The quality or state of being wettable or the degree to which something can be wet. This is also the ability of any solid surface to be wetted when in contact with a liquid whose surface tension is reduced so that the liquid spreads over the surface of the solid.
Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.
Silicon polymers that contain alternate silicon and oxygen atoms in linear or cyclic molecular structures.
Polymeric resins containing a combination of SILOXANES and OXIRANES.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Inorganic compounds that contain silicon as an integral part of the molecule.
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.
Ionized gases, consisting of free electrons and ionized atoms or molecules which collectively behave differently than gas, solid, or liquid. Plasma gases are used in biomedical fields in surface modification; biological decontamination; dentistry (e.g., PLASMA ARC DENTAL CURING LIGHTS); and in other treatments (e.g., ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION).
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.
Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.
Deacetylated CHITIN, a linear polysaccharide of deacetylated beta-1,4-D-glucosamine. It is used in HYDROGEL and to treat WOUNDS.
A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.
Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.
A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.
The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.

Denture plaque and adherence of Candida albicans to denture-base materials in vivo and in vitro. (1/210)

The aim of this paper is to review our understanding of the mechanisms and clinical significance of adhesion of C. albicans to denture-base materials in relation to denture plaque and denture-related stomatitis. Earlier reports in the literature of a 65% prevalence level of denture-related stomatitis seem to be exaggerated. More recent studies indicate that denture-related stomatitis is considerably less common, particularly in normal healthy subjects. The etiology of the condition is discussed in this review, and although much of the literature supports the view that the condition is strongly associated with C. albicans, this is not always so. In some subjects, the cause appears to be related to a non-specific plaque. This review also considers the role of denture plaque in the pathogenesis of denture-related stomatitis, the sequential development of denture plaque, and its colonization by Candida organisms. Designing controlled in vivo studies is difficult, and as a consequence, many investigators have had to resort to in vitro studies. The majority of these studies have attempted to investigate the hydrophobicity of C. albicans, relating the surface free-energy of denture-base materials, particularly acrylic resin, to that of the organism. Surprisingly little work has been directed at surface roughness and how it affects retention of organisms. Further, no attention has been paid to the properties and character of the surface, other than average surface roughness, as it affects adhesion. A comparison of results from in vitro studies on the effect on adhesion of pre-coating the surfaces of denture-base materials with saliva has produced equivocal conclusions. This is largely due to little standardization of experimental protocols between studies, particularly in the collection and handling of the saliva used. In conclusion, the review strongly supports the suggestion that adherence of C. albicans to denture-base materials in vitro is related to the hydrophobicity of the organism. The clinical significance of the observation and the mechanisms for the development and maturation of denture plaque are yet to be understood. There is a clear need for further investigation of other factors that may moderate the adhesion of organisms and subsequent colonization of denture-base materials.  (+info)

Effects of thermal cycling on dynamic viscoelastic properties of four commercial resins for crown and bridge. (2/210)

To elucidate the effects of thermal cycling on the viscoelastic properties of four commercial resins for crown and bridge, dynamic shear modulus (G'), mechanical loss tangent (tan delta), Knoop hardness, water sorption and appearance of specimen surfaces before and after thermal cycling test were determined. The changes of G' and tan delta for two materials were insignificant with increased repetitions of thermal cycling. Those of the other two materials were statistically significant: in particular, G' at temperatures above 60 degrees C was inclined to increase slightly and tan delta decreased considerably. While the Knoop hardness of the materials was a little decreased over a number of 75,000 thermal cycles, the water sorption almost attained an equilibrium in uptake after 14,000 thermal cycles. Furthermore, cracks on the specimen surface were observed after 37,500 to 75,000 thermal cycles. From these results, the deterioration of materials was observed as damage to the specimen surface. Moreover, it could be presumed that the materials would be further polymerized during the period of thermal cycling.  (+info)

Use of self-assembled monolayers of different wettabilities to study surface selection and primary adhesion processes of green algal (Enteromorpha) zoospores. (3/210)

We investigated surface selection and adhesion of motile zoospores of a green, macrofouling alga (Enteromorpha) to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) having a range of wettabilities. The SAMs were formed from alkyl thiols terminated with methyl (CH(3)) or hydroxyl (OH) groups or mixtures of CH(3)- and OH-terminated alkyl thiols and were characterized by measuring the advancing contact angles and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. There was a positive correlation between the number of spores that attached to the SAMs and increasing contact angle (hydrophobicity). Moreover, the sizes of the spore groups (adjacent spores touching) were larger on the hydrophobic SAMs. Video microscopy of a patterned arrangement of SAMs showed that more zoospores were engaged in swimming and "searching" above the hydrophobic sectors than above the hydrophilic sectors, suggesting that the cells were able to "sense" that the hydrophobic surfaces were more favorable for settlement. The results are discussed in relation to the attachment of microorganisms to substrata having different wettabilities.  (+info)

Femoral prosthetic heads and their significance in polyethylene wear. (4/210)

We used scanning electron microscopy to perform an ultrastructural analysis and two optical interferometric profilers to measure roughness on 40 prosthetic femoral heads. We expressed roughness as Ra (roughness average) value and Rsk (roughness skewness) value. Our results show that in order to obtain an ideal surface finish a low or not very high Ra value and a negative Rsk value are needed. The presence of depressions or holes (rather than scratches) with smooth (rather than sharp) edges seems to improve the lubrication and wettability properties.  (+info)

Intercalation compounds of layered materials for drug delivery use. II. Diclofenac sodium. (5/210)

Intercalation compounds of ternary layered inorganic materials, synthetic mica (Na-TSM), with diclofenac sodium (DFS) and its drug release characteristics were investigated. Hygroscopic DFS was selected as a model drug to verify the anti-humidity and anti-oxidation of the intercalation compounds. Na-TSM powder was first mixed with the reduced-type phosphatidylcholine (H-PC) solution of chloroform or ethanol. DFS was then mixed with these solutions and heated at 37 degrees C to prepare the ternary Na-TSM/H-PC/DFS compound. A remarkable phenomenon was observed in the drug release study. The net amount of DFS from the DFS powder decreased apparently after 20 min arising from the decomposition of DFS in acidic medium. On the other hand, the net amount of the released DFS from the intercalation compound was invariant. Thermal analyses study indicated that DFS powder was hygroscopic and a significant endothermic peak was observed accompanied by a large weight loss due to the dehydration of adsorbed water from 40 to 90 degrees C. On the other hand, no significant dehydration reaction was observed in the intercalation compounds even in the sample stored under humid conditions. The present results indicated that the ternary intercalation compound was resistant to acid in addition to anti-humidity.  (+info)

Polymer properties on resins composed of UDMA and methacrylates with the carboxyl group. (6/210)

The properties of dental matrix resins have been improved by synthesis of new monomers. However, except for improvements in water-resistance, monomers with better mechanical properties than Bis-GMA and UDMA could not being synthesized. Changing the point of emphasis, we tried to improve the mechanical properties controlling the matrix resin higher structure using noncovalent bonds. We prepared a matrix resin structured by UDMA, which is a high viscosity base monomer with imino groups, and by a low viscosity acidic monomer with carboxyl groups, which permits noncovalent bonds such as hydrogen bonds or electrostatic interaction with imino groups. The maximal mechanical strength for matrix resins structured by UDMA and an acidic monomer was obtained with a composition of imino groups and carboxyl groups at a ratio of 1:1. This mechanical strength value was higher than those obtained with UDMA resin or with a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/UDMA resin with typical composition. The improvement in mechanical properties may be due to the complex based on noncovalent bonds, between the imino groups of UDMA and the carboxyl groups of the acidic monomers.  (+info)

Moisture-insensitive adhesives: reactivity with water and bond strength to wet and saliva-contaminated enamel. (7/210)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the reactivity with water of a moisture-insensitive orthodontic primer (Transbond MIP), in conjunction with a no-mix orthodontic adhesive (Unite), and a moisture-insensitive adhesive (Smartbond), and to assess their bond strength to wet and saliva-contaminated enamel relative to the conventional application of the no-mix adhesive. The reactivity of the moisture-insensitive products with water was investigated by micro-multiple internal reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-MIR FTIR). Sixty premolars were divided into two groups of 30 teeth each and, on the buccal enamel surfaces, a standardized volume (0.1 ml) of water or fresh whole saliva was applied. Standard edgewise stainless steel brackets were then bonded to enamel surfaces as follows: (a) Unite, (b) Unite with the Transbond MIP, and (c) Smartbond. The brackets were debonded under shear force at a speed of 2 mm/min and the debonded enamel surfaces were subjected to fractographic analysis. The statistical analysis of the bond strength values was performed by two-way ANOVA with condition (water, saliva) and adhesive type serving as discriminating variables (n = 10, alpha = 0.05). The results of the fractographic analysis were evaluated by chi 2 test (alpha = 0.05). FTIR analysis showed that only Smartbond set in the presence of water. Application of water in Transbond MIP increased the extent of carboxyl ionization without inducing any setting reaction. Transbond MIP did not improve bond strength values when combined with the no-mix adhesive. Most adhesive-enamel condition combinations showed a trend to present lower bond strength in the presence of saliva; however, this was not confirmed statistically. Fractography of enamel and bracket base surfaces showed that Unite + Transbond MIP resulted in the most adhesive fractures (leaving no resin on enamel surface), whereas Smartbond presented the highest frequency of cohesive fractures (adhesive left on bracket and enamel surfaces).  (+info)

Radiation effects of carbon ions and gamma ray on UDMA based dental resin. (8/210)

The radiation effects on the mechanical and physical properties of photo-polymerized UDMA resin without filler was investigated by various mechanical tests and spectroscopic measurements. The radiation sources were carbon ion (12C ion) and gamma ray (gamma-ray). With 640 Gy of 12C ion radiation, Vickers hardness increased by about 40%, the degree of abrasion decreased by 30%, and the flexural strength increased by 20%. With the same dose of gamma-ray radiation, only Vickers hardness increased by 19%. The spectra taken by the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, and Fluorescence spectrophotometer showed little change in the peak configuration and background intensities. The relative degree of conversion (DC) of carbon double bonds by radiation to the state of non-radiated samples were estimated by FT-IR. Spectroscopic results were indicative for the formation of cross-linking between carbon chains. Cross-linking of carbon molecules induced by radiation might be one of the reasons for the improved mechanical properties of UDMA resin.  (+info)

"Wettability" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a term that is more commonly used in the fields of chemistry, physics, and materials science to describe how well a liquid spreads on a solid surface. In other words, it refers to the ability of a liquid to maintain contact with a solid surface, which can have implications for various medical applications such as the design of medical devices or the study of biological surfaces. However, it is not a term that would typically be used in a clinical medical context.

Surface properties in the context of medical science refer to the characteristics and features of the outermost layer or surface of a biological material or structure, such as cells, tissues, organs, or medical devices. These properties can include physical attributes like roughness, smoothness, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, and electrical conductivity, as well as chemical properties like charge, reactivity, and composition.

In the field of biomaterials science, understanding surface properties is crucial for designing medical implants, devices, and drug delivery systems that can interact safely and effectively with biological tissues and fluids. Surface modifications, such as coatings or chemical treatments, can be used to alter surface properties and enhance biocompatibility, improve lubricity, reduce fouling, or promote specific cellular responses like adhesion, proliferation, or differentiation.

Similarly, in the field of cell biology, understanding surface properties is essential for studying cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, and cell behavior. Cells can sense and respond to changes in their environment, including variations in surface properties, which can influence cell shape, motility, and function. Therefore, characterizing and manipulating surface properties can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes and offer new strategies for developing therapies and treatments for various diseases.

Siloxanes are a group of synthetic compounds that contain repeating units of silicon-oxygen-silicon (Si-O-Si) bonds, often combined with organic groups such as methyl or ethyl groups. They are widely used in various industrial and consumer products due to their unique properties, including thermal stability, low surface tension, and resistance to water and heat.

In medical terms, siloxanes have been studied for their potential use in medical devices and therapies. For example, some siloxane-based materials have been developed for use as coatings on medical implants, such as catheters and stents, due to their ability to reduce friction and prevent bacterial adhesion.

However, it's worth noting that exposure to high levels of certain types of siloxanes has been linked to potential health effects, including respiratory irritation and reproductive toxicity. Therefore, appropriate safety measures should be taken when handling these compounds in a medical or industrial setting.

Silorane resins are a type of dental restorative material used in dentistry for direct and indirect restorations, such as fillings and crowns. They are composed of a unique chemical structure that includes siloxanes and oxiranes. The siloxane component provides excellent hydrophobicity and wear resistance, while the oxirane component undergoes a polymerization reaction when activated by a curing light, forming a stable and durable restoration.

Silorane resins are known for their low shrinkage during polymerization, which reduces the risk of post-operative sensitivity and marginal gaps. They also have good biocompatibility and are less likely to cause tooth staining compared to other dental restorative materials. However, they may require a longer curing time and can be more technique-sensitive to place compared to other materials.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Silicon compounds refer to chemical substances that contain the element silicon (Si) combined with other elements. Silicon is a Group 14 semimetal in the periodic table, and it often forms compounds through covalent bonding. The most common silicon compound is silicon dioxide (SiO2), also known as silica, which is found in nature as quartz, sand, and other minerals.

Silicon can form compounds with many other elements, including hydrogen, oxygen, halogens, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon. For example:

* Silanes (SiHn) are a series of silicon-hydrogen compounds where n ranges from 1 to 6.
* Silicones are synthetic polymers made up of alternating silicon and oxygen atoms with organic groups attached to the silicon atoms.
* Silicates are a class of minerals that contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metal cations. They have a wide range of structures and uses, including as building materials, ceramics, and glass.
* Siloxanes are a group of compounds containing alternating silicon-oxygen bonds with organic groups attached to the silicon atoms.

Silicon compounds have various applications in industry, medicine, and daily life. For instance, silicones are used in medical devices such as breast implants, contact lenses, and catheters due to their biocompatibility and flexibility. Silicates are found in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food additives. Silicon-based materials are also used in dental restorations, bone cement, and drug delivery systems.

Titanium is not a medical term, but rather a chemical element (symbol Ti, atomic number 22) that is widely used in the medical field due to its unique properties. Medically, it is often referred to as a biocompatible material used in various medical applications such as:

1. Orthopedic implants: Titanium and its alloys are used for making joint replacements (hips, knees, shoulders), bone plates, screws, and rods due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility.
2. Dental implants: Titanium is also commonly used in dental applications like implants, crowns, and bridges because of its ability to osseointegrate, or fuse directly with bone tissue, providing a stable foundation for replacement teeth.
3. Cardiovascular devices: Titanium alloys are used in the construction of heart valves, pacemakers, and other cardiovascular implants due to their non-magnetic properties, which prevent interference with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.
4. Medical instruments: Due to its resistance to corrosion and high strength, titanium is used in the manufacturing of various medical instruments such as surgical tools, needles, and catheters.

In summary, Titanium is a chemical element with unique properties that make it an ideal material for various medical applications, including orthopedic and dental implants, cardiovascular devices, and medical instruments.

Nanostructures, in the context of medical and biomedical research, refer to materials or devices with structural features that have at least one dimension ranging between 1-100 nanometers (nm). At this size scale, the properties of these structures can differ significantly from bulk materials, exhibiting unique phenomena that are often influenced by quantum effects.

Nanostructures have attracted considerable interest in biomedicine due to their potential applications in various areas such as drug delivery, diagnostics, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. They can be fabricated from a wide range of materials including metals, polymers, ceramics, and carbon-based materials.

Some examples of nanostructures used in biomedicine include:

1. Nanoparticles: These are tiny particles with at least one dimension in the nanoscale range. They can be made from various materials like metals, polymers, or lipids and have applications in drug delivery, imaging, and diagnostics.
2. Quantum dots: These are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit unique optical properties due to quantum confinement effects. They are used as fluorescent labels for bioimaging and biosensing applications.
3. Carbon nanotubes: These are hollow, cylindrical structures made of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. They have exceptional mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability, making them suitable for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosensors.
4. Nanofibers: These are elongated nanostructures with high aspect ratios (length much greater than width). They can be fabricated from various materials like polymers, ceramics, or composites and have applications in tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery.
5. Dendrimers: These are highly branched, nanoscale polymers with a well-defined structure and narrow size distribution. They can be used as drug carriers, gene delivery vehicles, and diagnostic agents.
6. Nanoshells: These are hollow, spherical nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core covered by a thin metallic shell. They exhibit unique optical properties that make them suitable for applications such as photothermal therapy, biosensing, and imaging.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Plasma Gases" is not a recognized medical term or concept. Plasma is a state of matter, like solid, liquid, or gas, and it is often referred to as the fourth state of matter. It consists of ionized particles, or particles that have been stripped of some of their electrons.

In the context of medicine, plasma is most commonly discussed in relation to blood plasma, which is the yellowish fluid in which blood cells are suspended. Plasma carries cells, hormones, nutrients, and waste products throughout the body.

If you have any questions related to medical definitions or concepts, I'd be happy to help further if I can!

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

Adsorption is a process in which atoms, ions, or molecules from a gas, liquid, or dissolved solid accumulate on the surface of a material. This occurs because the particles in the adsorbate (the substance being adsorbed) have forces that attract them to the surface of the adsorbent (the material that the adsorbate is adhering to).

In medical terms, adsorption can refer to the use of materials with adsorptive properties to remove harmful substances from the body. For example, activated charcoal is sometimes used in the treatment of poisoning because it can adsorb a variety of toxic substances and prevent them from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

It's important to note that adsorption is different from absorption, which refers to the process by which a substance is taken up and distributed throughout a material or tissue.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polystyrenes" is not a medical term. Polystyrene is a type of synthetic aromatic hydrocarbon polymer that is used in a variety of commercial and industrial products, such as packaging materials, insulation, and disposable cutlery. It's important to note that some polystyrene products may contain potentially harmful chemicals, such as styrene, which can leach out into food or drink, posing potential health risks. However, the medical community primarily deals with the health effects of exposure to these chemicals rather than defining the material itself.

Chitosan is a complex carbohydrate that is derived from the exoskeletons of crustaceans, such as shrimp and crabs. It is made up of chains of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and d-glucosamine units. Chitosan has been studied for its potential medical and health benefits, including its ability to lower cholesterol levels, promote weight loss, and help control blood sugar levels. It is also used in wound care products due to its antibacterial and absorbent properties. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and establish recommended dosages and safety guidelines.

'Adhesiveness' is a term used in medicine and biology to describe the ability of two surfaces to stick or adhere to each other. In medical terms, it often refers to the property of tissues or cells to adhere to one another, as in the case of scar tissue formation where healing tissue adheres to adjacent structures.

In the context of microbiology, adhesiveness can refer to the ability of bacteria or other microorganisms to attach themselves to surfaces, such as medical devices or human tissues, which can lead to infection and other health problems. Adhesives used in medical devices, such as bandages or wound dressings, also have adhesiveness properties that allow them to stick to the skin or other surfaces.

Overall, adhesiveness is an important property in many areas of medicine and biology, with implications for wound healing, infection control, and the design and function of medical devices.

Methacrylates are a group of chemical compounds that contain the methacrylate functional group, which is a vinyl group (CH2=CH-) with a carbonyl group (C=O) at the β-position. This structure gives them unique chemical and physical properties, such as low viscosity, high reactivity, and resistance to heat and chemicals.

In medical terms, methacrylates are used in various biomedical applications, such as dental restorative materials, bone cements, and drug delivery systems. For example, methacrylate-based resins are commonly used in dentistry for fillings, crowns, and bridges due to their excellent mechanical properties and adhesion to tooth structures.

However, there have been concerns about the potential toxicity of methacrylates, particularly their ability to release monomers that can cause allergic reactions, irritation, or even mutagenic effects in some individuals. Therefore, it is essential to use these materials with caution and follow proper handling and safety protocols.

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a type of microscopy that allows visualization and measurement of surfaces at the atomic level. It works by using a sharp probe, called a tip, that is mounted on a flexible cantilever. The tip is brought very close to the surface of the sample and as the sample is scanned, the forces between the tip and the sample cause the cantilever to deflect. This deflection is measured and used to generate a topographic map of the surface with extremely high resolution, often on the order of fractions of a nanometer. AFM can be used to study both conductive and non-conductive samples, and can operate in various environments, including air and liquid. It has applications in fields such as materials science, biology, and chemistry.

Hydrophobic interactions: These are the interactions that occur between non-polar molecules or groups of atoms in an aqueous environment, leading to their association or aggregation. The term "hydrophobic" means "water-fearing" and describes the tendency of non-polar substances to repel water. When non-polar molecules or groups are placed in water, they tend to clump together to minimize contact with the polar water molecules. These interactions are primarily driven by the entropy increase of the system as a whole, rather than energy minimization. Hydrophobic interactions play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as protein folding, membrane formation, and molecular self-assembly.

Hydrophilic interactions: These are the interactions that occur between polar molecules or groups of atoms and water molecules. The term "hydrophilic" means "water-loving" and describes the attraction of polar substances to water. When polar molecules or groups are placed in water, they can form hydrogen bonds with the surrounding water molecules, which helps solvate them. Hydrophilic interactions contribute to the stability and functionality of various biological systems, such as protein structure, ion transport across membranes, and enzyme catalysis.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

Since other wettability indices such as Amott-Harvey, Lak wettability index and modified Lak are bounded in the range of -1 to ... Wetting Amott test Lak wettability index Donaldson, E.C.; Thomas, R.D.; Lorenz, P.B. (1969). "Wettability determination and its ... in 1969, is a method to measure wettability of petroleum reservoir rocks. In this method, the areas under the forced ... Mirzaei-Paiaman, A. (2022). "Analysis of the bounded and unbounded forms of USBM wettability index". Energy Geoscience. 3 (1): ...
3 ISBN 978-0-89520-202-4. Anderson, W.G. (1987). "Wettability literature survey part 5: the effects of wettability on relative ... In petroleum engineering, Lak wettability index is a quantitative indicator to measure wettability of rocks from relative ... Modified Lak wettability index exists which is based on the areas below water and oil relative permeability curves. I M L = A o ... Mirzaei-Paiaman, A.; Faramarzi-Palangar, M.; Djezzar, S.; Kord, S. (2021). "A new approach to measure wettability by relative ...
The wettability of a surface is determined by the outermost chemical groups of the solid. Differences in wettability between ... Muzammil, I.; Li, Y.P.; Li, X.Y.; Lei, M.K. (2018). "Duty cycle dependent chemical structure and wettability of RF pulsed ... Johnson, Rulon E. (1993) in Wettability Ed. Berg, John. C. New York, NY: Marcel Dekker, Inc. ISBN 0-8247-9046-4 Rowlinson, J.S ... Hu, Han; Ji, Hai-Feng; Sun, Ying (2013). "The effect of oxygen vacancies on water wettability of a ZnO surface". Physical ...
Wang ST, Liu H, Jiang L (2006). "Recent process on bio-inspired surface with special wettability". Annual Review of Nano ... ISBN 0-387-00592-7. Baxter AB, Cassie S (1944). "Wettability of Porous Surfaces". Trans. Faraday Soc. 40: 546-551. doi:10.1039/ ... "A drop penetration method to measure powder blend wettability". International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 538 (1): 112-118. doi: ...
ISBN 978-1-59693-444-3. OCLC 642685865.[page needed] Cassie, A. B. D.; Baxter, S. (1944). "Wettability of porous surfaces". ... "Influence of Surface roughness on contact angle and wettability" (PDF). Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J. (March 2007). "How ... Contact angles are important as they quantify a surface's wettability, the nature of solid-fluid intermolecular interactions. ...
Modern approaches to wettability. Springer. pp. 1-27. Shang, Jianying; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zollars, Richard L. ( ...
Cassie, A. B. D.; Baxter, S. (1944). "Wettability of porous surfaces". Transactions of the Faraday Society. 40: 546. doi: ...
Wang, S.T.; Liu, Huan; Jiang, Lei (2006). Recent process on bio-inspired surface with special wettability. Annual Review of ... There have been a few efforts in fabricating a surface with tunable wettability. For the purpose of spontaneous droplet ... An example of readily tunable wettability is found with special developed fabrics. By stretching a dip-coated commercial fabric ... ISBN 978-0-387-00592-8.[page needed] Cassie, A. B. D.; Baxter, S. (1944). "Wettability of porous surfaces". Transactions of the ...
"Wettability at High Temperatures". Pergamon Materials Series. 3. 1999. doi:10.1016/s1470-1804(99)x8001-1. ISBN 9780080421469. ... wettability, mixing, distribution, dispersion, stability, pushing and capture, etc.) Nanoparticle induced micro/nano-structure ...
Can we obtain the contact angle from the Washburn equation?". In Mittal, K. L. (ed.). Contact Angle, Wettability and Adhesion. ... Powder wettability measurement with the Washburn method (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, ... ISBN 978-0-12-223650-1. Marco, Brugnara; Claudio, Della Volpe; Stefano, Siboni (2006). "Wettability of porous materials. II. ... "Techniques for determining contact angle and wettability of powders". Powder Technology. 287: 201-215. doi:10.1016/j.powtec. ...
Sun, Taolei; Wang, Guojie; Liu, Huan; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Daoben (2003-12-01). "Control over the Wettability of an ... Cassie, A. B. D.; Baxter, S. (1944-01-01). "Wettability of porous surfaces". Transactions of the Faraday Society. 40: 546. doi: ... As described above, contact angle is used to characterize surface wettability. A droplet of solvent, typically water for ... Biomimicry is being used to create comparable properties in synthetic materials, particularly in wettability and self-cleaning ...
Paints and varnishes - Wettability - Part 2: Determination of the surface free energy of solid surfaces by measuring the ... Zisman, W. (1964). "Relation of the Equilibrium Contact Angle to Liquid and Solid Constitution". Contact Angle, Wettability, ... "Acid-etching and Hydration Influence on Dentin Roughness and Wettability". Journal of Dental Research. 78 (9): 1554-1559. doi: ... "Surface energies of silicate glasses calculated from their wettability data". Journal of Materials Science. 12 (4): 823-824. ...
A small contact angle indicates good wettability, while a large contact angle indicates poor wettability. The critical surface ... William Zisman Contact angle Adhesion Wettability ZISMAN, W. A. (1964-01-01). Contact Angle, Wettability, and Adhesion. ... Wettability is a measure of how well a liquid spreads and how complete the contact of the liquid is across the surface of a ... The ZIsman Plot proved to be a breakthrough which allowed for a very efficient way to measure wettability of a solid which ...
Wettability, and Adhesion. Advances in Chemistry. Vol. 43. pp. 1-51. doi:10.1021/ba-1964-0043.ch001. ISBN 978-0-8412-0044-9. ...
Brehm, Marius; Scheiger, Johannes M.; Welle, Alexander; Levkin, Pavel A. (2020). "Reversible Surface Wettability by ...
Both PVFc and PFcMA have been tethered onto silica wafers and the wettability measured when the polymer chains are uncharged ... and the switching of wettability is reversible. In the PFcMA case, the effect of lengthening the chains and hence introducing ... "Ferrocene Polymers for Switchable Surface Wettability". Organometallics. 32 (20): 5873-5878. doi:10.1021/om400468p. Wikimedia ...
Immersion silver improves wettability and solderability. Mixed flowing gas testing failed to alert the electronics ...
"Asymmetric Wettability of Nanostructures Directs Leidenfrost Droplets". ACS Nano. 8 (1): 860-867. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.642.2490. ...
Important surface properties: Wettability (surface energy) Surface chemistry Surface textures (smooth/rough) Topographical ... ISBN 978-0-12-415995-2. "How surface roughness and wettability affects biocompatibility". www.biolinscientific.com. Retrieved ...
Relationships between Water Wettability and Ice Adhesion. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2010, 11, 3100-3110 Zheng, L. et al. ...
One trend of research is the study of the relationship between wettability and anti-fouling effectiveness. Another trend is the ... Materials research into superior antifouling surfaces for fluidized bed reactors suggest that low wettability plastics such as ... correlating wettability with cell attachment". Biofouling. 22 (1): 11-21. doi:10.1080/08927010500484854. PMID 16551557. S2CID ...
Experimental study of wettability and Pore Geometry Effects on Heavy Oil Recovery of Hydrocarbon Solvent Flooding, A. Dehghan, ... The Role of Wettability in Immiscible Gas Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process, A. Alipoor Tabrizi, 2009. 97. Uncertainty ... Rostami B. Kharrat R., Ghotbi S, Pooladi D. M, Alipour A., Role of Wettability on oil recovery during forced gravity drainage ... Reservoir Wettability Modeling of Iranian Reservoirs, K. Ghaedsareh., 2002. 41. Determination of Bit Toque in Pabdeh & Gorpi ...
Bismuth significantly improves the wettability of the solder. When the composition is more than 47% Bi, the alloy will expand ... The influence of each element Antimony increases strength without affecting wettability. ...
Such surface textures magnify either wettability or water-repellency of smooth surfaces, which used to be impossible. He ... Using the micro- and nanofabrication technology, he also generated surfaces with super- wettability-contrast, such that ... is achieved when lifting a superhydrophobic object as compared with an object with moderate wettability. He also obtained the ... "Drop impact on super-wettability-contrast annular patterns". Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 730: 328-342. doi:10.1017/jfm.2013.358 ...
ISBN 978-1-84246-604-9. Holloway, P. J. (1969). "The effects of superficial wax on leaf wettability". Annals of Applied Biology ...
Bakli, Chirodeep; D, Sree Hari P.; Chakraborty, Suman (2017-08-31). "Mimicking wettability alterations using temperature ...
Kim, Samuel C.; Sukovich, David J.; Abate, Adam R. (2015-07-14). "Patterning microfluidic device wettability with spatially- ... Blood plasma separation Single Cell RNA Sequencing Electroosmotic Flow Valves Wettability Patterning in Microfluidic Devices ...
Additionally, even if wettability is acceptable, the PTFE will not form hydrogen bonds which are the primary source of adhesion ... Wettability is improved significantly by the sodium etching process. The resultant surface has an increased surface energy, ...
Another important consideration is the wettability of the material. This is the ability of a liquid to maintain contact with a ...
Flame treatment is a controlled, rapid, cost-effective method of increasing surface energy and wettability of polyolefins and ... can be used to estimate the surface energy of the polymer substrate qualitatively by observing the wettability of each. These ... "Surface Treatments for Wettability and Stickability," Medical Design 2009. http://medicaldesign.com/contract-manufacturing/ ... manufacturing-production/surface_treatments_wettability_0409/ Pardon, G; Saharil, F; Karlsson, JM; Supekar, O; Carlborg, CF; ...
Since other wettability indices such as Amott-Harvey, Lak wettability index and modified Lak are bounded in the range of -1 to ... Wetting Amott test Lak wettability index Donaldson, E.C.; Thomas, R.D.; Lorenz, P.B. (1969). "Wettability determination and its ... in 1969, is a method to measure wettability of petroleum reservoir rocks. In this method, the areas under the forced ... Mirzaei-Paiaman, A. (2022). "Analysis of the bounded and unbounded forms of USBM wettability index". Energy Geoscience. 3 (1): ...
Understanding formation wettability is essential for optimizing oil recovery. ... Wettability describes a preference of a solid surface to be in contact with one fluid rather than another. In reservoir rock, ... Wettability also affects the amount of oil produced at the end of oil displacement and recovery by waterflooding as measured by ... Wettability does not describe the saturation state of the rock; it describes the preference of the solid surfaces to be ...
Standard Test Method for Surface Wettability of Paper (Angle-of-Contact Method) (Withdrawn 2009). ... Standard Test Method for Surface Wettability of Paper (Angle-of-Contact Method) (Withdrawn 2009) D0724-99R03 ASTM,D0724-99R03, ... en-US Standard Test Method for Surface Wettability of Paper (Angle-of-Contact Method) (Withdrawn 2009) Standard D724 Standard ... Test Method for Surface Wettability of Paper (Angle-of-Contact Method) (Withdrawn 2009)> new BOS Vol. 15.09 Committee D06 $ ...
59v) Machine Learning-Based Prediction and Optimization of Liquid Wettability of an iCVD-Produced Fluoropolymer. Conference ...
Wettability and Tribocorrosion behavior of Metal-on-Metal implants in protein rich environments. Reference number. 2008-00983. ... Wettability and Tribocorrosion behavior of Metal-on-Metal implants in protein rich environments ...
Droplet Transport on a Discrete Wettability Gradient Surface: Role of Droplet Weber Number. Publication Type : Conference Paper ... Attempts were made to explain this behavior in terms of the relative magnitude of wettability gradient (or the difference ... R. Kannan, and Deivandren, S., "Droplet Transport on a Discrete Wettability Gradient Surface: Role of Droplet Weber Number", in ... HomePublicationsDroplet Transport on a Discrete Wettability Gradient Surface: Role of Droplet Weber Number ...
CO2 wettability behavior during CO2 sequestration in saline aquifer - An Experimental study on minerals representing sandstone ...
The wettability transition is accomplished through the photocleavage of the o-nitroanilide moieties, resulting in substantial ... Surfaces that can be switched with light are highly attractive, where the wettability properties of the surface or ... small molecules for the simple and precise control of a surfaces wettability, using UV light as the external trigger. ... we demonstrated their use for wettability patterning and water channel creation, highlighting the materials suitability for ...
The wettability of the electrode can be characterized by the static contact angles between the electrode surface and nonaqueous ... The wettability of customized Li−O2 battery electrodes is altered by mixing acetylene black carbon particles with various ... Effects of the Electrode Wettability on the Deep Discharge Capacity of Li-O2 Batteries. ...
Wettability changed over the test period, but not according to theory. The addition type silicones showed little or no sorption ... Wettability, water sorption and water solubility of seven silicone elastomers used for maxillofacial prostheses.. Denne ... The hypothesis was, that a material that has absorbed water would show an increase in the wettability and thus also the surface ... Wettability, water sorption and water solubility of seven silicone elastomers used for maxillofacial prostheses.. Hulterström ...
Control of Wettability of Carbon Nanotube Array by Reversible Dry Oxidation for Superhydrophobic Coating and Supercapacitor ... Aria, Adrianus Indrat (2013) Control of Wettability of Carbon Nanotube Array by Reversible Dry Oxidation for Superhydrophobic ... and vacuum annealing treatments are explored to precisely control the wettability of CNT arrays. By varying the exposure time ...
Cavitation-induced microjets tuned by channels with alternating wettability patterns. Schoppink, J. J., Mohan, K., Quetzeri- ... Cavitation-induced microjets tuned by channels with alternating wettability patterns. Jelle Schoppink, Keerthana Mohan, Miguel ... Cavitation-induced microjets tuned by channels with alternating wettability patterns. In: Physics of fluids. 2023 ; Vol. 35. ... Cavitation-induced microjets tuned by channels with alternating wettability patterns. Physics of fluids. 2023 Mar 21;35:032017 ...
... Ali M 2018.pdf (3.644Mb) ... This study involves the effect of organic acids on wettability for CO2 trapping capacities in deep saline aquifers and depleted ...
... vok. Benetzbarkeit, f; Netzbarkeit, f; Netzfähigkeit, f rus. смачиваемость, f pranc.… ... wettability - vilgumas statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. wettability vok. Anfeuchtbarkeit, f; Benetzbarkeit, f; ... wettability - drėkstamumas statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. wettability vok. Anfeuchtbarkeit, f; Benetzbarkeit, f ... wettability - Wettability Смачиваемость Свойство твердого материала допускать свое смачивание. Процесс, при котором граничащая ...
... vok. Anfeuchtbarkeit, f; Benetzbarkeit, f; Netzfähigkeit, f rus. смачиваемость, f pranc. mouillabilité, f ... wettability. vilgumas statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. wettability vok. Anfeuchtbarkeit, f; Benetzbarkeit, f; ... wettability - drėkstamumas statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. wettability vok. Anfeuchtbarkeit, f; Benetzbarkeit, f ... wettability - Wettability Смачиваемость Свойство твердого материала допускать свое смачивание. Процесс, при котором граничащая ...
Increasing the wettability between the particle and the fluid reduces the interfacial resistance. The nucleation of bubbles and ... Molecular dynamics study of effect of wettability on rapid boiling over copper nanoparticle in water pool. Bo Zhang ... A new approach to understanding the effects of surface wettability on nucleate boiling Mécanique & Industries 10, 223-230 (2009 ... The results show that the interfacial thermal conductance is influenced by the interfacial wettability. ...
Wettability alteration of formation minerals from strongly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet conditions using liquid-repellent ... Wettability alteration of formation minerals from strongly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet conditions using liquid-repellent ... Wettability alteration of formation minerals from strongly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet conditions using liquid-repellent ... Wettability alteration of formation minerals from strongly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet conditions using liquid-repellent ...
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The wettability of silicon wafers can be rendered to be hydrophilic by certain surface treatments. For example, after ozone ... Such physical or chemical treatments which tailor the wettability of surfaces can be used to improve reproducibility and to ... The wettability nature of substrates has been found to profoundly influence the surface assembly of monodisperse spherical ... The wettability of silicon wafers can be rendered to be hydrophilic by certain surface treatments. For example, after ozone ...
One measure of the wettability by a particular liquid is the contact angle. A wettability profile of a solid, the so-called ... Wettability describes the attempt of a solid to form a common interface with a liquid which comes into contact with it. ... Wettability. Wettability describes the attempt of a solid to form a common interface with a liquid which comes into contact ... One measure of the wettability by a particular liquid is the contact angle. A wettability profile of a solid, the so-called ...
Pore morphology and wettability of a porous medium have dominating effects on microscopic displacement efficiency, and ... Emami Meybodi H, Kharrat R, Nasehi Araghi M. Experimental studying of pore morphology and wettability effects on microscopic ... Emami Meybodi, H., Kharrat, R., & Nasehi Araghi, M. (2011). Experimental studying of pore morphology and wettability effects on ... Emami Meybodi, H, Kharrat, R & Nasehi Araghi, M 2011, Experimental studying of pore morphology and wettability effects on ...
Wettability. Wettability is strongly associated with protein layer absorption, blood clot formation and fibrin formation. ...
Dive into the research topics of Effect of surface properties on the wettability of iron containing amorphous carbon films. ... Effect of surface properties on the wettability of iron containing amorphous carbon films. ...
Find the optimal solution for your tasks in wettability and roughness analysis, surface and interfacial tension measurement, as ...
Water filling in carbon nanotubes with different wettability and implications on nanotube/water heat transfer via atomistic ... Water filling in carbon nanotubes with different wettability and implications on nanotube/water heat transfer via atomistic ...
CASE Nixon:Impact of Wettability of Dispersed Solids Surface Active Liquids on Droplet Coalescence & Phase Inversion. *Nienow, ... CASE Nixon:Impact of Wettability of Dispersed Solids Surface Active Liquids on Droplet Coalescence & Phase Inversion. ...
Membrane surface wettability appeared to mainly affect cell capacity to respond to the ammonia challenge. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. ... Membrane surface wettability appeared to mainly affect cell capacity to respond to the ammonia challenge. © 2014 Elsevier B.V ... Membrane surface wettability was characterized in terms of water sorption, dynamic contact angle, and oxygen content by XPS. ... Surface wettability of model microporous membranes enhances rat liver cell functions in sub-confluent adherent culture in a ...
The influence of tear and non-tear derived surface active components on the wettability of group IV hydrogel lenses. ...
  • Wettability alteration of formation minerals from strongly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet conditions using liquid-repellent fluorinated chemicals has shown promising results to mitigate such liquid-blockage issues. (hw.ac.uk)
  • In this paper, the initial investigations on the impact of surface roughness on the solid surface wettability was carried out, demonstrating the positive impact of surface roughness on increasing the desired level of oil repellency achieved after the wettability alteration. (hw.ac.uk)
  • Wettability Alteration and Adsorption of Mixed Nonionic and Anionic Surfactants on Carbonates. (bvsalud.org)
  • Surfaces that can be switched with light are highly attractive, where the wettability properties of the surface or photopatterned water channels can be remotely controlled. (strath.ac.uk)
  • The wettability of the electrode can be characterized by the static contact angles between the electrode surface and nonaqueous electrolyte, which is 1 M bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide lithium salt (LiTFSI) dissolved in tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether, and the double-layer capacitance measured by the cyclic voltammetry. (ku.edu)
  • The hypothesis was, that a material that has absorbed water would show an increase in the wettability and thus also the surface free energy of the material. (niom.no)
  • Surface Wettability Drives the Crystalline Surface Assembly of Monodis" by Brandy Perkins-Howard, Ashley R. Walker et al. (lsu.edu)
  • The wettability nature of substrates has been found to profoundly influence the surface assembly of monodisperse spherical particles for colloidal suspensions that are dried by evaporation to spontaneously form either periodic or disordered packing arrangements. (lsu.edu)
  • The wettability of silicon wafers can be rendered to be hydrophilic by certain surface treatments. (lsu.edu)
  • Such physical or chemical treatments which tailor the wettability of surfaces can be used to improve reproducibility and to lower the density of defects when preparing surface masks for emerging manufacturing processes based on colloidal lithography. (lsu.edu)
  • A wettability profile of a solid, the so-called wetting envelope, can be created by determining the surface free energy and its polar part and its disperse part. (kruss-scientific.com)
  • As a result of these tests, it is concluded that the time required for improving the wettability of the inner surface at the evaporator section is about 30 hours, and Cr and Ni elements, coming off from the material inside play an important part in the improvement of wettability. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In this work, molecular dynamics simulation of heat transfer from nanoparticle to a surrounding liquid pool is carried out to study the effect of solid-liquid interfacial wettability on the boiling phenomena of water around the nanoparticle. (e3s-conferences.org)
  • The results show that the interfacial thermal conductance is influenced by the interfacial wettability. (e3s-conferences.org)
  • Increasing the wettability between the particle and the fluid reduces the interfacial resistance. (e3s-conferences.org)
  • The nucleation of bubbles and formation of vapor occur more quickly for increased solid-liquid interfacial wettability. (e3s-conferences.org)
  • This was used in view of its low wettability, low thermal conductivity and low price [12]. (who.int)
  • This was used in view of its sional change in the impression material is low wettability, low thermal conductivity considered the most serious. (who.int)
  • The new findings from this work provide important guidelines in design and application of wettability modifiers for gas-condensate reservoirs. (hw.ac.uk)
  • Understanding droplet motion on wettability gradient surfaces has received considerable academic interest in the context of controlled motion of droplet liquid in a specified direction in micro-scale devices such as biochips. (amrita.edu)
  • Furthermore, we demonstrated their use for wettability patterning and water channel creation, highlighting the materials suitability for integration in smart surfaces. (strath.ac.uk)
  • In this thesis, dry chemical modification methods involving UV/ozone, oxygen plasma, and vacuum annealing treatments are explored to precisely control the wettability of CNT arrays. (caltech.edu)
  • Pore morphology and wettability of a porous medium have dominating effects on microscopic displacement efficiency, and consequently on the ultimate oil recovery. (psu.edu)
  • This study will investigate the effect of scleral shell prosthesis hydrophilicity (prosthesis material wettability) on prosthesis comfort of wear, required cleaning, lubrication use, dry eye symptoms, tear film features, prosthesis deposition, ocular microbiology, and ocular discharge in people who currently wear a scleral shell prosthesis. (who.int)
  • Wettability describes the attempt of a solid to form a common interface with a liquid which comes into contact with it. (kruss-scientific.com)
  • Wettability, water sorption and water solubility of seven silicone elastomers used for maxillofacial prostheses. (niom.no)
  • in 1969, is a method to measure wettability of petroleum reservoir rocks. (wikipedia.org)
  • One measure of the wettability by a particular liquid is the contact angle . (kruss-scientific.com)
  • Wetting Amott test Lak wettability index Donaldson, E.C. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wettability changed over the test period, but not according to theory. (niom.no)
  • Here, we introduce a straightforward approach using indoline-based, small molecules for the simple and precise control of a surface's wettability, using UV light as the external trigger. (strath.ac.uk)
  • For this reason, wettability alteration from liquid to gas-wet has been investigated in the past two decades as a permanent gas flow enhancement solution. (mdpi.com)
  • Unrepresentatively high wettability alteration in the laboratory may lead to wrong conclusions. (onepetro.org)
  • This study focuses on the wettability alteration (changing from a hydrophobic state to a hydrophilic state) of Indiana limestone for hydrogen (H2) geological storage. (edu.sa)
  • The two most important mechanisms for residual oil recovery are interfacial tension (IFT) reduction and wettability alteration (WA). (edu.sa)
  • However, they mostly focus on controllable wettability rather than controllable permeability. (bvsalud.org)
  • The subsequent reduction in permeability can be interpreted as damage, although there is uncertainty that such reduction would take place if the wettability was correct at the start of the test. (onepetro.org)
  • Return permeability results are presented by allowing cores to naturally alter wettability in the presence of reservoir fluids prior to the exposure of oil-based drilling fluids. (onepetro.org)
  • The effect of crude oil fractions on wettability as studied by interfacial tension and contact angles. (uib.no)
  • Advances in Contact Angle, Wettability and Adhesion. (rit.edu)
  • Numerous experiments suggest flow improvement for immiscible gas-liquid flow in wettability altered cores. (mdpi.com)
  • The spinning drop method and static contact angle method were used to measure the oil/water IFT and the wettability. (edu.sa)
  • Wade, GA & Cantwell, WJ 2000, ' Adhesive bonding and wettability of plasma treated, glass fiber-reinforced nylon-6,6 composites ', Journal of Materials Science Letters , vol. 19, no. 20, pp. 1829-1832. (ku.ac.ae)
  • We examine the effect of hexanoic acid C6, lauric acid C12, and stearic acid C18, on the wettability of Indiana limestone at ambient (298 K and 0.1 MPa) and reservoir (323 K and 8.27 MPa) conditions. (edu.sa)
  • Effect of Polar Organic Components on Wettability as Studied by Adsorption and Contact Angles. (uib.no)
  • We numerically investigate the effect of the volume fraction and the uniform wettability of the stabilizing spherical particles in mixtures of two fluids. (arxiv.org)
  • This glass frit has a lower CTE* than conventional products and excellent wettability with ceramics. (neg.co.jp)
  • This wettability reversal may increase the H2 storage capacity and containment security and lead to successful large-scale geological storage operations if H2 residual trapping is minimized. (edu.sa)