An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.
A technique with which an unknown region of a chromosome can be explored. It is generally used to isolate a locus of interest for which no probe is available but that is known to be linked to a gene which has been identified and cloned. A fragment containing a known gene is selected and used as a probe to identify other overlapping fragments which contain the same gene. The nucleotide sequences of these fragments can then be characterized. This process continues for the length of the chromosome.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.
Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.
The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.
Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.
The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.
The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.
A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.
Walking aids generally having two handgrips and four legs.
A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.
The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.
The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.
Sticks used as walking aids. The canes may have three or four prongs at the end of the shaft.
A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
'Shoes' are not a medical term, but an item of footwear designed to provide protection, support, and comfort to the feet during various activities, although ill-fitting or inappropriate shoes can contribute to various foot conditions such as blisters, corns, calluses, and orthopedic issues.
Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.
An increase in the rate of speed.
Difficulty in walking from place to place.
An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.
The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.
Wooden or metal staffs designed to aid a person in walking. (UMDNS,1999)
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
The use of a bicycle for transportation or recreation. It does not include the use of a bicycle in studying the body's response to physical exertion (BICYCLE ERGOMETRY TEST see EXERCISE TEST).
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.
The position or attitude of the body.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.
'Amputee' is a medical term used to describe an individual who has undergone the surgical removal of a limb or extremity, such as an arm, leg, foot, or hand, due to various reasons like trauma, disease, or congenital defects.
Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.
Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.
The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.
Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.
The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
Activity engaged in for pleasure.
A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.
Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.
The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.
The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).
The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.
Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).
Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.
Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.
Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.
Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.
Devices used to support or align the foot structure, or to prevent or correct foot deformities.
Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.
Comprehensive planning for the physical development of the city.
Processes and properties of the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)

Contribution of sensory feedback to the generation of extensor activity during walking in the decerebrate Cat. (1/4297)

In this investigation we have estimated the afferent contribution to the generation of activity in the knee and ankle extensor muscles during walking in decerebrate cats by loading and unloading extensor muscles, and by unilateral deafferentation of a hind leg. The total contribution of afferent feedback to extensor burst generation was estimated by allowing one hind leg to step into a hole in the treadmill belt on which the animal was walking. In the absence of ground support the level of activity in knee and ankle extensor muscles was reduced to approximately 70% of normal. Activity in the ankle extensors could be restored during the "foot-in-hole" trials by selectively resisting extension at the ankle. Thus feedback from proprioceptors in the ankle extensor muscles probably makes a large contribution to burst generation in these muscles during weight-bearing steps. Similarly, feedback from proprioceptors in knee extensor appears to contribute substantially to the activation of knee extensor muscles because unloading and loading these muscles, by lifting and dropping the hindquarters, strongly reduced and increased, respectively, the level of activity in the knee extensors. This conclusion was supported by the finding that partial deafferentation of one hind leg by transection of the L4-L6 dorsal roots reduced the level of activity in the knee extensors by approximately 50%, but did not noticeably influence the activity in ankle extensor muscles. However, extending the deafferentation to include the L7-S2 dorsal roots decreased the ankle extensor activity. We conclude that afferent feedback contributes to more than one-half of the input to knee and ankle extensor motoneurons during the stance phase of walking in decerebrate cats. The continuous contribution of afferent feedback to the generation of extensor activity could function to automatically adjust the intensity of activity to meet external demands.  (+info)

Visual control of locomotion in Parkinson's disease. (2/4297)

The effect of placing parallel lines on the walking surface on parkinsonian gait was evaluated. To identify the kind of visual cues (static or dynamic) required for the control of locomotion, we tested two visual conditions: normal lighting and stroboscopic illumination (three flashes/s), the latter acting to suppress dynamic visual cues completely. Sixteen subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (nine males, seven females; mean age 68.8 years) and the same number of age-matched controls (seven males; nine females, mean age 67.5 years) were studied. During the baseline phase, Parkinson's disease patients walked with a short-stepped, slow velocity pattern. The double limb support duration was increased and the step cadence was reduced relative to normal. Under normal lighting, visual cues from the lines on the walking surface induced a significant improvement in gait velocity and stride length in Parkinson's disease patients. With stroboscopic illumination and without lines, both groups reduced their stride length and velocity but the changes were significant only in the Parkinson's disease group, indicating greater dependence on dynamic visual information. When stroboscopic light was used with stripes on the floor, the improvement in gait due to the stripes was suppressed in parkinsonian patients. These results demonstrate that the perceived motion of stripes, induced by the patient's walking, is essential to improve the gait parameters and thus favour the hypothesis of a specific visual-motor pathway which is particularly responsive to rapidly moving targets. Previous studies have proposed a cerebellar circuit, allowing the visual stimuli to by-pass the damaged basal ganglia.  (+info)

The psychometric properties of clinical rating scales used in multiple sclerosis. (3/4297)

OullII;l y Many clinical rating scales have been proposed to assess the impact of multiple sclerosis on patients, but only few have been evaluated formally for reliability, validity and responsiveness. We assessed the psychometric properties of five commonly used scales in multiple sclerosis, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), the Scripps Neurological Rating Scale (SNRS), the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Ambulation Index (AI) and the Cambridge Multiple Sclerosis Basic Score (CAMBS). The score frequency distributions of all five scales were either bimodal (EDSS and AI) or severely skewed (SNRS, FIM and CAMBS). The reliability of each scale depended on the definition of 'agreement'. Inter-and intra-rater reliabilities were high when 'agreement' was considered to exist despite a difference of up to 1.0 EDSS point (two 0.5 steps), 13 SNRS points, 9 FIM points, 1 AI point and 1 point on the various CAMBS domains. The FIM, AI, and the relapse and progression domains of the CAMBS were sensitive to clinical change, but the EDSS and the SNRS were unresponsive. The validity of these scales as impairment (SNRS and EDSS) and disability (EDSS, FIM, AI and the disability domain of the CAMBS) measures was established. All scales correlated closely with other measures of handicap and quality of life. None of these scales satisfied the psychometric requirements of outcome measures completely, but each had some desirable properties. The SNRS and the EDSS were reliable and valid measures of impairment and disability, but they were unresponsive. The FIM was a reliable, valid and responsive measure of disability, but it is cumbersome to administer and has a limited content validity. The AI was a reliable and valid ambulation-related disability scale, but it was weakly responsive. The CAMBS was a reliable (all four domains) and responsive (relapse and progression domains) outcome measure, but had a limited validity (handicap domain). These psychometric properties should be considered when designing further clinical trials in multiple sclerosis.  (+info)

Amplitude of the human soleus H reflex during walking and running. (4/4297)

1. The objective of the study was to investigate the amplitude and modulation of the human soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex during walking and during running at different speeds. 2. EMGs were recorded with surface electrodes from the soleus, the medial and lateral head of the gastrocnemius, the vastus lateralis and the anterior tibial muscles. The EMGs and the soleus H reflex were recorded while walking on a treadmill at 4.5 km h-1 and during running at 8, 12 and 15 km h-1. 3. The amplitudes of the M wave and the H reflex were normalized to the amplitude of a maximal M wave elicited by a supramaximal stimulus just after the H reflex to compensate for movements of the recording and stimulus electrodes relative to the nerve and muscle fibres. The stimulus intensity was set to produce M waves that had an amplitude near to 25 % of the maximal M wave measured during the movements. As an alternative, the method of averaging of sweeps in sixteen intervals of the gait cycle was applied to the data. In this case the amplitude of the H reflex was expressed relative to the maximal M wave measured whilst in the standing position. 4. The amplitude of the H reflex was modulated during the gait cycle at all speeds. During the stance phase the reflex was facilitated and during the swing and flight phases it was suppressed. The size of the maximal M wave varied during the gait cycle and this variation was consistent for each subject although different among subjects. 5. The peak amplitude of the H reflex increased significantly (P = 0.04) from walking at 4.5 km h-1 to running at 12 and 15 km h-1 when using the method of correcting for variations of the maximal M wave during the gait cycle. The sweep averaging method showed a small but non-significant decrease (P = 0. 3) from walking to running at 8 km h-1 and a small decrease with running speed (P = 0.3). The amplitude of the EMG increased from walking to running and with running speed. 6. The relatively large H reflex recorded during the stance phase in running indicates that the stretch reflex may influence the muscle mechanics during the stance phase by contributing to the motor output and enhancing muscle stiffness.  (+info)

Long-term functional status and quality of life after lower extremity revascularization. (5/4297)

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the longer term (up to 7 years) functional status and quality of life outcomes from lower extremity revascularization. METHODS: This study was designed as a cross-sectional telephone survey and chart review at the University of Minnesota Hospital. The subjects were patients who underwent their first lower extremity revascularization procedure or a primary amputation for vascular disease between January 1, 1989, and January 31, 1995, who had granted consent or had died. The main outcome measures were ability to walk, SF-36 physical function, SF-12, subsequent amputation, and death. RESULTS: The medical records for all 329 subjects were reviewed after the qualifying procedures for details of the primary procedure (62.6% arterial bypass graft, 36.8% angioplasty, 0.6% atherectomy), comorbidities (64% diabetics), severity of disease, and other vascular risk factors. All 166 patients who were living were surveyed by telephone between June and August 1996. At 7 years after the qualifying procedure, 73% of the patients who were alive still had the qualifying limb, although 63% of the patients had died. Overall, at the time of the follow-up examination (1 to 7.5 years after the qualifying procedure), 65% of the patients who were living were able to walk independently and 43% had little or no limitation in walking several blocks. In a multiple regression model, patients with diabetes and patients who were older were less likely to be able to walk at follow-up examination and had a worse functional status on the SF-36 and a lower physical health on the SF-12. Number of years since the procedure was not a predictor in any of the analyses. CONCLUSION: Although the long-term mortality rate is high in the population that undergoes lower limb revascularization, the survivors are likely to retain their limb over time and have good functional status.  (+info)

Chronic motor neuropathies: response to interferon-beta1a after failure of conventional therapies. (6/4297)

OBJECTIVES: The effect of interferon-beta1a (INF-beta1a; Rebif) was studied in patients with chronic motor neuropathies not improving after conventional treatments such as immunoglobulins, steroids, cyclophosphamide or plasma exchange. METHODS: A prospective open study was performed with a duration of 6-12 months. Three patients with a multifocal motor neuropathy and one patient with a pure motor form of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy were enrolled. Three patients had anti-GM1 antibodies. Treatment consisted of subcutaneous injections of IBF-beta1a (6 MIU), three times a week. Primary outcome was assessed at the level of disability using the nine hole peg test, the 10 metres walking test, and the modified Rankin scale. Secondary outcome was measured at the impairment level using a slightly modified MRC sumscore. RESULTS: All patients showed a significant improvement on the modified MRC sumscore. The time required to walk 10 metres and to fulfil the nine hole peg test was also significantly reduced in the first 3 months in most patients. However, the translation of these results to functional improvement on the modified Rankin was only seen in two patients. There were no severe adverse events. Motor conduction blocks were partially restored in one patient only. Anti-GM1 antibody titres did not change. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that severely affected patients with chronic motor neuropathies not responding to conventional therapies may improve when treated with INF-beta1a. From this study it is suggested that INF-beta1a should be administered in patients with chronic motor neuropathies for a period of up to 3 months before deciding to cease treatment. A controlled trial is necessary to confirm these findings.  (+info)

Use of computed tomography and plantar pressure measurement for management of neuropathic ulcers in patients with diabetes. (7/4297)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Total contact casting is effective at healing neuropathic ulcers, but patients have a high rate (30%-57%) of ulcer recurrence when they resume walking without the cast. The purposes of this case report are to describe how data from plantar pressure measurement and spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) were used to help manage a patient with recurrent plantar ulcers and to discuss potential future benefits of this technology. CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient was a 62-year-old man with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) of 34 years' duration, peripheral neuropathy, and a recurrent plantar ulcer. Although total contact casting or relieving weight bearing with crutches apparently allowed the ulcer to heal, the ulcer recurred 3 times in an 18-month period. Spiral x-ray computed tomography and simultaneous pressure measurement were conducted to better understand the mechanism of his ulceration. OUTCOMES: The patient had a severe bony deformity that coincided with the location of highest plantar pressures (886 kPa). The results of the SXCT and pressure measurement convinced the patient to wear his prescribed footwear always, even when getting up in the middle of the night. The ulcer healed in 6 weeks, and the patient resumed his work, which required standing and walking for 8 to 10 hours a day. DISCUSSION: Following intervention, the patient's recurrent ulcer healed and remained healed for several months. Future benefits of these methods may include the ability to define how structural changes of the foot relate to increased plantar pressures and to help design and fabricate optimal orthoses.  (+info)

Behavioral changes and cholinesterase activity of rats acutely treated with propoxur. (8/4297)

Early assessment of neurological and behavioral effects is extremely valuable for early identification of intoxications because preventive measures can be taken against more severe or chronic toxic consequences. The time course of the effects of an oral dose of the anticholinesterase agent propoxur (8.3 mg/kg) was determined on behaviors displayed in the open-field and during an active avoidance task by rats and on blood and brain cholinesterase activity. Maximum inhibition of blood cholinesterase was observed within 30 min after administration of propoxur. The half-life of enzyme-activity recovery was estimated to be 208.6 min. Peak brain cholinesterase inhibition was also detected between 5 and 30 min of the pesticide administration, but the half-life for enzyme activity recovery was much shorter, in the range of 85 min. Within this same time interval of the enzyme effects, diminished motor and exploratory activities and decreased performance of animals in the active avoidance task were observed. Likewise, behavioral normalization after propoxur followed a time frame similar to that of brain cholinesterase. These data indicate that behavioral changes that occur during intoxication with low oral doses of propoxur may be dissociated from signs characteristic of cholinergic over-stimulation but accompany brain cholinesterase activity inhibition.  (+info)

Medical science often defines and describes "walking" as a form of locomotion or mobility where an individual repeatedly lifts and sets down each foot to move forward, usually bearing weight on both legs. It is a complex motor activity that requires the integration and coordination of various systems in the human body, including the musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiovascular systems.

Walking involves several components such as balance, coordination, strength, and endurance. The ability to walk independently is often used as a measure of functional mobility and overall health status. However, it's important to note that the specific definition of walking may vary depending on the context and the medical or scientific field in question.

Chromosome walking is a historical term used in genetics to describe the process of mapping and sequencing DNA along a chromosome. It involves the identification and characterization of a specific starting point, or "landmark," on a chromosome, followed by the systematic analysis of adjacent DNA segments, one after another, in a step-by-step manner.

The technique typically employs the use of molecular biology tools such as restriction enzymes, cloning vectors, and genetic markers to physically isolate and characterize overlapping DNA fragments that cover the region of interest. By identifying shared sequences or markers between adjacent fragments, researchers can "walk" along the chromosome, gradually building up a more detailed map of the genetic sequence.

Chromosome walking was an important technique in the early days of genetics and genomics research, as it allowed scientists to systematically analyze large stretches of DNA before the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Today, while whole-genome sequencing has largely replaced chromosome walking for many applications, the technique is still used in some specialized contexts where a targeted approach is required.

Biomechanics is the application of mechanical laws to living structures and systems, particularly in the field of medicine and healthcare. A biomechanical phenomenon refers to a observable event or occurrence that involves the interaction of biological tissues or systems with mechanical forces. These phenomena can be studied at various levels, from the molecular and cellular level to the tissue, organ, and whole-body level.

Examples of biomechanical phenomena include:

1. The way that bones and muscles work together to produce movement (known as joint kinematics).
2. The mechanical behavior of biological tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments under various loads and stresses.
3. The response of cells and tissues to mechanical stimuli, such as the way that bone tissue adapts to changes in loading conditions (known as Wolff's law).
4. The biomechanics of injury and disease processes, such as the mechanisms of joint injury or the development of osteoarthritis.
5. The use of mechanical devices and interventions to treat medical conditions, such as orthopedic implants or assistive devices for mobility impairments.

Understanding biomechanical phenomena is essential for developing effective treatments and prevention strategies for a wide range of medical conditions, from musculoskeletal injuries to neurological disorders.

A gait disorder is a disturbance in the ability to walk that can't be attributed to physical disabilities such as weakness or paralysis. Neurologic gait disorders are those specifically caused by underlying neurological conditions. These disorders can result from damage to the brain, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves that disrupts communication between the muscles and the brain.

Neurologic gait disorders can present in various ways, including:

1. **Spastic Gait:** This is a stiff, foot-dragging walk caused by increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and stiffness (spasticity). It's often seen in conditions like cerebral palsy or multiple sclerosis.

2. **Ataxic Gait:** This is a broad-based, unsteady, and irregular walk caused by damage to the cerebellum, which affects balance and coordination. Conditions such as cerebellar atrophy or stroke can cause this type of gait disorder.

3. **Parkinsonian Gait:** This is a shuffling walk with small steps, flexed knees, and difficulty turning. It's often seen in Parkinson's disease.

4. **Neuropathic Gait:** This is a high-stepping walk caused by foot drop (difficulty lifting the front part of the foot), which results from damage to the peripheral nerves. Conditions such as diabetic neuropathy or Guillain-Barre syndrome can cause this type of gait disorder.

5. **Choreic Gait:** This is an irregular, dance-like walk caused by involuntary movements (chorea) seen in conditions like Huntington's disease.

6. **Mixed Gait:** Sometimes, a person may exhibit elements of more than one type of gait disorder.

The specific type of gait disorder can provide important clues about the underlying neurological condition and help guide diagnosis and treatment.

Locomotion, in a medical context, refers to the ability to move independently and change location. It involves the coordinated movement of the muscles, bones, and nervous system that enables an individual to move from one place to another. This can include walking, running, jumping, or using assistive devices such as wheelchairs or crutches. Locomotion is a fundamental aspect of human mobility and is often assessed in medical evaluations to determine overall health and functioning.

I couldn't find a medical definition specifically for "environment design." However, in the context of healthcare and public health, "environmental design" generally refers to the process of creating or modifying physical spaces to promote health, prevent injury and illness, and improve overall well-being. This can include designing hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities to optimize patient care, as well as creating community spaces that encourage physical activity and social interaction. Environmental design can also involve reducing exposure to environmental hazards, such as air pollution or noise, to protect public health.

Orthotic devices are custom-made or prefabricated appliances designed to align, support, prevent deformity, or improve the function of movable body parts. They are frequently used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders, such as foot and ankle conditions, knee problems, spinal alignment issues, and hand or wrist ailments. These devices can be adjustable or non-adjustable and are typically made from materials like plastic, metal, leather, or fabric. They work by redistributing forces across joints, correcting alignment, preventing unwanted movements, or accommodating existing deformities. Examples of orthotic devices include ankle-foot orthoses, knee braces, back braces, wrist splints, and custom-made foot insoles.

In medical terms, the foot is the part of the lower limb that is distal to the leg and below the ankle, extending from the tarsus to the toes. It is primarily responsible for supporting body weight and facilitating movement through push-off during walking or running. The foot is a complex structure made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, and numerous muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves that work together to provide stability, balance, and flexibility. It can be divided into three main parts: the hindfoot, which contains the talus and calcaneus (heel) bones; the midfoot, which includes the navicular, cuboid, and cuneiform bones; and the forefoot, which consists of the metatarsals and phalanges that form the toes.

The ankle joint, also known as the talocrural joint, is the articulation between the bones of the lower leg (tibia and fibula) and the talus bone in the foot. It is a synovial hinge joint that allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements, which are essential for walking, running, and jumping. The ankle joint is reinforced by strong ligaments on both sides to provide stability during these movements.

An exercise test, also known as a stress test or an exercise stress test, is a medical procedure used to evaluate the heart's function and response to physical exertion. It typically involves walking on a treadmill or pedaling a stationary bike while being monitored for changes in heart rate, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG), and sometimes other variables such as oxygen consumption or gas exchange.

During the test, the patient's symptoms, such as chest pain or shortness of breath, are also closely monitored. The exercise test can help diagnose coronary artery disease, assess the severity of heart-related symptoms, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for heart conditions. It may also be used to determine a person's safe level of physical activity and fitness.

There are different types of exercise tests, including treadmill stress testing, stationary bike stress testing, nuclear stress testing, and stress echocardiography. The specific type of test used depends on the patient's medical history, symptoms, and overall health status.

Postural balance is the ability to maintain, achieve, or restore a state of equilibrium during any posture or activity. It involves the integration of sensory information (visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive) to control and adjust body position in space, thereby maintaining the center of gravity within the base of support. This is crucial for performing daily activities and preventing falls, especially in older adults and individuals with neurological or orthopedic conditions.

"Walker" is not a medical term per se, but it is often used in the medical field to refer to a mobility aid that helps individuals who have difficulty walking independently. Walkers are typically made of lightweight metal and have four legs that provide stability and support. Some walkers come with wheels or glides on the front legs to make it easier for users to move around. They may also include brakes, seats, and baskets for added functionality.

Walkers can be beneficial for people who have mobility limitations due to various medical conditions such as arthritis, stroke, fractures, neurological disorders, or aging-related issues. Using a walker can help reduce the risk of falls, improve balance, increase independence, and enhance overall quality of life.

It is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using a walker to ensure proper fit, adjustment, and usage techniques for maximum safety and effectiveness.

Intermittent claudication is a medical condition characterized by pain or cramping in the legs, usually in the calf muscles, that occurs during exercise or walking and is relieved by rest. This symptom is caused by insufficient blood flow to the working muscles due to peripheral artery disease (PAD), a narrowing or blockage of the arteries in the limbs. As the individual walks, the muscle demands for oxygen and nutrients increase, but the restricted blood supply cannot meet these demands, leading to ischemia (lack of oxygen) and pain. The pain typically subsides after a few minutes of rest, as the muscle's demand for oxygen decreases, allowing the limited blood flow to compensate. Regular exercise and medications may help improve symptoms and reduce the risk of complications associated with PAD.

The ankle, also known as the talocrural region, is the joint between the leg and the foot. It is a synovial hinge joint that allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements. The ankle is composed of three bones: the tibia and fibula of the lower leg, and the talus of the foot. The bottom portion of the tibia and fibula, called the malleoli, form a mortise that surrounds and articulates with the talus.

The ankle joint is strengthened by several ligaments, including the medial (deltoid) ligament and lateral ligament complex. The ankle also contains important nerves and blood vessels that provide sensation and circulation to the foot.

Damage to the ankle joint, such as sprains or fractures, can result in pain, swelling, and difficulty walking. Proper care and rehabilitation are essential for maintaining the health and function of the ankle joint.

In the context of medical definitions, "transportation" typically refers to the movement of patients from one location to another. This can include the transfer of patients between healthcare facilities (such as from a hospital to a long-term care facility), between departments within a healthcare facility (such as from the emergency department to an inpatient unit), or to and from medical appointments.

Transportation may also refer to the movement of medical equipment, supplies, or specimens between locations. In this context, transportation ensures that necessary items are delivered to the right place at the right time, which is critical for providing high-quality patient care.

It's important to note that safe and timely transportation is essential for ensuring positive patient outcomes, reducing the risk of adverse events, and improving overall healthcare efficiency.

The term "canes" is a common name for walking sticks that are used as a mobility aid. They are typically made of materials such as wood, metal, or fiberglass and have a handle at the top and a single foot at the bottom to provide support and stability while walking.

However, in medical terminology, "canes" does not have a specific definition. It is simply another name for walking sticks or walking canes. If you are looking for a medical definition related to a specific medical condition or treatment, could you please provide more context?

Exercise therapy is a type of medical treatment that uses physical movement and exercise to improve a patient's physical functioning, mobility, and overall health. It is often used as a component of rehabilitation programs for individuals who have experienced injuries, illnesses, or surgeries that have impaired their ability to move and function normally.

Exercise therapy may involve a range of activities, including stretching, strengthening, balance training, aerobic exercise, and functional training. The specific exercises used will depend on the individual's needs, goals, and medical condition.

The benefits of exercise therapy include:

* Improved strength and flexibility
* Increased endurance and stamina
* Enhanced balance and coordination
* Reduced pain and inflammation
* Improved cardiovascular health
* Increased range of motion and joint mobility
* Better overall physical functioning and quality of life.

Exercise therapy is typically prescribed and supervised by a healthcare professional, such as a physical therapist or exercise physiologist, who has experience working with individuals with similar medical conditions. The healthcare professional will create an individualized exercise program based on the patient's needs and goals, and will provide guidance and support to ensure that the exercises are performed safely and effectively.

In medical terms, the leg refers to the lower portion of the human body that extends from the knee down to the foot. It includes the thigh (femur), lower leg (tibia and fibula), foot, and ankle. The leg is primarily responsible for supporting the body's weight and enabling movements such as standing, walking, running, and jumping.

The leg contains several important structures, including bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, nerves, and joints. These structures work together to provide stability, support, and mobility to the lower extremity. Common medical conditions that can affect the leg include fractures, sprains, strains, infections, peripheral artery disease, and neurological disorders.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "shoes" are not a medical term. Shoes are items of footwear intended to protect and comfort the feet. They typically have a durable sole that provides protection from sharp objects, hot surfaces, and the effects of moisture. The upper part of a shoe can be made from various materials such as leather, plastic, or textiles, and is designed to provide coverage and support for the foot.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help!

Electromyography (EMG) is a medical diagnostic procedure that measures the electrical activity of skeletal muscles during contraction and at rest. It involves inserting a thin needle electrode into the muscle to record the electrical signals generated by the muscle fibers. These signals are then displayed on an oscilloscope and may be heard through a speaker.

EMG can help diagnose various neuromuscular disorders, such as muscle weakness, numbness, or pain, and can distinguish between muscle and nerve disorders. It is often used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests, such as nerve conduction studies, to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the nervous system.

EMG is typically performed by a neurologist or a physiatrist, and the procedure may cause some discomfort or pain, although this is usually minimal. The results of an EMG can help guide treatment decisions and monitor the progression of neuromuscular conditions over time.

In the context of medicine and physiology, acceleration refers to the process of increasing or quickening a function or process. For example, heart rate acceleration is an increase in the speed at which the heart beats. It can also refer to the rate at which something increases, such as the acceleration of muscle strength during rehabilitation. In physics terms, acceleration refers to the rate at which an object changes its velocity, but this definition is not typically used in a medical context.

Mobility limitation refers to the partial or complete inability to move or perform functional mobility tasks independently and safely. This condition can affect any part of the body, such as limited joint range of motion, muscle weakness, or neurological impairments, making it difficult for a person to perform activities like walking, standing, transferring, balancing, and reaching. Mobility limitations can be temporary or permanent and vary in severity, significantly impacting a person's quality of life, independence, and overall health.

I couldn't find a specific medical definition for "running" as an exercise or physical activity. However, in a medical or clinical context, running usually refers to the act of moving at a steady speed by lifting and setting down each foot in turn, allowing for a faster motion than walking. It is often used as a form of exercise, recreation, or transportation.

Running can be described medically in terms of its biomechanics, physiological effects, and potential health benefits or risks. For instance, running involves the repetitive movement of the lower extremities, which can lead to increased heart rate, respiratory rate, and metabolic demand, ultimately improving cardiovascular fitness and burning calories. However, it is also associated with potential injuries such as runner's knee, shin splints, or plantar fasciitis, especially if proper precautions are not taken.

It is important to note that before starting any new exercise regimen, including running, individuals should consult their healthcare provider, particularly those with pre-existing medical conditions or concerns about their ability to engage in physical activity safely.

"Weight-bearing" is a term used in the medical field to describe the ability of a body part or limb to support the weight or pressure exerted upon it, typically while standing, walking, or performing other physical activities. In a clinical setting, healthcare professionals often use the term "weight-bearing exercise" to refer to physical activities that involve supporting one's own body weight, such as walking, jogging, or climbing stairs. These exercises can help improve bone density, muscle strength, and overall physical function, particularly in individuals with conditions affecting the bones, joints, or muscles.

In addition, "weight-bearing" is also used to describe the positioning of a body part during medical imaging studies, such as X-rays or MRIs. For example, a weight-bearing X-ray of the foot or ankle involves taking an image while the patient stands on the affected limb, allowing healthcare providers to assess any alignment or stability issues that may not be apparent in a non-weight-bearing position.

Crutches are medical devices that provide support and assistance for mobility, typically used by individuals who have difficulty walking or standing due to injury, illness, or disability. They help to reduce weight-bearing stress on the affected limb, improve balance, and increase stability during ambulation. Crutches can be either manually operated or designed with special features such as springs or shock absorbers to enhance comfort and functionality. Proper fit, adjustment, and usage of crutches are crucial for ensuring safety, preventing further injury, and promoting rehabilitation.

"Motor activity" is a general term used in the field of medicine and neuroscience to refer to any kind of physical movement or action that is generated by the body's motor system. The motor system includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles that work together to produce movements such as walking, talking, reaching for an object, or even subtle actions like moving your eyes.

Motor activity can be voluntary, meaning it is initiated intentionally by the individual, or involuntary, meaning it is triggered automatically by the nervous system without conscious control. Examples of voluntary motor activity include deliberately lifting your arm or kicking a ball, while examples of involuntary motor activity include heartbeat, digestion, and reflex actions like jerking your hand away from a hot stove.

Abnormalities in motor activity can be a sign of neurological or muscular disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis. Assessment of motor activity is often used in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

Artificial limbs, also known as prosthetics, are artificial substitutes that replace a part or all of an absent extremity or limb. They are designed to restore the function, mobility, and appearance of the lost limb as much as possible. Artificial limbs can be made from various materials such as wood, plastic, metal, or carbon fiber, and they can be custom-made to fit the individual's specific needs and measurements.

Prosthetic limbs can be categorized into two main types: cosmetic and functional. Cosmetic prosthetics are designed to look like natural limbs and are primarily used to improve the appearance of the person. Functional prosthetics, on the other hand, are designed to help the individual perform specific tasks and activities. They may include features such as hooks, hands, or specialized feet that can be used for different purposes.

Advances in technology have led to the development of more sophisticated artificial limbs, including those that can be controlled by the user's nervous system, known as bionic prosthetics. These advanced prosthetic devices can provide a greater degree of mobility and control for the user, allowing them to perform complex movements and tasks with ease.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

Bicycling is defined in medical terms as the act of riding a bicycle. It involves the use of a two-wheeled vehicle that is propelled by pedaling, with the power being transferred to the rear wheel through a chain and sprocket system. Bicycling can be done for various purposes such as transportation, recreation, exercise, or sport.

Regular bicycling has been shown to have numerous health benefits, including improving cardiovascular fitness, increasing muscle strength and flexibility, reducing stress and anxiety, and helping with weight management. However, it is important to wear a helmet while bicycling to reduce the risk of head injury in case of an accident. Additionally, cyclists should follow traffic rules and be aware of their surroundings to ensure their safety and the safety of others on the road.

The term "lower extremity" is used in the medical field to refer to the portion of the human body that includes the structures below the hip joint. This includes the thigh, lower leg, ankle, and foot. The lower extremities are responsible for weight-bearing and locomotion, allowing individuals to stand, walk, run, and jump. They contain many important structures such as bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels.

Ambulatory monitoring is a medical practice that involves the continuous or intermittent recording of physiological parameters in a patient who is mobile and able to perform their usual activities while outside of a hospital or clinical setting. This type of monitoring allows healthcare professionals to evaluate a patient's condition over an extended period, typically 24 hours or more, in their natural environment.

Ambulatory monitoring can be used to diagnose and manage various medical conditions such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, sleep disorders, and mobility issues. Common methods of ambulatory monitoring include:

1. Holter monitoring: A small, portable device that records the electrical activity of the heart for 24-48 hours or more.
2. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM): A device that measures blood pressure at regular intervals throughout the day and night.
3. Event monitors: Devices that record heart rhythms only when symptoms occur or when activated by the patient.
4. Actigraphy: A non-invasive method of monitoring sleep-wake patterns, physical activity, and circadian rhythms using a wristwatch-like device.
5. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM): A device that measures blood sugar levels continuously throughout the day and night.

Overall, ambulatory monitoring provides valuable information about a patient's physiological status in their natural environment, allowing healthcare professionals to make informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, and management of medical conditions.

Energy metabolism is the process by which living organisms produce and consume energy to maintain life. It involves a series of chemical reactions that convert nutrients from food, such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, into energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

The process of energy metabolism can be divided into two main categories: catabolism and anabolism. Catabolism is the breakdown of nutrients to release energy, while anabolism is the synthesis of complex molecules from simpler ones using energy.

There are three main stages of energy metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and oxidative phosphorylation. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of the cell and involves the breakdown of glucose into pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The citric acid cycle takes place in the mitochondria and involves the further breakdown of pyruvate to produce more ATP, NADH, and carbon dioxide. Oxidative phosphorylation is the final stage of energy metabolism and occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It involves the transfer of electrons from NADH and other electron carriers to oxygen, which generates a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, producing the majority of the cell's energy.

Overall, energy metabolism is a complex and essential process that allows organisms to grow, reproduce, and maintain their bodily functions. Disruptions in energy metabolism can lead to various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Exercise is defined in the medical context as a physical activity that is planned, structured, and repetitive, with the primary aim of improving or maintaining one or more components of physical fitness. Components of physical fitness include cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Exercise can be classified based on its intensity (light, moderate, or vigorous), duration (length of time), and frequency (number of times per week). Common types of exercise include aerobic exercises, such as walking, jogging, cycling, and swimming; resistance exercises, such as weightlifting; flexibility exercises, such as stretching; and balance exercises. Exercise has numerous health benefits, including reducing the risk of chronic diseases, improving mental health, and enhancing overall quality of life.

The knee joint, also known as the tibiofemoral joint, is the largest and one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is a synovial joint that connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The patella (kneecap), which is a sesamoid bone, is located in front of the knee joint and helps in the extension of the leg.

The knee joint is made up of three articulations: the femorotibial joint between the femur and tibia, the femoropatellar joint between the femur and patella, and the tibiofibular joint between the tibia and fibula. These articulations are surrounded by a fibrous capsule that encloses the synovial membrane, which secretes synovial fluid to lubricate the joint.

The knee joint is stabilized by several ligaments, including the medial and lateral collateral ligaments, which provide stability to the sides of the joint, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, which prevent excessive forward and backward movement of the tibia relative to the femur. The menisci, which are C-shaped fibrocartilaginous structures located between the femoral condyles and tibial plateaus, also help to stabilize the joint by absorbing shock and distributing weight evenly across the articular surfaces.

The knee joint allows for flexion, extension, and a small amount of rotation, making it essential for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and sitting.

Exercise tolerance is a term used to describe the ability of an individual to perform physical activity or exercise without experiencing symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, or undue fatigue. It is often used as a measure of cardiovascular fitness and can be assessed through various tests, such as a stress test or a six-minute walk test. Exercise intolerance may indicate the presence of underlying medical conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease, or deconditioning.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "residence characteristics" is not a commonly used medical term. It is more related to the field of public health or epidemiology. However, if you are asking for the characteristics of a residence that could be relevant to medical or health research, they might include:

1. Housing type (single-family home, apartment, mobile home, etc.)
2. Age and condition of the housing unit
3. Presence of environmental hazards (lead paint, asbestos, radon, etc.)
4. Quality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems
5. Access to clean water and sanitation facilities
6. Safety features (smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, etc.)
7. Presence of pests (rodents, cockroaches, bed bugs, etc.)
8. Neighborhood characteristics (crime rates, access to healthy food options, walkability, etc.)

These factors can all have an impact on the health outcomes of individuals and communities, and are often studied in public health research.

Robotics, in the medical context, refers to the branch of technology that deals with the design, construction, operation, and application of robots in medical fields. These machines are capable of performing a variety of tasks that can aid or replicate human actions, often with high precision and accuracy. They can be used for various medical applications such as surgery, rehabilitation, prosthetics, patient care, and diagnostics. Surgical robotics, for example, allows surgeons to perform complex procedures with increased dexterity, control, and reduced fatigue, while minimizing invasiveness and improving patient outcomes.

Posture is the position or alignment of body parts supported by the muscles, especially the spine and head in relation to the vertebral column. It can be described as static (related to a stationary position) or dynamic (related to movement). Good posture involves training your body to stand, walk, sit, and lie in positions where the least strain is placed on supporting muscles and ligaments during movement or weight-bearing activities. Poor posture can lead to various health issues such as back pain, neck pain, headaches, and respiratory problems.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

Activities of Daily Living (ADL) are routine self-care activities that individuals usually do every day without assistance. These activities are widely used as a measure to determine the functional status and independence of a person, particularly in the elderly or those with disabilities or chronic illnesses. The basic ADLs include:

1. Personal hygiene: Bathing, washing hands and face, brushing teeth, grooming, and using the toilet.
2. Dressing: Selecting appropriate clothes and dressing oneself.
3. Eating: Preparing and consuming food, either independently or with assistive devices.
4. Mobility: Moving in and out of bed, chairs, or wheelchairs, walking independently or using mobility aids.
5. Transferring: Moving from one place to another, such as getting in and out of a car, bath, or bed.

There are also more complex Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) that assess an individual's ability to manage their own life and live independently. These include managing finances, shopping for groceries, using the telephone, taking medications as prescribed, preparing meals, and housekeeping tasks.

Disability Evaluation is the process of determining the nature and extent of a person's functional limitations or impairments, and assessing their ability to perform various tasks and activities in order to determine eligibility for disability benefits or accommodations. This process typically involves a medical examination and assessment by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician or psychologist, who evaluates the individual's symptoms, medical history, laboratory test results, and functional abilities. The evaluation may also involve input from other professionals, such as vocational experts, occupational therapists, or speech-language pathologists, who can provide additional information about the person's ability to perform specific tasks and activities in a work or daily living context. Based on this information, a determination is made about whether the individual meets the criteria for disability as defined by the relevant governing authority, such as the Social Security Administration or the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The hip joint, also known as the coxal joint, is a ball-and-socket type synovial joint that connects the femur (thigh bone) to the pelvis. The "ball" is the head of the femur, while the "socket" is the acetabulum, a concave surface on the pelvic bone.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong fibrous capsule and is reinforced by several ligaments, including the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and pubofemoral ligaments. The joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation, and circumduction movements, making it one of the most mobile joints in the body.

The hip joint is also supported by various muscles, including the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, iliopsoas, and other hip flexors and extensors. These muscles provide stability and strength to the joint, allowing for weight-bearing activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

Paresis is a medical term that refers to a partial loss of voluntary muscle function. It is often described as muscle weakness, and it can affect one or several parts of the body. Paresis can be caused by various conditions, including nerve damage, stroke, spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, and infections like polio or botulism. The severity of paresis can range from mild to severe, depending on the underlying cause and the specific muscles involved. Treatment for paresis typically focuses on addressing the underlying condition causing it.

An amputee is a person who has had a limb or extremity removed by trauma, medical illness, or surgical intervention. Amputation may affect any part of the body, including fingers, toes, hands, feet, arms, and legs. The level of amputation can vary from partial loss to complete removal of the affected limb.

There are several reasons why a person might become an amputee:
- Trauma: Accidents, injuries, or violence can result in amputations due to severe tissue damage or irreparable vascular injury.
- Medical illness: Certain medical conditions such as diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, and cancer may require amputation if the affected limb cannot be saved through other treatments.
- Infection: Severe infections that do not respond to antibiotics or other treatments may necessitate amputation to prevent the spread of infection.
- Congenital defects: Some individuals are born with missing or malformed limbs, making them congenital amputees.

Amputees face various challenges, including physical limitations, emotional distress, and social adjustment. However, advancements in prosthetics and rehabilitation have significantly improved the quality of life for many amputees, enabling them to lead active and fulfilling lives.

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a medical condition characterized by the narrowing or blockage of arteries that supply blood to the extremities, most commonly the legs. This results in reduced blood flow, leading to symptoms such as leg pain, cramping, numbness, or weakness during physical activity, and in severe cases, tissue damage or gangrene. PAD is often indicative of widespread atherosclerosis, which is the hardening and narrowing of arteries due to the buildup of fatty deposits called plaques. It's important to note that early detection and management can help prevent serious complications.

An accidental fall is an unplanned, unexpected event in which a person suddenly and involuntarily comes to rest on the ground or other lower level, excluding intentional changes in position (e.g., jumping to catch a ball) and landings that are part of a planned activity (e.g., diving into a pool). Accidental falls can occur for various reasons, such as environmental hazards, muscle weakness, balance problems, visual impairment, or certain medical conditions. They are a significant health concern, particularly among older adults, as they can lead to serious injuries, loss of independence, reduced quality of life, and increased mortality.

In medical terms, the hip is a ball-and-socket joint where the rounded head of the femur (thigh bone) fits into the cup-shaped socket, also known as the acetabulum, of the pelvis. This joint allows for a wide range of movement in the lower extremities and supports the weight of the upper body during activities such as walking, running, and jumping. The hip joint is surrounded by strong ligaments, muscles, and tendons that provide stability and enable proper functioning.

Self-help devices, also known as assistive devices or adaptive equipment, are tools that help individuals perform activities of daily living (ADLs) that have become difficult or impossible due to disability, injury, or aging. These devices can help improve a person's independence, safety, and quality of life by reducing the physical demands of daily tasks and compensating for functional limitations.

Examples of self-help devices include:

1. Mobility aids: walkers, canes, crutches, wheelchairs, scooters, and prosthetics that help with mobility and balance.
2. Bathroom aids: raised toilet seats, shower chairs, grab bars, and non-slip mats that help with bathing and toileting.
3. Dressing aids: button hooks, zipper pulls, reachers, and dressing sticks that help with dressing and grooming.
4. Kitchen aids: easy-grip utensils, jar openers, and adapted cutting boards that help with meal preparation and cooking.
5. Communication aids: speech-generating devices, communication boards, and hearing aids that help with communication and social interaction.
6. Cognitive aids: memory aids, calendar organizers, and visual cues that help with memory, attention, and executive functioning.

It is important to consult with healthcare professionals, such as occupational therapists or physical therapists, to determine the appropriate self-help devices for an individual's specific needs and to ensure proper use and safety.

Muscle strength, in a medical context, refers to the amount of force a muscle or group of muscles can produce during contraction. It is the maximum amount of force that a muscle can generate through its full range of motion and is often measured in units of force such as pounds or newtons. Muscle strength is an important component of physical function and mobility, and it can be assessed through various tests, including manual muscle testing, dynamometry, and isokinetic testing. Factors that can affect muscle strength include age, sex, body composition, injury, disease, and physical activity level.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

The term "extremities" in a medical context refers to the most distant parts of the body, including the hands and feet (both fingers and toes), as well as the arms and legs. These are the farthest parts from the torso and head. Medical professionals may examine a patient's extremities for various reasons, such as checking circulation, assessing nerve function, or looking for injuries or abnormalities.

Physical exertion is defined as the act of applying energy to physically demandable activities or tasks, which results in various body systems working together to produce movement and maintain homeostasis. It often leads to an increase in heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature, among other physiological responses. The level of physical exertion can vary based on the intensity, duration, and frequency of the activity.

It's important to note that engaging in regular physical exertion has numerous health benefits, such as improving cardiovascular fitness, strengthening muscles and bones, reducing stress, and preventing chronic diseases like obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. However, it is also crucial to balance physical exertion with adequate rest and recovery time to avoid overtraining or injury.

Oxygen consumption, also known as oxygen uptake, is the amount of oxygen that is consumed or utilized by the body during a specific period of time, usually measured in liters per minute (L/min). It is a common measurement used in exercise physiology and critical care medicine to assess an individual's aerobic metabolism and overall health status.

In clinical settings, oxygen consumption is often measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiovascular function, pulmonary function, and exercise capacity in patients with various medical conditions such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory or cardiac disorders.

During exercise, oxygen is consumed by the muscles to generate energy through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. The amount of oxygen consumed during exercise can provide important information about an individual's fitness level, exercise capacity, and overall health status. Additionally, measuring oxygen consumption can help healthcare providers assess the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation programs in patients with various medical conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "recreation" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Recreation generally refers to activities done for enjoyment, relaxation, or leisure. It could include various hobbies, sports, games, and other forms of entertainment. While certain recreational activities can have health benefits, such as improving physical fitness or reducing stress, "recreation" itself is not a medical concept.

In medical terms, the knee is referred to as the largest and one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is a hinge joint that connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bones (tibia and fibula), enabling movements like flexion, extension, and a small amount of rotation. The knee also contains several other components such as menisci, ligaments, tendons, and bursae, which provide stability, cushioning, and protection during movement.

Hemiplegia is a medical term that refers to paralysis affecting one side of the body. It is typically caused by damage to the motor center of the brain, such as from a stroke, head injury, or brain tumor. The symptoms can vary in severity but often include muscle weakness, stiffness, and difficulty with coordination and balance on the affected side. In severe cases, the individual may be unable to move or feel anything on that side of the body. Hemiplegia can also affect speech, vision, and other functions controlled by the damaged area of the brain. Rehabilitation therapy is often recommended to help individuals with hemiplegia regain as much function as possible.

Physical fitness is a state of being able to perform various physical activities that require endurance, strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), physical fitness is defined as "a set of attributes that people have or achieve that relates to the ability to perform physical activity."

The AHA identifies five components of physical fitness:

1. Cardiorespiratory endurance: The ability of the heart, lungs, and blood vessels to supply oxygen to muscles during sustained physical activity.
2. Muscular strength: The amount of force a muscle can exert in a single effort.
3. Muscular endurance: The ability of a muscle or group of muscles to sustain repeated contractions or to continue to apply force against an external resistance over time.
4. Flexibility: The range of motion possible at a joint.
5. Body composition: The proportion of fat-free mass (muscle, bone, and organs) to fat mass in the body.

Being physically fit can help reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and some types of cancer. It can also improve mental health, increase energy levels, and enhance overall quality of life.

I apologize, but "video recording" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the process of capturing and storing moving visual images on electronic media, which is used in various medical fields for different purposes such as surgical training, telemedicine consultations, or monitoring patient conditions. However, there is no unique medical meaning associated with this term.

Physiological adaptation refers to the changes or modifications that occur in an organism's biological functions or structures as a result of environmental pressures or changes. These adaptations enable the organism to survive and reproduce more successfully in its environment. They can be short-term, such as the constriction of blood vessels in response to cold temperatures, or long-term, such as the evolution of longer limbs in animals that live in open environments.

In the context of human physiology, examples of physiological adaptation include:

1. Acclimatization: The process by which the body adjusts to changes in environmental conditions, such as altitude or temperature. For example, when a person moves to a high-altitude location, their body may produce more red blood cells to compensate for the lower oxygen levels, leading to improved oxygen delivery to tissues.

2. Exercise adaptation: Regular physical activity can lead to various physiological adaptations, such as increased muscle strength and endurance, enhanced cardiovascular function, and improved insulin sensitivity.

3. Hormonal adaptation: The body can adjust hormone levels in response to changes in the environment or internal conditions. For instance, during prolonged fasting, the body releases stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline to help maintain energy levels and prevent muscle wasting.

4. Sensory adaptation: Our senses can adapt to different stimuli over time. For example, when we enter a dark room after being in bright sunlight, it takes some time for our eyes to adjust to the new light level. This process is known as dark adaptation.

5. Aging-related adaptations: As we age, various physiological changes occur that help us adapt to the changing environment and maintain homeostasis. These include changes in body composition, immune function, and cognitive abilities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "gravitation" is not a term that is typically used in the context of medical definitions. Gravitation is a fundamental force that attracts two objects with mass towards each other. It is the force that causes objects to fall towards the earth and keeps the planets in orbit around the sun.

In the field of medicine, the concepts of gravity or gravitational forces are not directly relevant to the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. However, there may be some indirect applications related to physiology and human health, such as the effects of microgravity on the human body during space travel.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and maintain balance and posture. According to the Mayo Clinic, CP is caused by abnormal brain development or damage to the developing brain that affects a child's ability to control movement.

The symptoms of cerebral palsy can vary in severity and may include:

* Spasticity (stiff or tight muscles)
* Rigidity (resistance to passive movement)
* Poor coordination and balance
* Weakness or paralysis
* Tremors or involuntary movements
* Abnormal gait or difficulty walking
* Difficulty with fine motor skills, such as writing or using utensils
* Speech and language difficulties
* Vision, hearing, or swallowing problems

It's important to note that cerebral palsy is not a progressive condition, meaning that it does not worsen over time. However, the symptoms may change over time, and some individuals with CP may experience additional medical conditions as they age.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by brain damage that occurs before or during birth, but it can also be caused by brain injuries that occur in the first few years of life. Some possible causes of cerebral palsy include:

* Infections during pregnancy
* Lack of oxygen to the brain during delivery
* Traumatic head injury during birth
* Brain bleeding or stroke in the newborn period
* Genetic disorders
* Maternal illness or infection during pregnancy

There is no cure for cerebral palsy, but early intervention and treatment can help improve outcomes and quality of life. Treatment may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, medications to manage symptoms, surgery, and assistive devices such as braces or wheelchairs.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) refer to damage to the spinal cord that results in a loss of function, such as mobility or feeling. This injury can be caused by direct trauma to the spine or by indirect damage resulting from disease or degeneration of surrounding bones, tissues, or blood vessels. The location and severity of the injury on the spinal cord will determine which parts of the body are affected and to what extent.

The effects of SCI can range from mild sensory changes to severe paralysis, including loss of motor function, autonomic dysfunction, and possible changes in sensation, strength, and reflexes below the level of injury. These injuries are typically classified as complete or incomplete, depending on whether there is any remaining function below the level of injury.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal cord injuries to prevent further damage and improve the chances of recovery. Treatment usually involves immobilization of the spine, medications to reduce swelling and pressure, surgery to stabilize the spine, and rehabilitation to help regain lost function. Despite advances in treatment, SCI can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities.

Physical therapy modalities refer to the various forms of treatment that physical therapists use to help reduce pain, promote healing, and restore function to the body. These modalities can include:

1. Heat therapy: This includes the use of hot packs, paraffin baths, and infrared heat to increase blood flow, relax muscles, and relieve pain.
2. Cold therapy: Also known as cryotherapy, this involves the use of ice packs, cold compresses, or cooling gels to reduce inflammation, numb the area, and relieve pain.
3. Electrical stimulation: This uses electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles, which can help to reduce pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and function.
4. Ultrasound: This uses high-frequency sound waves to penetrate deep into tissues, increasing blood flow, reducing inflammation, and promoting healing.
5. Manual therapy: This includes techniques such as massage, joint mobilization, and stretching, which are used to improve range of motion, reduce pain, and promote relaxation.
6. Traction: This is a technique that uses gentle pulling on the spine or other joints to help relieve pressure and improve alignment.
7. Light therapy: Also known as phototherapy, this involves the use of low-level lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to promote healing and reduce pain and inflammation.
8. Therapeutic exercise: This includes a range of exercises that are designed to improve strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, and help patients recover from injury or illness.

Physical therapy modalities are often used in combination with other treatments, such as manual therapy and therapeutic exercise, to provide a comprehensive approach to rehabilitation and pain management.

Proprioception is the unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself. It is sometimes described as the "sixth sense" and it's all about knowing where your body parts are, how they are moving, and the effort being used to move them. This information is crucial for motor control, balance, and coordination.

The proprioceptive system includes sensory receptors called proprioreceptors located in muscles, tendons, and joints that send messages to the brain through nerves regarding body position and movement. These messages are then integrated with information from other senses, such as vision and vestibular sense (related to balance), to create a complete understanding of the body's position and motion in space.

Deficits in proprioception can lead to problems with coordination, balance, and fine motor skills.

Orthopedic equipment refers to devices or appliances used in the practice of orthopedics, which is a branch of medicine focused on the correction, support, and prevention of disorders, injuries, or deformities of the skeletal system, including bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, and muscles. These devices can be categorized into various types based on their function and application:

1. Mobility aids: Equipment that helps individuals with impaired mobility to move around more easily, such as walkers, crutches, canes, wheelchairs, and scooters.
2. Immobilization devices: Used to restrict movement of a specific body part to promote healing, prevent further injury, or provide support during rehabilitation, including casts, braces, splints, slings, and collars.
3. Prosthetics: Artificial limbs that replace missing body parts due to amputation, illness, or congenital defects, enabling individuals to perform daily activities and maintain independence.
4. Orthotics: Custom-made or off-the-shelf devices worn inside shoes or on the body to correct foot alignment issues, provide arch support, or alleviate pain in the lower extremities.
5. Rehabilitation equipment: Devices used during physical therapy sessions to improve strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, such as resistance bands, exercise balls, balance boards, and weight training machines.
6. Surgical instruments: Specialized tools used by orthopedic surgeons during operations to repair fractures, replace joints, or correct deformities, including saws, drills, retractors, and screwdrivers.
7. Diagnostic equipment: Imaging devices that help healthcare professionals assess musculoskeletal conditions, such as X-ray machines, CT scanners, MRI machines, and ultrasound systems.

These various types of orthopedic equipment play a crucial role in the diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and management of orthopedic disorders and injuries, enhancing patients' quality of life and functional abilities.

In the context of healthcare, "safety" refers to the freedom from harm or injury that is intentionally designed into a process, system, or environment. It involves the prevention of adverse events or injuries, as well as the reduction of risk and the mitigation of harm when accidents do occur. Safety in healthcare aims to protect patients, healthcare workers, and other stakeholders from potential harm associated with medical care, treatments, or procedures. This is achieved through evidence-based practices, guidelines, protocols, training, and continuous quality improvement efforts.

Foot orthoses, also known as orthotic devices or simply orthotics, are custom-made or prefabricated shoe inserts that are designed to support, align, correct, or accommodate various foot and ankle deformities or biomechanical issues. They can be made of different materials such as plastic, rubber, leather, or foam and are inserted into the shoes to provide extra cushioning, arch support, or realignment of the foot structure.

Custom-made foot orthoses are created based on a mold or a digital scan of the individual's foot, taking into account their specific needs and medical condition. These devices are typically prescribed by healthcare professionals such as podiatrists, orthopedic surgeons, or physical therapists to treat various conditions such as plantar fasciitis, flat feet, high arches, bunions, diabetic foot ulcers, or arthritis.

Foot orthoses can help improve foot function, reduce pain and discomfort, prevent further deformities, and enhance overall mobility and quality of life.

Peripheral Vascular Diseases (PVD) refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels outside of the heart and brain. These diseases are characterized by a narrowing or blockage of the peripheral arteries, which can lead to reduced blood flow to the limbs, particularly the legs.

The primary cause of PVD is atherosclerosis, a buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in and on the walls of the arteries, forming plaques that restrict blood flow. Other risk factors include smoking, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of vascular disease.

Symptoms of PVD can vary depending on the severity of the condition but may include leg pain or cramping during exercise (claudication), numbness or tingling in the legs, coldness or discoloration of the feet, sores or wounds that heal slowly or not at all, and in severe cases, gangrene.

PVD can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, so it is essential to diagnose and treat the condition as early as possible. Treatment options include lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy diet, medications to control symptoms and reduce the risk of complications, and surgical procedures such as angioplasty or bypass surgery to restore blood flow.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Psychomotor performance refers to the integration and coordination of mental processes (cognitive functions) with physical movements. It involves the ability to perform complex tasks that require both cognitive skills, such as thinking, remembering, and perceiving, and motor skills, such as gross and fine motor movements. Examples of psychomotor performances include driving a car, playing a musical instrument, or performing surgical procedures.

In a medical context, psychomotor performance is often used to assess an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), such as bathing, dressing, cooking, cleaning, and managing medications. Deficits in psychomotor performance can be a sign of neurological or psychiatric disorders, such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, or depression.

Assessment of psychomotor performance may involve tests that measure reaction time, coordination, speed, precision, and accuracy of movements, as well as cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. These assessments can help healthcare professionals develop appropriate treatment plans and monitor the progression of diseases or the effectiveness of interventions.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, "movement" refers to the act or process of changing physical location or position. It involves the contraction and relaxation of muscles, which allows for the joints to move and the body to be in motion. Movement can also refer to the ability of a patient to move a specific body part or limb, which is assessed during physical examinations. Additionally, "movement" can describe the progression or spread of a disease within the body.

City planning, also known as urban planning, is the process of designing and managing the development of urban areas to create functional, sustainable, and livable spaces. It involves the integration of various disciplines, including architecture, engineering, sociology, environmental studies, and public health, to address the needs of a city's residents and ensure the optimal use of resources.

City planning encompasses several key components, such as land use planning, transportation planning, housing and neighborhood development, infrastructure development, and open space preservation. The goal is to create safe, healthy, and equitable communities that promote social, economic, and environmental sustainability.

In terms of public health, city planning plays a critical role in shaping the physical environment in which people live, work, and play. By creating walkable neighborhoods with easy access to parks, community facilities, and public transportation, city planners can encourage physical activity, reduce traffic congestion and air pollution, and promote social interaction and community engagement.

Moreover, city planning can help address health disparities by ensuring that all residents have equal access to essential services and resources, such as quality housing, healthy food options, and safe outdoor spaces. By working closely with public health professionals, city planners can develop evidence-based policies and strategies that promote health and well-being in urban areas.

Musculoskeletal physiological phenomena refer to the various functions, processes, and responses that occur in the musculoskeletal system. This system includes the muscles, bones, joints, cartilages, tendons, ligaments, and other connective tissues that work together to support the body's structure, enable movement, and protect vital organs.

Musculoskeletal physiological phenomena can be categorized into several areas:

1. Muscle contraction and relaxation: This involves the conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy through the sliding of actin and myosin filaments in muscle fibers, leading to muscle shortening or lengthening.
2. Bone homeostasis: This includes the maintenance of bone mass, density, and strength through a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts.
3. Joint movement and stability: The movement of joints is enabled by the interaction between muscles, tendons, ligaments, and articular cartilage, while stability is maintained through the passive tension provided by ligaments and the active contraction of muscles.
4. Connective tissue repair and regeneration: This involves the response of tissues such as tendons, ligaments, and muscles to injury or damage, including inflammation, cell proliferation, and matrix remodeling.
5. Neuromuscular control: The coordination of muscle activity through the integration of sensory information from proprioceptors (e.g., muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs) and motor commands from the central nervous system.
6. Skeletal development and growth: This includes the processes of bone formation, mineralization, and modeling during fetal development and childhood, as well as the maintenance of bone mass and strength throughout adulthood.
7. Aging and degeneration: The progressive decline in musculoskeletal function and structure with age, including sarcopenia (loss of muscle mass), osteoporosis (brittle bones), and joint degeneration (osteoarthritis).

Understanding these physiological phenomena is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, leading to deprivation of oxygen and nutrients to brain cells. This can result in the death of brain tissue and cause permanent damage or temporary impairment to cognitive functions, speech, memory, movement, and other body functions controlled by the affected area of the brain.

Strokes can be caused by either a blockage in an artery that supplies blood to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a "mini-stroke," is a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain that lasts only a few minutes and does not cause permanent damage.

Symptoms of a stroke may include sudden weakness or numbness in the face, arm, or leg; difficulty speaking or understanding speech; vision problems; loss of balance or coordination; severe headache with no known cause; and confusion or disorientation. Immediate medical attention is crucial for stroke patients to receive appropriate treatment and prevent long-term complications.

Within the Speed Walking category are a variety of fast walking techniques: Power Walking, Fit Walking, etc. Power walking is ... Its "Get Walking Keep Walking" project provides free route guides, led walks, as well as information for people new to walking ... and walking Preferred walking speed Student transport Tobler's hiking function Walkathon Walking audit Walking bus Walking tour ... beach walking, hillwalking, volksmarching, Nordic walking, trekking, dog walking and hiking. Some people prefer to walk indoors ...
"Walking Disaster" ends on an optimistic note, "I can't wait to see you smile, wouldn't miss it for the world", expressing his ... The video focuses on a toy robot walking around L.A. Meanwhile, the band is playing in a toy store in Los Angeles. In the end ... "Walking Disaster" is the second track on Sum 41's 2007 studio album Underclass Hero. It was released as the album's second ... "Walking Disaster" is a song that captures the concept of "confusion and frustration of modern society", the underlying theme in ...
A sewing machine might have a single walking foot with a second holding foot, or two walking feet which both feed with ... A "plaid matcher" is similar to a walking foot, but unlike a walking foot it does not actually contribute any forward or ... A walking foot is usually combined with another feed mechanism, such as a drop feed or a needle feed. It is not a commonly used ... A walking foot is a mechanism for feeding the workpiece through a sewing machine as it is being stitched. It is most useful for ...
The Walking Piano, also called the Big Piano by its creator, Remo Saraceni, is an oversized synthesizer. Merging dance, music, ... An early, one-octave version of the Walking Piano was installed at FAO Schwarz in New York City in 1982. A new three-octave ... McFarland, Kevin (October 14, 2013). "Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock recreated the walking piano scene from Big on a British late ... "Featured in Big, Remo Saraceni's Walking Piano Plays Its Sweetest Music at the Cash Register". People. September 12, 1988. ...
... , or the loyalty penalty, is a form of price discrimination whereby longstanding, loyal customers of a service ... Ruzicka, Angelique (25 September 2020). "What is the ban on price walking all about?". RiskHeads Insurance Magazine. Peachey, ... Scott, Katie (28 May 2021). "FCA publishes policy statement confirming price walking remedies". Insurance Times. Hasler, Nicky ... Gangcuangco, Terry (June 1, 2021). "Insurance industry stakeholders react to price walking ban". www.insurancebusinessmag.com. ...
... on YouTube Walking Forward at IMDb Walking Forward Official Website Walking Forward on NamibInsider "Walking ... "Walking Forward in Namibia Economist". "Walking Forward in Erongo". 17 December 2020. Wikiquote has quotations related to ... Walking Forward is a Namibian documentary web series produced by Tim Huebschle. The first season premiered in December 2020 on ... Walking Forward was shot in Windhoek in October 2020. The scripts were written by Ndinomholo Ndilula. The interviewees were ...
... is the fourth studio album by American singer-songwriter Lilly Hiatt. It was released on March 27, 2020, under ... Walking Proof was met with universal acclaim reviews from critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average rating out ... Hudak, Joseph (April 7, 2020). "Lilly Hiatt Summons an Urgent New Nashville Sound on Her Album 'Walking Proof'". Rolling Stone ... Crump, Andy (March 25, 2020). "Lilly Hiatt Gives Us Walking Proof of Her Talent". Paste. Retrieved June 3, 2020. Thomas ...
... was included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die. Credits for Walking Wounded adapted from ... Walking Wounded". Hung Medien. Retrieved 25 March 2018. "Austriancharts.at - Everything but the Girl - Walking Wounded" (in ... Walking Wounded is the ninth studio album by British musical duo Everything but the Girl. It was released on 6 May 1996 by ... Walking Wounded was reissued by Edsel Records as a two-disc deluxe set on 4 September 2015. On 8 November 2019, the album was ...
"Chaos Walking (film) - Wikipedia". en.m.wikipedia.org. Retrieved 25 April 2020. "Chaos Walking". IMDb. (All articles with dead ... "Daisy Ridley to Star in Adaptation of YA Novel 'Chaos Walking'". variety.com. 14 August 2016. "'Chaos Walking': Tom Holland May ... Chaos Walking is set on a planet called New World, which was colonised by a small group of religiously devout settlers from Old ... Chaos Walking is a young adult science fiction series written by American-British novelist Patrick Ness. It is set in a ...
Similar slower-paced sports include walking netball, walking rugby, walking basketball, walking hockey (based on field hockey) ... Walking football was devised as a competitive sport by John Croot of Chesterfield FC. Coverage of a walking football session, ... "Walking Football". Chesterfield F.C. Community Trust. Retrieved 30 September 2023. "Sky Sports to air walking football film in ... "Walking football: A slower version of the beautiful game". BBC News. 9 June 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2014. "Walking Football". ...
... garnered a total of ₱26 million box office gross during the official run of the 2017 Metro Manila Film Festival ... Deadma Walking is a 2017 Philippine comedy - drama musical film, directed by Julius Alfonso. The film is about a terminally ill ... Deadma Walking at IMDb (Pages with non-numeric formatnum arguments, CS1 foreign language sources (ISO 639-2), Use Philippine ... Eric Cabahug began writing the screenplay of the film in 2014, predating Die Beautiful another film which Deadma Walking has ...
Look up walking fern in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Walking fern may refer to two species of fern in the genus Asplenium, ... The name "walking fern" derives from the fact that new plantlets grow wherever the arching leaves of the parent touch the ... "walking fern." Encyclopædia Britannica. . Encyclopædia Britannica Online. . This page is an index of articles on plant species ... ground, creating a walking effect. Both have evergreen, undivided, slightly leathery leaves that are triangular and taper to a ...
... may refer to: Walking With (album), an album by Kim Dong-ryool Walking with..., a series of TV shows produced by ... the BBC This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Walking With. If an internal link led you here, you ...
Run to Be Born 2004 Comprehensive listing of Walking Concert releases, shows, flyers and videos Walking Concert official band ... Walking Concert is an indie rock band from New York City, featuring Walter Schreifels on vocals and guitar; Jeffery E. Johnson ... The band takes its name from the line "Boy, you're gonna be a Walking Concert!", spoken by a music store clerk to Ralph ... site Walking Concert at Some Records Walter Schreifels official site United by Walter a Walter Schreifels fan site v t e ( ...
... a 2007 sequel to the 2004 film Walking Tall Walking Tall: Lone Justice, a 2007 sequel to Walking Tall: The Payback Walk Tall ( ... Walking Tall may refer to: Walking Tall (1973 film), a 1973 film Walking Tall Part 2, (a.k.a. The Legend of Buford Pusser), a ... 1975 sequel to Walking Tall Walking Tall: Final Chapter, a 1977 sequel to Walking Tall Part 2. A Real American Hero (film), a ... Walking Tall (TV series), a 1981 television series adaptation of the films of the same name Walking Tall (2004 film), a remake ...
... is the fourth studio album by Jane Siberry. The album was released on Reprise Records internationally, but remained ... "The Walking (and Constantly)" - 6:16 "The Lobby" - 6:19 "The Bird in the Gravel" - 10:34 Jane Siberry - vocals, guitars, piano ... announced that it did not view any track on The Walking as viable for airplay on their station.[citation needed] Sales of the ...
The Walking Boston, sometimes designated the One Step Waltz, is a very simple dance in which many graceful figures may be ... The man starts forward with his left foot and the lady backward with her right, simply walking to waltz time, counting one, two ... The above are the fundamental figures of the Walking Boston. There is no rule governing the number of steps to be taken forward ... The dance includes a great deal of "balancing". Indeed, the Walking Boston cannot be performed easily or gracefully unless the ...
... is undertaken individually, in groups, or as part of an organized mall walking program. Mall walking in the United ... Mall walking is a form of exercise in which people walk or jog through the usually long corridors of shopping malls as a ... Many mall walkers cite the camaraderie of walking in groups. Mall walking was featured in the television shows Better Call Saul ... Many malls open early so that people may mall walk; stores and other such facilities generally do not open at this time, though ...
Compared to regular walking, Nordic walking (also called pole walking) involves applying force to the poles with each stride. ... One study in particular compared regular walking to Nordic walking. This study showed that Nordic walking led to more ... Croatian Nordic Walking Association (since 2011) Estonia: Estonian Nordic Walking Union Finland: Nordic Walking Finland ry ( ... Nordic walking is a Finnish-origin total-body version of walking that can be done both by non-athletes as a health-promoting ...
Listening walking was developed into Sensory Memory Walking while carrying out the work for the Acoustic Environments in Change ... Once they have selected the path, they will be the one leading the walk. Second the questioner will walk this path with the ... Sensobiographic walking is an ethnographic research method. It provides a possibility for the study of rich, embodied and site- ... As an ethnographic fieldwork method, sensobiographic walking is simple. First, a person or a group of persons are asked to ...
"Walking", a song by Tindersticks from their 1997 album Curtains Walking bass Walking (1961 film), a Soviet drama film Walking ( ... Walking is the main form of animal locomotion on land, distinguished from running and crawling. Walking may also refer to: Walk ... Walk (disambiguation) The Walk (disambiguation) This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Walking. If ... "Walking", a song by The Kelly Family "Walking", a song by Soul Asylum from their 1984 album Say What You Will, Clarence...Karl ...
Oskar Gullstrand directed the accompanying music video for "Start Walking". Digital download "Start Walking" - 3:14 Digital ... "Start Walking (Acoustic Version) - Single by Tove Styrke". Apple Music. Retrieved 20 February 2022. "Credits / Start Walking / ... "Start Walking" is a song by Swedish singer Tove Styrke. It was released on 22 October 2021 through Sony Music as the lead ... "Start Walking" is a pop song. Styrke described the song as a "disco banger". Regarding its lyrics, she deemed it an "upbeat ...
2014 Walking Shapes Residency at Pianos NYC The Waster, July 11, 2013 "PREMIERE: "Winter Fell" by Walking Shapes". The Village ... Walking Shapes is a five-piece rock band from New York City. The band formed in late 2012 by Nathaniel Hoho (lead vocals, ... The band has also received radio airplay on the BBC 6 with their song 'Feel Good' and 'Winter Fell.' In 2015, Walking Shapes' ... Fearless Radio Visual Album Stream Of Walking Shapes' Taka Come On CMJ, April 18, 2014 "News". "BBC Radio 6 Music - New Music ...
A walking stick or walking cane is a device used primarily to aid walking, provide postural stability or support, or assist in ... A collector of walking sticks is termed a rabologist. Around the 17th or 18th century, a walking stick became an essential part ... Nordic walking poles are extremely popular[citation needed] in Europe. Walking with two poles in the correct length radically ... People with disabilities may use some kinds of walking sticks as a crutch but a walking cane is not designed for full weight ...
... or The Walking Dead may refer to: The Walking Dead (franchise) The Walking Dead (comic book) 2003-2019, source ... "Walking Dead", a 2005 song by Z-Trip "Walking Dead", a 2012 song by Papa Roach from The Connection "The Walking Dead (EP)", by ... The Walking Dead (1995 film) Walking Dead, a 2008 novel in the Atticus Kodiak series by Greg Rucka The Walking Dead, a 2000 ... spin-off series Tales of the Walking Dead, 2022, spin-off series The Walking Dead: Dead City, 2023, spin-off series The Walking ...
... is a virtual reality locomotion technique that enables users to explore a virtual world that is considerably ... IEEE computer graphics and applications, 38(2), 44-56 Zhang, Sarah (August 31, 2015). "You Can't Walk in a Straight Line-And ... Steinicke F, Bruder G, Jerald J, Frenz H, Lappe M (2010). "Estimation of Detection Thresholds for Redirected Walking Techniques ... 15 years of research on redirected walking in immersive virtual environments. ...
... is the act of a person walking with a dog, typically from the dog's residence and then returning. Leashes are ... The length of walks should take into account the dog's age and health status. Long walks (over 1 hour) should not be undertaken ... Some dog walkers will take many dogs for a walk at once, while others will only take a single dog. The length of a walk might ... Professional dog walking services can be obtained locally or through online referral services. Obtaining a position as a ...
... is an outdoor sculpture by Donald Baechler, located at Francis S. Gabreski Airport in Suffolk County, New York, ... Walking Figure' sculpture at Gabreski Airport turns heads in Westhampton Beach". News 12 Long Island. June 10, 2014. Archived ... In the Hamptons, beauty is not in the eye of the beholder Katz, Emily Tess (June 10, 2014). "30-Foot-Tall 'Walking Figure' ...
A walking day is a type of church parade. Walking days are most common in North West England, where they are an annual event ... A particular feature of the walks is that the spectators lining the streets, when they see children they know walking in the ... There may be several churches involved in a local walking day, however, most 'church' walking days are held individually for ... Churches now walk in ecumenical groups from each area. Most businesses in the town used to close for the day, but as Warrington ...
"Walking Stewart", Record of My Life, pp. 163-68 Wikimedia Commons has media related to Walking Stewart. John Stewart's "Sensate ... Walking Stewart Works by or about Walking Stewart at Wikisource (Articles with short description, Short description is ... Known as 'Walking' Stewart to his contemporaries for having travelled on foot from Madras, India (where he had worked as a ... After Walking Stewart's travels came to an end around the turn of the nineteenth century, he became close friends with the ...

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