Annonaceae: The custard-apple plant family of the order Magnoliales, subclass Magnoliidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some members provide large pulpy fruits and commercial timber. Leaves and wood are often fragrant. Leaves are simple, with smooth margins, and alternately arranged in two rows along the stems.Rosales: An order of the ANGIOSPERMS, subclass Rosidae. Its members include some of the most known ornamental and edible plants of temperate zones including roses, apples, cherries, and peaches.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Plant Tumors: A localized proliferation of plant tissue forming a swelling or outgrowth, commonly with a characteristic shape and unlike any organ of the normal plant. Plant tumors or galls usually form in response to the action of a pathogen or a pest. (Holliday, P., A Dictionary of Plant Pathology, 1989, p330)Xylella: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE. It is found in the xylem of plant tissue.Agrobacterium: A genus of gram negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, plants, and marine mud.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Xylem: Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Anthocyanins: A group of FLAVONOIDS derived from FLAVONOLS, which lack the ketone oxygen at the 4-position. They are glycosylated versions of cyanidin, pelargonidin or delphinidin. The conjugated bonds result in blue, red, and purple colors in flowers of plants.Rhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.Oomycetes: Eukaryotes in the group STRAMENOPILES, formerly considered FUNGI, whose exact taxonomic level is unsettled. Many consider Oomycetes (Oomycota) a phylum in the kingdom Stramenopila, or alternatively, as Pseudofungi in the phylum Heterokonta of the kingdom Chromista. They are morphologically similar to fungi but have no close phylogenetic relationship to them. Oomycetes are found in both fresh and salt water as well as in terrestrial environments. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, pp683-4). They produce flagellated, actively motile spores (zoospores) that are pathogenic to many crop plants and FISHES.Vitaceae: A plant family of the order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida, best known for the VITIS genus, the source of grapes.Genome, Plant: The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Peronospora: A genus of OOMYCETES in the family Peronosporaceae. Most species are obligatory parasites and many are plant pathogens.Proanthocyanidins: Dimers and oligomers of flavan-3-ol units (CATECHIN analogs) linked mainly through C4 to C8 bonds to leucoanthocyanidins. They are structurally similar to ANTHOCYANINS but are the result of a different fork in biosynthetic pathways.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Genetic Privacy: The protection of genetic information about an individual, family, or population group, from unauthorized disclosure.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Cemeteries: Areas set apart as burial grounds.IndianaBurial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.Embalming: Process of preserving a dead body to protect it from decay.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Funeral Rites: Those customs and ceremonies pertaining to the dead.Agastache: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that contains tilianin, agastanol, and agastaquinone (a cytotoxic diterpenoid quinone).Andropogon: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The common name of bluestem is also used for other plants in this family. Andropogon nardus has been reclassified as CYMBOPOGON nardus and Andropogon zizanioides to VETIVERIA zizanioides.Cellophane: A generic name for film produced from wood pulp by the viscose process. It is a thin, transparent sheeting of regenerated cellulose, moisture-proof and sometimes dyed, and used chiefly as food wrapping or as bags for dialysis. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Foeniculum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE used in SPICES.Butterflies: Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Hair Color: Color of hair or fur.Citrullus: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the edible fruit.Lissamine Green Dyes: Green dyes containing ammonium and aryl sulfonate moieties that facilitate the visualization of tissues, if given intravenously. They have mostly been used in the study of kidney physiology.Tigers: The species Panthera tigris, a large feline inhabiting Asia. Several subspecies exist including the Siberian tiger and Sumatran tiger.Liriodendron: A plant genus of the family MAGNOLIACEAE. Members include hardwood trees of eastern North America with distinct large tuliplike flowers.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Apiaceae: A large plant family in the order Apiales, also known as Umbelliferae. Most are aromatic herbs with alternate, feather-divided leaves that are sheathed at the base. The flowers often form a conspicuous flat-topped umbel. Each small individual flower is usually bisexual, with five sepals, five petals, and an enlarged disk at the base of the style. The fruits are ridged and are composed of two parts that split open at maturity.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
bicolor), Vitis labrusca, Vitis riparia and Vitis vulpina. In Italy, mines were found on various Vitis vinifera cultivars, ... Vermont on Vitis riparia 25 USA: Tennessee on Vitis vulpina, 26, 28 USA: Georgia on Vitis aestivalis var. aestivalis, 27 USA: ... The wingspan is 5.5-6.2 millimetres (0.22-0.24 in). In North America, larvae have been found feeding on Vitis aestivalis (var. ... Living male Living male 21, 23, 24: Italy, Borgo Valsusana on Vitis vinifera, 22 USA: ...
The larvae feed on Vitis vulpina and Parthenocissus quinquefolia. They mine the leaves of their host plant. On Parthenocissus ... Research suggests that two species might be involved under this name, one feeding on Vitis species which is found in Kentucky ...
The hostplants for the species include Vitis cordifolia and Vitis vulpina. They mine the leaves of their host plant. The mine ...
They have been found on leaves of V. riparia, V. labrusca, and V. vulpina. Its galls have also been found on V. aestivalis var ... He based the description on galls on Vitis and larvae found in the vicinity of Washington, D.C. The magazine The American ... The specific epithet viticola is a Latin noun in apposition; it consists of the word vitis "grape vine" and the suffix -cola " ... vitis + -cola. "uītis". Oxford Latin Dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1968. p. 2079. A grape-vine. "-cola". Oxford ...
Vitis riparia, Vitis rotundifolia, and Vitis vulpina. But the wine making industry is based on the cultivation of the European ... In South America, this grape is known as criolla or "colonialized European".) Although a Vitis vinifera variety, it is a grape ... In 1683, William Penn planted a vineyard of French vinifera in Pennsylvania; it may have interbred with a native Vitis labrusca ... The California Wild Grape (Vitis californicus) does not produce wine-quality fruit, although it sometimes is used as rootstock ...
"Vitis riparia (Frost grape) (Vitis vulpina)". The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt). The UniProt Consortium. Retrieved ... "PLANTS Profile for Vitis (grape)". USDA. Retrieved November 16, 2009.. *^ GRIN. "Species in GRIN for genus Vitis". Taxonomy for ... Most Vitis species have 38 chromosomes (n=19),[9] but 40 (n=20) in Vitis rotundifolia (subgenus Muscadinia).[citation needed] ... Vitis vulpina, the frost grape, native to the Eastern United States, from Massachusetts to Florida, and west to Nebraska, ...
... cordata Cissus incisa Cissus verticillata Cissus trifoliata Vitis baileyana Vitis cinerea Vitis cordifolia Vitis vulpina Possum ...
... is a common name which may refer to any of the following species of grapevine: Vitis cinerea Vitis vulpina (also ...
Netted chain fern Woodwardia areolata Yellow harlequin Corydalis flavula Spring avens Geum vernum Winter grape Vitis vulpina ...
Vitis labrusca Riverbank Grapevine, Vitis riparia Frost Grapevine, Vitis vulpina Charles V. Covell, Jr (2005). Moths of Eastern ... Here is a list of host plants used by the Grapevine Epimenis: Summer Grapevine, Vitis aestivalis Fox Grapevine, ...
The root stocks that Munson recommended to the French were Texas native Vitis Berlandieri (leading candidate), cinerea and ... cordifolia (vulpina) grapes that were found in the centralTexas hill country at Dog Ridge in Bell County near Temple, Texas. ... allowing them to recover from the devastating epidemic of the late 19th century while still growing the ancient Vitis vinifera ...
... amurensis, native to the Asian continent, including parts of Siberia and China. Vitis vulpina, the frost grape, native to ... "Vitis riparia (Frost grape) (Vitis vulpina)". The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt). The UniProt Consortium. Retrieved ... ISBN 2-01-236331-8. "PLANTS Profile for Vitis vulpina (snow grape)". USDA. Retrieved November 16, 2009. Jain, E.; Bairoch, A.; ... Vitis labrusca, the fox grapevine, sometimes used for wine. Native to the Eastern United States and Canada. Vitis riparia, the ...
Vitis rupestris, native to North America. Vitis riparia (also sometimes known as Vitis vulpina), the "river bank grape", native ... Vitis amurensis, the Asiatic grape species, native to Siberia and China. Vitis rotundifolia, the muscadines, native to the ... Hybrid grapes are grape varieties that are the product of a crossing of two or more Vitis species. This is in contrast to ... Due to the abundance of American Vitis species one finds such natural hybrid vines on the American continent. The majority of ...
... was first published in Species Plantarum 1: 203. 1753. "Vitis vulpina". Germplasm Resources Information Network ( ... "Profile for Vitis vulpina L. (frost grape)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved May 18, 2011. Vitis cordifolia was first ... Vitis vulpina is a high-climbing woody vine with a thick trunk and red tendrils. The grapes and the vine itself have many uses ... The genus name Vitis comes from the Latin word for "vine" and the species name vulpina comes from the Latin word for "fox-like ...
"SEINet - Arizona Chapter - Vitis arizonica". swbiodiversity.org. Retrieved May 4, 2017.. *^ United States Department of ... Tropicos, specimen reports for Vitis arizonica Engelm.. *^ Littlefield, Larry J.; Burns, Pearl M. (2015). Wildflowers of the ... "Vitis arizonica". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department ... Vitis arizonica is a North American species of wild grape. It is a deciduous vine. ...
Vitis vulpina. Vinranke eller vin (Vitis) er en slekt i vinfamilien. De er forvedede klatreplanter med avflassende bark. ... en) Kategori:Vitis - bilder, video eller lyd på Wikimedia Commons. *(en) Vitis - galleri av bilder, video eller lyd på ... Vitis». Flora of China. Besøkt 4. juni 2015.. *. D. Tröndle m.fl. (2010). «Molecular phylogeny of the genus Vitis (Vitaceae) ... Den meste kjente arten er den gamle kulturplanten ekte vinranke (Vitis vinifera), som gir oss druer og vin. ...
Grape ( Vitis ) species. *V. acerifolia. *V. adenoclada. *V. aestivalis. *V. amurensis. *V. × andersonii ...
Curriculum Vitae at the University of Colorado North America check list of lichens. ... Xanthopsorella texana Letharia vulpina (L.) Hue f. californica (Lév.) W.A.Weber = L. columbiana Mobergia calculiformis (W.A. ...
1913 Narosoideus vulpinus (Wileman, 1911) Natada arizana (Wileman, 1916) Neiraga baibarana Matsumura, 1931 Parasa bicolor ( ... Nippoptilia vitis (Sasaki, 1913) Ochyrotica taiwanica Gielis, 1990 Ochyrotica yanoi Arenberger, 1988 Oidaematophorus kuwayamai ...
... thorn shrub Vitis vinifera, wild grape Ziziphus jujuba, jujube Varieties Scutia spicata var. pauciflora There are 38 species, ... sheathed sedge Carex vesicaria Carex vixdentata Carex vulpina, true fox sedge Carex vulpinoidea, brown fox sedge Carex ... hiba arbor-vitae Torreya grandis, Chinese nutmeg tree Torreya nucifera, Japanese nutmeg tree Tsuga chinensis, Chinese hemlock ... hairy alpenrose Rhododendron wrayi Vaccinium macrocarpon Vaccinium oxycoccos Vaccinium vitis-idaea, lingonberry Varieties ...
Vitis vulpina was first published in Species Plantarum 1: 203. 1753. "Vitis vulpina". Germplasm Resources Information Network ( ... "Profile for Vitis vulpina L. (frost grape)". PLANTS Database. USDA, NRCS. Retrieved May 18, 2011. Vitis cordifolia was first ... Vitis vulpina is a high-climbing woody vine with a thick trunk and red tendrils. The grapes and the vine itself have many uses ... The genus name Vitis comes from the Latin word for "vine" and the species name vulpina comes from the Latin word for "fox-like ...
Vitis vulpina is a liana native to eastern North America. It is introduced in New England. ... Vitis palmata:. branchlets red to purple throughout, maturing red-brown to dark red-brown, leaf blades acuminate to long- ... Vitis vinifera:. leaf blades orbicular to suborbicular, often prominently lobed with deep sinuses, commonly with some patches ... V. vulpina, with leaf blades ovate to orbicular, unlobed or with obscure to evident lobes, lacking tomentose hairs, though ...
Vitis vulpina L.. Grapes in art[edit]. See Grapes in art and Grapes in heraldry ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vitis&oldid=260612715" ...
"Vitis riparia (Frost grape) (Vitis vulpina)". The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt). The UniProt Consortium. Retrieved ... "PLANTS Profile for Vitis (grape)". USDA. Retrieved November 16, 2009.. *^ GRIN. "Species in GRIN for genus Vitis". Taxonomy for ... Most Vitis species have 38 chromosomes (n=19),[9] but 40 (n=20) in Vitis rotundifolia (subgenus Muscadinia).[citation needed] ... Vitis vulpina, the frost grape, native to the Eastern United States, from Massachusetts to Florida, and west to Nebraska, ...
Vitis riparia Michx.; Riverbank Grape; Shrubby old-field and woodland; Common; C = 1; BSUH 18807. Vitis vulpina L.; Frost, Fox ... crabapples), Morus alba, Pyrus calleryana, Quercus spp., Rosa setigera, Ulmus americana, U. pumila, Vitis riparia, and V. ... vulpina. Between the shrubs, the two most abundant grasses are Poa pratensis and Schedonorus arundinaceus. Several sedges are ...
Vitis riparia Michx.; Riverbank Grape; C = 1; BSUH 16507; 16615. Vitis vulpina L.; Frost Grape; C = 3; BSUH 16530; 16635, 16636 ... X Vitis vulpina X X X Vitis riparia X X Yucca filamentosa X Table 2.--Physiognomic analyses of the flora occurring at each ...
Vitis vulpina L. geographic distribution includes. *URI: http://eol.org/schema/terms/Present ...
Vitis amurensis, native to the Asian continent, including parts of Siberia and China. Vitis vulpina, the frost grape, native to ... "Vitis riparia (Frost grape) (Vitis vulpina)". The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt). The UniProt Consortium. Retrieved ... ISBN 2-01-236331-8. "PLANTS Profile for Vitis vulpina (snow grape)". USDA. Retrieved November 16, 2009. Jain, E.; Bairoch, A.; ... Vitis labrusca, the fox grapevine, sometimes used for wine. Native to the Eastern United States and Canada. Vitis riparia, the ...
Vitis vulpina. Vitaceae. frost grape. ciwe minun, ciwiminaga wunj:Ojibwe, Chippewa. Medicinal, Main. Twigs were used in tea ...
This page has been reproduced from the Vitae website (www.vitae.ac.uk). Vitae is dedicated to realising the potential of ... David Fox, Founder, Vulpine Science & Learning. Dr Sharon Maguire, AGCAS Research Staff ... Vitae Connections Week 2020 * A1: Concordats, Commitments and Culture: The Researcher Development Concordat and Technician ... Vitae Connections Week 2020 * A1: Concordats, Commitments and Culture: The Researcher Development Concordat and Technician ...
Vitis vinifera L. - wine grape. Species. Vitis vulpina L. - wild grape, fox grape, frost grape. ... Vitis X bourquina Munson ex Viala (pro sp.) - grape. Species. Vitis californica Benth. - California wild grape, California ... Vitis X champinii Planch. (pro sp.) - Champins grape. Species. Vitis cinerea (Engelm.) Engelm. ex Millard - sweet grape, ... Vitis tiliifolia Humb. & Bonpl. ex Schult. - West Indian grape. Species. ...
Vitis aestivalis (Summer grape): 35, sunny, well-drained soil. Vitis labrusca (Fox Grape) 10-40. Vitis vulpina (Winter Grape ... Vitis: fast-growing vines with spring flowers followed by fruit in late summer to fall. Flowers are visited by bumblebees, ...
Vitis vulpina. frost grape. L48 (N), CAN (N). POSI2. Potentilla simplex. common cinquefoil. oldfield cinquefoil. oldfield ... Vitis riparia. riverbank grape. L48 (N), CAN (N). VIVU. ... Vitis labrusca. fox grape. L48 (N), CAN (I). ACNE2. Acer ... Vitis aestivalis. summer grape. L48 (N), CAN (N). VIRI. ...
Vitis,, ,Temporal range: ,60-0... World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, ... "Vitis vulpina (Frost grape) (Vitis riparia". The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt). The UniProt Consortium. Retrieved ... snow grape)"Vitis vulpina"PLANTS Profile for . * ^ Jain, E.; Bairoch, A.; Duvaud, S.; Phan, I.; Redaschi, N.; Suzek, B.E.; ... "Vitis coignetiae"RHS Plant Selector . Retrieved June 2013. * ^ " New York MuscatVitis"RHS Plant Selector - . Retrieved June ...
Scuppernong (skuper-nong), n. The American name for a species of grape, supposed to be a variety of Vitis vulpina, cultivated ...
12). DNA analyses indicate a close relationship between V. aestivalis, V. cinerea, V. labrusca, and V. vulpina (Miller et al. ... BASIONYM: Vitis simpsonii Munson 1887.. Vitis simpsonii Vitis simpsonii Munson, Proc. Annual Meeting Soc. Promot. Agric. Sci. 8 ... Vitis cinerea (Engelm.)Engelm. ex Millardet var. floridana Munson - FLORIDA GRAPE. Citation. Citation. VITIS CINEREA (Engelmann ... Vitis sola Vitis sola L. H. Bailey, Gentes Herb. 3: 203, f. 116. 1934.. TYPE: FLORIDA: Duval Co.: Swamp near Jacksonville, 20 ...
The common name of Vitis labrusca is potentially confusing as it sometimes refers to Vitis vulpina (Frost Grape), where ... Many cultivated grapes are actually hybrids of Vitis labrusca (Fox Grape) and the European Vitis vinifera (Wine Grape). Such ... Unlike other Vitis spp. in Illinois, tendrils of Fox Grape often develop across from 3 or more leaves in succession. ... Vitis labrusca. Grape family (Vitaceae). Description: This climbing woody vine is 10-40 long, branching occasionally. By means ...
two miles of town ; he can get high families on the Vitis vulpina or Bui- cluded the latter to be correct,but are We find the ... He as regards the kind of wild stock Bullace (V.: Vulpina), although viti- grapes are sour, hence those of any. can get ... grapes of the domesticated Vitis vul grapes" on or middle. Then cut away lengthwayshalf. water front, or he can get as far from ... the wild "summer" grape, Vitis JEsta- vine, and mark out the exact length. spring in Florida, and all this at more Wilder, ...
"SEINet - Arizona Chapter - Vitis arizonica". swbiodiversity.org. Retrieved May 4, 2017.. *^ United States Department of ... Tropicos, specimen reports for Vitis arizonica Engelm.. *^ Littlefield, Larry J.; Burns, Pearl M. (2015). Wildflowers of the ... "Vitis arizonica". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department ... Vitis arizonica is a North American species of wild grape. It is a deciduous vine. ...
Vitis aestivalis. - Vitis cinerea. - Vitis palmata. - Vitis riparia. - Vitis rotundifolia. - Vitis rupestris. - Vitis vulpina. ...
Vitis vulpina. Winter Grape. Vittaria appalachiana. Appalachian Shoestring Fern. Woodsia alpina. Alpine Cliff Fern. ...
Vitis vulpina (1) * Vole Scat (1) * Voles (2) * Walking Stick (1) * Walnut Husk Fly (1) ...
Vitis vulpina (1) * Vole Scat (1) * Voles (2) * Walking Stick (1) * Walnut Husk Fly (1) ...
Vitis riparia Michx. *Vitis vulpina L. STAPHYLEACEAE. *Staphylea trifolia L.. GERANIACEAE. *Geranium maculatum L. ...
Vitis vulpina ( Frost Grape ). A large, deciduous woody vine native to swamps and bottomlands in eastern North America ( from ... Vitis Autumn King. * video found on Youtube. Vitis Baco Noir. A very vigorous interspecific hybrid including Vitis riparia ... Vitis Tabernet Franc. Similar to Vitis Tabernet Sauvignon but is more cold tolerant and early ripening.. Vitis Tabernet ... Vitis Lemberger. Also called Vitis Limberger. Very vigorous and upright, originating in Austria and having Vitis vinifera ...
  • It is believed that foxes were attracted to this type of grapevine and Linnaeus, used the term vulpina to differentiate these smaller wild grapes from the other American known grapes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vitis cordifolia was first published in Flora Boreali-Americana (Michaux) 2: 231. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most Vitis varieties are wind-pollinated with hermaphroditic flowers containing both male and female reproductive structures. (wikipedia.org)