to protect occupants during a crash. (wikipedia.org)
  • in addition, they may not demonstrate an appropriate safety profile in current or later stage or larger scale clinical trials as a result of known or as yet unanticipated side effects. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and dosing of drug Sotatercept, as a subcutaneous injection, to stimulate production of red blood cell production. (centerwatch.com)
  • There are other standards for other types of reflectors such as safety vests and reflectors on bicycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Obama administration moved ahead Friday with the first major overhaul of the nation s food-safety system in more than 70 years, proposing tough new standards for fruit and vegetable producers and food manufacturers. (freerepublic.com)
  • Safety Profile will also serve as the future foundation that will help customers certify their devices to additional IEC standards. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Safety is the state of being "safe" (from French sauf), the condition of being protected from harm or other non-desirable outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, home safety may indicate a building's ability to protect against external harm events (such as weather, home invasion, etc.), or may indicate that its internal installations (such as appliances, stairs, etc.) are safe (not dangerous or harmful) for its inhabitants. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus of their work is not the safety of particle accelerators per se but the chances of any particular scientific argument being wrong. (slashdot.org)
  • See Fig 14.1 in Walter H. Olson chapter, 'Electrical Safety, pp 751ff in Webster (ed) Medical Instrumentation (1992): Work of former UC Berkeley advisor Charles Dalziel. (brown.edu)
  • Topic 20: ALARP concept and health and safety of personel, equipments and the work environment. (imechanica.org)
  • Discuss the concept of ALARP as it relates to health and safety of personels, equipments and the work environs. (imechanica.org)
  • Health and Safety at Work etc. (imechanica.org)
  • From where it was then brought into the Factories Act and then passed on into the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974. (imechanica.org)
  • Oversees work in the magnetic resonance department, maintains technical aspects of radiologic safety and evaluates accuracy and quality of MRIs. (salary.com)
  • health and safety policy Martin Nettleton adds: "We invested in the campaign to target those larger installation and distribution companies increasingly dissatisfied with the big fabricators who are starting to compete with them by setting up their own networks of trade counters and distribution outlets. (solnapravljica.eu)
  • UK Health and Safety Executive Leaflet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using this generic definition of safety it is possible to specify the elements of a security program. (wikipedia.org)
  • The simple remedy of replacing hyperventilation with permissive hypercarbia that enhances respiratory drive can improve safety and outcome by preventing unexpected respiratory depression, rendering opioids more predictable, and facilitating greater opioid dosage to control stress. (apsf.org)
  • The award recognizes and rewards call takers, dispatchers and emergency responders who are able to effectively use information in a Smart911 Safety Profile to positively affect the outcome of an emergency. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 ( FDASIA ) is a piece of American regulatory legislation signed into law on July 9, 2012. (govtrack.us)
  • Fire safety is often a component of building safety . (wikipedia.org)
  • Fire safety policies apply at the construction of a building and throughout its operating life. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vector clipart example "Design elements - Fire safety equipment" is included in the Safety and Security solution from the Illustration area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. (conceptdraw.com)