The infective system of a virus, composed of the viral genome, a protein core, and a protein coat called a capsid, which may be naked or enclosed in a lipoprotein envelope called the peplos.
Proteins found in any species of virus.
The assembly of VIRAL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS and nucleic acid (VIRAL DNA or VIRAL RNA) to form a VIRUS PARTICLE.
The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.
The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.
Layers of protein which surround the capsid in animal viruses with tubular nucleocapsids. The envelope consists of an inner layer of lipids and virus specified proteins also called membrane or matrix proteins. The outer layer consists of one or more types of morphological subunits called peplomers which project from the viral envelope; this layer always consists of glycoproteins.
Viral proteins that are components of the mature assembled VIRUS PARTICLES. They may include nucleocapsid core proteins (gag proteins), enzymes packaged within the virus particle (pol proteins), and membrane components (env proteins). These do not include the proteins encoded in the VIRAL GENOME that are produced in infected cells but which are not packaged in the mature virus particle,i.e. the so called non-structural proteins (VIRAL NONSTRUCTURAL PROTEINS).
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Release of a virus from the host cell following VIRUS ASSEMBLY and maturation. Egress can occur by host cell lysis, EXOCYTOSIS, or budding through the plasma membrane.
The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.
The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.
A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.
The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.
A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.
Proteins coded by the retroviral gag gene. The products are usually synthesized as protein precursors or POLYPROTEINS, which are then cleaved by viral proteases to yield the final products. Many of the final products are associated with the nucleoprotein core of the virion. gag is short for group-specific antigen.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A protein-nucleic acid complex which forms part or all of a virion. It consists of a CAPSID plus enclosed nucleic acid. Depending on the virus, the nucleocapsid may correspond to a naked core or be surrounded by a membranous envelope.
The type species of SIMPLEXVIRUS causing most forms of non-genital herpes simplex in humans. Primary infection occurs mainly in infants and young children and then the virus becomes latent in the dorsal root ganglion. It then is periodically reactivated throughout life causing mostly benign conditions.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic factors influence the differential control of gene action in viruses.
A species of VARICELLOVIRUS producing a respiratory infection (PSEUDORABIES) in swine, its natural host. It also produces an usually fatal ENCEPHALOMYELITIS in cattle, sheep, dogs, cats, foxes, and mink.
The entering of cells by viruses following VIRUS ATTACHMENT. This is achieved by ENDOCYTOSIS, by direct MEMBRANE FUSION of the viral membrane with the CELL MEMBRANE, or by translocation of the whole virus across the cell membrane.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
Electron microscopy involving rapid freezing of the samples. The imaging of frozen-hydrated molecules and organelles permits the best possible resolution closest to the living state, free of chemical fixatives or stains.
Proteins associated with the inner surface of the lipid bilayer of the viral envelope. These proteins have been implicated in control of viral transcription and may possibly serve as the "glue" that binds the nucleocapsid to the appropriate membrane site during viral budding from the host cell.
Method for measuring viral infectivity and multiplication in CULTURED CELLS. Clear lysed areas or plaques develop as the VIRAL PARTICLES are released from the infected cells during incubation. With some VIRUSES, the cells are killed by a cytopathic effect; with others, the infected cells are not killed but can be detected by their hemadsorptive ability. Sometimes the plaque cells contain VIRAL ANTIGENS which can be measured by IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.
Separation of particles according to density by employing a gradient of varying densities. At equilibrium each particle settles in the gradient at a point equal to its density. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds within RNA. EC 3.1.-.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).
Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.
Proteins found mainly in icosahedral DNA and RNA viruses. They consist of proteins directly associated with the nucleic acid inside the NUCLEOCAPSID.
Proteins encoded by the GAG GENE of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE, consisting of herpes simplex-like viruses. The type species is HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.
A family of unenveloped RNA viruses with cubic symmetry. The twelve genera include ORTHOREOVIRUS; ORBIVIRUS; COLTIVIRUS; ROTAVIRUS; Aquareovirus, Cypovirus, Phytoreovirus, Fijivirus, Seadornavirus, Idnoreovirus, Mycoreovirus, and Oryzavirus.
The binding of virus particles to receptors on the host cell surface. For enveloped viruses, the virion ligand is usually a surface glycoprotein as is the cellular receptor. For non-enveloped viruses, the virus CAPSID serves as the ligand.
The type species of VESICULOVIRUS causing a disease symptomatically similar to FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cattle, horses, and pigs. It may be transmitted to other species including humans, where it causes influenza-like symptoms.
Trans-acting proteins which accelerate retroviral virus replication. The vpr proteins act in trans to increase the levels of specified proteins. vpr is short for viral protein R, where R is undefined.
Proteins encoded by the VIF GENES of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
The production of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS by the constituents of a living organism. The biosynthesis of proteins on RIBOSOMES following an RNA template is termed translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC). There are other, non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NUCLEIC ACID-INDEPENDENT) mechanisms carried out by PEPTIDE SYNTHASES and PEPTIDYLTRANSFERASES. Further modifications of peptide chains yield functional peptide and protein molecules.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
Protein precursors, also known as proproteins or prohormones, are inactive forms of proteins that undergo post-translational modification, such as cleavage, to produce the active functional protein or peptide hormone.
Proteins encoded by the VPR GENES of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
Viruses which lack a complete genome so that they cannot completely replicate or cannot form a protein coat. Some are host-dependent defectives, meaning they can replicate only in cell systems which provide the particular genetic function which they lack. Others, called SATELLITE VIRUSES, are able to replicate only when their genetic defect is complemented by a helper virus.
A species of ENTEROVIRUS which is the causal agent of POLIOMYELITIS in humans. Three serotypes (strains) exist. Transmission is by the fecal-oral route, pharyngeal secretions, or mechanical vector (flies). Vaccines with both inactivated and live attenuated virus have proven effective in immunizing against the infection.
A broad category of viral proteins that play indirect roles in the biological processes and activities of viruses. Included here are proteins that either regulate the expression of viral genes or are involved in modifying host cell functions. Many of the proteins in this category serve multiple functions.
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.
A genus of plant viruses in the family CLOSTEROVIRIDAE containing highly flexuous filaments. Some members are important pathogens of crop plants. Natural vectors include APHIDS, whiteflies, and mealybugs. The type species is Beet yellows virus.
A species in the genus N4-like viruses, in the family PODOVIRIDAE, that infects E. coli.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.
Proteins synthesized by HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES such as the HIV-1 and HIV-2.
Retrovirally encoded accessary proteins that play an essential role VIRUS REPLICATION. They are found in the cytoplasm of host cells and associate with a variety of host cell proteins. Vif stands for "virion infectivity factor".
A family of enveloped, linear, double-stranded DNA viruses infecting a wide variety of animals. Subfamilies, based on biological characteristics, include: ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE; BETAHERPESVIRINAE; and GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE.
Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA.
Trans-acting protein that combines with host factors to induce immediate early gene transcription in herpes simplex virus.
Arthropod-borne viruses. A non-taxonomic designation for viruses that can replicate in both vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Included are some members of the following families: ARENAVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; TOGAVIRIDAE; and FLAVIVIRIDAE. (From Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)
Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Viral proteins found in either the NUCLEOCAPSID or the viral core (VIRAL CORE PROTEINS).
A family of insect viruses causing disease in lepidopterous larvae, most commonly from species of the owlet moth family Noctuidae. There is one genus: Ascovirus.
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting New World primates and other species. HERPESVIRUS 2, SAIMIRIINE is the type species.
Viruses whose hosts are bacterial cells.
The adherence and merging of cell membranes, intracellular membranes, or artificial membranes to each other or to viruses, parasites, or interstitial particles through a variety of chemical and physical processes.
Spherical RNA viruses, in the order NIDOVIRALES, infecting a wide range of animals including humans. Transmission is by fecal-oral and respiratory routes. Mechanical transmission is also common. There are two genera: CORONAVIRUS and TOROVIRUS.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
The type species of ALPHAVIRUS normally transmitted to birds by CULEX mosquitoes in Egypt, South Africa, India, Malaya, the Philippines, and Australia. It may be associated with fever in humans. Serotypes (differing by less than 17% in nucleotide sequence) include Babanki, Kyzylagach, and Ockelbo viruses.
DNA sequences that form the coding region for proteins associated with the viral core in retroviruses. gag is short for group-specific antigen.
Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.
Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.
Polyprotein products of a fused portion of retroviral mRNA containing the gag and pol genes. The polyprotein is synthesized only five percent of the time since pol is out of frame with gag, and is generated by ribosomal frameshifting.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
A genus of owlet moths of the family Noctuidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.
An enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of cytidine, forming uridine. EC 3.5.4.5.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A strain of Murine leukemia virus (LEUKEMIA VIRUS, MURINE) arising during the propagation of S37 mouse sarcoma, and causing lymphoid leukemia in mice. It also infects rats and newborn hamsters. It is apparently transmitted to embryos in utero and to newborns through mother's milk.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
An enzyme that synthesizes DNA on an RNA template. It is encoded by the pol gene of retroviruses and by certain retrovirus-like elements. EC 2.7.7.49.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
A cultured line of C3H mouse FIBROBLASTS that do not adhere to one another and do not express CADHERINS.
A fractionated cell extract that maintains a biological function. A subcellular fraction isolated by ultracentrifugation or other separation techniques must first be isolated so that a process can be studied free from all of the complex side reactions that occur in a cell. The cell-free system is therefore widely used in cell biology. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p166)
Agglutination of ERYTHROCYTES by a virus.
A strain of MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS associated with mouse tumors similar to those caused by the FRIEND MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS. It is a replication-competent murine leukemia virus. It can act as a helper virus when complexing with a defective transforming component, RAUSCHER SPLEEN FOCUS-FORMING VIRUS.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
Centrifugation using a rotating chamber of large capacity in which to separate cell organelles by density-gradient centrifugation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A suborder of PRIMATES consisting of six families: CEBIDAE (some New World monkeys), ATELIDAE (some New World monkeys), CERCOPITHECIDAE (Old World monkeys), HYLOBATIDAE (gibbons and siamangs), CALLITRICHINAE (marmosets and tamarins), and HOMINIDAE (humans and great apes).
Uridine is a nucleoside, specifically a derivative of pyrimidine, that is composed of a uracil molecule joined to a ribose sugar molecule through a β-N1 glycosidic bond, and has significant roles in RNA synthesis, energy transfer, and cell signaling.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
A family of RNA plant viruses infecting disparate plant families. They are transmitted by specific aphid vectors. There are three genera: LUTEOVIRUS; Polerovirus; and Enamovirus.
A technique used to separate particles according to their densities in a continuous density gradient. The sample is usually mixed with a solution of known gradient materials and subjected to centrifugation. Each particle sediments to the position at which the gradient density is equal to its own. The range of the density gradient is usually greater than that of the sample particles. It is used in purifying biological materials such as proteins, nucleic acids, organelles, and cell types.
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.
Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.
Proteins encoded by the NEF GENES of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
A genus of the family REOVIRIDAE infecting vertebrates only. Transmission is horizontal and infected species include humans, birds, cattle, monkeys, sheep, swine, baboons, and bats. MAMMALIAN ORTHOREOVIRUS is the type species.
Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.
An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
The type species of ALPHARETROVIRUS producing latent or manifest lymphoid leukosis in fowl.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
Proteins conjugated with nucleic acids.
A family of very small DNA viruses containing a single molecule of single-stranded DNA and consisting of two subfamilies: PARVOVIRINAE and DENSOVIRINAE. They infect both vertebrates and invertebrates.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Viruses whose taxonomic relationships have not been established.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
A species of POLYOMAVIRUS originally isolated from Rhesus monkey kidney tissue. It produces malignancy in human and newborn hamster kidney cell cultures.
Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.
Proteins, usually glycoproteins, found in the viral envelopes of a variety of viruses. They promote cell membrane fusion and thereby may function in the uptake of the virus by cells.
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
DNA sequences that form the coding region for a trans-activator protein that specifies rapid growth in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). vpr is short for viral protein R, where R is undefined.
Microscopy in which the samples are first stained immunocytochemically and then examined using an electron microscope. Immunoelectron microscopy is used extensively in diagnostic virology as part of very sensitive immunoassays.
Stable phosphorus atoms that have the same atomic number as the element phosphorus, but differ in atomic weight. P-31 is a stable phosphorus isotope.
Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.
Group of alpharetroviruses (ALPHARETROVIRUS) producing sarcomata and other tumors in chickens and other fowl and also in pigeons, ducks, and RATS.
A phenomenon in which infection by a first virus results in resistance of cells or tissues to infection by a second, unrelated virus.
A family of bacteriophages which are characterized by short, non-contractile tails.
Fusion of somatic cells in vitro or in vivo, which results in somatic cell hybridization.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Species of GAMMARETROVIRUS, containing many well-defined strains, producing leukemia in mice. Disease is commonly induced by injecting filtrates of propagable tumors into newborn mice.
A genus in the family FILOVIRIDAE consisting of several distinct species of Ebolavirus, each containing separate strains. These viruses cause outbreaks of a contagious, hemorrhagic disease (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER, EBOLA) in humans, usually with high mortality.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Products of the retroviral NEF GENE. They play a role as accessory proteins that influence the rate of viral infectivity and the destruction of the host immune system. nef gene products were originally found as factors that trans-suppress viral replication and function as negative regulators of transcription. nef stands for negative factor.
Viruses whose hosts are in the domain ARCHAEA.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.
A species of temperate bacteriophage in the genus P22-like viruses, family PODOVIRIDAE, that infects SALMONELLA species. The genome consists of double-stranded DNA, terminally redundant, and circularly permuted.
Proteins from the family Retroviridae. The most frequently encountered member of this family is the Rous sarcoma virus protein.
A group of acute infections caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 that is characterized by the development of one or more small fluid-filled vesicles with a raised erythematous base on the skin or mucous membrane. It occurs as a primary infection or recurs due to a reactivation of a latent infection. (Dorland, 27th ed.)
14-carbon saturated monocarboxylic acids.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.
A highly contagious herpesvirus infection affecting the central nervous system of swine, cattle, dogs, cats, rats, and other animals.
A family of RNA viruses causing INFLUENZA and other diseases. There are five recognized genera: INFLUENZAVIRUS A; INFLUENZAVIRUS B; INFLUENZAVIRUS C; ISAVIRUS; and THOGOTOVIRUS.
Proteins found in the tail sections of DNA and RNA viruses. It is believed that these proteins play a role in directing chain folding and assembly of polypeptide chains.
Specific hemagglutinin subtypes encoded by VIRUSES.
The type species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing CHICKENPOX (varicella) and HERPES ZOSTER (shingles) in humans.
Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.
The cutaneous and occasional systemic reactions associated with vaccination using smallpox (variola) vaccine.
A tomographic technique for obtaining 3-dimensional images with transmission electron microscopy.
A genus of the family BACULOVIRIDAE, subfamily Eubaculovirinae, characterized by the formation of crystalline, polyhedral occlusion bodies in the host cell nucleus. The type species is Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus.
DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.
Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.

The L1 major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 11 recombinant virus-like particles interacts with heparin and cell-surface glycosaminoglycans on human keratinocytes. (1/5443)

The L1 major capsid protein of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11, a 55-kDa polypeptide, forms particulate structures resembling native virus with an average particle diameter of 50-60 nm when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show in this report that these virus-like particles (VLPs) interact with heparin and with cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) resembling heparin on keratinocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The binding of VLPs to heparin is shown to exhibit an affinity comparable to that of other identified heparin-binding proteins. Immobilized heparin chromatography and surface plasmon resonance were used to show that this interaction can be specifically inhibited by free heparin and dextran sulfate and that the effectiveness of the inhibitor is related to its molecular weight and charge density. Sequence comparison of nine human L1 types revealed a conserved region of the carboxyl terminus containing clustered basic amino acids that bear resemblance to proposed heparin-binding motifs in unrelated proteins. Specific enzymatic cleavage of this region eliminated binding to both immobilized heparin and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells. Removal of heparan sulfate GAGs on keratinocytes by treatment with heparinase or heparitinase resulted in an 80-90% reduction of VLP binding, whereas treatment of cells with laminin, a substrate for alpha6 integrin receptors, provided minimal inhibition. Cells treated with chlorate or substituted beta-D-xylosides, resulting in undersulfation or secretion of GAG chains, also showed a reduced affinity for VLPs. Similarly, binding of VLPs to a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant deficient in GAG synthesis was shown to be only 10% that observed for wild type cells. This report establishes for the first time that the carboxyl-terminal portion of HPV L1 interacts with heparin, and that this region appears to be crucial for interaction with the cell surface.  (+info)

A lipid modified ubiquitin is packaged into particles of several enveloped viruses. (2/5443)

An anti-ubiquitin cross-reactive protein which migrates more slowly (6.5 kDa) by SDS-PAGE than ubiquitin was identified in African swine fever virus particles. This protein was extracted into the detergent phase in Triton X-114 phase separations, showing that it is hydrophobic, and was radiolabelled with both [3H]palmitic acid and [32P]orthophosphate. This indicates that the protein has a similar structure to the membrane associated phosphatidyl ubiquitin described in baculovirus particles. A similar molecule was found in vaccinia virus and herpes simplex virus particles, suggesting that it may be a component of uninfected cell membranes, which is incorporated into membrane layers in virions during morphogenesis.  (+info)

A novel Vpr peptide interactor fused to integrase (IN) restores integration activity to IN-defective HIV-1 virions. (3/5443)

A novel approach to complement human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-defective virions has been identified. The approach involves fusion of a 23-amino-acid stretch to the N-terminus of wild-type IN and coexpression of this chimera with the IN-defective proviral template in virus producing cells. The 23-amino-acid peptide represents a Vpr "interactor," referred to as the the WxxF or WF domain, which apparently leads to docking of the domain along with the fusion partner onto HIV-1 Vpr, thus permitting virion incorporation of the chimeric protein when expressed, in trans, with other viral products. Transfection of the WF-IN expression plasmid along with HIV-1 viral clones that produce Vpr, but bear an IN mutation, results in the release of a proportion of viral particles that are competent for integration. The extent of complementation was assessed using the MAGI cell assay, where integration of viral DNA results in the eventual appearance of easily visible multinucleated blue syncytia. The efficiency of dWF-IN (double copy of WF domain) complementation is not improved markedly by incorporation of a HIV-1 protease cleavage site (PR) between the dWF domain and IN (dWF-PR-IN), unlike that observed with Vpr fusions to IN. Furthermore, the ability of Vpr-PR-IN and dWF-PR-IN to complement IN-defective proviral clones, both of which bear an intervening protease cleavage site, appear comparable. Western blotting analyses using virions isolated through sucrose cushions demonstrate clearly the incorporation of the dWF-IN fusion protein into Vpr containing HIV-1 particles but not in Vpr-deficient virions. Additional Western blotting analyses indicate that all Vpr-IN and dWF-IN chimeras, with or without a PR site, are packaged into virions. The efficiency of virion incorporation of Vpr-IN and dWF-IN chimeras appears approximately comparable by Western blotting analysis. The ability of dWF-IN to complement IN-defective proviruses with efficiency similar to that of Vpr-PR-IN and dWF-PR-IN indicates that dWF-IN retains the full complement of functions necessary for integration of proviral DNA and is likely due to the benign nature of this small domain at the amino-terminus of IN.  (+info)

A new picornavirus isolated from bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). (4/5443)

A previously unknown picornavirus was isolated from bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). Electron microscopy images and sequence data of the prototype isolate, named Ljungan virus, showed that it is a picornavirus. The amino acid sequences of predicted Ljungan virus capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 were closely related to the human pathogen echovirus 22 (approximately 70% similarity). A partial 5' noncoding region sequence of Ljungan virus showed the highest degree of relatedness to cardioviruses. Two additional isolates were serologically and molecularly related to the prototype.  (+info)

Two types of HTLV-1 particles are released from MT-2 cells. (5/5443)

The MT-2 cell line transformed by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) contains one complete provirus and seven defective proviruses. Four defective genomes have an identical structure (LTR-MA-deltaCA-pX-LTR) with an open reading frame that spans from MA to pX, giving rise to a 3.4-kb (24S) RNA transcript encoding a chimeric Gag-pX protein, p28. MT-2 cells release two distinct types of virions. The major "classic" type of particle has a buoyant density of 1.155-1.16 g/cm3 and contains the standard HTLV-I structural proteins and reverse transcriptase (RT). In addition, about 5% of particles are "light," approximately 1.12 g/cm3, and contain p28, RT activity, and the 3.4-kb RNA transcript. RT-PCR and in vitro translation indicate that some of the classic HTLV-1 particles package 3.4-kb RNA as well as full-length 8.5-kb RNA. In addition to matrix features, the p28 protein has a motif resembling a zinc finger at the C-terminal, pX0 region, which may play a role in the assembly of the defective light virions.  (+info)

Noncytopathic flavivirus replicon RNA-based system for expression and delivery of heterologous genes. (6/5443)

Noncytopathic replicons of the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) were employed for expression and delivery of heterologous genes. Replicon vector C20DX2Arep, containing a unique cloning site followed by the sequence of 2A autoprotease of foot-and-mouth disease virus, was constructed and used for expression of a number of heterologous genes including chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), green fluorescent protein (GFP), beta-galactosidase, glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus, and the Core and NS3 genes of hepatitis C virus. The expression and proper processing of these genes upon transfection of BHK21 cells with the recombinant replicon RNAs were demonstrated by immunofluorescence, radioimmunoprecipitation, and appropriate reporter gene assays. Most of these recombinant KUN replicon RNAs were also successfully packaged into secreted virus-like particles (VLPs) by subsequent transfection with Semliki Forest virus replicon RNA expressing KUN structural genes. Infection of BHK21 and Vero cells with these VLPs resulted in continuous replication of the recombinant replicon RNAs and prolonged expression of the cloned genes without any cytopathic effect. We also developed a replicon vector for generation of stable cell lines continuously expressing heterologous genes by inserting an encephalomyelocarditis virus internal ribosomal entry site-neomycin transferase gene cassette into the 3'-untranslated region of the C20DX2Arep vector. Using this vector (C20DX2ArepNeo), stable BHK cell lines persistently expressing GFP and CAT genes for up to 17 passages were established. Thus noncytopathic KUN replicon vectors with the ability to be packaged into VLPs should provide a useful tool for the development of noninfectious and noncytopathic vaccines as well as for gene therapy applications.  (+info)

Intranasal delivery of recombinant parvovirus-like particles elicits cytotoxic T-cell and neutralizing antibody responses. (7/5443)

We previously demonstrated that chimeric porcine parvovirus-like particles (PPV:VLP) carrying heterologous epitopes, when injected intraperitoneally into mice without adjuvant, activate strong CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses specific for the foreign epitopes. In the present study, we investigated the immunogenicity of PPV:VLP carrying a CD8(+) T-cell epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) administered by mucosal routes. Mice immunized intranasally with recombinant PPV:VLP, in the absence of adjuvant, developed high levels of PPV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and/or IgA in their serum, as well as in mucosal sites such as the bronchoalveolar and intestinal fluids. Antibodies in sera from mice immunized parenterally or intranasally with PPV:VLP were strongly neutralizing in vitro. Intranasal immunization with PPV:VLP carrying the LCMV CD8(+) T-cell epitope also elicited a strong peptide-specific cytotoxic-T-cell (CTL) response. In contrast, mice orally immunized with recombinant PPV:VLP did not develop any antibody or CTL responses. We also showed that mice primed with PPV:VLP are still able to develop strong CTL responses after subsequent immunization with chimeric PPV:VLP carrying a foreign CD8(+) T-cell epitope. These results highlight the attractive potential of PPV:VLP as a safe, nonreplicating antigen carrier to stimulate systemic and mucosal immunity after nasal administration.  (+info)

Human antibody responses to mature and immature forms of viral envelope in respiratory syncytial virus infection: significance for subunit vaccines. (8/5443)

A number of antibodies generated during human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have been cloned by the phage library approach. Antibodies reactive with an immunodominant epitope on the F glycoprotein of this virus have a high affinity for affinity-purified F antigen. These antibodies, however, have a much lower affinity for mature F glycoprotein on the surface of infected cells and are nonneutralizing. In contrast, a potent neutralizing antibody has a high affinity for mature F protein but a much lower affinity for purified F protein or F protein in viral lysates. The data indicate that at least two F protein immunogens are produced during natural RSV infection: immature F, found in viral lysates, and mature F, found on infected cells or virions. Binding studies with polyclonal human immunoglobulin G suggest that the antibody responses to the two immunogens are of similar magnitudes. Competitive binding studies suggest that overlap between the responses is relatively limited. A mature envelope with an antigenic configuration different from that of the immature envelope has an evolutionary advantage in that the infecting virus is less subject to neutralization by the humoral response to the immature envelope that inevitably arises following lysis of infected cells. Subunit vaccines may be at a disadvantage because they most often resemble immature envelope molecules and ignore this aspect of viral evasion.  (+info)

A virion is the complete, infectious form of a virus outside its host cell. It consists of the viral genome (DNA or RNA) enclosed within a protein coat called the capsid, which is often surrounded by a lipid membrane called the envelope. The envelope may contain viral proteins and glycoproteins that aid in attachment to and entry into host cells during infection. The term "virion" emphasizes the infectious nature of the virus particle, as opposed to non-infectious components like individual capsid proteins or naked viral genome.

Viral proteins are the proteins that are encoded by the viral genome and are essential for the viral life cycle. These proteins can be structural or non-structural and play various roles in the virus's replication, infection, and assembly process. Structural proteins make up the physical structure of the virus, including the capsid (the protein shell that surrounds the viral genome) and any envelope proteins (that may be present on enveloped viruses). Non-structural proteins are involved in the replication of the viral genome and modulation of the host cell environment to favor viral replication. Overall, a thorough understanding of viral proteins is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

Virus assembly, also known as virion assembly, is the final stage in the virus life cycle where individual viral components come together to form a complete viral particle or virion. This process typically involves the self-assembly of viral capsid proteins around the viral genome (DNA or RNA) and, in enveloped viruses, the acquisition of a lipid bilayer membrane containing viral glycoproteins. The specific mechanisms and regulation of virus assembly vary among different viral families, but it is often directed by interactions between viral structural proteins and genomic nucleic acid.

Virus replication is the process by which a virus produces copies or reproduces itself inside a host cell. This involves several steps:

1. Attachment: The virus attaches to a specific receptor on the surface of the host cell.
2. Penetration: The viral genetic material enters the host cell, either by invagination of the cell membrane or endocytosis.
3. Uncoating: The viral genetic material is released from its protective coat (capsid) inside the host cell.
4. Replication: The viral genetic material uses the host cell's machinery to produce new viral components, such as proteins and nucleic acids.
5. Assembly: The newly synthesized viral components are assembled into new virus particles.
6. Release: The newly formed viruses are released from the host cell, often through lysis (breaking) of the cell membrane or by budding off the cell membrane.

The specific mechanisms and details of virus replication can vary depending on the type of virus. Some viruses, such as DNA viruses, use the host cell's DNA polymerase to replicate their genetic material, while others, such as RNA viruses, use their own RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase enzymes. Understanding the process of virus replication is important for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

A capsid is the protein shell that encloses and protects the genetic material of a virus. It is composed of multiple copies of one or more proteins that are arranged in a specific structure, which can vary in shape and symmetry depending on the type of virus. The capsid plays a crucial role in the viral life cycle, including protecting the viral genome from host cell defenses, mediating attachment to and entry into host cells, and assisting with the assembly of new virus particles during replication.

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Capsid proteins are the structural proteins that make up the capsid, which is the protective shell of a virus. The capsid encloses the viral genome and helps to protect it from degradation and detection by the host's immune system. Capsid proteins are typically arranged in a symmetrical pattern and can self-assemble into the capsid structure when exposed to the viral genome.

The specific arrangement and composition of capsid proteins vary between different types of viruses, and they play important roles in the virus's life cycle, including recognition and binding to host cells, entry into the cell, and release of the viral genome into the host cytoplasm. Capsid proteins can also serve as targets for antiviral therapies and vaccines.

Viral envelope proteins are structural proteins found in the envelope that surrounds many types of viruses. These proteins play a crucial role in the virus's life cycle, including attachment to host cells, fusion with the cell membrane, and entry into the host cell. They are typically made up of glycoproteins and are often responsible for eliciting an immune response in the host organism. The exact structure and function of viral envelope proteins vary between different types of viruses.

Viral structural proteins are the protein components that make up the viral particle or capsid, providing structure and stability to the virus. These proteins are encoded by the viral genome and are involved in the assembly of new virus particles during the replication cycle. They can be classified into different types based on their location and function, such as capsid proteins, matrix proteins, and envelope proteins. Capsid proteins form the protein shell that encapsulates the viral genome, while matrix proteins are located between the capsid and the envelope, and envelope proteins are embedded in the lipid bilayer membrane that surrounds some viruses.

Viral DNA refers to the genetic material present in viruses that consist of DNA as their core component. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the two types of nucleic acids that are responsible for storing and transmitting genetic information in living organisms. Viruses are infectious agents much smaller than bacteria that can only replicate inside the cells of other organisms, called hosts.

Viral DNA can be double-stranded (dsDNA) or single-stranded (ssDNA), depending on the type of virus. Double-stranded DNA viruses have a genome made up of two complementary strands of DNA, while single-stranded DNA viruses contain only one strand of DNA.

Examples of dsDNA viruses include Adenoviruses, Herpesviruses, and Poxviruses, while ssDNA viruses include Parvoviruses and Circoviruses. Viral DNA plays a crucial role in the replication cycle of the virus, encoding for various proteins necessary for its multiplication and survival within the host cell.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

'Virus release' in a medical context typically refers to the point at which a virus that has infected a host cell causes that cell to rupture or disintegrate, releasing new viruses into the surrounding tissue or bodily fluids. This is a key step in the replication cycle of many viruses and can lead to the spread of infection throughout the body.

The process of virus release often follows a phase of viral replication inside the host cell, where the virus uses the cell's machinery to produce multiple copies of its genetic material and proteins. Once enough new viruses have been produced, they can cause the host cell membrane to break down, allowing the viruses to exit and infect other cells.

It is important to note that not all viruses follow this pattern of replication, and some may use alternative mechanisms such as budding or exocytosis to release new viruses from infected cells.

Viral genes refer to the genetic material present in viruses that contains the information necessary for their replication and the production of viral proteins. In DNA viruses, the genetic material is composed of double-stranded or single-stranded DNA, while in RNA viruses, it is composed of single-stranded or double-stranded RNA.

Viral genes can be classified into three categories: early, late, and structural. Early genes encode proteins involved in the replication of the viral genome, modulation of host cell processes, and regulation of viral gene expression. Late genes encode structural proteins that make up the viral capsid or envelope. Some viruses also have structural genes that are expressed throughout their replication cycle.

Understanding the genetic makeup of viruses is crucial for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines. By targeting specific viral genes, researchers can develop drugs that inhibit viral replication and reduce the severity of viral infections. Additionally, knowledge of viral gene sequences can inform the development of vaccines that stimulate an immune response to specific viral proteins.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

A viral genome is the genetic material (DNA or RNA) that is present in a virus. It contains all the genetic information that a virus needs to replicate itself and infect its host. The size and complexity of viral genomes can vary greatly, ranging from a few thousand bases to hundreds of thousands of bases. Some viruses have linear genomes, while others have circular genomes. The genome of a virus also contains the information necessary for the virus to hijack the host cell's machinery and use it to produce new copies of the virus. Understanding the genetic makeup of viruses is important for developing vaccines and antiviral treatments.

HIV-1 (Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1) is a species of the retrovirus genus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is primarily transmitted through sexual contact, exposure to infected blood or blood products, and from mother to child during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. HIV-1 infects vital cells in the human immune system, such as CD4+ T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, leading to a decline in their numbers and weakening of the immune response over time. This results in the individual becoming susceptible to various opportunistic infections and cancers that ultimately cause death if left untreated. HIV-1 is the most prevalent form of HIV worldwide and has been identified as the causative agent of the global AIDS pandemic.

'Cercopithecus aethiops' is the scientific name for the monkey species more commonly known as the green monkey. It belongs to the family Cercopithecidae and is native to western Africa. The green monkey is omnivorous, with a diet that includes fruits, nuts, seeds, insects, and small vertebrates. They are known for their distinctive greenish-brown fur and long tail. Green monkeys are also important animal models in biomedical research due to their susceptibility to certain diseases, such as SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus), which is closely related to HIV.

Vaccinia virus is a large, complex DNA virus that belongs to the Poxviridae family. It is the virus used in the production of the smallpox vaccine. The vaccinia virus is not identical to the variola virus, which causes smallpox, but it is closely related and provides cross-protection against smallpox infection.

The vaccinia virus has a unique replication cycle that occurs entirely in the cytoplasm of infected cells, rather than in the nucleus like many other DNA viruses. This allows the virus to evade host cell defenses and efficiently produce new virions. The virus causes the formation of pocks or lesions on the skin, which contain large numbers of virus particles that can be transmitted to others through close contact.

Vaccinia virus has also been used as a vector for the delivery of genes encoding therapeutic proteins, vaccines against other infectious diseases, and cancer therapies. However, the use of vaccinia virus as a vector is limited by its potential to cause adverse reactions in some individuals, particularly those with weakened immune systems or certain skin conditions.

Vero cells are a line of cultured kidney epithelial cells that were isolated from an African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) in the 1960s. They are named after the location where they were initially developed, the Vervet Research Institute in Japan.

Vero cells have the ability to divide indefinitely under certain laboratory conditions and are often used in scientific research, including virology, as a host cell for viruses to replicate. This allows researchers to study the characteristics of various viruses, such as their growth patterns and interactions with host cells. Vero cells are also used in the production of some vaccines, including those for rabies, polio, and Japanese encephalitis.

It is important to note that while Vero cells have been widely used in research and vaccine production, they can still have variations between different cell lines due to factors like passage number or culture conditions. Therefore, it's essential to specify the exact source and condition of Vero cells when reporting experimental results.

"Gene products, GAG" refer to the proteins that are produced by the GAG (Group-specific Antigen) gene found in retroviruses, such as HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). These proteins play a crucial role in the structure and function of the viral particle or virion.

The GAG gene encodes for a polyprotein that is cleaved by a protease into several individual proteins, including matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins. These proteins are involved in the formation of the viral core, which encloses the viral RNA genome and associated enzymes required for replication.

The MA protein is responsible for binding to the host cell membrane during viral entry, while the CA protein forms the capsid shell that surrounds the viral RNA and NC protein. The NC protein binds to the viral RNA and helps to package it into the virion during assembly. Overall, GAG gene products are essential for the life cycle of retroviruses and are important targets for antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected individuals.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

A nucleocapsid is a protein structure that encloses the genetic material (nucleic acid) of certain viruses. It is composed of proteins encoded by the virus itself, which are synthesized inside the host cell and then assemble around the viral genome to form a stable complex.

The nucleocapsid plays an important role in the viral life cycle. It protects the viral genome from degradation by host enzymes and helps to facilitate the packaging of the genome into new virus particles during assembly. Additionally, the nucleocapsid can also play a role in the regulation of viral gene expression and replication.

In some viruses, such as coronaviruses, the nucleocapsid is encased within an envelope derived from the host cell membrane, while in others, it exists as a naked capsid. The structure and composition of the nucleocapsid can vary significantly between different virus families.

Medical Definition of "Herpesvirus 1, Human" (also known as Human Herpesvirus 1 or HHV-1):

Herpesvirus 1, Human is a type of herpesvirus that primarily causes infection in humans. It is also commonly referred to as human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1) or oral herpes. This virus is highly contagious and can be transmitted through direct contact with infected saliva, skin, or mucous membranes.

After initial infection, the virus typically remains dormant in the body's nerve cells and may reactivate later, causing recurrent symptoms. The most common manifestation of HHV-1 infection is oral herpes, characterized by cold sores or fever blisters around the mouth and lips. In some cases, HHV-1 can also cause other conditions such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and keratitis (inflammation of the eye's cornea).

There is no cure for HHV-1 infection, but antiviral medications can help manage symptoms and reduce the severity and frequency of recurrent outbreaks.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Gene expression regulation, viral, refers to the processes that control the production of viral gene products, such as proteins and nucleic acids, during the viral life cycle. This can involve both viral and host cell factors that regulate transcription, RNA processing, translation, and post-translational modifications of viral genes.

Viral gene expression regulation is critical for the virus to replicate and produce progeny virions. Different types of viruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to regulate their gene expression, including the use of promoters, enhancers, transcription factors, RNA silencing, and epigenetic modifications. Understanding these regulatory processes can provide insights into viral pathogenesis and help in the development of antiviral therapies.

Herpesvirus 1, Suid (Suid Herpesvirus 1 or SHV-1), also known as Pseudorabies Virus (PrV), is a species of the genus Varicellovirus in the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae of the family Herpesviridae. It is a double-stranded DNA virus that primarily infects members of the Suidae family, including domestic pigs and wild boars. The virus can cause a range of symptoms known as Aujeszky's disease in these animals, which may include respiratory distress, neurological issues, and reproductive failures.

SHV-1 is highly contagious and can be transmitted through direct contact with infected animals or their secretions, as well as through aerosol transmission. Although it does not typically infect humans, there have been rare cases of human infection, usually resulting from exposure to infected pigs or their tissues. In these instances, the virus may cause mild flu-like symptoms or more severe neurological issues.

SHV-1 is an important pathogen in the swine industry and has significant economic implications due to its impact on animal health and production. Vaccination programs are widely used to control the spread of the virus and protect susceptible pig populations.

Virus internalization, also known as viral entry, is the process by which a virus enters a host cell to infect it and replicate its genetic material. This process typically involves several steps:

1. Attachment: The viral envelope proteins bind to specific receptors on the surface of the host cell.
2. Entry: The virus then enters the host cell through endocytosis or membrane fusion, depending on the type of virus.
3. Uncoating: Once inside the host cell, the viral capsid is removed, releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm.
4. Replication: The viral genome then uses the host cell's machinery to replicate itself and produce new viral particles.

It's important to note that the specific mechanisms of virus internalization can vary widely between different types of viruses, and are an active area of research in virology and infectious disease.

Electron microscopy (EM) is a type of microscopy that uses a beam of electrons to create an image of the sample being examined, resulting in much higher magnification and resolution than light microscopy. There are several types of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection electron microscopy (REM).

In TEM, a beam of electrons is transmitted through a thin slice of the sample, and the electrons that pass through the sample are focused to form an image. This technique can provide detailed information about the internal structure of cells, viruses, and other biological specimens, as well as the composition and structure of materials at the atomic level.

In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of the sample, and the electrons that are scattered back from the surface are detected to create an image. This technique can provide information about the topography and composition of surfaces, as well as the structure of materials at the microscopic level.

REM is a variation of SEM in which the beam of electrons is reflected off the surface of the sample, rather than scattered back from it. This technique can provide information about the surface chemistry and composition of materials.

Electron microscopy has a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and materials science, including the study of cellular structure and function, disease diagnosis, and the development of new materials and technologies.

Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) is a type of electron microscopy where the sample is studied at cryogenic temperatures, typically liquid nitrogen temperatures. This technique is used to investigate the structure and shape of biological molecules and complexes, viruses, and other nanoscale particles.

In Cryo-EM, the sample is rapidly frozen to preserve its natural structure and then imaged using a beam of electrons. The images are collected at different angles and then computationally combined to generate a 3D reconstruction of the sample. This technique allows researchers to visualize biological structures in their native environment with near-atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their function and behavior.

Cryo-EM has become an increasingly popular tool in structural biology due to its ability to image large and complex structures that are difficult or impossible to crystallize for X-ray crystallography. It has been used to determine the structures of many important biological molecules, including membrane proteins, ribosomes, viruses, and protein complexes involved in various cellular processes.

Viral matrix proteins are structural proteins that play a crucial role in the morphogenesis and life cycle of many viruses. They are often located between the viral envelope and the viral genome, serving as a scaffold for virus assembly and budding. These proteins also interact with other viral components, such as the viral genome, capsid proteins, and envelope proteins, to form an infectious virion. Additionally, matrix proteins can have regulatory functions, influencing viral transcription, replication, and host cell responses. The specific functions of viral matrix proteins vary among different virus families.

A viral plaque assay is a laboratory technique used to measure the infectivity and concentration of viruses in a sample. This method involves infecting a monolayer of cells (usually in a petri dish or multi-well plate) with a known volume of a virus-containing sample, followed by overlaying the cells with a nutrient-agar medium to restrict viral spread and enable individual plaques to form.

After an incubation period that allows for viral replication and cell death, the cells are stained, and clear areas or "plaques" become visible in the monolayer. Each plaque represents a localized region of infected and lysed cells, caused by the progeny of a single infectious virus particle. The number of plaques is then counted, and the viral titer (infectious units per milliliter or PFU/mL) is calculated based on the dilution factor and volume of the original inoculum.

Viral plaque assays are essential for determining viral titers, assessing virus-host interactions, evaluating antiviral agents, and studying viral pathogenesis.

Centrifugation, Density Gradient is a medical laboratory technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their size, density, and shape. This method involves the use of a centrifuge and a density gradient medium, such as sucrose or cesium chloride, to create a stable density gradient within a column or tube.

The sample is carefully layered onto the top of the gradient and then subjected to high-speed centrifugation. During centrifugation, the particles in the sample move through the gradient based on their size, density, and shape, with heavier particles migrating faster and further than lighter ones. This results in the separation of different components of the mixture into distinct bands or zones within the gradient.

This technique is commonly used to purify and concentrate various types of biological materials, such as viruses, organelles, ribosomes, and subcellular fractions, from complex mixtures. It allows for the isolation of pure and intact particles, which can then be collected and analyzed for further study or use in downstream applications.

In summary, Centrifugation, Density Gradient is a medical laboratory technique used to separate and purify different components of a mixture based on their size, density, and shape using a centrifuge and a density gradient medium.

Ribonucleases (RNases) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the degradation of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules by hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bonds. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as RNA processing, turnover, and quality control. They can be classified into several types based on their specificities, mechanisms, and cellular localizations.

Some common classes of ribonucleases include:

1. Endoribonucleases: These enzymes cleave RNA internally, at specific sequences or structural motifs. Examples include RNase A, which targets single-stranded RNA; RNase III, which cuts double-stranded RNA at specific stem-loop structures; and RNase T1, which recognizes and cuts unpaired guanosine residues in RNA molecules.
2. Exoribonucleases: These enzymes remove nucleotides from the ends of RNA molecules. They can be further divided into 5'-3' exoribonucleases, which degrade RNA starting from the 5' end, and 3'-5' exoribonucleases, which start at the 3' end. Examples include Xrn1, a 5'-3' exoribonuclease involved in mRNA decay; and Dis3/RRP6, a 3'-5' exoribonuclease that participates in ribosomal RNA processing and degradation.
3. Specific ribonucleases: These enzymes target specific RNA molecules or regions with high precision. For example, RNase P is responsible for cleaving the 5' leader sequence of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs) during their maturation; and RNase MRP is involved in the processing of ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial RNA molecules.

Dysregulation or mutations in ribonucleases have been implicated in various human diseases, such as neurological disorders, cancer, and viral infections. Therefore, understanding their functions and mechanisms is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Neutralization tests are a type of laboratory assay used in microbiology and immunology to measure the ability of a substance, such as an antibody or antitoxin, to neutralize the activity of a toxin or infectious agent. In these tests, the substance to be tested is mixed with a known quantity of the toxin or infectious agent, and the mixture is then incubated under controlled conditions. After incubation, the mixture is tested for residual toxicity or infectivity using a variety of methods, such as cell culture assays, animal models, or biochemical assays.

The neutralization titer is then calculated based on the highest dilution of the test substance that completely neutralizes the toxin or infectious agent. Neutralization tests are commonly used in the diagnosis and evaluation of immune responses to vaccines, as well as in the detection and quantification of toxins and other harmful substances.

Examples of neutralization tests include the serum neutralization test for measles antibodies, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) for dengue virus antibodies, and the cytotoxicity neutralization assay for botulinum neurotoxins.

An antigen is any substance that can stimulate an immune response, particularly the production of antibodies. Viral antigens are antigens that are found on or produced by viruses. They can be proteins, glycoproteins, or carbohydrates present on the surface or inside the viral particle.

Viral antigens play a crucial role in the immune system's recognition and response to viral infections. When a virus infects a host cell, it may display its antigens on the surface of the infected cell. This allows the immune system to recognize and target the infected cells for destruction, thereby limiting the spread of the virus.

Viral antigens are also important targets for vaccines. Vaccines typically work by introducing a harmless form of a viral antigen to the body, which then stimulates the production of antibodies and memory T-cells that can recognize and respond quickly and effectively to future infections with the actual virus.

It's worth noting that different types of viruses have different antigens, and these antigens can vary between strains of the same virus. This is why there are often different vaccines available for different viral diseases, and why flu vaccines need to be updated every year to account for changes in the circulating influenza virus strains.

Viral core proteins are the structural proteins that make up the viral capsid or protein shell, enclosing and protecting the viral genome. These proteins play a crucial role in the assembly of the virion, assist in the infection process by helping to deliver the viral genome into the host cell, and may also have functions in regulating viral replication. The specific composition and structure of viral core proteins vary among different types of viruses.

A "gag gene product" in the context of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) refers to the proteins produced by the viral gag gene. The gag gene is one of the nine genes found in the HIV genome and it plays a crucial role in the viral replication cycle.

The gag gene encodes for the group-specific antigen (GAG) proteins, which are structural components of the virus. These proteins include matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins, as well as several smaller peptides. Together, these GAG proteins form the viral core, which encapsulates the viral RNA genome and enzymes necessary for replication.

The matrix protein is responsible for forming a layer underneath the viral envelope, while the capsid protein forms the inner shell of the viral core. The nucleocapsid protein binds to the viral RNA genome and protects it from degradation by host cell enzymes. Overall, the gag gene products are essential for the assembly and infectivity of HIV particles.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

Simplexvirus is a genus of viruses in the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. This genus contains two species: Human alphaherpesvirus 1 (also known as HSV-1 or herpes simplex virus type 1) and Human alphaherpesvirus 2 (also known as HSV-2 or herpes simplex virus type 2). These viruses are responsible for causing various medical conditions, most commonly oral and genital herpes. They are characterized by their ability to establish lifelong latency in the nervous system and reactivate periodically to cause recurrent symptoms.

An open reading frame (ORF) is a continuous stretch of DNA or RNA sequence that has the potential to be translated into a protein. It begins with a start codon (usually "ATG" in DNA, which corresponds to "AUG" in RNA) and ends with a stop codon ("TAA", "TAG", or "TGA" in DNA; "UAA", "UAG", or "UGA" in RNA). The sequence between these two points is called a coding sequence (CDS), which, when transcribed into mRNA and translated into amino acids, forms a polypeptide chain.

In eukaryotic cells, ORFs can be located in either protein-coding genes or non-coding regions of the genome. In prokaryotic cells, multiple ORFs may be present on a single strand of DNA, often organized into operons that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that not all ORFs necessarily represent functional proteins; some may be pseudogenes or result from errors in genome annotation. Therefore, additional experimental evidence is typically required to confirm the expression and functionality of a given ORF.

Glycoproteins are complex proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. These glycans are linked to the protein through asparagine residues (N-linked) or serine/threonine residues (O-linked). Glycoproteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found on the outer surface of cell membranes, in extracellular fluids, and as components of the extracellular matrix. The structure and composition of glycoproteins can vary significantly depending on their function and location within an organism.

Reoviridae is a family of double-stranded RNA viruses that are non-enveloped and have a segmented genome. The name "Reoviridae" is derived from Respiratory Enteric Orphan virus, as these viruses were initially discovered in respiratory and enteric (gastrointestinal) samples but did not appear to cause any specific diseases.

The family Reoviridae includes several important human pathogens such as rotaviruses, which are a major cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide, and orthoreoviruses, which can cause respiratory and systemic infections in humans. Additionally, many Reoviridae viruses infect animals, including birds, mammals, fish, and insects, and can cause a variety of diseases.

Reoviridae virions are typically composed of multiple protein layers that encase the genomic RNA segments. The family is divided into two subfamilies, Sedoreovirinae and Spinareovirinae, based on structural features and genome organization. Reoviruses have a complex replication cycle that involves multiple steps, including attachment to host cells, uncoating of the viral particle, transcription of the genomic RNA, translation of viral proteins, packaging of new virions, and release from infected cells.

A viral attachment, in the context of virology, refers to the initial step in the infection process of a host cell by a virus. This involves the binding or adsorption of the viral particle to specific receptors on the surface of the host cell. The viral attachment proteins, often located on the viral envelope or capsid, recognize and interact with these receptors, leading to a close association between the virus and the host cell. This interaction is highly specific, as different viruses may target various cell types based on their unique receptor-binding preferences. Following attachment, the virus can enter the host cell and initiate the replication cycle, ultimately leading to the production of new viral particles and potential disease manifestations.

Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV) is a single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus that belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae and genus Vesiculovirus. It is the causative agent of vesicular stomatitis (VS), a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle, but can also infect other species including swine, sheep, goats, and humans.

The virus is transmitted through direct contact with infected animals or their saliva, as well as through insect vectors such as black flies and sandflies. The incubation period for VS ranges from 2 to 8 days, after which infected animals develop fever, lethargy, and vesicular lesions in the mouth, nose, and feet. These lesions can be painful and may cause difficulty eating or walking.

In humans, VSIV infection is typically asymptomatic or causes mild flu-like symptoms such as fever, muscle aches, and headache. Occasionally, individuals may develop vesicular lesions on their skin or mucous membranes, particularly if they have had contact with infected animals.

Diagnosis of VSIV infection is typically made through virus isolation from lesion exudates or blood, as well as through serological testing. Treatment is generally supportive and aimed at relieving symptoms, as there are no specific antiviral therapies available for VS. Prevention measures include vaccination of susceptible animals, vector control, and biosecurity measures to prevent the spread of infection between animals.

Vpr is a protein that is encoded by the viral protein R (vpr) gene in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The vpr gene is one of the accessory genes in HIV that are not essential for viral replication but contribute to the pathogenesis of the infection.

The Vpr protein plays a role in the regulation of the viral life cycle and the host cell response to infection. It can induce cell cycle arrest, promote nuclear import of the viral DNA, and enhance viral transcription. Additionally, Vpr has been shown to have pro-apoptotic activity, contributing to CD4+ T cell depletion and disease progression in HIV infection.

Vpr is also involved in the transport of the viral particle into the nucleus of non-dividing cells, such as macrophages, allowing for efficient replication in these cells. Overall, Vpr is an important virulence factor in HIV infection and has been a target for antiretroviral therapy development.

The "vif" gene in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) encodes for the Vif (Viral Infectivity Factor) protein. This protein is essential for the virus to infect and replicate within certain types of immune cells, particularly the CD4+ T-cells and cells of the macrophage lineage.

The Vif protein plays a crucial role in counteracting the host's antiviral defense mechanisms. Specifically, it targets and degrades a cellular protein called APOBEC3G (Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Enzyme Catalytic Polypeptide-like 3G), which would otherwise be incorporated into viral particles during the budding process. APOBEC3G has the ability to mutate the HIV genome, leading to the production of nonfunctional viral particles. By degrading APOBEC3G, Vif ensures the production of functional progeny virions and allows for efficient infection of new cells.

In summary, the Vif protein, encoded by the vif gene in HIV, is a critical factor that enables the virus to evade host immune defenses and maintain its replicative potential within susceptible cells.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Peptide biosynthesis is the process by which cells synthesize peptides, short chains of amino acids. This process is mediated by enzymes called peptide synthetases, which catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between individual amino acids to create a longer chain. Peptide biosynthesis typically occurs through one of two pathways: ribosomal or non-ribosomal.

Ribosomal peptide biosynthesis involves the use of the cell's translational machinery, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs (tRNAs), to synthesize peptides from a messenger RNA (mRNA) template. This process is highly regulated and typically results in the production of small, linear peptides that are further modified by enzymes to create bioactive molecules such as hormones or neurotransmitters.

Non-ribosomal peptide biosynthesis (NRPS), on the other hand, is a more complex process that involves large multifunctional enzyme complexes called non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). These enzymes are capable of synthesizing a wide variety of structurally diverse peptides, including cyclic and branched peptides, as well as those containing non-proteinogenic amino acids. NRPSs typically consist of multiple modules, each responsible for adding a single amino acid to the growing peptide chain. The modular nature of NRPS systems allows for great diversity in the types of peptides that can be synthesized, making them important sources of bioactive molecules with potential therapeutic applications.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

Protein precursors, also known as proproteins or prohormones, are inactive forms of proteins that undergo post-translational modification to become active. These modifications typically include cleavage of the precursor protein by specific enzymes, resulting in the release of the active protein. This process allows for the regulation and control of protein activity within the body. Protein precursors can be found in various biological processes, including the endocrine system where they serve as inactive hormones that can be converted into their active forms when needed.

The "vpr gene products" refer to the proteins produced by the vpr gene in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The vpr gene is one of the accessory genes found in the HIV genome. It encodes for a viral protein, Vpr, which plays several roles during the viral replication cycle and infection process.

Vpr is a small, 96-amino acid protein that has multiple functions:

1. Nuclear localization: Vpr helps in the transport of the viral DNA into the nucleus of the infected cell by interacting with importin-α, a cellular protein responsible for nuclear import.
2. Cell cycle arrest: Vpr can induce G2 phase cell cycle arrest in infected cells, which may promote efficient viral replication and assembly.
3. Apoptosis (programmed cell death): Vpr has been shown to induce apoptosis in certain cell types, contributing to the cytopathic effects of HIV infection.
4. Virion packaging: Vpr is incorporated into newly assembled virions during the budding process, allowing it to be transmitted to neighboring cells during subsequent rounds of infection.
5. Transcriptional regulation: Vpr can interact with cellular proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, potentially modulating host gene expression and contributing to HIV pathogenesis.

Overall, vpr gene products play a significant role in the HIV replication cycle and contribute to viral pathogenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and altering host cell gene expression.

Defective viruses are viruses that have lost the ability to complete a full replication cycle and produce progeny virions independently. These viruses require the assistance of a helper virus, which provides the necessary functions for replication. Defective viruses can arise due to mutations, deletions, or other genetic changes that result in the loss of essential genes. They are often non-infectious and cannot cause disease on their own, but they may interfere with the replication of the helper virus and modulate the course of infection. Defective viruses can be found in various types of viruses, including retroviruses, bacteriophages, and DNA viruses.

Poliovirus is a human enterovirus, specifically a type of picornavirus, that is the causative agent of poliomyelitis (polio). It is a small, non-enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus. There are three serotypes of Poliovirus (types 1, 2 and 3) which can cause different degrees of severity in the disease. The virus primarily spreads through the fecal-oral route and infects the gastrointestinal tract, from where it can invade the nervous system and cause paralysis.

The Poliovirus has an icosahedral symmetry, with a diameter of about 30 nanometers. It contains a single stranded RNA genome which is encapsidated in a protein shell called capsid. The capsid is made up of 60 units of four different proteins (VP1, VP2, VP3 and VP4).

Poliovirus has been eradicated from most countries of the world through widespread vaccination with inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) or oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, it still remains endemic in a few countries and is considered a major public health concern.

Viral regulatory and accessory proteins are a type of viral protein that play a role in the regulation of viral replication, gene expression, and host immune response. These proteins are not directly involved in the structural components of the virus but instead help to modulate the environment inside the host cell to facilitate viral replication and evade the host's immune system.

Regulatory proteins control various stages of the viral life cycle, such as transcription, translation, and genome replication. They may also interact with host cell regulatory proteins to alter their function and promote viral replication. Accessory proteins, on the other hand, are non-essential for viral replication but can enhance viral pathogenesis or modulate the host's immune response.

The specific functions of viral regulatory and accessory proteins vary widely among different viruses. For example, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the Tat protein is a regulatory protein that activates transcription of the viral genome, while the Vpu protein is an accessory protein that downregulates the expression of CD4 receptors on host cells to prevent superinfection.

Understanding the functions of viral regulatory and accessory proteins is important for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines, as these proteins can be potential targets for inhibiting viral replication or modulating the host's immune response.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a type of herpesvirus that can cause infection in humans. It is characterized by the enlargement of infected cells (cytomegaly) and is typically transmitted through close contact with an infected person, such as through saliva, urine, breast milk, or sexual contact.

CMV infection can also be acquired through organ transplantation, blood transfusions, or during pregnancy from mother to fetus. While many people infected with CMV experience no symptoms, it can cause serious complications in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those undergoing cancer treatment or those who have HIV/AIDS.

In newborns, congenital CMV infection can lead to hearing loss, vision problems, and developmental delays. Pregnant women who become infected with CMV for the first time during pregnancy are at higher risk of transmitting the virus to their unborn child. There is no cure for CMV, but antiviral medications can help manage symptoms and reduce the risk of complications in severe cases.

A closterovirus is a type of virus that primarily infects plants. These viruses are characterized by their long, flexuous (flexible) filamentous particles, which can be up to several thousand nanometers in length. Closteroviruses have a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome and are transmitted by insect vectors, such as aphids.

Closteroviruses infect a wide range of plants, including important crops like citrus, beet, and grapevines. They can cause various symptoms in infected plants, such as stunting, leaf yellowing, and reduced yield. Some closteroviruses also have satellite RNAs or associated viruses that can affect the severity of the disease.

Examples of closteroviruses include citrus tristeza virus (CTV), beet yellows virus (BYV), and grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3). Due to their economic importance, closteroviruses have been extensively studied, and significant efforts have been made to develop control strategies for these viruses.

Bacteriophage N4 is a type of virus that infects and replicates within the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli). It is a double-stranded DNA virus, which means that its genetic material is made up of two strands of DNA. The virus specifically targets E. coli bacteria that have the F plasmid, a type of extra genetic material that some strains of E. coli carry.

Bacteriophage N4 has a complex structure and replication cycle. After infecting an E. coli cell, it first uses the host's machinery to produce early and late proteins, which are necessary for the virus to replicate its genetic material and assemble new viral particles. The virus then packages its DNA into newly assembled capsids (the protein shell of the virus) and releases them from the host cell by causing it to lyse, or burst.

Bacteriophage N4 has been studied for its potential use in bacterial genetics and as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, more research is needed to fully understand its properties and potential applications.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Influenza A virus is defined as a negative-sense, single-stranded, segmented RNA virus belonging to the family Orthomyxoviridae. It is responsible for causing epidemic and pandemic influenza in humans and is also known to infect various animal species, such as birds, pigs, horses, and seals. The viral surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are the primary targets for antiviral drugs and vaccines. There are 18 different HA subtypes and 11 known NA subtypes, which contribute to the diversity and antigenic drift of Influenza A viruses. The zoonotic nature of this virus allows for genetic reassortment between human and animal strains, leading to the emergence of novel variants with pandemic potential.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Proteins refer to the different structural and non-structural proteins that are encoded by the HIV genome. These proteins play crucial roles in various stages of the viral life cycle, such as virus entry, replication, assembly, and release from infected host cells.

The major HIV proteins include:

1. Group-specific antigen (gag): A structural protein that forms the matrix, capsid, and nucleocapsid of the virion. It is involved in virus particle assembly and release.
2. Polymerase (pol): A multi-functional enzyme responsible for HIV replication, including reverse transcriptase activity, RNase H activity, and integrase activity. Reverse transcriptase converts the single-stranded viral RNA into double-stranded DNA, while integrase inserts this viral DNA into the host cell genome.
3. Envelope (env): A glycoprotein on the surface of the virion that mediates virus entry into host cells by binding to specific receptors and co-receptors on the target cell membrane, followed by fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. The envelope protein consists of two subunits: gp120 (the exterior domain) and gp41 (the transmembrane domain).
4. Accessory proteins: HIV encodes several accessory proteins that regulate various aspects of the viral life cycle, modulate host cell functions, and counteract the host immune response. These include Vif (viral infectivity factor), Vpr (viral protein R), Vpu (virion-associated protein unique for HIV-1), and Nef (negative regulatory factor).
5. Regulatory proteins: HIV encodes two regulatory proteins, Tat (transactivator of transcription) and Rev (regulator of expression of viral genes), that control the expression of viral genes during different stages of the viral life cycle. Tat is essential for efficient transcription of the viral genome, while Rev facilitates the export of fully spliced and partially spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

Vif ( Viral Infectivity Factor) is a gene product of certain retroviruses, including HIV-1 and HIV-2. It is an accessory protein that plays a crucial role in the viral replication cycle by counteracting the host cell's antiviral defense mechanisms.

The primary function of Vif is to neutralize the host restriction factor APOBEC3G (Apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G), which would otherwise be incorporated into viral particles during budding and deaminate cytidine residues in the single-stranded DNA during reverse transcription. This results in hypermutation of the viral genome, leading to the production of nonfunctional viral proteins and ultimately inhibiting viral replication.

Vif binds to APOBEC3G and targets it for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome, thereby preventing its incorporation into virions and allowing efficient viral replication. Vif also interacts with other host factors involved in the ubiquitination pathway, such as CUL5 (Cullin 5) and ELOBC3 (Elongin B3), to form an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that mediates APOBEC3G degradation.

In summary, Vif is a gene product of certain retroviruses that counteracts the host's antiviral defense mechanisms by neutralizing the restriction factor APOBEC3G and allowing efficient viral replication.

Herpesviridae is a family of large, double-stranded DNA viruses that includes several important pathogens affecting humans and animals. The herpesviruses are characterized by their ability to establish latency in infected host cells, allowing them to persist for the lifetime of the host and leading to recurrent episodes of disease.

The family Herpesviridae is divided into three subfamilies: Alphaherpesvirinae, Betaherpesvirinae, and Gammaherpesvirinae. Each subfamily includes several genera and species that infect various hosts, including humans, primates, rodents, birds, and reptiles.

Human herpesviruses include:

* Alphaherpesvirinae: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and Varicella-zoster virus (VZV)
* Betaherpesvirinae: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B), and Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7)
* Gammaherpesvirinae: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also known as HHV-8)

These viruses are responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, from mild skin lesions to life-threatening diseases. Primary infections usually occur during childhood or adolescence and can be followed by recurrent episodes due to virus reactivation from latency.

DNA viruses are a type of virus that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) as their genetic material. These viruses replicate by using the host cell's machinery to synthesize new viral components, which are then assembled into new viruses and released from the host cell.

DNA viruses can be further classified based on the structure of their genomes and the way they replicate. For example, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses have a genome made up of two strands of DNA, while single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses have a genome made up of a single strand of DNA.

Examples of DNA viruses include herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, human papillomavirus, and adenoviruses. Some DNA viruses are associated with specific diseases, such as cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus) or neurological disorders (e.g., herpes simplex virus).

It's important to note that while DNA viruses contain DNA as their genetic material, RNA viruses contain RNA (ribonucleic acid) as their genetic material. Both DNA and RNA viruses can cause a wide range of diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Herpes Simplex Virus Protein Vmw65, also known as Infected Cell Protein 0 (ICP0), is a crucial regulatory protein of the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). It is a viral early protein, which means it becomes active during the initial stages of viral replication.

Vmw65 plays a significant role in the virus's ability to evade the host's immune response and promote viral replication. It functions as a transcriptional regulator, affecting the expression of various genes involved in the host's antiviral defense mechanisms. Vmw65 can induce the degradation of certain cellular proteins that inhibit viral replication and also enhance viral gene expression by promoting viral DNA synthesis.

The protein's name, Vmw65, is derived from its molecular weight (65 kilodaltons) and its initial discovery as a virus-induced membrane protein. However, it's now more commonly referred to as ICP0 due to its role as an immediate-early viral gene product that functions as a transcriptional regulatory protein.

Arboviruses are a group of viruses that are primarily transmitted to humans and animals through the bites of infected arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, and sandflies. The term "arbovirus" is short for "arthropod-borne virus."

Arboviruses can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the specific virus and the individual host's immune response. Some common symptoms associated with arboviral infections include fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, rash, and fatigue. In severe cases, arboviral infections can lead to serious complications such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), or hemorrhagic fever (bleeding disorders).

There are hundreds of different arboviruses, and they are found in many parts of the world. Some of the most well-known arboviral diseases include dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika virus infection, West Nile virus infection, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis.

Prevention of arboviral infections typically involves avoiding mosquito bites and other arthropod vectors through the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying indoors during peak mosquito feeding times. Public health efforts also focus on reducing vector populations through environmental management and the use of larvicides. Vaccines are available for some arboviral diseases, such as yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis.

Virus receptors are specific molecules (commonly proteins) on the surface of host cells that viruses bind to in order to enter and infect those cells. This interaction between the virus and its receptor is a critical step in the infection process. Different types of viruses have different receptor requirements, and identifying these receptors can provide important insights into the biology of the virus and potential targets for antiviral therapies.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Nucleocapsid proteins are structural proteins that are associated with the viral genome in many viruses. They play a crucial role in the formation and stability of the viral particle, also known as the virion. In particular, nucleocapsid proteins bind to the viral RNA or DNA genome and help to protect it from degradation by host cell enzymes. They also participate in the assembly and disassembly of the virion during the viral replication cycle.

In some viruses, such as coronaviruses, the nucleocapsid protein is also involved in regulating the transcription and replication of the viral genome. The nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2, for example, has been shown to interact with host cell proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression, which may contribute to the virus's ability to manipulate the host cell environment and evade the immune response.

Overall, nucleocapsid proteins are important components of many viruses and are often targeted by antiviral therapies due to their essential role in the viral replication cycle.

Ascoviridae is a family of large, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect and replicate in the cells of lepidopteran insects (moths and butterflies). The name "ascovirus" comes from the characteristic inclusion bodies, called ascus, that these viruses form within the infected host cells. Ascoviruses are unique among animal viruses because they have a complex life cycle involving both sexual and asexual reproduction. They are transmitted horizontally between hosts through the ingestion of virus-infected insect eggs or larvae, and can also be vertically transmitted from infected female moths to their offspring. Ascoviruses cause diseases that can lead to significant mortality in insect populations, particularly in agricultural settings where they can impact pest control efforts. However, due to their narrow host range and complex life cycle, ascoviruses are not considered a threat to human or animal health.

Rhadinovirus is a type of gammaherpesvirus that can infect various animals, including humans. In humans, the rhadinovirus species includes the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). This virus is associated with several diseases, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease, particularly in people with weakened immune systems. Rhadinoviruses are characterized by their complex genome structure and ability to establish latency in infected host cells.

Bacteriophages, often simply called phages, are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria. They consist of a protein coat, called the capsid, that encases the genetic material, which can be either DNA or RNA. Bacteriophages are highly specific, meaning they only infect certain types of bacteria, and they reproduce by hijacking the bacterial cell's machinery to produce more viruses.

Once a phage infects a bacterium, it can either replicate its genetic material and create new phages (lytic cycle), or integrate its genetic material into the bacterial chromosome and replicate along with the bacterium (lysogenic cycle). In the lytic cycle, the newly formed phages are released by lysing, or breaking open, the bacterial cell.

Bacteriophages play a crucial role in shaping microbial communities and have been studied as potential alternatives to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections.

Membrane fusion is a fundamental biological process that involves the merging of two initially separate lipid bilayers, such as those surrounding cells or organelles, to form a single continuous membrane. This process plays a crucial role in various physiological events including neurotransmitter release, hormone secretion, fertilization, viral infection, and intracellular trafficking of proteins and lipids. Membrane fusion is tightly regulated and requires the participation of specific proteins called SNAREs (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein REceptors) and other accessory factors that facilitate the recognition, approximation, and merger of the membranes. The energy required to overcome the repulsive forces between the negatively charged lipid headgroups is provided by these proteins, which undergo conformational changes during the fusion process. Membrane fusion is a highly specific and coordinated event, ensuring that the correct membranes fuse at the right time and place within the cell.

Coronaviridae is a family of enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses. They are named for the crown-like (corona) appearance of their surface proteins. Coronaviruses infect a wide range of animals, including mammals and birds, and can cause respiratory, gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases. Some coronaviruses, such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), can cause severe and potentially fatal illness in humans. The most recent example is SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

DNA-directed RNA polymerases are enzymes that synthesize RNA molecules using a DNA template in a process called transcription. These enzymes read the sequence of nucleotides in a DNA molecule and use it as a blueprint to construct a complementary RNA strand.

The RNA polymerase moves along the DNA template, adding ribonucleotides one by one to the growing RNA chain. The synthesis is directional, starting at the promoter region of the DNA and moving towards the terminator region.

In bacteria, there is a single type of RNA polymerase that is responsible for transcribing all types of RNA (mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA). In eukaryotic cells, however, there are three different types of RNA polymerases: RNA polymerase I, II, and III. Each type is responsible for transcribing specific types of RNA.

RNA polymerases play a crucial role in gene expression, as they link the genetic information encoded in DNA to the production of functional proteins. Inhibition or mutation of these enzymes can have significant consequences for cellular function and survival.

Protein biosynthesis is the process by which cells generate new proteins. It involves two major steps: transcription and translation. Transcription is the process of creating a complementary RNA copy of a sequence of DNA. This RNA copy, or messenger RNA (mRNA), carries the genetic information to the site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. During translation, the mRNA is read by transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules, which bring specific amino acids to the ribosome based on the sequence of nucleotides in the mRNA. The ribosome then links these amino acids together in the correct order to form a polypeptide chain, which may then fold into a functional protein. Protein biosynthesis is essential for the growth and maintenance of all living organisms.

Sindbis virus is an alphavirus that belongs to the Togaviridae family. It's named after the location where it was first isolated, in Sindbis, Egypt, in 1952. This virus is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes and can infect a wide range of animals, including birds and humans. In humans, Sindbis virus infection often causes a mild flu-like illness characterized by fever, rash, and joint pain. However, some people may develop more severe symptoms, such as neurological disorders, although this is relatively rare. There is no specific treatment for Sindbis virus infection, and management typically involves supportive care to alleviate symptoms.

"Gag" is a term that refers to a group of genes found in retroviruses, a type of virus that includes HIV (human immunodeficiency virus). These genes encode proteins that play a crucial role in the replication and packaging of the viral genome into new virus particles.

The "gag" gene encodes a polyprotein, which is cleaved by viral proteases into several individual proteins during the maturation of the virus. The resulting proteins include matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins, as well as smaller peptides that help to facilitate the assembly and release of new virus particles.

The gag gene is an essential component of retroviruses, and its function has been extensively studied in order to better understand the replication cycle of these viruses and to develop potential therapies for retroviral infections.

Virus cultivation, also known as virus isolation or viral culture, is a laboratory method used to propagate and detect viruses by introducing them to host cells and allowing them to replicate. This process helps in identifying the specific virus causing an infection and studying its characteristics, such as morphology, growth pattern, and sensitivity to antiviral agents.

The steps involved in virus cultivation typically include:

1. Collection of a clinical sample (e.g., throat swab, blood, sputum) from the patient.
2. Preparation of the sample by centrifugation or filtration to remove cellular debris and other contaminants.
3. Inoculation of the prepared sample into susceptible host cells, which can be primary cell cultures, continuous cell lines, or embryonated eggs, depending on the type of virus.
4. Incubation of the inoculated cells under appropriate conditions to allow viral replication.
5. Observation for cytopathic effects (CPE), which are changes in the host cells caused by viral replication, such as cell rounding, shrinkage, or lysis.
6. Confirmation of viral presence through additional tests, like immunofluorescence assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or electron microscopy.

Virus cultivation is a valuable tool in diagnostic virology, vaccine development, and research on viral pathogenesis and host-virus interactions. However, it requires specialized equipment, trained personnel, and biosafety measures due to the potential infectivity of the viruses being cultured.

RNA viruses are a type of virus that contain ribonucleic acid (RNA) as their genetic material, as opposed to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). RNA viruses replicate by using an enzyme called RNA-dependent RNA polymerase to transcribe and replicate their RNA genome.

There are several different groups of RNA viruses, including:

1. Negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses: These viruses have a genome that is complementary to the mRNA and must undergo transcription to produce mRNA before translation can occur. Examples include influenza virus, measles virus, and rabies virus.
2. Positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses: These viruses have a genome that can serve as mRNA and can be directly translated into protein after entry into the host cell. Examples include poliovirus, rhinoviruses, and coronaviruses.
3. Double-stranded RNA viruses: These viruses have a genome consisting of double-stranded RNA and use a complex replication strategy involving both transcription and reverse transcription. Examples include rotaviruses and reoviruses.

RNA viruses are known to cause a wide range of human diseases, ranging from the common cold to more severe illnesses such as hepatitis C, polio, and COVID-19. Due to their high mutation rates and ability to adapt quickly to new environments, RNA viruses can be difficult to control and treat with antiviral drugs or vaccines.

"Gag-Pol" fusion proteins are a crucial component in the life cycle of retroviruses, such as HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). These proteins are created through the joining of two viral gene products: the "gag" gene and the "pol" gene.

The "gag" gene encodes for structural proteins that make up the viral matrix and capsid, while the "pol" gene encodes for enzymes necessary for viral replication, including reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease.

Through a process called ribosomal frameshifting or translational readthrough, the viral RNA genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that contains both Gag and Pol domains. This Gag-Pol fusion protein is then cleaved by the viral protease into its individual functional components, allowing for the assembly of new virus particles and the replication of the viral genome in the host cell.

The formation of Gag-Pol fusion proteins is essential for retroviral replication and represents a key target for antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV infection.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

"Spodoptera" is not a medical term, but a genus name in the insect family Noctuidae. It includes several species of moths commonly known as armyworms or cutworms due to their habit of consuming leaves and roots of various plants, causing significant damage to crops.

Some well-known species in this genus are Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm), Spodoptera litura (tobacco cutworm), and Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm). These pests can be a concern for medical entomology when they transmit pathogens or cause allergic reactions. For instance, their frass (feces) and shed skins may trigger asthma symptoms in susceptible individuals. However, the insects themselves are not typically considered medical issues unless they directly affect human health.

Cytidine deaminase is an enzyme that catalyzes the removal of an amino group from cytidine, converting it to uridine. This reaction is part of the process of RNA degradation and also plays a role in the immune response to viral infections.

Cytidine deaminase can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, humans, and other mammals. In humans, cytidine deaminase is encoded by the APOBEC3 gene family, which consists of several different enzymes that have distinct functions and expression patterns. Some members of this gene family are involved in the restriction of retroviruses, such as HIV-1, while others play a role in the regulation of endogenous retroelements and the modification of cellular RNA.

Mutations in cytidine deaminase genes have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and autoimmune disorders. For example, mutations in the APOBEC3B gene have been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, while mutations in other members of the APOBEC3 family have been implicated in the development of lymphoma and other malignancies. Additionally, aberrant expression of cytidine deaminase enzymes has been observed in some autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, suggesting a potential role for these enzymes in the pathogenesis of these conditions.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

The Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a type of retrovirus, specifically a gammaretrovirus, that is commonly found in mice. It was first discovered and isolated by John Moloney in 1960. Mo-MLV is known to cause various types of cancerous conditions, particularly leukemia, in susceptible mouse strains.

Mo-MLV has a single-stranded RNA genome that is reverse transcribed into double-stranded DNA upon infection of the host cell. This viral DNA then integrates into the host's genome and utilizes the host's cellular machinery to produce new virus particles. The Mo-MLV genome encodes for several viral proteins, including gag (group-specific antigen), pol (polymerase), and env (envelope) proteins, which are essential for the replication cycle of the virus.

Mo-MLV is widely used in laboratory research as a model retrovirus to study various aspects of viral replication, gene therapy, and oncogenesis. It has also been engineered as a vector for gene delivery applications due to its ability to efficiently integrate into the host genome and deliver large DNA sequences. However, it is important to note that Mo-MLV and other retroviruses have the potential to cause insertional mutagenesis, which can lead to unintended genetic alterations and adverse effects in some cases.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

RNA-directed DNA polymerase is a type of enzyme that can synthesize DNA using an RNA molecule as a template. This process is called reverse transcription, and it is the mechanism by which retroviruses, such as HIV, replicate their genetic material. The enzyme responsible for this reaction in retroviruses is called reverse transcriptase.

Reverse transcriptase is an important target for antiretroviral therapy used to treat HIV infection and AIDS. In addition to its role in viral replication, RNA-directed DNA polymerase also has applications in molecular biology research, such as in the production of complementary DNA (cDNA) copies of RNA molecules for use in downstream applications like cloning and sequencing.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

A cell-free system is a biochemical environment in which biological reactions can occur outside of an intact living cell. These systems are often used to study specific cellular processes or pathways, as they allow researchers to control and manipulate the conditions in which the reactions take place. In a cell-free system, the necessary enzymes, substrates, and cofactors for a particular reaction are provided in a test tube or other container, rather than within a whole cell.

Cell-free systems can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells. They can be used to study a wide range of cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, protein folding, and metabolism. For example, a cell-free system might be used to express and purify a specific protein, or to investigate the regulation of a particular metabolic pathway.

One advantage of using cell-free systems is that they can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes without the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive cell culture or genetic manipulation. Additionally, because cell-free systems are not constrained by the limitations of a whole cell, they offer greater flexibility in terms of reaction conditions and the ability to study complex or transient interactions between biological molecules.

Overall, cell-free systems are an important tool in molecular biology and biochemistry, providing researchers with a versatile and powerful means of investigating the fundamental processes that underlie life at the cellular level.

Hemagglutination is a process where red blood cells (RBCs) agglutinate or clump together. Viral hemagglutination refers to the ability of certain viruses to bind to and agglutinate RBCs. This is often due to viral surface proteins known as hemagglutinins, which can recognize and attach to specific receptors on the surface of RBCs.

In virology, viral hemagglutination assays are commonly used for virus identification and quantification. For example, the influenza virus is known to hemagglutinate chicken RBCs, and this property can be used to identify and titrate the virus in a sample. The hemagglutination titer is the highest dilution of a virus that still causes visible agglutination of RBCs. This information can be useful in understanding the viral load in a patient or during vaccine production.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there seems to be no established medical definition or recognition of a "Rauscher Virus" in human or veterinary medicine. It is possible that you may have misspelled or misremembered the name of a specific virus or medical term. If you have more information or context about where this term was used, I'd be happy to help you further research the topic.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a molecular biology technique used to introduce specific and targeted changes to a specific DNA sequence. This process involves creating a new variant of a gene or a specific region of interest within a DNA molecule by introducing a planned, deliberate change, or mutation, at a predetermined site within the DNA sequence.

The methodology typically involves the use of molecular tools such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, and/or ligases to introduce the desired mutation(s) into a plasmid or other vector containing the target DNA sequence. The resulting modified DNA molecule can then be used to transform host cells, allowing for the production of large quantities of the mutated gene or protein for further study.

Site-directed mutagenesis is a valuable tool in basic research, drug discovery, and biotechnology applications where specific changes to a DNA sequence are required to understand gene function, investigate protein structure/function relationships, or engineer novel biological properties into existing genes or proteins.

Zonal centrifugation is a type of centrifugation technique used in laboratory settings, particularly in the field of molecular biology and biochemistry. It involves the use of a specialized rotor with a radial gradient that allows for the separation of particles based on their size, density, and shape.

In zonal centrifugation, a sample is placed in a zone or sector of the rotor, which is then spun at high speeds to generate centrifugal force. This force causes the particles within the sample to migrate through the radial gradient towards the outer edge of the rotor, where they are separated based on their physical properties.

Zonal centrifugation is often used to purify subcellular fractions, such as organelles or membrane fragments, from complex biological samples. It can also be used to separate and concentrate viruses, ribosomes, and other large macromolecular complexes. The technique allows for high resolution separation of particles, making it a valuable tool in many areas of research.

Haplorhini is a term used in the field of primatology and physical anthropology to refer to a parvorder of simian primates, which includes humans, apes (both great and small), and Old World monkeys. The name "Haplorhini" comes from the Greek words "haploos," meaning single or simple, and "rhinos," meaning nose.

The defining characteristic of Haplorhini is the presence of a simple, dry nose, as opposed to the wet, fleshy noses found in other primates, such as New World monkeys and strepsirrhines (which include lemurs and lorises). The nostrils of haplorhines are located close together at the tip of the snout, and they lack the rhinarium or "wet nose" that is present in other primates.

Haplorhini is further divided into two infraorders: Simiiformes (which includes apes and Old World monkeys) and Tarsioidea (which includes tarsiers). These groups are distinguished by various anatomical and behavioral differences, such as the presence or absence of a tail, the structure of the hand and foot, and the degree of sociality.

Overall, Haplorhini is a group of primates that share a number of distinctive features related to their sensory systems, locomotion, and social behavior. Understanding the evolutionary history and diversity of this group is an important area of research in anthropology, biology, and psychology.

Uridine is a nucleoside that consists of a pyrimidine base (uracil) linked to a pentose sugar (ribose). It is a component of RNA, where it pairs with adenine. Uridine can also be found in various foods such as beer, broccoli, yeast, and meat. In the body, uridine can be synthesized from orotate or from the breakdown of RNA. It has several functions, including acting as a building block for RNA, contributing to energy metabolism, and regulating cell growth and differentiation. Uridine is also available as a dietary supplement and has been studied for its potential benefits in various health conditions.

Morphogenesis is a term used in developmental biology and refers to the process by which cells give rise to tissues and organs with specific shapes, structures, and patterns during embryonic development. This process involves complex interactions between genes, cells, and the extracellular environment that result in the coordinated movement and differentiation of cells into specialized functional units.

Morphogenesis is a dynamic and highly regulated process that involves several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. These processes are controlled by genetic programs and signaling pathways that respond to environmental cues and regulate the behavior of individual cells within a developing tissue or organ.

The study of morphogenesis is important for understanding how complex biological structures form during development and how these processes can go awry in disease states such as cancer, birth defects, and degenerative disorders.

Luteoviridae is a family of positive-strand RNA viruses that primarily infect plants. The name "luteo" comes from Latin and means "yellow," which refers to the yellowing symptoms often caused by these viruses in infected plants. The virions are non-enveloped and icosahedral in shape, with a diameter of about 25-30 nanometers.

The genome of Luteoviridae viruses is monopartite and contains one molecule of linear, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA. The genome is encapsidated within the virion and protected by a capsid protein. The genome encodes several proteins, including a readthrough protein that functions as a movement protein, allowing the virus to move from cell to cell within the plant.

Luteoviridae viruses are transmitted by aphids in a persistent, circulative manner. Once an aphid ingests virus particles while feeding on an infected plant, the virus moves through the insect's body and accumulates in its salivary glands. When the aphid feeds on a healthy plant, it injects the virus into the plant tissue along with its saliva.

Some notable members of Luteoviridae include Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV), Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV), and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV). These viruses can cause significant economic losses in agriculture, particularly in cereal crops and potatoes.

Isopycnic centrifugation is a type of centrifugation technique used in medical and scientific research. The term "isopycnic" refers to the process of separating particles based on their density, where the density of the particles is equal to that of the surrounding medium. In this technique, a sample containing particles of different densities is placed in a gradient medium within a centrifuge tube and then subjected to high-speed centrifugation.

During centrifugation, the particles move through the gradient medium until they reach a layer where their density matches that of the surrounding medium. Once the particles reach this point, they will no longer continue to move, even if the centrifugation continues for an extended period. This results in the separation of particles based on their densities, with denser particles settling at lower levels and less dense particles settling at higher levels.

Isopycnic centrifugation is a useful technique for separating and purifying various types of biological particles, such as viruses, organelles, and subcellular structures. It can also be used to study the properties of these particles, including their density, size, and shape.

Genetic recombination is the process by which genetic material is exchanged between two similar or identical molecules of DNA during meiosis, resulting in new combinations of genes on each chromosome. This exchange occurs during crossover, where segments of DNA are swapped between non-sister homologous chromatids, creating genetic diversity among the offspring. It is a crucial mechanism for generating genetic variability and facilitating evolutionary change within populations. Additionally, recombination also plays an essential role in DNA repair processes through mechanisms such as homologous recombinational repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a type of microscopy in which an electron beam is transmitted through a ultra-thin specimen, interacting with it as it passes through. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons with the specimen; the image is then magnified and visualized on a fluorescent screen or recorded on an electronic detector (or photographic film in older models).

TEM can provide high-resolution, high-magnification images that can reveal the internal structure of specimens including cells, viruses, and even molecules. It is widely used in biological and materials science research to investigate the ultrastructure of cells, tissues and materials. In medicine, TEM is used for diagnostic purposes in fields such as virology and bacteriology.

It's important to note that preparing a sample for TEM is a complex process, requiring specialized techniques to create thin (50-100 nm) specimens. These include cutting ultrathin sections of embedded samples using an ultramicrotome, staining with heavy metal salts, and positive staining or negative staining methods.

Adenoviruses, Human: A group of viruses that commonly cause respiratory illnesses, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and croup, in humans. They can also cause conjunctivitis (pink eye), cystitis (bladder infection), and gastroenteritis (stomach and intestinal infection).

Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that belong to the family Adenoviridae. There are more than 50 different types of human adenoviruses, which can be classified into seven species (A-G). Different types of adenoviruses tend to cause specific illnesses, such as respiratory or gastrointestinal infections.

Human adenoviruses are highly contagious and can spread through close personal contact, respiratory droplets, or contaminated surfaces. They can also be transmitted through contaminated water sources. Some people may become carriers of the virus and experience no symptoms but still spread the virus to others.

Most human adenovirus infections are mild and resolve on their own within a few days to a week. However, some types of adenoviruses can cause severe illness, particularly in people with weakened immune systems, such as infants, young children, older adults, and individuals with HIV/AIDS or organ transplants.

There are no specific antiviral treatments for human adenovirus infections, but supportive care, such as hydration, rest, and fever reduction, can help manage symptoms. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and not sharing personal items like towels or utensils.

The nef gene in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) encodes for the nef protein, which is a key regulatory protein for the virus. The nef gene products, which include the nef protein and its cleavage fragments, play several crucial roles in the viral life cycle and the pathogenesis of HIV infection.

The nef protein is a myristoylated, multifunctional type I transmembrane protein that localizes to the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments. It has been shown to have several effects on both viral replication and host cell functions:

1. Downregulation of CD4 receptor and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules from the cell surface: By reducing the expression of these molecules, nef helps HIV to evade the immune response and enhances viral infectivity.
2. Enhancement of virion infectivity: Nef can increase the incorporation of viral envelope proteins into virions and promote their fusogenic activity, leading to more efficient infection of target cells.
3. Augmentation of viral replication: Nef contributes to the activation of signaling pathways that stimulate viral gene expression and support the establishment of viral reservoirs in infected cells.
4. Modulation of host cell signal transduction: Nef can interact with various host cell proteins, affecting their functions and contributing to HIV-induced immune dysfunction and disease progression.

The nef gene products are essential for efficient HIV replication and pathogenesis, making them potential targets for antiretroviral therapy and vaccine development.

Orthoreovirus is a type of virus that belongs to the family Reoviridae. These are non-enveloped viruses with a double-stranded RNA genome. Orthoreoviruses are further classified into three main serotypes (Orthoreovirus 1-3), and they are known to infect both humans and animals, including birds and mammals.

In humans, orthoreovirus infections are usually mild or asymptomatic but can sometimes cause respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly in children. The virus is typically transmitted through respiratory droplets or the fecal-oral route. Once inside the host, the virus infects and replicates within cells of the respiratory or intestinal tract, leading to tissue damage and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

Orthoreovirus infections are generally self-limiting, and treatment is typically supportive. However, there is ongoing research into the potential use of orthoreoviruses as oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy, as they have been shown to selectively infect and kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells unharmed.

Post-translational protein processing refers to the modifications and changes that proteins undergo after their synthesis on ribosomes, which are complex molecular machines responsible for protein synthesis. These modifications occur through various biochemical processes and play a crucial role in determining the final structure, function, and stability of the protein.

The process begins with the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into a linear polypeptide chain, which is then subjected to several post-translational modifications. These modifications can include:

1. Proteolytic cleavage: The removal of specific segments or domains from the polypeptide chain by proteases, resulting in the formation of mature, functional protein subunits.
2. Chemical modifications: Addition or modification of chemical groups to the side chains of amino acids, such as phosphorylation (addition of a phosphate group), glycosylation (addition of sugar moieties), methylation (addition of a methyl group), acetylation (addition of an acetyl group), and ubiquitination (addition of a ubiquitin protein).
3. Disulfide bond formation: The oxidation of specific cysteine residues within the polypeptide chain, leading to the formation of disulfide bonds between them. This process helps stabilize the three-dimensional structure of proteins, particularly in extracellular environments.
4. Folding and assembly: The acquisition of a specific three-dimensional conformation by the polypeptide chain, which is essential for its function. Chaperone proteins assist in this process to ensure proper folding and prevent aggregation.
5. Protein targeting: The directed transport of proteins to their appropriate cellular locations, such as the nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, or plasma membrane. This is often facilitated by specific signal sequences within the protein that are recognized and bound by transport machinery.

Collectively, these post-translational modifications contribute to the functional diversity of proteins in living organisms, allowing them to perform a wide range of cellular processes, including signaling, catalysis, regulation, and structural support.

Inclusion bodies, viral are typically described as intracellular inclusions that appear as a result of viral infections. These inclusion bodies consist of aggregates of virus-specific proteins, viral particles, or both, which accumulate inside the host cell's cytoplasm or nucleus during the replication cycle of certain viruses.

The presence of inclusion bodies can sometimes be observed through histological or cytological examination using various staining techniques. Different types of viruses may exhibit distinct morphologies and locations of these inclusion bodies, which can aid in the identification and diagnosis of specific viral infections. However, it is important to note that not all viral infections result in the formation of inclusion bodies, and their presence does not necessarily indicate active viral replication or infection.

A genetic complementation test is a laboratory procedure used in molecular genetics to determine whether two mutated genes can complement each other's function, indicating that they are located at different loci and represent separate alleles. This test involves introducing a normal or wild-type copy of one gene into a cell containing a mutant version of the same gene, and then observing whether the presence of the normal gene restores the normal function of the mutated gene. If the introduction of the normal gene results in the restoration of the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at different loci and can complement each other's function. However, if the introduction of the normal gene does not restore the normal phenotype, it suggests that the two genes are located at the same locus and represent different alleles of the same gene. This test is commonly used to map genes and identify genetic interactions in a variety of organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and animals.

Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is a type of retrovirus that primarily affects chickens and other birds. It is responsible for a group of diseases known as avian leukosis, which includes various types of tumors and immunosuppressive conditions. The virus is transmitted horizontally through the shedder's dander, feathers, and vertical transmission through infected eggs.

There are several subgroups of ALV (A, B, C, D, E, and J), each with different host ranges and pathogenicity. Some strains can cause rapid death in young chickens, while others may take years to develop clinical signs. The most common form of the disease is neoplastic, characterized by the development of various types of tumors such as lymphomas, myelomas, and sarcomas.

Avian leukosis virus infection can have significant economic impacts on the poultry industry due to decreased growth rates, increased mortality, and condemnation of infected birds at processing. Control measures include eradication programs, biosecurity practices, vaccination, and breeding for genetic resistance.

Host-pathogen interactions refer to the complex and dynamic relationship between a living organism (the host) and a disease-causing agent (the pathogen). This interaction can involve various molecular, cellular, and physiological processes that occur between the two entities. The outcome of this interaction can determine whether the host will develop an infection or not, as well as the severity and duration of the illness.

During host-pathogen interactions, the pathogen may release virulence factors that allow it to evade the host's immune system, colonize tissues, and obtain nutrients for its survival and replication. The host, in turn, may mount an immune response to recognize and eliminate the pathogen, which can involve various mechanisms such as inflammation, phagocytosis, and the production of antimicrobial agents.

Understanding the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. This knowledge can help identify new targets for therapeutic interventions, inform vaccine design, and guide public health policies to control the spread of infectious agents.

Nucleoproteins are complexes formed by the association of proteins with nucleic acids (DNA or RNA). These complexes play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as packaging and protecting genetic material, regulating gene expression, and replication and repair of DNA. In these complexes, proteins interact with nucleic acids through electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and other non-covalent interactions, leading to the formation of stable structures that help maintain the integrity and function of the genetic material. Some well-known examples of nucleoproteins include histones, which are involved in DNA packaging in eukaryotic cells, and reverse transcriptase, an enzyme found in retroviruses that transcribes RNA into DNA.

Parvoviridae is a family of small, non-enveloped viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, animals, and birds. These viruses have a single-stranded DNA genome and replicate in the nucleus of infected cells. They are resistant to heat, acid, and organic solvents, making them difficult to inactivate.

The family Parvoviridae is divided into two subfamilies: Parvovirinae and Densovirinae. Parvovirinae infect vertebrates, while Densovirinae infect invertebrates. The subfamily Parvovirinae includes several genera that infect various hosts, such as humans, dogs, cats, and primates.

Parvovirus B19 is a well-known member of this family that causes a variety of clinical manifestations in humans, including fifth disease (slapped cheek syndrome), arthralgia, and occasionally more severe diseases in immunocompromised individuals or those with certain hematological disorders.

In animals, parvoviruses can cause serious diseases such as canine parvovirus infection in dogs and feline panleukopenia in cats, which can be fatal if left untreated.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Viruses, Unclassified" is not a recognized medical or scientific category. Generally, viruses are classified based on various characteristics such as genome structure, mode of replication, host range, and symptoms they cause. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) is the organization responsible for the formal classification of viruses.

If you have any specific questions about certain unclassified viral entities or phenomena, I'd be happy to help if I can! Please provide more context so I can give a more accurate and helpful response.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Simian Virus 40 (SV40) is a polyomavirus that is found in both monkeys and humans. It is a DNA virus that has been extensively studied in laboratory settings due to its ability to transform cells and cause tumors in animals. In fact, SV40 was discovered as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines that were prepared using rhesus monkey kidney cells in the 1950s and 1960s.

SV40 is not typically associated with human disease, but there has been some concern that exposure to the virus through contaminated vaccines or other means could increase the risk of certain types of cancer, such as mesothelioma and brain tumors. However, most studies have failed to find a consistent link between SV40 infection and cancer in humans.

The medical community generally agrees that SV40 is not a significant public health threat, but researchers continue to study the virus to better understand its biology and potential impact on human health.

A plant virus is not defined in medical terms, as viruses are typically considered within the context of living organisms and plants are not classified as such. However, I can provide a general virology definition for you:

Plant viruses are small infectious agents that consist of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) enclosed in a protein coat. They infect various plant species, causing a wide range of symptoms and diseases, which can result in significant economic losses in agriculture and horticulture. Plant viruses lack the ability to replicate outside a host cell, and they rely on the host's metabolic machinery for their reproduction. They can be transmitted through various means, such as insect vectors, seeds, or mechanical contact.

Viral fusion proteins are specialized surface proteins found on the envelope of enveloped viruses. These proteins play a crucial role in the viral infection process by mediating the fusion of the viral membrane with the target cell membrane, allowing the viral genetic material to enter the host cell and initiate replication.

The fusion protein is often synthesized as an inactive precursor, which undergoes a series of conformational changes upon interaction with specific receptors on the host cell surface. This results in the exposure of hydrophobic fusion peptides or domains that insert into the target cell membrane, bringing the two membranes into close proximity and facilitating their merger.

A well-known example of a viral fusion protein is the gp120/gp41 complex found on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The gp120 subunit binds to CD4 receptors and chemokine coreceptors on the host cell surface, triggering conformational changes in the gp41 subunit that expose the fusion peptide and enable membrane fusion. Understanding the structure and function of viral fusion proteins is important for developing antiviral strategies and vaccines.

An epitope is a specific region on the surface of an antigen (a molecule that can trigger an immune response) that is recognized by an antibody, B-cell receptor, or T-cell receptor. It is also commonly referred to as an antigenic determinant. Epitopes are typically composed of linear amino acid sequences or conformational structures made up of discontinuous amino acids in the antigen. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between self and non-self molecules, leading to the targeted destruction of foreign substances like viruses and bacteria. Understanding epitopes is essential for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "VPR" is not a term that is typically associated with genes in the context of medical or genetic definitions.

VPR can refer to the viral protein R of certain retroviruses, such as HIV-1. Vpr is a regulatory protein that plays a role in the replication and pathogenesis of the virus. It has been studied for its potential as a target for antiretroviral therapy.

If you meant to ask about a specific gene related to VPR or another medical topic, please provide more context or clarify your question, and I will do my best to help you find the information you are looking for!

Immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) is a specialized type of electron microscopy that combines the principles of immunochemistry and electron microscopy to detect and localize specific antigens within cells or tissues at the ultrastructural level. This technique allows for the visualization and identification of specific proteins, viruses, or other antigenic structures with a high degree of resolution and specificity.

In IEM, samples are first fixed, embedded, and sectioned to prepare them for electron microscopy. The sections are then treated with specific antibodies that have been labeled with electron-dense markers, such as gold particles or ferritin. These labeled antibodies bind to the target antigens in the sample, allowing for their visualization under an electron microscope.

There are several different methods of IEM, including pre-embedding and post-embedding techniques. Pre-embedding involves labeling the antigens before embedding the sample in resin, while post-embedding involves labeling the antigens after embedding. Post-embedding techniques are generally more commonly used because they allow for better preservation of ultrastructure and higher resolution.

IEM is a valuable tool in many areas of research, including virology, bacteriology, immunology, and cell biology. It can be used to study the structure and function of viruses, bacteria, and other microorganisms, as well as the distribution and localization of specific proteins and antigens within cells and tissues.

Phosphorus isotopes are different forms of the element phosphorus that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei, while the number of protons remains the same. The most common and stable isotope of phosphorus is 31P, which contains 15 protons and 16 neutrons. However, there are also several other isotopes of phosphorus that exist, including 32P and 33P, which are radioactive and have 15 protons and 17 or 18 neutrons, respectively. These radioactive isotopes are often used in medical research and treatment, such as in the form of radiopharmaceuticals to diagnose and treat various diseases.

Viral nonstructural proteins (NS) are viral proteins that are not part of the virion structure. They play various roles in the viral life cycle, such as replication of the viral genome, transcription, translation regulation, and modulation of the host cell environment to favor virus replication. These proteins are often produced in large quantities during infection and can manipulate or disrupt various cellular pathways to benefit the virus. They may also be involved in evasion of the host's immune response. The specific functions of viral nonstructural proteins vary depending on the type of virus.

Avian sarcoma viruses (ASVs) are a group of retroviruses that primarily infect birds and cause various types of tumors, particularly sarcomas. These viruses contain an oncogene, which is a gene that has the ability to transform normal cells into cancerous ones. The oncogene in ASVs is often derived from cellular genes called proto-oncogenes, which are normally involved in regulating cell growth and division.

ASVs can be divided into two main types: non-defective and defective. Non-defective ASVs contain a complete set of viral genes that allow them to replicate independently, while defective ASVs lack some of the necessary viral genes and require assistance from other viruses to replicate.

One well-known example of an avian sarcoma virus is the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), which was first discovered in chickens by Peyton Rous in 1910. RSV causes a highly malignant form of sarcoma in chickens and has been extensively studied as a model system for cancer research. The oncogene in RSV is called v-src, which is derived from the normal cellular gene c-src.

Avian sarcoma viruses have contributed significantly to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and have provided valuable insights into the role of oncogenes in tumorigenesis.

Viral interference is a phenomenon where the replication of one virus is inhibited or blocked by the presence of another virus. This can occur when two different viruses infect the same cell and compete for the cell's resources, such as nucleotides, energy, and replication machinery. As a result, the replication of one virus may be suppressed, allowing the other virus to predominate.

This phenomenon has been observed in both in vitro (laboratory) studies and in vivo (in the body) studies. It has been suggested that viral interference may play a role in the outcome of viral coinfections, where an individual is infected with more than one virus at the same time. Viral interference can also be exploited as a potential strategy for antiviral therapy, where one virus is used to inhibit the replication of another virus.

It's important to note that not all viruses interfere with each other, and the outcome of viral coinfections can depend on various factors such as the specific viruses involved, the timing and sequence of infection, and the host's immune response.

Podoviridae is a family of viruses in the order Caudovirales, which are tailed, double-stranded DNA viruses. The members of this family are characterized by their short, noncontractile tails. The virions (virus particles) of Podoviridae are typically icosahedral in shape and measure around 60 nanometers in diameter.

The host organisms of Podoviridae are primarily bacteria, making them bacteriophages or phages. They infect and replicate within the host bacterium, often leading to its lysis (breakdown) and release of new virions. The family Podoviridae is further divided into several genera, including T7-like viruses, N4-like viruses, and P22-like viruses, among others.

It's worth noting that while Podoviridae is a well-established family of bacteriophages, the field of virology is constantly evolving as new research and discoveries are made. Therefore, it's possible that the classification and definition of Podoviridae may change over time.

Cell fusion is the process by which two or more cells combine to form a single cell with a single nucleus, containing the genetic material from all of the original cells. This can occur naturally in certain biological processes, such as fertilization (when a sperm and egg cell fuse to form a zygote), muscle development (where multiple muscle precursor cells fuse together to create multinucleated muscle fibers), and during the formation of bone (where osteoclasts, the cells responsible for breaking down bone tissue, are multinucleated).

Cell fusion can also be induced artificially in laboratory settings through various methods, including chemical treatments, electrical stimulation, or viral vectors. Induced cell fusion is often used in research to create hybrid cells with unique properties, such as cybrid cells (cytoplasmic hybrids) and heterokaryons (nuclear hybrids). These hybrid cells can help scientists study various aspects of cell biology, genetics, and disease mechanisms.

In summary, cell fusion is the merging of two or more cells into one, resulting in a single cell with combined genetic material. This process occurs naturally during certain biological processes and can be induced artificially for research purposes.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

Medical Definition:

Murine leukemia virus (MLV) is a type of retrovirus that primarily infects and causes various types of malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas in mice. It is a complex genus of viruses, with many strains showing different pathogenic properties.

MLV contains two identical single-stranded RNA genomes and has the ability to reverse transcribe its RNA into DNA upon infection, integrating this proviral DNA into the host cell's genome. This is facilitated by an enzyme called reverse transcriptase, which MLV carries within its viral particle.

The virus can be horizontally transmitted between mice through close contact with infected saliva, urine, or milk. Vertical transmission from mother to offspring can also occur either in-utero or through the ingestion of infected breast milk.

MLV has been extensively studied as a model system for retroviral pathogenesis and tumorigenesis, contributing significantly to our understanding of oncogenes and their role in cancer development. It's important to note that Murine Leukemia Virus does not infect humans.

Ebolavirus is a genus of viruses in the family Filoviridae, order Mononegavirales. It is named after the Ebola River in the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire), where the virus was first identified in 1976. There are six species of Ebolavirus, four of which are known to cause disease in humans: Zaire ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Bundibugyo ebolavirus, and Tai Forest ebolavirus (formerly Cote d'Ivoire ebolavirus). The fifth species, Reston ebolavirus, is known to cause disease in non-human primates and pigs, but not in humans. The sixth and most recently identified species, Bombali ebolavirus, has not been associated with any human or animal diseases.

Ebolaviruses are enveloped, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that cause a severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. Fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family are considered to be the natural host of Ebolavirus.

The symptoms of Ebolavirus disease (EVD) typically include fever, severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, fatigue, and sore throat, followed by vomiting, diarrhea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding. The case fatality rate of EVD is variable but has been historically high, ranging from 25% to 90% in past outbreaks depending on the species and the quality of medical care. There are no licensed specific treatments or vaccines available for EVD, although several promising candidates are currently under development.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

A "gene product" is a general term that refers to the biochemical material or molecule produced by a gene after it has been transcribed and translated. This can include proteins, RNA molecules, or other types of functional genetic material.

In the context of "nef," this refers to a specific protein encoded by the nef gene found in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS. The nef gene is one of the nine genes present in the HIV genome, and it encodes for a protein that plays a crucial role in the viral replication cycle and the pathogenesis of HIV infection.

The nef protein has multiple functions, including downregulation of CD4 receptors on the surface of infected cells, which helps the virus evade the immune response. It also enhances viral infectivity and modulates various cell signaling pathways to promote viral replication and survival. The nef gene product is an important target for HIV research and potential therapeutic interventions.

Archaeal viruses are viruses that infect and replicate within archaea, which are single-celled microorganisms without a nucleus. These viruses have unique characteristics that distinguish them from bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. They often possess distinct morphologies, such as icosahedral or filamentous shapes, and their genomes can be composed of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), or single-stranded RNA (ssRNA).

Archaeal viruses have evolved various strategies to hijack the host cell's machinery for replication, packaging, and release of new virus particles. Some archaeal viruses even encode their own proteins for transcription and translation, suggesting a more complex relationship with their hosts than previously thought. The study of archaeal viruses provides valuable insights into the evolution of viruses and their hosts and has implications for understanding the origins of life on Earth.

Mutagenesis is the process by which the genetic material (DNA or RNA) of an organism is changed in a way that can alter its phenotype, or observable traits. These changes, known as mutations, can be caused by various factors such as chemicals, radiation, or viruses. Some mutations may have no effect on the organism, while others can cause harm, including diseases and cancer. Mutagenesis is a crucial area of study in genetics and molecular biology, with implications for understanding evolution, genetic disorders, and the development of new medical treatments.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

A chick embryo refers to the developing organism that arises from a fertilized chicken egg. It is often used as a model system in biological research, particularly during the stages of development when many of its organs and systems are forming and can be easily observed and manipulated. The study of chick embryos has contributed significantly to our understanding of various aspects of developmental biology, including gastrulation, neurulation, organogenesis, and pattern formation. Researchers may use various techniques to observe and manipulate the chick embryo, such as surgical alterations, cell labeling, and exposure to drugs or other agents.

Bacteriophage P22 is a specific type of virus that infects and replicates within the bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. It is a double-stranded DNA virus and has an icosahedral head and a short, non-contractile tail. Bacteriophage P22 is known for its ability to undergo generalized transduction, where it can package host bacterial DNA into new phage particles, allowing the transfer of genetic material between bacteria. It is widely used in molecular biology as a tool for studying and manipulating bacterial genomes.

Retroviridae is a family of viruses that includes HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). Retroviridae proteins refer to the various structural and functional proteins that are encoded by the retroviral genome. These proteins can be categorized into three main groups:

1. Group-specific antigen (Gag) proteins: These proteins make up the viral matrix, capsid, and nucleocapsid. They are involved in the assembly of new virus particles.

2. Polymerase (Pol) proteins: These proteins include the reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease enzymes. Reverse transcriptase is responsible for converting the viral RNA genome into DNA, which can then be integrated into the host cell's genome by the integrase enzyme. The protease enzyme is involved in processing the polyprotein precursors of Gag and Pol into their mature forms.

3. Envelope (Env) proteins: These proteins are responsible for the attachment and fusion of the virus to the host cell membrane. They are synthesized as a precursor protein, which is then cleaved by a host cell protease to form two distinct proteins - the surface unit (SU) and the transmembrane unit (TM). The SU protein contains the receptor-binding domain, while the TM protein forms the transmembrane anchor.

Retroviral proteins play crucial roles in various stages of the viral life cycle, including entry, reverse transcription, integration, transcription, translation, assembly, and release. Understanding the functions of these proteins is essential for developing effective antiretroviral therapies and vaccines against retroviral infections.

Herpes Simplex is a viral infection caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). There are two types of HSV: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Both types can cause sores or blisters on the skin or mucous membranes, but HSV-1 is typically associated with oral herpes (cold sores) and HSV-2 is usually linked to genital herpes. However, either type can infect any area of the body. The virus remains in the body for life and can reactivate periodically, causing recurrent outbreaks of lesions or blisters. It is transmitted through direct contact with infected skin or mucous membranes, such as during kissing or sexual activity.

Myristic acid is not typically considered in the context of medical definitions, but it is instead more commonly referred to in the fields of chemistry and biochemistry. However, I can provide you with some relevant information about myristic acid that may be helpful.

Myristic acid is a type of saturated fatty acid, which means it contains no double bonds between its carbon atoms. The chemical formula for myristic acid is CH3(CH2)12COOH. It has a 14-carbon chain and is named after the nutmeg tree (Myristica fragrans), from which it was first isolated. Myristic acid occurs naturally in various plant and animal sources, including coconut oil, palm kernel oil, butterfat, and breast milk.

In a medical context, myristic acid is sometimes discussed due to its potential role in health and disease. For instance, some studies have suggested that high intake of myristic acid may contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, as it can raise levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also known as "bad" cholesterol. However, more research is needed to fully understand the health implications of myristic acid consumption.

It's worth noting that medical definitions typically focus on specific substances or processes related to human health, disease, and treatment. Myristic acid, while an essential component in biochemistry, may not have a direct medical definition due to its broader relevance in chemistry and food science.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

An amino acid substitution is a type of mutation in which one amino acid in a protein is replaced by another. This occurs when there is a change in the DNA sequence that codes for a particular amino acid in a protein. The genetic code is redundant, meaning that most amino acids are encoded by more than one codon (a sequence of three nucleotides). As a result, a single base pair change in the DNA sequence may not necessarily lead to an amino acid substitution. However, if a change does occur, it can have a variety of effects on the protein's structure and function, depending on the nature of the substituted amino acids. Some substitutions may be harmless, while others may alter the protein's activity or stability, leading to disease.

A sequence deletion in a genetic context refers to the removal or absence of one or more nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA or RNA) from a specific region in a DNA or RNA molecule. This type of mutation can lead to the loss of genetic information, potentially resulting in changes in the function or expression of a gene. If the deletion involves a critical portion of the gene, it can cause diseases, depending on the role of that gene in the body. The size of the deleted sequence can vary, ranging from a single nucleotide to a large segment of DNA.

Pseudorabies, also known as Aujeszky's disease, is a viral disease that primarily affects animals, particularly pigs, but can occasionally infect other mammals including dogs, cats, and humans. The disease is caused by the Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1) and is named "pseudorabies" because it can cause symptoms similar to rabies, such as neurological signs and aggression. However, it is not related to rabies and is caused by a different virus.

In pigs, the disease can cause a range of symptoms including respiratory distress, fever, neurological signs, and reproductive failure. In other animals, pseudorabies can cause severe neurological signs such as seizures, disorientation, and aggression.

Humans can become infected with pseudorabies through close contact with infected animals or their tissues, but it is rare and usually only occurs in people who work closely with pigs or other susceptible animals. In humans, the disease typically causes mild flu-like symptoms or a skin rash, but in rare cases, it can cause more severe neurological signs.

There is no specific treatment for pseudorabies, and prevention measures such as vaccination and biosecurity are critical to controlling the spread of the disease in animal populations.

Orthomyxoviridae is a family of viruses that includes influenza A, B, and C viruses, which are the causative agents of flu in humans and animals. These viruses are enveloped, meaning they have a lipid membrane derived from the host cell, and have a single-stranded, negative-sense RNA genome. The genome is segmented, meaning it consists of several separate pieces of RNA, which allows for genetic reassortment or "shuffling" when two different strains infect the same cell, leading to the emergence of new strains.

The viral envelope contains two major glycoproteins: hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). The HA protein is responsible for binding to host cells and facilitating entry into the cell, while NA helps release newly formed virus particles from infected cells by cleaving sialic acid residues on the host cell surface.

Orthomyxoviruses are known to cause respiratory infections in humans and animals, with influenza A viruses being the most virulent and capable of causing pandemics. Influenza B viruses typically cause less severe illness and are primarily found in humans, while influenza C viruses generally cause mild upper respiratory symptoms and are also mainly restricted to humans.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "viral tail proteins" is not a widely recognized or established medical term. The term "tail proteins" is used in the context of certain viruses, particularly bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), which have a tail-like structure that helps them attach to and inject their genetic material into host cells.

However, even within this context, there isn't a specific concept known as "viral tail proteins" that has a widely accepted medical definition. The proteins that make up the tail structure of bacteriophages have various functions and are referred to by different names based on their roles. These can include terms like "tail fiber proteins," "tail tube proteins," "tail terminator proteins," etc.

If you're looking for information about a specific protein or group of proteins related to viral tails, I would be happy to help further if you could provide more details.

Hemagglutinins are glycoprotein spikes found on the surface of influenza viruses. They play a crucial role in the viral infection process by binding to sialic acid receptors on host cells, primarily in the respiratory tract. After attachment, hemagglutinins mediate the fusion of the viral and host cell membranes, allowing the viral genome to enter the host cell and initiate replication.

There are 18 different subtypes of hemagglutinin (H1-H18) identified in influenza A viruses, which naturally infect various animal species, including birds, pigs, and humans. The specificity of hemagglutinins for particular sialic acid receptors can influence host range and tissue tropism, contributing to the zoonotic potential of certain influenza A virus subtypes.

Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays are commonly used in virology and epidemiology to measure the antibody response to influenza viruses and determine vaccine effectiveness. In these assays, hemagglutinins bind to red blood cells coated with sialic acid receptors, forming a diffuse mat of cells that can be observed visually. The addition of specific antisera containing antibodies against the hemagglutinin prevents this binding and results in the formation of discrete buttons of red blood cells, indicating a positive HI titer and the presence of neutralizing antibodies.

Also known as Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), Herpesvirus 3, Human is a species-specific alphaherpesvirus that causes two distinct diseases: chickenpox (varicella) during primary infection and herpes zoster (shingles) upon reactivation of latent infection.

Chickenpox is typically a self-limiting disease characterized by a generalized, pruritic vesicular rash, fever, and malaise. After resolution of the primary infection, VZV remains latent in the sensory ganglia and can reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster, which is characterized by a unilateral, dermatomal vesicular rash and pain.

Herpesvirus 3, Human is highly contagious and spreads through respiratory droplets or direct contact with the chickenpox rash. Vaccination is available to prevent primary infection and reduce the risk of complications associated with chickenpox and herpes zoster.

Insect viruses, also known as entomoviruses, are viruses that specifically infect and replicate in insect hosts. These viruses can be found in various insect species, including those of medical and agricultural importance. Insect viruses can cause diseases in insect populations, leading to significant impacts on their growth, development, and survival. Some insect viruses have been studied as potential biological control agents for managing pest insects that affect crops or transmit diseases. Examples of insect viruses include Baculoviridae, Reoviridae, and Picornaviridae families.

Vaccinia is actually not a medical term with a specific definition, but it refers to the virus used in the smallpox vaccine. The vaccinia virus is related to, but less harmful than, the variola virus that causes smallpox. When vaccinia virus is introduced into the skin, it leads to an immune response that protects against smallpox.

The term "vaccinia" also refers to the characteristic pockmark-like lesion that forms on the skin as part of the body's reaction to the vaccine. This lesion is a result of the infection and replication of the vaccinia virus in the skin cells, which triggers an immune response that helps protect against smallpox.

It's worth noting that while the smallpox vaccine is no longer routinely administered due to the eradication of smallpox, it may still be used in certain circumstances, such as in laboratory workers who handle the virus or in the event of a bioterrorism threat involving smallpox.

Electron microscope tomography (EMT) is a 3D imaging technique used in electron microscopy. It involves collecting a series of images of a sample at different tilt angles, and then using computational algorithms to reconstruct the 3D structure of the sample from these images.

In EMT, a sample is prepared and placed in an electron microscope, where it is exposed to a beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the atoms in the sample, producing contrast that allows the features of the sample to be visualized. By tilting the sample and collecting images at multiple angles, a range of perspectives can be obtained, which are then used to create a 3D reconstruction of the sample.

EMT is a powerful tool for studying the ultrastructure of cells and tissues, as it allows researchers to visualize structures that may not be visible using other imaging techniques. It has been used to study a wide range of biological systems, including viruses, bacteria, organelles, and cells.

EMT is a complex technique that requires specialized equipment and expertise to perform. However, it can provide valuable insights into the structure and function of biological systems, making it an important tool in the field of biology and medicine.

A nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) is a type of large, complex DNA virus that infects insects, particularly members of the order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies). NPVs are characterized by their ability to produce multiple virions within a single polyhedral occlusion body, which provides protection for the virions in the environment and facilitates their transmission between hosts.

NPVs replicate in the nucleus of infected cells, where they induce the production of large quantities of viral proteins that ultimately lead to the lysis of the host cell. The virions are then released and can infect other cells or be transmitted to other insects. NPVs are important pathogens of many agricultural pests, and some species have been developed as biological control agents for use in integrated pest management programs.

A genetic vector is a vehicle, often a plasmid or a virus, that is used to introduce foreign DNA into a host cell as part of genetic engineering or gene therapy techniques. The vector contains the desired gene or genes, along with regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers, which are needed for the expression of the gene in the target cells.

The choice of vector depends on several factors, including the size of the DNA to be inserted, the type of cell to be targeted, and the efficiency of uptake and expression required. Commonly used vectors include plasmids, adenoviruses, retroviruses, and lentiviruses.

Plasmids are small circular DNA molecules that can replicate independently in bacteria. They are often used as cloning vectors to amplify and manipulate DNA fragments. Adenoviruses are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect a wide range of host cells, including human cells. They are commonly used as gene therapy vectors because they can efficiently transfer genes into both dividing and non-dividing cells.

Retroviruses and lentiviruses are RNA viruses that integrate their genetic material into the host cell's genome. This allows for stable expression of the transgene over time. Lentiviruses, a subclass of retroviruses, have the advantage of being able to infect non-dividing cells, making them useful for gene therapy applications in post-mitotic tissues such as neurons and muscle cells.

Overall, genetic vectors play a crucial role in modern molecular biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study gene function, develop new therapies, and modify organisms for various purposes.

Neutralizing antibodies are a type of antibody that defends against pathogens such as viruses or bacteria by neutralizing their ability to infect cells. They do this by binding to specific regions on the surface proteins of the pathogen, preventing it from attaching to and entering host cells. This renders the pathogen ineffective and helps to prevent or reduce the severity of infection. Neutralizing antibodies can be produced naturally in response to an infection or vaccination, or they can be generated artificially for therapeutic purposes.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Virion studied sculpture in Paris under Jean-Paul Aubé and Charles Gauthier and exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français ... Charles Louis Eugene Virion Archived 2015-06-22 at the Wayback Machine National Museum of Wildlife Art of the United States, ... Charles Louis Eugène Virion (Ajaccio, 1 December 1865 - Montigny-sur-Loing, 30 December 1946) was a noted French sculptor, ... Armand Point "VIRION, Charles Louis Eugène." Benezit Dictionary of Artists, Oxford Art Online, Oxford University Press. ...
Virion is another name for a virus particle. Virion may also refer to: Charles Virion (1865-1946), a noted French sculptor and ... ceramicist Pierre Virion (1899-1988), a French journalist and writer Virion Screen Project, a screen based digital art ... exhibition This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Virion. If an internal link led you here, you may ...
... (1899-1988) was a French journalist and promoter of the Judeo-Masonic conspiracy theory. Taguieff, Pierre-André ( ...
The Virion Screen Project was held from 19 July 2015 to 1 August 2015.[citation needed] Developed by Rachael Parsons, Virion ... Virion Screen Project Website Virion Screen Project Discussion Creative Industries Precinct Rachael Parsons Urban Dental Health ... Using the Virion website, internet users were invited to upload an image, short video work or sound work to be exhibited during ... Virion is a screen-based digital art exhibition that links to public sites across Brisbane, focused in the Kelvin Grove Urban ...
Look up viron in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Viron may refer to: Viron P. Vaky (1925-2012), American diplomat an ... Philippines Viron,the Latin name of virus meaning poison Virion, a virus particle This disambiguation page lists articles ... alternative form of Vyronas, a suburb of Athens, Greece Viron, a fictional city in The Book of the Long Sun by Gene Wolfe Viron ... a playable race (or their language) in the computer RTS game Ground Control II Viron Transit, a bus company servicing the ...
Viron Transportation Company or Viron Transit is a bus company servicing the Ilocos Region, Philippines. The bus company is ... Viron Transit is utilizing Mitsubishi Fuso, Hino Pilipinas, Mercedes Benz, King Long buses, Viron Motor/Marilao Works (VMW) at ... Viron Transportation Co., Inc. ("Viron" originates from "VIRgilio RONdaris") is related to the former Times Transit (because it ... Starting May 20, 2013, Viron Transit will be using the front of the terminal formerly used by Times located along Quezon Avenue ...
... was born in Corpus Christi, Texas, on September 13, 1925, as a son of Greek immigrants. During the Second World ... Viron Peter Vaky (September 13, 1925 - November 22, 2012) was an American diplomat who was United States Ambassador to Costa ... "Council on Foreign Relations". Schudel, Matt (2012-12-08). "Viron P. Vaky, ambassador who helped shape Latin American policy, ... "Viron P. Vaky, ambassador who helped shape Latin American policy, dies at 87". The Washington Post. Retrieved 4 December 2014. ...
... (Dutch: Kasteel de Viron, French: Château de Viron) is a castle in Dilbeek, Flemish Brabant, Belgium, which ... It was built in 1863 by the Jean-Pierre Cluysenaar, commissioned by the de Viron family, which settled in Dilbeek in 1775. The ... Media related to Kasteel de Viron at Wikimedia Commons Official website (Infobox mapframe without OSM relation ID on Wikidata, ...
The term virion (plural virions), which dates from 1959, is also used to refer to a single viral particle that is released from ... These proteins go on to become either new virions within the cell, helper proteins, which help assembly of new virions, or ... The whole virion is slightly pleomorphic, ranging from ovoid to brick-shaped. Mimivirus is one of the largest characterised ... When virions are coated with stain (positive staining), fine detail is obscured. Negative staining overcomes this problem by ...
"Virion tegument". www.uniprot.org. Retrieved 7 May 2019. Yu, Xuekui; Shah, Sanket; Lee, Manfred; Dai, Wei; Lo, Pierrette; Britt ...
... all the virion components are very similar. The main virion components are: Envelope: composed of lipids (obtained from the ... The virions also contain two identical single-stranded RNA molecules 7-10 kilobases in length. The two molecules are present as ... Env proteins play a role in association and entry of virions into the host cell. Possessing a functional copy of an env gene is ... Virions, viruses in the form of independent particles of retroviruses, consist of enveloped particles about 100 nm in diameter ...
Virion, C. (1972). Charles Virion's French Country Cookbook. Hawthorn Books. p. 100. Sinclair, C.G. (1998). International ...
See section: Virion Structure. Chang CK, Hou MH, Chang CF, Hsiao CD, Huang TH (March 2014). "The SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid ... Virions acquired an envelope by budding into the cisternae and formed mostly spherical, sometimes pleomorphic, particles that ... upon uptake of virions into target cell endosomes (25). Alternatively, the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) ...
See section: Virion Structure. Naskalska A, Dabrowska A, Szczepanski A, Milewska A, Jasik KP, Pyrc K (October 2019). "Membrane ... Virions acquired an envelope by budding into the cisternae and formed mostly spherical, sometimes pleomorphic, particles that ... The name refers to the characteristic appearance of virions (the infective form of the virus) by electron microscopy, which ... They are responsible for virion assembly, intracellular trafficking and morphogenesis (budding). The spikes are the most ...
Charles Virion "GAUTHIER, Charles." Benezit Dictionary of Artists, Oxford Art Online, Oxford University Press. Retrieved 23 ...
See section: Virion Structure. Ryu YB, Park SJ, Kim YM, Lee JY, Seo WD, Chang JS, et al. (March 2010). "SARS-CoV 3CLpro ...
... es have no true virion. They do not have structural proteins or a capsid. Mitoviruses have nonsegmented, linear, ...
"Mass of virion - Virus Vaccinia". BioNumbers. Retrieved 1 November 2011. "Conversion from J to kg". The NIST Reference on ...
Each virion may contain defective interfering copies. In Influenza A (H1N1) PB1-F2 is produced from an alternative reading ... The influenzavirus virion is pleomorphic; the viral envelope can occur in spherical and filamentous forms. In general, the ... the arrangement within the virion is uncertain. The ribonuclear proteins are filamentous and fall in the range of 50-130 nm ... and other viral proteins are assembled into a virion. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase molecules cluster into a bulge in the ...
... es have a naked RNA genome without a virion and derive their name from this feature. Narnaviruses have no true virion ...
The Wohl Virion Centre, London; Arts Council England, London; Arts Council England, Brighton; and Arts Council England, ...
"Häviävästä Viron satasesta voi lukea Suomea kosiskelevan viestin". HS.fi. Retrieved 2010-10-20. Zetterberg, Seppo (2007). Viron ... ISBN 978-951-746-520-5. Zetterberg, Seppo (2017). Uusi Viron historia. Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura. ISBN 978-952-222-838-3 ...
Cornacchione, S.; Sadick, N. S.; Neveu, M.; Talbourdet, S.; Lazou, K.; Viron, C.; Renimel, I.; De Quéral, D.; Kurfurst, R.; ...
The virion has a capsid (coat protein) but no envelope. The icosahedral symmetry of the capsid is round to elongated. The range ... The virions are mainly found in the cytoplasm of the infected plant (as inclusion bodies; Inclusions of Alfalfa mosaic virus).[ ... Virions assemble. (Most details of the replication cycle are still unknown). AMV infects over 600 plant species in 70 families ... for the length of the virion particle is about 30-57 nm. AMV is a multipartite virus and is composed of four particles (three ...
Virions are the products of a completed viral replication cycle; upon release from the infected cell, they are fully capable of ... Most virions are exceedingly simple in structure and physically minute, averaging just 1⁄100 the size of the typical bacterium ... While not inside an infected cell or in the process of infecting a cell, viruses exist in the form of independent virions. ... virus counter A specialized type of flow cytometer used to rapidly quantify the number of individual virions or viral particles ...
Mature virions bud from the Golgi apparatus into vesicles which are transported to the cell surface.[citation needed] ... These RNA segments are single-stranded, and exist in a helical formation within the virion. Besides, they exhibit a pseudo- ... They have an enveloped, spherical virion. Though generally found in arthropods or rodents, certain viruses in this order ... spherical virions with diameters of 80-120 nm. These viruses contain no matrix proteins. Bunyaviruses have bi- or tripartite ...
The influenza virion is roughly spherical. It is an enveloped virus; the outer layer is a lipid membrane which is taken from ...
An RNA polymerase in the virion." This paper went on to show that "the virions of vesicular stomatitis virus contain an enzyme ... An RNA Polymerase in the Virion*". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 66 (2): 572 ...
"Bureau International de l'Heure (B.I.H.) - Archives". francearchives.gouv.fr (in French). de Viron, Olivier; Dehant, Véronique ...
Viron kielen peruskurssi". Turku, (5. edition 1994, 7. edition 1997) Mati Erelt, Reet Kasik, Helle Metslang jt., "Eesti keele ... grammatika 1. Morfoloogia, sõnamoodustus". Tallinn: Eesti TA Keele ja Kirjanduse Instituut, 1995 Reet Kasik, "Johdatus viron ...
Virion studied sculpture in Paris under Jean-Paul Aubé and Charles Gauthier and exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français ... Charles Louis Eugene Virion Archived 2015-06-22 at the Wayback Machine National Museum of Wildlife Art of the United States, ... Charles Louis Eugène Virion (Ajaccio, 1 December 1865 - Montigny-sur-Loing, 30 December 1946) was a noted French sculptor, ... Armand Point "VIRION, Charles Louis Eugène." Benezit Dictionary of Artists, Oxford Art Online, Oxford University Press. ...
HIV Virion and Genome. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is a member of the Retroviridae family. It is an enveloped virus ... In order to adequately comprehend the scope of laboratory methods, a basic understanding of the structure of the HIV virion and ...
In this study, two H7N9 split virion vaccines with or without AS03 adjuvant were tested in the naive ferret model. Serological ... Stadlbauer, D., Waal, L.d., Beaulieu, E. et al. AS03-adjuvanted H7N9 inactivated split virion vaccines induce cross-reactive ... The detergent-split virion vaccines were ad-mixed with the AS03 by gentle inversion preceding each immunization. ... Animals were immunized on days 0 and 21 with non-adjuvanted standard-dose H7N9 split virion Q-H7N9 or D-H7N9 vaccine, AS03- ...
The illustration at left depicts a virion - the infectious particle that is designed for transmission of the nucleic acid ... 33 thoughts on "The virus and the virion" * Pingback: Tweets that mention The virus and the virion -- Topsy.com ... whereas the virion is used to spread from cell to cell. He wrote that "to confuse the virion with the virus would be the same ... A virion is not the same as a virus. I define virus as a distinct biological entity with five different characteristics. Others ...
Protein target information for Virion infectivity factor (Simian immunodeficiency virus (AGM3 ISOLATE)). Find diseases ...
Kilbourne, E. D. (2008). A Rondelay (Without Cadenza) By The Virion Of Influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(2), 359. ... A Rondelay (Without Cadenza) By The Virion Of Influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(2):359. doi:10.3201/eid1402. ... A Rondelay (Without Cadenza) By The Virion Of Influenza On This Page ... A Rondelay (Without Cadenza) By The Virion Of Influenza. Volume 14, Number 2-February 2008 ...
virus pictures / Smallpox pictures / Smallpox or Variola virion (virus particle). Above: surface view illustration of Smallpox ... virus or virion (virus particle). Image measures 500 pixels across, original image is 1380 pixels across. EXPLANATION OF ...
â The Virion Transitâ is on view at Telematic Media Arts (323 10th St., San Francisco) through Oct. 2. Artist David Bayus will ... In a few detailed black-and-white strokes, The Virion Transitâ on view at the SoMa gallery Telematic Media Arts through Oct. 2â ... In his artist statement, Bayus traces his inspiration for The Virion Transit to the notion of the Fisher King. I respond less ... David Bayus, still from The Virion Transit, 2021. COVID allusions aside, Bayusâ s 13-minute tour de force will give you the ...
... Creators. Rümenapf, Tillmann Strauss, Ellen G. Strauss, James H. ... Purified virions of Aura virus, a South American alphavirus related to Sindbis virus, were found to contain two RNA species, ... Quantitation of the amounts of genomic and subgenomic RNA both in virions and in infected cells showed that the ratio of ... The importance of the packaging of this RNA into virions in the natural history of the virus remains to be determined. ...
A) Quantities of gp120 on virions expressing selected V1-V5 region from each time point. (B) Relative levels of 293T cell ... C) Correlation between the levels of virion-associated gp120 (black bars) and 293T cell surface-associated gp120 (red dots). (D ... Correlation between the levels of virion-associated gp120 (black bars) and the ratio of 293T cell surface-associated gp160-120 ...
Viron Gas Heater uses technology to heat your pool quickly to the selected temperature. Save roughly 20% on operating costs ... The Viron Gas Heater uses revolutionary technology to heat your pool quickly and accurately to the temperature you select. Heat ... By absorbing so much heat into the pool water, Viron produces up to 10 litres of condensation per hour which can be piped back ... in fact, in a typical pool heating application Viron can add more than 3000 litres of water to your swimming pool each year, ...
AFLURIA QUAD - Inactivated Quadrivalent Influenza vaccine (split virion), 60 mcg HA, Suspension for injection, pre-filled ... AFLURIA QUAD - Inactivated Quadrivalent Influenza vaccine (split virion), 60 mcg HA, Suspension for injection, pre-filled ... AFLURIA QUAD - Inactivated Quadrivalent Influenza vaccine (split virion), 60 mcg HA, Suspension for injection, pre-filled ...
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Multimerization properties of class II IN mutants in virions and in vitro.. (A) Purified HIV-1 virions were crosslinked with 1 ... Immunoblot analyses of IN multimers in virions. Purified WT or IN mutant HIV-1NL4-3 virions were treated with 1 mM EGS, and ... A) Immunoblot analysis of sedimentation profiles of IN in WT or IN mutant virions. Purified HIV-1NLGP virions were analyzed by ... Profile of WT virions is denoted in black, IN mutants that led to bimodal IN distribution are shown in red and others are shown ...
The aim of this surveillance was to assess the quadrivalent inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine (IIV4) during routine ... Trivalent split-virion inactivated influenza vaccine. IIV3-ID:. Intradermally administered trivalent split-virion inactivated ... Chabanon, AL., Wague, S., Moureau, A. et al. Enhanced passive safety surveillance of the quadrivalent inactivated split-virion ... The aim of this surveillance was to assess the quadrivalent inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine (IIV4) during routine ...
Resume, la frazo estu Viron, kies..., oni nomas vidvo.. PaulP June 13, 2015 June 13, 2015 at 5:58:14 AM UTC. link. Permalink ...
... The virion, if I am to describe it, has a grave and pensive air, like a headmaster smoking a ... The virion is a patient bastard. It keeps a silent vigil over my writhing and moaning. Dawn comes and still I have not slept. ... The virion insists on this form of address, even though its been years since I stepped down from that post and withdrew to the ... The virion recedes, the corners of the room recede. Everything outward.. In the morning sky there blows a cool breeze, and a ...
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HIV virions were sedimented at 100,000 for 1.5 h and resuspended in PBS at 10 g of p24/ml. marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 ... HIV virions were sedimented at 100,000 for 1. Orexin1 Receptors by icem2012 ... We and others also found that Hsp90 is usually incorporated within the mature virion (21, 29), and there is growing evidence ...
Antigens, CD4, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Electron Microscope Tomography, HIV, HIV Envelope Protein gp120, Virion, gag Gene ...
Virion medizinische und pharmazeutische. Handelsgesellschaft mbH. Lippestr. 9a. 63452 Hanau. Kundenservice(at)virion.de ... Virion is your reliable partner. Conventional distribution channels for medicinal products tend to be complex and complicated, ...
... virions with altered capsid protein, where the AAV virions exhibit greater infectivity of retinal cells compared to wild-type ... An rAAV virion can be generated using a subject host cell. Methods of generating an rAAV virion are described in, e.g., U.S. ... The rAAV virion of claim 31, wherein the rAAV virion exhibits at least 5-fold increased infectivity of a retinal cell compared ... The rAAV virion of claim 31, wherein the rAAV virion exhibits at least 50-fold increased infectivity of a retinal cell compared ...
Center for Breakthrough Medicines and Virion Therapeutics Announce Strategic Partnership to Manufacture Virions Proprietary ... Virion Therapeutics, LLC Announces the Appointment of M. Michelle Berrey, M.D., M.P.H. and Williamson Bradford, M.D., Ph.D. to ... Virion Therapeutics Presents Data Showing Enhanced and Sustained Virus Declines in Animals upon Immunization with VRON-0200, a ... Virion Therapeutics, LLC Raises $5 Million to Develop Checkpoint Inhibitor Powered Vaccine Therapies for Treatment of Virally ...
Thornburg, Natalie J. "RSV virion and vaccine products" 202208, no. 80802 (2022). Thornburg, Natalie J. "RSV virion and vaccine ... Title : RSV virion and vaccine products Personal Author(s) : Thornburg, Natalie J. Corporate Authors(s) : National Center for ... Thornburg, Natalie J. (2022). RSV virion and vaccine products. 202208(80802). ...
We show that ApoBDs generated from IAV-infected monocytes contained IAV mRNA, protein and virions and consequently, could ... 3h). This suggests that virions were likely to be retained on the ApoBD surface as virion uptake would result in a decrease in ... ApoBD-virion binding assys. To determine whether virions could bind to apoptotic samples directly, UV-irradiated THP1 monocytes ... 2: Influenza proteins, mRNA, and virions are distributed into the ApoBDs of infected monocytes.. ...
Virón is a plant-based footwear brand following a slow fashion approach with a focus on circularity and a philosophy deeply rooted in youth and counterculture. Based in Paris, Virón is designed to be a democratic platform where new ideas and sustainable practices grow and are developed together ...
... After a combined twenty-five years of experience in the industry, eco-conscious designers Mats Rombaut and Julian Romer ...
I learned a lot about virions, their composition and their effects on the human body. A virion is defined as a virus particle. ... Virions. I have always been fascinated by science. Spending much of my undergraduate career as a pre-med student, studying ... While the science behind these deadly structures can be found in medical journals, the beauty of these virions can be found by ... This media-media series titled Virions consists of viruses loosely drawn with charcoal on the paper of old medical journals. ...
  • David Bayus, still from 'The Virion Transit,' 2021. (khsu.org)
  • Claverie suggested that the viral factory corresponds to the organism, whereas the virion is used to spread from cell to cell. (virology.ws)
  • We and others also found that Hsp90 is usually incorporated within the mature virion (21, 29), and there is growing evidence that several virus families exploit cellular Hsp90 for folding and assembly of virus structural proteins and for maturation of viral enzymes (30,C32). (icem2012.org)
  • We show that ApoBDs generated from IAV-infected monocytes contained IAV mRNA, protein and virions and consequently, could facilitate viral propagation in vitro and in vivo, and induce a robust antiviral immune response. (nature.com)
  • While medical professionals and scientists seek to contain the actions of deadly viruses, artists seek to spread their artwork to the masses, much like virions that take viral genomes from cell to cell. (andrewsomera.com)
  • Among the metagenomics -based approaches that have been developed since the beginning of the 21st century, shotgun metagenomics applied specifically to virion -associated nucleic acids (VANA) has been used to disentangle the diversity of the viral world. (bvsalud.org)
  • In order to adequately comprehend the scope of laboratory methods, a basic understanding of the structure of the HIV virion and its genome is necessary. (medscape.com)
  • The illustration at left depicts a virion - the infectious particle that is designed for transmission of the nucleic acid genome among hosts or host cells. (virology.ws)
  • Virions are composed of a 25 nm icoshedral capsid encompassing a 4.9 kb single-stranded DNA genome with two open reading frames: rep and cap. (justia.com)
  • CMV shares many attributes with other herpes viruses, including genome, virion structure, and the ability to cause latent and persistent infections. (medscape.com)
  • This results in an energetically unfavorable state of the packaged genome, creating tens of atmospheres internal pressure inside the virion. (lu.se)
  • These findings challenge a previously accepted dogma for pestivirus replication and provide new implications for virion morphogenesis of pestiviruses and HCV. (uni-luebeck.de)
  • The present disclosure provides adeno-associated virus (AAV) virions with altered capsid protein, where the AAV virions exhibit greater infectivity of retinal cells compared to wild-type AAV. (justia.com)
  • The aim of this surveillance was to assess the quadrivalent inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine (IIV4) during routine immunization in Finland, as per the national immunization program for 2019/20. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Download MedicPresents.com's free Influenza Virion Structure Medical PowerPoint Template now for your upcoming medical PowerPoint presentations. (medicpresents.com)
  • This free Influenza Virion Structure medical ppt is one of the free medical PowerPoint templates available for medical and healthcare professionals on MedicPresents.com. (medicpresents.com)
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  • The process by which a virion protein binds to molecules on the host cellular surface or host cell surface projection. (planteome.org)
  • A polyhedral or ovocylindrical shaped matrix composed of a single crystalline protein (OCCLUSION BODY MATRIX PROTEINS) in which VIRIONS are embedded. (bvsalud.org)
  • ApoBDs generated by IAV-infected monocytes contained a series of IAV components, including IAV mRNA, proteins, and infectious virions. (nature.com)
  • Strikingly, five out of these six proteins are also the virion components. (uidaho.edu)
  • Preliminary experiments indicated that p20 and two other virion proteins, p64 and CPm, are likely to play major roles in BYV aphid transmission. (uidaho.edu)
  • In BVDV-infected cells, significant amounts of NS2-3 accumulate at late time points postinfection and play an essential but ill-defined role in the production of infectious virions. (uni-luebeck.de)
  • In this context, a mutation in the N-terminal third of NS2 was identified as a critical determinant for efficient production of infectious virions in the absence of uncleaved NS2-3. (uni-luebeck.de)
  • Quantity of envelope on cell surfaces and gp120 on virions. (figshare.com)
  • A) Quantities of gp120 on virions expressing selected V1-V5 region from each time point. (figshare.com)
  • C) Correlation between the levels of virion-associated gp120 (black bars) and 293T cell surface-associated gp120 (red dots). (figshare.com)
  • Above: surface view illustration of Smallpox virus or virion (virus particle). (rkm.com.au)
  • Smallpox virion. (medscape.com)
  • The AstralPool Viron eQuilibrium Chlorinator provides a range of options to minimise or eliminate the change in water balance. (melbournepoolservicing.com.au)
  • In Total Ai mode, the Viron eQuilibrium Chlorinator can test, monitor and maintain the perfect sanitiser level and pH balance, while also controlling the pool pump for maximum energy savings. (melbournepoolservicing.com.au)
  • Virion-Associated Nucleic Acid-Based Metagenomics: A Decade of Advances in Molecular Characterization of Plant Viruses. (bvsalud.org)
  • Title : RSV virion and vaccine products Personal Author(s) : Thornburg, Natalie J. Corporate Authors(s) : National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (U.S.) Conference Author(s) : United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Quantitation of the amounts of genomic and subgenomic RNA both in virions and in infected cells showed that the ratio of genomic to subgenomic RNA was 3- to 10-fold higher in Aura virions than in infected cells. (caltech.edu)
  • This media-media series titled Virions consists of viruses loosely drawn with charcoal on the paper of old medical journals. (andrewsomera.com)
  • For phloem-limited viruses such as Beet yellows virus (BYV), aphid transmission requires virion assembly and transport in the plant vascular system. (uidaho.edu)
  • By absorbing so much heat into the pool water, Viron produces up to 10 litres of condensation per hour which can be piped back into your pool or spa. (astralpool.com.au)
  • But virologists are not the only ones at fault - the media writes about the AIDS virus while showing an illustration of the virion. (virology.ws)
  • With operating efficiencies of up to 97%, Viron reduces operating costs by more than 20% over conventional gas heaters. (astralpool.com.au)
  • With dramatically increased energy efficiency, Viron makes the most of this clean energy source by reducing greenhouse emissions over conventional gas heaters. (astralpool.com.au)
  • If we accept that the virus is the infected cell, then it becomes clear that most virologists have confused the virion and the virus. (virology.ws)
  • We will also determine the mechanisms responsible for the cross-talk between the long distance transport, aphid transmission, and virion assembly. (uidaho.edu)
  • A virion is not the same as a virus. (virology.ws)
  • The idea that virus and virion are distinct was first proposed by Bandea in 1983. (virology.ws)
  • Purified virions of Aura virus, a South American alphavirus related to Sindbis virus, were found to contain two RNA species, one of 12 kb and the other of 4.2 kb. (caltech.edu)
  • Packaging of the Aura virus subgenomic RNA, but not those of other alphaviruses, suggests that Aura virus 26S RNA contains a packaging signal for incorporation into virions. (caltech.edu)
  • The importance of the packaging of this RNA into virions in the natural history of the virus remains to be determined. (caltech.edu)
  • A ) Immunoblot analysis of Gag and Gag-Pol products in cell lysates and virions. (elifesciences.org)
  • In a few detailed black-and-white strokes, The Virion Transit â on view at the SoMa gallery Telematic Media Arts through Oct. 2â eloquently invokes last yearâ s COVID fears of an invisible menace that can easily penetrate paltry human defenses. (khsu.org)
  • â The Virion Transitâ is on view at Telematic Media Arts (323 10th St., San Francisco) through Oct. 2. (khsu.org)
  • In this study, two H7N9 split virion vaccines with or without AS03 adjuvant were tested in the naive ferret model. (nature.com)
  • Link to all annotated objects annotated to virion attachment to host cell. (planteome.org)
  • Link to all direct and indirect annotations to virion attachment to host cell. (planteome.org)
  • Spending much of my undergraduate career as a pre-med student, studying organic chemistry and biology, I learned a lot about virions, their composition and their effects on the human body. (andrewsomera.com)
  • Viron® Engineering has developed a unique FRP laminate construction to maximize the performance of FRP in the harsh environmental of scrubbing chromic acid. (vironintl.com)
  • From clothing to accessories, Viron creates unique pieces for those who aim to stand out from the crowd. (afew-store.com)
  • Situated on the calendar and in our psyches between the free-floating nightmares fueled by locked-down isolation and the Halloween urge to face up to our fears, David Bayus â animated short film The Virion Transit inhabits a disturbing militarized zone between the past and the future. (khsu.org)
  • Cell lysates and purified virions were harvested 2 d post-transfection and analyzed by immunoblotting for CA, IN, and, in the case of virions, RT. (elifesciences.org)
  • While the science behind these deadly structures can be found in medical journals, the beauty of these virions can be found by its visual representation. (andrewsomera.com)
  • Viron®'s VIRO-CHROME 9000 Series Chrome Scrubber systems have been meeting the stringent efficiency requirements in place and solving customer's emission concerns since 1971. (vironintl.com)
  • If your corrosion resistant application requires the control on chrome emissions you will need to contact Viron® International to insure that the VIRO-CHROME 900 Series system is the design of choice. (vironintl.com)
  • The virion insists on this form of address, even though it's been years since I stepped down from that post and withdrew to the private sector. (alicewhittenburg.com)