Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Lobbying: A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Public Relations: Relations of an individual, association, organization, hospital, or corporation with the publics which it must take into consideration in carrying out its functions. Publics may include consumers, patients, pressure groups, departments, etc.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Propaganda: The deliberate attempt to influence attitudes and beliefs for furthering one's cause or damaging an opponent's cause.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Consumer Product SafetyPersuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Tobacco, Smokeless: Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Product Packaging: Form in which product is processed or wrapped and labeled. PRODUCT LABELING is also available.Labor Unions: Organizations comprising wage and salary workers in health-related fields for the purpose of improving their status and conditions. The concept includes labor union activities toward providing health services to members.Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Tobacco Products: Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Plants, Toxic: Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Ethics, Business: The moral obligations governing the conduct of commercial or industrial enterprises.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.United States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Voluntary Programs: Programs in which participation is not required.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Tobacco Use Cessation: Ending the TOBACCO habits of smoking, chewing, or snuff use.United StatesSmoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Tobacco Mosaic Virus: The type species of TOBAMOVIRUS which causes mosaic disease of tobacco. Transmission occurs by mechanical inoculation.Product Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a product or its container or wrapper. It includes purpose, effect, description, directions, hazards, warnings, and other relevant information.Menthol: An alcohol produced from mint oils or prepared synthetically.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Organizations: Administration and functional structures for the purpose of collectively systematizing activities for a particular goal.Consumer Organizations: Organized groups of users of goods and services.Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.Consultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Commonwealth of Independent StatesVentilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Harm Reduction: The application of methods designed to reduce the risk of harm associated with certain behaviors without reduction in frequency of those behaviors. The risk-associated behaviors include ongoing and active addictive behaviors.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Product Line Management: Management control systems for structuring health care delivery strategies around case types, as in DRGs, or specific clinical services.Tars: Viscous materials composed of complex, high-molecular-weight compounds derived from the distillation of petroleum or the destructive distillation of wood or coal. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)RestaurantsNicotine: Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Tobacco Use: Use of TOBACCO (Nicotiana tabacum L) and TOBACCO PRODUCTS.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.SmokeAerospace Medicine: That branch of medicine dealing with the studies and effects of flight through the atmosphere or in space upon the human body and with the prevention or cure of physiological or psychological malfunctions arising from these effects. (from NASA Thesaurus)Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Latin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Investments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Flavoring Agents: Substances added to foods and medicine to improve the quality of taste.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.CaliforniaIsometric Contraction: Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.Organizational Affiliation: Formal relationships established between otherwise independent organizations. These include affiliation agreements, interlocking boards, common controls, hospital medical school affiliations, etc.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Voluntary Health Agencies: Non-profit organizations concerned with various aspects of health, e.g., education, promotion, treatment, services, etc.Negotiating: The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)ArgentinaOccupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Air Conditioning: The maintenance of certain aspects of the environment within a defined space to facilitate the function of that space; aspects controlled include air temperature and motion, radiant heat level, moisture, and concentration of pollutants such as dust, microorganisms, and gases. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)MinnesotaMuscle Fatigue: A state arrived at through prolonged and strong contraction of a muscle. Studies in athletes during prolonged submaximal exercise have shown that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of muscle glycogen depletion. Muscle fatigue in short-term maximal exercise is associated with oxygen lack and an increased level of blood and muscle lactic acid, and an accompanying increase in hydrogen-ion concentration in the exercised muscle.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.United States Environmental Protection Agency: An agency in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. It was created as an independent regulatory agency responsible for the implementation of federal laws designed to protect the environment. Its mission is to protect human health and the ENVIRONMENT.
  • Industry lawyers and scientists deleted results unfavourable to the industry's position from the study before delivering it to the airline. (bmj.com)
  • Instead, some would argue that it was regulation that defined the industry's trade practices and, by doing so, maintained the industry's high profits and expanded the sale of products in just those markets Tobacco-Free Kids and others worry about. (fee.org)
  • The program's goal was "to influence policy makers, media and the public" by having industry consultants attend conferences, present papers and lobby, all while hiding or obscuring the tobacco industry's role. (sourcewatch.org)
  • We know that tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship are critical to the industry's continued physical and political expansion", says Dr Ala Alwan, WHO Regional Director for the Eastern Mediterranean. (who.int)
  • A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco found that the tobacco industry "recruited and managed an international network of more than 80 scientific and medical experts in Europe, Asia and elsewhere in a bid to avoid regulations on secondhand smoke. (sourcewatch.org)
  • 1 Tobacco industry response to CAB actions took many forms, including letter writing campaigns, petition drives, and surveys aimed at persuading the CAB that the flying public did not support attempts to regulate smoking or that existing restrictions were adequate. (bmj.com)
  • The World Health Organization's global forum in Moscow on 27th April , Addressing the challenge of noncommunicable diseases, sparked concern from public health campaigners and Member States about the potential for food industry influence on WHO and governments' strategies to curb food-related diseases. (babymilkaction.org)
  • in the working group on food and drink, chaired by Jorge Casimiro of Coca Cola, Janet Voute of Nestlé presented IFBA's voluntary, self-regulated proposals to reformulate foods, extend 'responsible advertising' and support public private partnerships. (babymilkaction.org)
  • Such relationships contravene the WHO FCTC and enable the tobacco industry to tout its relationship with a reputable institution while continuing to undermine public health policymaking, exploit farmers, and obstruct farm workers' right to collective bargaining. (fctc.org)
  • Although scientific knowledge is still incomplete, it is less divided than the industry would have the public believe. (manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  • A quantitative comparison of the effects of these interventions would enable public health policy makers to make maximum use of the (usually limited) funds available for tobacco control. (bmj.com)
  • Imagery emanating from motion pictures con- work because the fiduciary interests of the tinues to provide misleadingly positive impres- tobacco industry are opposite those of the public sions of tobacco use. (who.int)
  • Numerous studies have backed industry claims that GMO foods appear to be safe for human consumption, including an examination of more than 130 research projects conducted in the European Union prior to 2010 and work published by the American Medical Association's Council on Science and Public Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government agencies or their officials endorse, support, form partnerships with or participate in so-called CSR activities or initiatives organized by the tobacco industry including allowing public disclosure of the same). (who.int)
  • Current government officials or relatives hold positions in the tobacco business, including consultancy positions, or those with previous links to the tobacco industry are given a role in setting or implementing public health policies concerning tobacco control. (who.int)
  • The government has no code of conduct for public officials, prescribing the standards with which they should comply in their dealings with the tobacco industry. (who.int)
  • Across Europe, governments are bringing in laws to banish tobacco smoke from public places. (walesonline.co.uk)
  • In an accompanying opinion piece , Tony Rao, visiting researcher at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, wrote: "If we cannot rely on our government to observe the principle of being at arm's length from the drinks industry, we wander into a storm that has the potential to capsize public health and all that it represents. (medscape.com)
  • Trade associations and other industry groupings established to deceive the public should be disbanded. (nih.gov)
  • The incompatibility of tobacco money and the public interest has been widely recognized. (ash.org)
  • Firstly, as a global industry that came under sustained criticism from the mid-twentieth century onwards, it pioneered many big-budget campaigns that fueled the growth and evolution of the public relations industry. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Their letter has asked for a 'complete ban' on tobacco, but public health experts caution that although there is no debate on the health hazards of tobacco, seeking a ban at this point is impractical. (telegraphindia.com)
  • Front groups appear to serve a public cause but actually serve as the voice of the tobacco industry. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • As calls for restrictions on print advertisements, sampling and sports sponsorship became more frequent, the industry cooked up various public relations schemes to rebut compelling charges that it was marketing to kids. (multinationalmonitor.org)
  • To the public, the industry tried to portray its efforts as purely altruistic, with concern for children and parents at the fore. (multinationalmonitor.org)
  • Since 2008, there has been growing recognition of the fundamental and irreconcilable conflict of interest between tobacco industry and public health policy, and countries are at different levels in implementing it domestically. (business-humanrights.org)
  • Although the fundamental conflict of interest between the tobacco industry and public health is fully recognised in the declaration, other groups from the food and drink industry - which the UN euphemistically refers to as "civil society" alongside organisations such as academia - were invited to participate in the meeting, although they were excluded from any decision-making. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • It has become a voice for industry instead of a voice for members of the public. (councilforresponsiblegenetics.org)
  • European Union directives on tobacco have been drafted and annulled, and we have seen the EU attempt to extend its remit to public health via a circuitous route on the ground of regulating commerce. (parliament.uk)
  • As part of this evidence review, Sir Cyril Chantler is currently looking at the likely effect on public health, particularly for children, if standardised tobacco packaging is introduced, with findings expected in mid-March. (bath.ac.uk)
  • The paper also highlights tobacco industry reliance on third parties, making it difficult for the public and policy-makers to assess the credibility and motivation behind efforts to shape the political agenda. (bath.ac.uk)
  • Tobacco control continues to face challenges from the tobacco industry as it threatens to use its massive public relations and communications budget to derail any efforts made to reduce tobacco use. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The proposals for strengthened health warnings outlined in the CBRC report to the Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy (MCDS) were strongly supported by the public iii but once again were vigorously resisted by the Australian tobacco industry. (tobaccoinaustralia.org.au)
  • Frederick J. Stare (d. 2002-04-04 ) was an industry-friendly, industry-funded Professor of Nutrition and head of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health , who also regularly took money from the tobacco industry to provide them with a scientific front and money-laundering service. (sourcewatch.org)
  • Seltzer was eventually transfered (via generous tobacco industry research grants) to the Harvard School of Public Health , and given a Professorship in the Nutrition Department where Stare protected him for many years. (sourcewatch.org)
  • In 2009, local and state policymakers began identifying ways to regulate their sale, public usage, taxation, and marketing, often by integrating them into existing tobacco control laws. (milbank.org)
  • In its recent announcement the FDA warns that while it has not "ruled out" future regulatory action, it will instead "focus its efforts for now on the potential for voluntary reform and the promotion of the judicious use of antimicrobials in the interest of public health. (ecowatch.com)
  • These reports were submitted for the 2004 through 2007 funding period by local tobacco control organizations to the California Department of Public Health, Tobacco Control Program. (cdc.gov)
  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) chief Scott Gottlieb expressed his persistent disappointment with the vaping industry during a Jan. 18 public hearing , threatening "game over" for vape manufacturers if vaping rates among children and teens continue to rise. (beasleyallen.com)
  • The industrial agriculture industry has denied that antibiotics usage in animals poses a direct risk to public health, and it's difficult for researchers to prove the point, in part, because the industry makes it harder. (mercola.com)
  • Dr. James Johnson, an infectious disease physician at the University of Minnesota, told Scientific American, "Frankly, it reminds me of the tobacco industry, the asbestos industry and the oil industry … We have a long history of industries subverting public health. (mercola.com)
  • The UK Public Health Responsibility Deal was launched in 2011 as a public-private partnership among industry, government, public bodies and voluntary organisations. (eurekalert.org)
  • Organisations involved make voluntary pledges designed to improve public health. (eurekalert.org)
  • The number of people covered by bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, the focus of this year's report, increased by almost 400 million people, residing mainly in low- and middle-income countries. (who.int)
  • Bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship are some of the most powerful measures to control tobacco use. (who.int)
  • Data from the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey shows that vape product use among U.S. children and teens has spiked so high that it has become a national epidemic. (beasleyallen.com)
  • Bernie Ecclestone's donation to the Labour party was linked to its compliant handling of tobacco sponsorship of Formula 1, and the Bill failed in the last Parliament because the Government did not give it sufficient priority. (parliament.uk)
  • The claim was brought by Philip Morris, the global tobacco giant, at the World Bank's International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) in Washington DC. (corpwatch.org)
  • FDA cannot rely on voluntary efforts by the tobacco industry, nor should FDA only act to restrict sales. (lung.org)
  • For all these reasons, securing outdoor smoke-free policy has become a recommended strategy by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for states and local jurisdictions (8), and California's tobacco control program likewise supports community policies to restrict outdoor area smoking (9). (cdc.gov)
  • In the next Congress, which begins Jan. 3, both Rep. Henry Waxman (D) of California and Sen. Edward Kennedy (D) of Massachusetts will introduce proposals designed to reduce tobacco use by minors through curtailed vending-machine placement, sharply restricted tobacco advertising, and prohibition of the now-current use of tobacco brand names in the sponsoring of sports events. (csmonitor.com)
  • In fact, the problem is so alarming that the World Health Assembly approved nine voluntary global targets to help decrease tobacco prevalence by 30% among people older than 15 by 2025. (forbes.com)
  • The prevalence of voluntary warnings, warnings with the specific capitalized word "WARNING", and MarkTen warnings were examined after being weighted using factors related to exposure between January 2012 and March 2015. (mdpi.com)
  • 3 The FAA studied the issue, finding eventually that exposure to tobacco smoke was unlikely to be "injurious to the health of nonsmokers", and declined to take action. (bmj.com)
  • The food industry has a long way to go if its pledges are to comprehensively reduce the exposure and power of marketing to children. (babymilkaction.org)
  • It also identifies vulnerable workers, including children and adolescents, who may be more sensitive to chemical exposure and more likely to suffer from green tobacco sickness, and who may suffer more serious health consequences than adults. (osha.gov)
  • 2 Article 8 of the FCTC recognises that scientific evidence has established that exposure to tobacco smoke causes death, disease and disability. (scielo.org.mx)
  • Health Assembly resolution 54.18, which urges Member States to be aware of affiliations between the tobacco industry and members of their delegations, and urges WHO and Member States to be alert to any efforts by the tobacco industry to continue its subversive practice and to assure the integrity of health policy development in any WHO meeting and in national governments. (who.int)
  • Every tobacco company in every market should publicly disclose what it knew about the addictiveness and harm caused by tobacco, when it obtained this information, and what it did about it. (nih.gov)
  • WARNING: Tobacco smoke can harm your children. (fee.org)
  • When questions arose about health risks of tobacco, they focused on two key themes: 1) how bad is the problem (i.e., absolute risk) and 2) what can be done to reduce the risk without cessation (i.e., prospects for harm reduction). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Nevertheless, we believe that the industry does have a role to play in harm reduction, particularly in an international context. (nuffieldbioethics.org)
  • To make matters even worse, the FDA's announcement is actually a (less strict) rehash of proposals that were first announced in 2008, and which were immediately recalled after the usual uproar from the intensive farming industry lobby. (ecowatch.com)
  • It also found that evidence external to the FDCA-that the FDA consistently stated before 1995 that it lacked jurisdiction over tobacco, that Congress has enacted several tobacco-specific statutes fully cognizant of the FDA's position, and that Congress has considered and rejected many bills that would have given the agency such authority-confirms this conclusion. (justia.com)
  • Similarly, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes tobacco use as "the single most important preventable risk to human health in developed countries and an important cause of premature death worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vested interests that lobbied for the HGP and funded many of the scientists involved - including the tobacco industry - made repeated false claims about the role of genes in common diseases such as lung cancer and hypertension and oversold the likely benefit to health of genetic 'prediction and prevention' of disease (4). (councilforresponsiblegenetics.org)
  • The WHO official said the small alpine country was good at monitoring tobacco use and prevention measures. (swissinfo.ch)
  • Even if Congress ultimately fails to enact the tobacco deal, thereby killing the President's new programs, Democrats can come away with a potent political issue, Mr. Clinton's aides said. (nytimes.com)
  • 1 Congress instructed the telecommunications industry to develop a television (TV) ratings system and TV manufacturers to integrate hardware (the V-chip) to allow parents to block objectionable content. (aappublications.org)
  • Dr Rakesh Gupta, state nodal officer, Punjab, said, "The fight is being taken to the tobacco industry very seriously and more and more jurisdictions will go smoke-free and Punjab will become a smoke-free state in the near future. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Al Gore's tobacco flip-flop -- politically exploiting his sister's smoking-related death after having boasted in 1988 about his tobacco farming history -- didn't receive any evening news coverage during the Democratic Convention. (mrc.org)
  • Science and Technology (S&T) Programs has been performing voluntary laboratory services under the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, as amended, for the AMS commodity programs (Fruit and Vegetable, Cotton, Livestock and Seed, Poultry, Dairy, and Tobacco) and applicable customers in these industries since its inception on August 17, 1988. (federalregister.gov)
  • Issued jointly by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , the bulletin identifies serious health hazards related to work in tobacco fields, and steps employers can take to protect the health of farm workers. (osha.gov)