Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Corneal Stroma: The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Endothelium, Corneal: Single layer of large flattened cells covering the surface of the cornea.Keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea.Keratoconus: A noninflammatory, usually bilateral protrusion of the cornea, the apex being displaced downward and nasally. It occurs most commonly in females at about puberty. The cause is unknown but hereditary factors may play a role. The -conus refers to the cone shape of the corneal protrusion. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Corneal Opacity: Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.Eye Burns: Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.Corneal Neovascularization: New blood vessels originating from the corneal veins and extending from the limbus into the adjacent CORNEAL STROMA. Neovascularization in the superficial and/or deep corneal stroma is a sequel to numerous inflammatory diseases of the ocular anterior segment, such as TRACHOMA, viral interstitial KERATITIS, microbial KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS, and the immune response elicited by CORNEAL TRANSPLANTATION.Corneal Ulcer: Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Eye Banks: Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.Corneal Edema: An excessive amount of fluid in the cornea due to damage of the epithelium or endothelium causing decreased visual acuity.Descemet Membrane: A layer of the cornea. It is the basal lamina of the CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM (from which it is secreted) separating it from the CORNEAL STROMA. It is a homogeneous structure composed of fine collagenous filaments, and slowly increases in thickness with age.Corneal Keratocytes: Fibroblasts which occur in the CORNEAL STROMA.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Keratitis, Herpetic: A superficial, epithelial Herpesvirus hominis infection of the cornea, characterized by the presence of small vesicles which may break down and coalesce to form dendritic ulcers (KERATITIS, DENDRITIC). (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Limbus Corneae: An annular transitional zone, approximately 1 mm wide, between the cornea and the bulbar conjunctiva and sclera. It is highly vascular and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea. It is ophthalmologically significant in that it appears on the outer surface of the eyeball as a slight furrow, marking the line between the clear cornea and the sclera. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Keratan Sulfate: A sulfated mucopolysaccharide initially isolated from bovine cornea. At least two types are known. Type I, found mostly in the cornea, contains D-galactose and D-glucosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit; type II, found in skeletal tissues, contains D-galactose and D-galactosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Photorefractive Keratectomy: A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.Corneal Dystrophies, Hereditary: Bilateral hereditary disorders of the cornea, usually autosomal dominant, which may be present at birth but more frequently develop during adolescence and progress slowly throughout life. Central macular dystrophy is transmitted as an autosomal recessive defect.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Sodium Hydroxide: A highly caustic substance that is used to neutralize acids and make sodium salts. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Fuchs' Endothelial Dystrophy: Disorder caused by loss of endothelium of the central cornea. It is characterized by hyaline endothelial outgrowths on Descemet's membrane, epithelial blisters, reduced vision, and pain.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Contact Lenses: Lenses designed to be worn on the front surface of the eyeball. (UMDNS, 1999)Organ Culture Techniques: A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)Artificial Organs: Devices intended to replace non-functioning organs. They may be temporary or permanent. Since they are intended always to function as the natural organs they are replacing, they should be differentiated from PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS and specific types of prostheses which, though also replacements for body parts, are frequently cosmetic (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) as well as functional (ARTIFICIAL LIMBS).Alkalies: Usually a hydroxide of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium or cesium, but also the carbonates of these metals, ammonia, and the amines. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Bowman Membrane: A layer of acellular matrix that lies beneath the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM and above the CORNEAL STROMA. It consists of randomly arranged COLLAGEN fibers in a condensed bed of intercellular substance. It provides stability and strength to the cornea.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Eye Infections, Fungal: Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.Keratitis, Dendritic: A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Keratin-12: A type I keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-3 in the CORNEA and is regarded as a marker for corneal-type epithelial differentiation. Mutations in the gene for keratin-12 have been associated with MEESMANN CORNEAL EPITHELIAL DYSTROPHY.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Anterior Eye Segment: The front third of the eyeball that includes the structures between the front surface of the cornea and the front of the VITREOUS BODY.Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Sclera: The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Eye ProteinsFluorophotometry: Measurement of light given off by fluorescein in order to assess the integrity of various ocular barriers. The method is used to investigate the blood-aqueous barrier, blood-retinal barrier, aqueous flow measurements, corneal endothelial permeability, and tear flow dynamics.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Corneal Perforation: A puncture or hole through the CORNEAL STROMA resulting from various diseases or trauma.Eye Injuries, Penetrating: Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Descemet Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty: A surgical procedure or KERATOPLASTY involving selective stripping and replacement of diseased host DESCEMET MEMBRANE and CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM with a suitable and healthy donor posterior lamella. The advantage to this procedure is that the normal corneal surface of the recipient is retained, thereby avoiding corneal surface incisions and sutures.Anterior Chamber: The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Fibrillar Collagens: A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Microscopy, Acoustic: A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.Acanthamoeba Keratitis: Infection of the cornea by an ameboid protozoan which may cause corneal ulceration leading to blindness.
Maurice D: Direct toxicity to the cornea: a nonspecific process? In: Goldberg AM (Ed): In vivo Toxicology: Approaches to ... William S. Stokes, Preliminary Evaluation of the Underprediction Rate of the In Vivo Dermal Irritation Test Method, U.S. ... the Bovine Cornea Opacity Test (BCOP) and Isolated chicken eye test (ICE). A 1995 study funded by the European Commission and ... required further in vivo testing. Regulatory bodies have therefore begun to adopt a tiered testing strategy for skin and eye ...
"In Vivo Confocal Microscopy in a Patient with Keratopigmentation (Corneal Tattooing)." Cornea 2005; 24:2:238-240. Panda, A. et ... The methods used to apply the ink to the cornea differ. In one such method, the physician applies the ink into the cornea ... "An Instrument for Tattooing the Cornea." Sekundo, Walter et al. "Long term ultrastructural changes in human corneas after ... Tattooing the cornea can alter a discoloration, blending an opacity into the normal eye color. Most physicians agree that the ...
In the mouse, it photo-entrains the retina and cornea at least ex vivo. These pineal opsins, found in the Actinopterygii (ray- ... mediated photoentrainment of local circadian oscillators in mammalian retina and cornea". Proceedings of the National Academy ...
Cornea. 2013 Mar;32(3):345-54 Liang H, Baudouin C, Daull P, Garrigue JS, Buggage R, Brignole-Baudouin F. In vitro and in vivo ... Cornea. 2012 Nov;31(11):1319-29 Liang, H., F. Brignole-Baudouin, et al. (2008). "Reduction of quaternary ammonium-induced ... ocular surface toxicity by emulsions: an in vivo study in rabbits." Mol Vis 14: 204-16 Amrane M, Creuzot-Garcher C, Robert PY, ... and is the driving force behind the biological adhesion of the nanodroplets to negatively charged cell epithelium in vivo. In ...
Morphology and pathologic responses of the cornea to disease. In: Smolin G, Thoft RA, eds. The Cornea. Scientific Foundations ... a prospective study using in vivo confocal microscopy". Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 50 (9): 4192-8. doi:10.1167/iovs.09-3781. ... Histology image: 08002loa - Histology Learning System at Boston University Diagram at sheinman.com Diagram at cornea_ ... Cornea. 19 (4): 417-20. doi:10.1097/00003226-200007000-00001. Lagali, N; Germundsson, J; Fagerholm, P (Sep 2009). "The role of ...
Cornea and Laser Eye Institute-Hersh Vision Group. Peter S. Hersh, M.D.. Retrieved 17 May 2013. "Peter S. Hersh, M.D". ... In Vivo Biomechanical Changes After Corneal Collagen Cross-linking for Keratoconus and Corneal Ectasia: 1-Year Analysis of a ... Hersh's Cornea & Laser Eye Institute is one of 7 sites involved in the Avedro clinical trials for patients with keratoconus ... Cornea 202; 31: 21-25. Greenstein SA, Fry KL, Hersh, MJ, Hersh PS. Higher-order aberrations after corneal collagen crosslinking ...
... has been shown to have potent angiogenic activity in vivo in mouse cornea model and in vitro in a 3-dimensional ...
While at Harvard she moved on from studying salamanders to focus more on the embryonic chick cornea. Betty then accepted the ... The second was using Nomarski optics to study how corneal fibroblasts migrated through the stroma in vivo and in collagen gels ... This work showed that contact inhibition of movement occurred in vivo and in 3D gels. Gary Greenburg then entered Betty' lab as ... "The behaviour of fibroblasts from the developing avian cornea: their morphology and movement in situ and in vitro. =Journal of ...
He also made contributions in his research of cell division in vivo, on the histology of the cornea, and on the relationship of ...
"Quantitative comparison of the inhibitory effects of GW5638 and tamoxifen on angiogenesis in the cornea pocket assay". ... related to tamoxifen on breast and endometrial cancer growth in vivo". Clin. Cancer Res. 8: 1995-2001. PMID 12060645. " ...
In vivo demonstration of the dynamic regulation of perlecan and its control by extracellular signaling pathways is critical to ... A similar result was produced in the corneal micropocket assay, where FGF-2 is implanted into the cornea of mice and in normal ... These results are in contrast to in vivo results with the same Kaposi Sarcoma lines, which show that decreased perlecan leads ... These findings of greater tumorigenesis in vivo are supported by data showing that the C-terminus of the perlecan protein acts ...
Ophthalmia nodosa, an irritation reaction, can result when the barbed hairs lodge in the cornea. Handlers are advised to wear ... In vivo effects and molecular aspects associated with the hemorrhagic syndrome. Toxicon. Volume 56, Issue 7, 15 December 2010, ...
2002). "Immature osteoblastic cells express the pro-alpha2(XI) collagen gene during bone formation in vitro and in vivo". J. ... 2001). "Microarray analysis of gene expression in human donor corneas". Arch. Ophthalmol. 119 (11): 1629-34. doi:10.1001/ ...
Patel DV, McGhee CN (2007). "Contemporary in vivo confocal microscopy of the living human cornea using white light and laser ... The authors speculate about fluorescent dyes for in vivo investigations. They cite Minsky's patent, thank Steve Baer, at the ... and quantification of endothelial cells of the cornea.[9] It is used for localizing and identifying the presence of filamentary ...
While its in vivo synthetic pathway has not been defined, 10-epi-PD1 has anti-inflammatory activity. The following table lists ... response along with various other aspects of a pathologically enhanced inflammatory response in experimental models of cornea ... resist in vivo metabolic inactivation. The SPM possess overlapping activities which work to resolve inflammation. SPMs ( ... has been found in inflamed exudates of animal models and possesses in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity almost as ...
SHG microscopy has been used for extensive studies of the cornea and lamina cribrosa sclerae, both of which consist primarily ... "Application of second harmonic imaging microscopy to assess structural changes in optic nerve head structure ex vivo". Journal ... Han, M; Giese, G; Bille, J (2005). "Second harmonic generation imaging of collagen fibrils in cornea and sclera". Optics ...
Patel, S.; McLaren, J.; Hodge, D.; Bourne, W. (April 2002). "Confocal Microscopy In Vivo in Corneas of Long-Term Contact Lens ... This is probably because most contact lens-induced changes to the cornea are caused by hypoxia, which occurs as long as any ... Contact lenses Keratitis Cornea Fungal contamination of contact lenses Liu, Z.; Pflugfelder, S. (January 2000). "The effects of ... When determining the effects of long-term contact lens use on the cornea, many studies do not differentiate between users of ...
Conventionally in a corneal transplantation, doctors use a whole cornea or parts of the five layers of the cornea to perform ... There are additional research studies in progress to elucidate the regenerating capacity of the endothelial cells in vivo. ... For that to happen the inside corneal layer the endothelium pumps out water from the cornea so that the cornea remains ... PDEK is different from the whole cornea transplantation in which the transplantation of entire donor cornea to the recipient is ...
Guo T, Cornea RL, Huke S, Camors E, Yang Y, Picht E, Fruen BR, Bers DM (June 2010). "Kinetics of FKBP12.6 binding to ryanodine ... and survival require calcium flux through cardiac ryanodine receptors in vivo". Journal of Biological Chemistry. 288 (26): ...
"Artificial Cornea Allows Blind Man to See Again". Fox News. 23 December 2010. Retrieved 6 March 2013. Christine Doyle (20 April ... Daya SM; Watson A; Sharpe JR; Giledi O; Rowe A; Martin R; James SE (March 2005). "Outcomes and DNA analysis of ex vivo expanded ... He has also been published several times in the journal Ophthalmology, as well as in the journals Cornea, the British Journal ... Maccheron LJ, Daya SM (June 2012). "Wedge resection and lamellar dissection for pellucid marginal degeneration". Cornea. 31: ...
"Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal ... "Anti-heparan sulfate peptides that block herpes simplex virus infection in vivo." (2011) "A novel function of heparan sulfate ...
In consequence of the operation of this anabolic pathway, LXs have very short half-lives in vivo, the epi-LXs have longer in ... cornea inflammation; and inflammation-based pain and hyperalgesia. Lipoxins have protective effects in animal models of ... it mimics an estrogenic molecule to stimulate human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro and mouse uterine tissue in vivo. The ... vivo half-lives and thereby greater potencies than their LX epimers, and synthetic lipoxins that are metabolically resistant to ...
It is found in the cornea. Chitin, a component of insect shells and fungal structures, can be de-N-acetylated to form chitosan ... acquiring GAG side chains in vivo. One counter example is the protein chymase, which directly binds to heparin. Dermatan ...
Ribeiro C, Ebner A, and Affolter M (2002) "In vivo imaging reveals different cellular functions for FGF and Dpp signaling in ... Crosson CE, Klyce SD, and Beuerman RW (1986) "Epithelial wound closure in the rabbit cornea. A biphasic process" Invest ... Lawson ND and Weinstein BM (2002) "In vivo imaging of embryonic vascular development using transgenic zebrafish" Dev Biol 248 ( ...
"In vivo laser Doppler holography of the human retina." Biomedical optics express 9, no. 9 (2018): 4113-4129. ...
"Air Pollution and the microvasculature: a crosssectional assessment of in vivo retinal images in the population based ...
... sulfate during endothelial wound healing were investigated in organ cultured human corneas and in vivo in rabbit corneas. ... In wounded organ cultured bovine corneas, there was a decrease in keratan sulfate levels and an increase in chondroitin sulfate ... pattern of occurrence of keratan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate on the corneal endothelial cells in normal and wounded cornea ... of keratan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate on endothelial cell surfaces were investigated on organ cultured bovine corneas ...
... Katsuo Tomoyose,1 Yuka Okada,1 Takayoshi ... "Suppression of In Vivo Neovascularization by the Loss of TRPV1 in Mouse Cornea," Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 2015, Article ...
Barry R. Masters, "Scanning slit confocal microscopy of the in vivo cornea," Opt. Eng. 34(3) (1 March 1995) Include:. ... In-vivo real-time confocal microscopy of the human cornea Proceedings of SPIE (June 24 1993) ... This instrument uses an axial scanning microscope objective to scan through the full thickness of the in vivo cornea. The ... Barry R. Masters, "Scanning slit confocal microscopy of the in vivo cornea," Optical Engineering 34(3), (1 March 1995). https ...
Conclusions: : Transient displacements of the corneal surfaces were observed in ex vivo pig cornea and in vivo human corneas. ... larger displacements observed in ex vivo compared to in vivo corneas suggests that edematous changes in the ex vivo cornea may ... Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force on the Cornea in vivo A. Barmettler; R. H. Silverman; H. O. Lloyd; J. A. Ketterling; Y. ... Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force on the Cornea in vivo You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated ...
An analogous situation also occurs in the in vivo swollen cornea [30]. This observed rigidity of the anterior cornea with ... The in vivo cornea is loaded by the IOP at the endothelial-aqueous interface (figure 1a). The anterior stroma is sealed by the ... In the ex vivo cornea, no active transport occurs and Q+ = Q− = 1. This condition is employed in §6.1 to model in vitro free ... A calibrated value of Q+Q− = 0.965 is found for the normo-hydrated in vivo cornea. As will be discussed in §6.2.1, the positive ...
... ... Laser-scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the cornea is becoming an increasingly popular tool to examine the living ... human cornea with cellular-level detail in both healthy and pathologic states. Here, we describe the use of the IVCM technique ...
... and the mouse cornea in vivo. The results show that the wave velocity can be quantified from the analysis of wave propagation, ... optical coherence tomography measurements of elastic wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms and mouse cornea in vivo," ... optical coherence tomography measurements of elastic wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms and mouse cornea in vivo. ... optical coherence tomography measurements of elastic wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms and mouse cornea in vivo," J ...
Cornea , July 2000. Autosomal Recessive Cornea Plana: In Vivo Corneal Morphology and Corneal Sensitivity ... Tissue morphology of three corneas was evaluated, and in two corneas thickness of corneal layers was measured using in vivo ... Autosomal Recessive Cornea Plana: In Vivo Corneal Morphology and Corneal Sensitivity You will receive an email whenever this ... Diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis in vivo with confocal microscopy. Cornea. 1995;14:10-17. [PubMed] ...
In vivo confocal microscopic characterisation of the cornea in chronic graft-versus-host disease related severe dry eye disease ... In vivo confocal microscopic characterisation of the cornea in chronic graft-versus-host disease related severe dry eye disease ... Aims To first describe in vivo confocal microscopic (IVCM) corneal findings in severe dry eye syndrome due to ocular chronic ... Conclusions IVCM findings of the cornea in patients with severe ocular cGvHD include a rarefaction of the sub basal corneal ...
... ResearchSpace/Manakin Repository. ... Evaluation of 2 ex vivo Bovine Cornea Storage Protocols for Drug Delivery Applications.. en. ... Corneas stored in OC demonstrated significantly higher hydration and permeability when compared to those stored in PBS. ... The use of corneal tissue for ex vivo therapeutic evaluations is limited due to its rapid loss of viability after excision. ...
... scanning in vivo confocal microscopy reveals two morphologically distinct populations of stromal nerves in normal human corneas ... scanning in vivo confocal microscopy reveals two morphologically distinct populations of stromal nerves in normal human corneas ... was performed via an established database of laser-scanning in vivo confocal microscopy on images of the central cornea of ... Background: The purpose of this study was to use laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy to elucidate the location and ...
Localization of candidate stem and progenitor cell markers within the human cornea limbus and bulbar conjunctiva in vivo and in ... MATERIALS AND METHODS Corneas Postmortem human corneas stored in Optisol, obtained from the Eye Bank of Canada (Toronto, Canada ... 2005 21Watanabe et al., 2004 RESULTS Immunostaining of Intact Cornea Human corneas were immunostained for candidate markers and ... Localization of Candidate Stem and Progenitor Cell Markers Within the Human Cornea, Limbus, and Bulbar Conjunctiva In Vivo and ...
Assessment of the influence of viscoelasticity of cornea in animal ex vivo model using air‐puff optical coherence tomography ... Assessment of the influence of viscoelasticity of cornea in animal ex vivo model using air‐puff optical coherence tomography ... puff force and corneal apex displacement of porcine corneas ex vivo is demonstrated. Simultaneous recording of time‐evolution ... In vivo measurement of the human epidermal thickness in different localizations by multiphoton laser tomography also published ...
Rapid Image Evaluation System for Corneal In Vivo Confocal Microscopy. Sindt, Christine W.; Lay, Bruno; Bouchard, Helene; More ... Nucleic Acid Testing and Tissue Safety: An Eye Banks Five-Year Review of HIV and Hepatitis Testing for Donor Corneas. Heck, ... Optical Coherence Tomography and Ultrasound Biomicroscopy Imaging of Opaque Corneas. Zhou, Shi-you; Wang, Chun-xiao; Cai, Xiao- ... Quantitative 3-Dimensional Corneal Imaging In Vivo Using a Modified HRT-RCM Confocal Microscope. Petroll, W. Matthew; Weaver, ...
Compared with NL corneas, in DM wounded corneas, the expression of both SEMA3C and NRP2 in CECs was repressed at both mRNA and ... SEMA3C Promotes Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing and Sensory Nerve Regeneration In Vivo. Given the upregulation of SEMA3C in ... Hence, in nonwounded corneas, SEMA3C may have minimal effects on CECs. In response to wounding in NL corneas, CEC expression of ... 2). In nonwounded corneas, very faint or no staining can be detected for all four proteins in NL and DM corneas as well as in ...
Helping you find trustworthy answers on Cornea , Latest evidence made easy ... Find all the evidence you need on Cornea via the Trip Database. ... Stromal-wounded ex vivo canine corneas exhibited greater ... Assessment of Topical Therapies for Improving the Optical Clarity Following Stromal Wounding in a Novel Ex Vivo Canine Cornea ... Optimization of femtosecond lasers using porcine and human donor corneas before in vivo use. (Abstract). Optimization of ...
Presents high-magnification in vivo images of the morphology of recurrent corneal erosions and epithelial edema as captured by ... In Vivo Morphology in the Human Cornea (2012) and Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca and Filamentary Keratopathy: In Vivo Morphology in ... In Vivo Morphology in the Human Cornea. Authors. * Helena M. Tabery Copyright. 2015. Publisher. Springer International ... In Vivo Morphology in the Human Cornea (2010), Varicella-Zoster Virus Epithelial Keratitis in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus: In ...
Diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis in vivo with confocal microscopy. Cornea. 1995 Jan;14(1):10-7. ... The epidemic of Acanthamoeba keratitis: where do we stand? Cornea. 1998;17:3-10. ...
... Bohn, Sebastian; Sperlich, Karsten; Allgeier, ... We present an in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy based method for large 3D reconstruction of the cornea on a cellular ...
Ex vivo human cornea model. Thirty-six human corneas were obtained from the Lions Eye Bank of Texas, Houston, TX after informed ... Corneal virulence was assessed ex vivo by inoculating C. albicans onto superficially scarified human corneas that were ... Thewes S, Kretschmar M, Park H, Schaller M, Filler SG, Hube B. In vivo and ex vivo comparative transcriptional profiling of ... albicans per cornea. Inoculated corneas were put epithelial side up into a 6 well culture dish (Corning, Corning, NY) so that ...
... in ex vivo and cultured cells. For verification, PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced. DNA dot blot analysis was performed ... BMPR-IB and BMPR-II was detected in ex vivo and cultured epithelium and stroma. The level of transcription was higher in ... Growth/differentiation factor-5 induces angiogenesis in vivo.. *Hisahiko Yamashita, Aki Shimizu, +7 authors Kohei Miyazono ... BMP7 Gene Transfer via Gold Nanoparticles into Stroma Inhibits Corneal Fibrosis In Vivo. *Ashish Tandon, Ajay Sharma, Jason T. ...
Cornea. 2012 Dec;31(12):1508. doi: 10.1097/ICO.0b013e31825904c0. No abstract available. ... Diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis in vivo with confocal microscopy.. Winchester K, Mathers WD, Sutphin JE, Daley TE. ...
Experiments in vivo (3). *. Informed consent (32). *. Research and publication ethics (38) ...
METHODS: The central corneas of 120 subjects (mean age, 41 years; range, 11 to 80 years) were examined using an in vivo slit- ... A population study of the normal cornea using an in vivo, slit-scanning confocal microscope By Joanna G. Hollingsworth, Inma ... PURPOSE: To document qualitative and quantitative changes in the normal, healthy human cornea with age using the confocal ... Topics: 111300 OPTOMETRY AND OPHTHALMOLOGY, confocal microscopy, normal cornea, keratocyte density, endothelial cell density ...
  • Water is the principal component of stroma which saturates the collagen solid phase, solvates the ionic phase and accounts for about 78% of the cornea by weight [ 7 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Conclusions IVCM findings of the cornea in patients with severe ocular cGvHD include a rarefaction of the sub basal corneal nerve plexus and dense accumulation of hyper-reflective extracellular matrix in the anterior stroma. (bmj.com)
  • The mutant stroma exhibited impaired keratocyte differentiation with accelerated cell proliferation and reduction in the accumulation of collagen type I. The mutant embryos also showed hyperproliferative nodules in the ocular surface epithelia with anomaly of cornea-type epithelial differentiation and the absence of the epithelial basement membrane. (molvis.org)
  • The expression of alpha11 integrin chain in the cornea is of great interest, as it is part of the alpha11beta1 integrin receptor for collagen type I, the predominant component of the corneal stroma. (diva-portal.org)
  • To identify mediators of granulocyte recruitment to the corneal stroma, we determined the relative contribution of chemokine receptors CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)-2 (IL-8R homologue) and CCR1 using a murine model of ocular onchocerciasis (river blindness) in which neutrophils and eosinophils migrate from peripheral vessels to the central cornea. (jimmunol.org)
  • The corneas in groups-C & -F additionally received concurrent CXL with saline-diluted (0.10%) riboflavin instilled on the stroma, irradiated with high-irradiance UV-A through the repositioned flap. (escrs.org)
  • Localization of candidate stem and progenitor cell markers within the human cornea limbus and bulbar conjunctiva in vivo and in cell culture. (docme.ru)
  • 1999). In some cases, corneal stem cells, which are believed to lie within the limbus of the cornea, are grafted in explant or following expansion in cell culture to resurface the cornea in disorders where epithelial stem cells are considered damaged or Grant sponsor: Canadian Stem Cell Network. (docme.ru)
  • In normal corneas, sensory nerve regeneration is robust, starting near the limbus with newly formed sensory nerve fibers and endings arranged in parallel and extending radially toward the center of the cornea ( 16 , 18 , 19 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Diabetic mouse corneas exhibit changes similar to those observed in diabetic human corneas, with fewer nerve insertion sites near the limbus, and severely delayed regeneration of sensory nerve endings that exhibit a tortuous, fragmented appearance ( 20 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • 3 , 4 The migration of dendritic immune cells from the limbus into the central cornea may be initiated by proinflammatory cytokines or chemokines 5 , 6 and may be accomplished via pathways along the nerve plexus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • range, 11 to 80 years) were examined using an in vivo slit-scanning real-time confocal microscope. (core.ac.uk)
  • Human CECs (HCECs) normally have a limited proliferative capacity in vivo [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ] because they are maintained in a Gl-phase arrested state [ 8 , 9 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • The endothelial cells originate from cranial neural crest cells, forming a single monolayer of hexagonal cells lining the Descemet's membrane of the posterior cornea [ 1 ], and play a critical role in mediating vision function [ 2 ]. (medsci.org)
  • In contrast, the endothelial cells form a single hexagonal monolayer located at the Descemet's membrane in the posterior cornea [ 2 ], and play a significant role in maintaining visual function [ 3 ]. (medsci.org)