Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral: Visible morphologic changes in cells infected with viruses. It includes shutdown of cellular RNA and protein synthesis, cell fusion, release of lysosomal enzymes, changes in cell membrane permeability, diffuse changes in intracellular structures, presence of viral inclusion bodies, and chromosomal aberrations. It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable method for identifying and classifying the infecting viruses.Trichomonas: A genus of parasitic flagellate EUKARYOTES distinguished by the presence of four anterior flagella, an undulating membrane, and a trailing flagellum.Diarrhea Viruses, Bovine Viral: A group of viruses in the genus PESTIVIRUS, causing diarrhea, fever, oral ulcerations, hemorrhagic syndrome, and various necrotic lesions among cattle and other domestic animals. The two species (genotypes), BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 , exhibit antigenic and pathological differences. The historical designation, BVDV, consisted of both (then unrecognized) genotypes.Torovirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus TOROVIRUS, family CORONAVIRIDAE.Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease: Acute disease of cattle caused by the bovine viral diarrhea viruses (DIARRHEA VIRUSES, BOVINE VIRAL). Often mouth ulcerations are the only sign but fever, diarrhea, drop in milk yield, and loss of appetite are also seen. Severity of clinical disease varies and is strain dependent. Outbreaks are characterized by low morbidity and high mortality.Pestivirus: A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE, also known as mucosal disease virus group, which is not arthropod-borne. Transmission is by direct and indirect contact, and by transplacental and congenital transmission. Species include BORDER DISEASE VIRUS, bovine viral diarrhea virus (DIARRHEA VIRUS, BOVINE VIRAL), and CLASSICAL SWINE FEVER VIRUS.Classical swine fever virus: A species of the PESTIVIRUS genus causing exceedingly contagious and fatal hemorrhagic disease of swine.Viruses: Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.RNA Helicases: A family of proteins that promote unwinding of RNA during splicing and translation.Tissue Culture Techniques: A technique for maintaining or growing TISSUE in vitro, usually by DIFFUSION, perifusion, or PERFUSION. The tissue is cultured directly after removal from the host without being dispersed for cell culture.Chicken anemia virus: The type species of GYROVIRUS, a small, non-enveloped DNA virus originally isolated from contaminated vaccines in Japan. It causes chicken infectious anemia and may possibly play a key role in hemorrhagic anemia syndrome, anemia dermatitis, and blue wing disease.Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Virus Cultivation: Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Defective Viruses: Viruses which lack a complete genome so that they cannot completely replicate or cannot form a protein coat. Some are host-dependent defectives, meaning they can replicate only in cell systems which provide the particular genetic function which they lack. Others, called SATELLITE VIRUSES, are able to replicate only when their genetic defect is complemented by a helper virus.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Peptide Hydrolases: Hydrolases that specifically cleave the peptide bonds found in PROTEINS and PEPTIDES. Examples of sub-subclasses for this group include EXOPEPTIDASES and ENDOPEPTIDASES.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Culture Techniques: Methods of maintaining or growing biological materials in controlled laboratory conditions. These include the cultures of CELLS; TISSUES; organs; or embryo in vitro. Both animal and plant tissues may be cultured by a variety of methods. Cultures may derive from normal or abnormal tissues, and consist of a single cell type or mixed cell types.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus: The type species of APHTHOVIRUS, causing FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cloven-hoofed animals. Several different serotypes exist.Foot-and-Mouth DiseaseAphthovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. They cause vesicular lesions and upper respiratory tract infections. FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS is the type species.Ribosomes: Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Plectrovirus: A genus of bacteriophages of the family INOVIRIDAE. Organisms of this genus infect Acholeplasma and Spiroplasma.Inclusion Bodies: A generic term for any circumscribed mass of foreign (e.g., lead or viruses) or metabolically inactive materials (e.g., ceroid or MALLORY BODIES), within the cytoplasm or nucleus of a cell. Inclusion bodies are in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses, observed especially in nerve, epithelial, or endothelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Inclusion Bodies, Viral: An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.Border disease virus: A species of PESTIVIRUS causing a congenital sheep disease characterized by an abnormally hairy birth-coat, tremors, and poor growth.Diarrhea Virus 1, Bovine Viral: A species of PESTIVIRUS causing systemic infections (BOVINE VIRUS DIARRHEA-MUCOSAL DISEASE) in cattle and some other cloven-hoofed animals. There are several strains and two biotypes: cytopathic (rare) and non-cytopathic. Infections range from clinically inapparent to severe, but do not correlate with biotypes.Border Disease: Congenital disorder of lambs caused by a virus closely related to or identical with certain strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Expert Systems: Computer programs based on knowledge developed from consultation with experts on a problem, and the processing and/or formalizing of this knowledge using these programs in such a manner that the problems may be solved.Food, Genetically Modified: Food derived from genetically modified organisms (ORGANISMS, GENETICALLY MODIFIED).Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Herpesvirus 4, Equid: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS and the chief cause of rhinopneumonitis in horses.Herpesvirus 1, Equid: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing abortion and respiratory disease in horses.Equidae: A family of hoofed MAMMALS consisting of HORSES, donkeys, and zebras. Members of this family are strict herbivores and can be classified as either browsers or grazers depending on how they feed.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Circovirus: A genus of the family CIRCOVIRIDAE that infects SWINE; PSITTACINES; and non-psittacine BIRDS. Species include Beak and feather disease virus causing a fatal disease in psittacine birds, and Porcine circovirus causing postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in pigs (PORCINE POSTWEANING MULTISYSTEMIC WASTING SYNDROME).Circoviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the CIRCOVIRIDAE.Gyrovirus: A genus in the family CIRCOVIRIDAE comprising the single species CHICKEN ANEMIA VIRUS.Circoviridae: A family of very small viruses containing circular, single-stranded DNA and possessing no envelope. The modes of transmission are not known.Wasting Syndrome: A condition of involuntary weight loss of greater then 10% of baseline body weight. It is characterized by atrophy of muscles and depletion of lean body mass. Wasting is a sign of MALNUTRITION as a result of inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, or hypermetabolism.Porcine Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome: A worldwide emerging disease of weaned piglets first recognized in swine herds in western Canada in 1997. This syndrome is characterized by progressive weight loss, rapid (tachypnea) and difficult (dyspnea) breathing, and yellowing of skin. PMWS is caused by PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS infection, specifically type 2 or PCV-2.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Then, the viral infection is introduced. All cells in the monolayer shrink rapidly, become dense in a process known as pyknosis ... Cytopathic effect or cytopathogenic effect (abbreviated CPE) refers to structural changes in host cells that are caused by ... Some viral infections cause a strange CPE, the formation of syncytia. Syncytia are large cycoplasmic masses that contain many ... For many viral infections, different host cell strains may have a characteristic response. Currently, there are many concerns ...
The effects of fetal infection with BVDV are dependent upon the stage of gestation at which the dam suffers acute infection. ... 1998). Prolonged nasal shedding and viraemia of cytopathogenic bovine virus diarrhoea virus in experimental late-onset mucosal ... PIs act as viral reservoirs and are the principal source of viral infection but transiently infected animals and contaminated ... BVD infection results in a wide variety of clinical signs, due to its immunosuppressive effects, as well as having a direct ...
Adenoviruses have long been a popular viral vector for gene therapy due to their ability to affect both replicating and non- ... Most infections with adenovirus result in infections of the upper respiratory tract. Adenovirus infections often show up as ... Rowe WP, Huebner RJ, Gilmore LK, Parrott RH, Ward TG (December 1953). "Isolation of a cytopathogenic agent from human adenoids ... Type 1 infection can also cause respiratory and eye infections. Canine adenovirus 2 (CAdV-2) is one of the potential causes of ...
Type 1 infection can also cause respiratory and eye infections. CAdV-1 also affects foxes (Vulpes vulpes, Vulpes lagopus) and ... Adenoviruses have long been a popular viral vector for gene therapy due to their ability to affect both replicating and non- ... Rowe WP, Huebner RJ, Gilmore LK, Parrott RH, Ward TG (December 1953). "Isolation of a cytopathogenic agent from human adenoids ... InfectionsEdit. Main article: Adenovirus infection. Most infections with adenovirus result in infections of the upper ...
Waggoner JJ, Soda EA, Deresinski S (October 2013). "Rare and emerging viral infections in transplant recipients". Clinical ... Measles affects about 20 million people a year, primarily in the developing areas of Africa and Asia. No other vaccine- ... Enders JF, Peebles TC (1954). "Propagation in tissue culture of cytopathogenic agents from patients with measles". Proceedings ... either direct viral pneumonia or secondary bacterial pneumonia), bronchitis (either direct viral bronchitis or secondary ...
... the viral DNA will directly integrate into the host's genome via the viral enzyme integrase. If the payload was ssRNA the RNA ... Thought this effect in seen quite frequently, its cause is still yet to be determined. In some more rare instances, cell death ... Continued research has shown that the infection prevalence of BFV is 40-85% worldwide but lacks any significant pathogenic ... Enders, J. F.; Peebles, T. C. (June 1954). "Propagation in tissue cultures of cytopathogenic agents from patients with measles ...
Transplantation antigens and their changes in carcinogenesis and viral infection. In: Virusnyi onkoliz i iskusstvennaya ... "RIGVIR Side Effects". RIGVIR. Archived from the original on 2016-11-13. Muceniece A.J. 1978. Analysis of sensitivity of human ... Enteric Cytopathogenic Human Orphan, type 7 (ECHO-7). It was developed in the 1960s and 1970s by the team of Aina Muceniece ( ... The most commonly reported side effects are subfebrile temperature, pain in the tumor, fatigue, drowsiness, and dyspepsia ( ...
... or cytopathogenic effect (abbreviated CPE) refers to structural changes in host cells that are caused by viral invasion. The infecting virus causes lysis of the host cell or when the cell dies without lysis due to an inability to reproduce. Both of these effects occur due to CPEs. If a virus causes these morphological changes in the host cell, it is said to be cytopathogenic. Common examples of CPE include rounding of the infected cell, fusion with adjacent cells to form syncytia, and the appearance of nuclear or cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. CPEs and other changes in cell morphology are only a few of the many effects by cytocidal viruses. When a cytocidal virus infects a permissive cell, the viruses kill the host cell through changes in cell morphology, in cell physiology, and the biosynthetic events that follow. These changes are necessary for efficient virus replication but at the ...
Maresca M; Mahfoud R; Garmy N; et al. (2003). „The virotoxin model of HIV-1 enteropathy: involvement of GPR15/Bob and galactosylceramide in the cytopathic effects induced by HIV-1 gp120 in the HT-29-D4 intestinal cell line.". J. Biomed. Sci. 10 (1): 156-66. PMID 12566994. doi:10.1159/000068089 ...
... is a cosmopolitan parasite of pigeons and doves. Other birds such as domestic and wild turkeys, chickens, raptors (hawks, golden eagle, etc.) may also become infected. The disease in pigeons is commonly called canker. The same condition in birds of prey is called frounce. It is believed to be an ancient pathogen causing frounce-like symptoms in dinosaurs. In 2005, Trichomonas gallinae was first recognized as a cause of disease in British finches, with greenfinch and chaffinch most affected, although a range of garden birds have been found to be susceptible to the parasite. Recent studies have shown that up to a third of adult wood pigeons in Spain may carry the disease. The protozoan has four anterior flagella and an undulating membrane on one side. An important diagnostic feature is the lack of a free posterior flagellum. T. gallinae is generally found in the oral-nasal cavity or anterior end of the digestive and respiratory tracts. The trichomonads multiply rapidly by ...
... is an anaerobic, flagellated protozoan parasite and the causative agent of trichomoniasis. It is the most common pathogenic protozoan infection of humans in industrialized countries. Infection rates between men and women are similar with women being symptomatic, while infections in men are usually asymptomatic. Transmission usually occurs via direct, skin-to-skin contact with an infected individual, most often through vaginal intercourse. The WHO has estimated that 160 million cases of infection are acquired annually worldwide. The estimates for North America alone are between 5 and 8 million new infections each year, with an estimated rate of asymptomatic cases as high as 50%. Usually treatment consists of metronidazole and tinidazole. Alfred Francois Donné (1801-1878) was the first to describe a procedure to diagnose trichomoniasis through "the microscopic observation of motile protozoa in vaginal or cervical secretions" in 1836. He published this in the article ...
... or cytopathogenic effect (abbreviated CPE) refers to structural changes in host cells that are caused by viral invasion. The infecting virus causes lysis of the host cell or when the cell dies without lysis due to an inability to reproduce. Both of these effects occur due to CPEs. If a virus causes these morphological changes in the host cell, it is said to be cytopathogenic. Common examples of CPE include rounding of the infected cell, fusion with adjacent cells to form syncytia, and the appearance of nuclear or cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. CPEs and other changes in cell morphology are only a few of the many effects by cytocidal viruses. When a cytocidal virus infects a permissive cell, the viruses kill the host cell through changes in cell morphology, in cell physiology, and the biosynthetic events that follow. These changes are necessary for efficient virus replication but at the ...
Rectal foreign bodies are large foreign items found in the rectum that can be assumed to have been inserted through the anus, rather than reaching the rectum via the mouth and gastrointestinal tract. It can be of clinical relevance if the patient cannot remove it the way he or she intended. Smaller, ingested foreign bodies, such as bones eaten with food, can sometimes be found stuck in the rectum upon x-ray and are rarely of clinical relevance. Rectal foreign bodies are a subgroup of foreign bodies in the alimentary tract. There is no reliable data about the incidence of clinically meaningful foreign rectal bodies. It may have increased in the long term as it is observed more often in recent times. The incident rate is significantly higher for men than for women. The gender ratio is in the area of 28:1. A metastudy in the year 2010 found a ratio of 37:1. Median age of the patients was 44.1 years, with a standard deviation of 16.6 years. Rectal foreign bodies are not an unusual occurrence in ...
Trichomoniasis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world that is not caused by a virus. Every year, about 248 million more people get trichomoniasis.[16][17] It is more common in women than men.[18]. It is also the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the United States. In the U.S., about 3.7 million people have trichomoniasis, and about 1.1 million more people get infected every year.[19][20] Recent research has said that 3% of the U.S. population (3 in every 100 people) have trichomoniasis.[21][22] In people who are at higher risk of getting trichomoniasis, like people with HIV and people in prison, between 7.5% to 32% are infected.[23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30]. ...
... is a hoverfly, also known as the drone fly (or "dronefly"). It is migratory and cosmopolitan, the most widely distributed syrphid species in the world, and is known from all regions except the Antarctic. It has been introduced into North America and is widely established. The larva of E. tenax is a rat-tailed maggot. It lives in drainage ditches, pools around manure piles, sewage, and similar places containing water badly polluted with organic matter. The larva likely feeds on the abundant bacteria living in these places. When fully grown, the larva creeps out into drier habitats and seeks a suitable place to pupate. In doing so it sometimes enters buildings, especially barns and basements on farms. The pupa is 10-12 mm long, grey-brown, oval, and retains the long tail; it looks like a tiny mouse. The adult fly that emerges from the pupa is harmless. It looks somewhat like a drone honey bee, and likely gains some degree of protection from this resemblance to a stinging insect. ...
Sebuah hidrogenosom adalah organel tertutup membran beberapa ciliata anaerobik, Trichomonas, jamur, dan hewan. Hidrogenosom dari Trichomonas (yang paling banyak dipelajari dari mikroorganisme mengandung hidrogenosom) menghasilkan hidrogen molekul, asetat, karbon dioksida dan ATP oleh tindakan gabungan dari piruvat:feredoksin oksido-reduktase, hydrogenase, asetat: suksinat transferase CoA dan suksinat thiokinase. Superoksida dismutase, dehidrogenase malat (decarboxylating), ferredoxin, kinase siklase dan NADH: ferredoxin Oxido-reductase juga dilokalisasi di hidrogenosom. Hal ini hampir secara universal diterima bahwa hidrogenosom berevolusi dari mitokondria.[butuh rujukan]. ...
Papanicolau test ehk Pap-test on günekoloogias kasutatava meditsiinilise protseduuri käigus tehtava Pap-proovi tsütoloogiline uuring. Pap-testi kasutatakse Pap-proovi ajal tütarlapse või naise tupevõlvilt, emakasuudmest või emakakaelakanalist kas sondi või harjaga võetud rakukaape preparaadi[1] laboratoorseks töötlemiseks, säilitamiseks ja mikroskoopiliseks uurimiseks viirusinfektsioonide, kasvajaeelsete seisundite, kasvajate, emakakaelavähi, endomeetriumivähi ja muude naiste urogenitaalsüsteemi haiguste diagnoosimiseks. Pap-proovi loetakse täpseks seene Trichomonas vaginalis'e, bakteri Actinomyces ja Herpes simplex'i viiruse tuvastamisel. Pap-proovi spetsiifilisus (õige positiivne leid) on 50-70%.[2] Test seisneb pindmiste rakkude eemaldamises. Protseduuri võib teha peaaegu iga vastava ettevalmistusega tervishoiutöötaja ja proovi võtmine on valutu. Rakuproov saadetakse edasi laboratooriumisse, kus seda uurivad tsütoloogid. Üha enam kasutatakse ka arvutipõhiseid, ...
... (BVD) or bovine viral diarrhoea (UK English), and previously referred to as bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD), is a significant economic disease of cattle that is endemic in the majority of countries throughout the world. The causative agent, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), is a member of the Pestivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. BVD infection results in a wide variety of clinical signs, due to its immunosuppressive effects, as well as having a direct effect on respiratory disease and fertility. In addition, BVD infection of a susceptible dam during a certain period of gestation can result in the production of a persistently infected (PI) fetus. PI animals recognise intra-cellular BVD viral particles as 'self' and shed virus in large quantities throughout life; they represent the cornerstone of the success of BVD as a disease. BVDV is a member of the Pestivirus ...
... will normally clear up by itself from several hours to two days after running. As with all forms of diarrhea, replacement of fluids and electrolytes is advisable. Methods to prevent runner's diarrhea will vary between individuals, although it is advisable to consider examining the pre-running diet to determine potential trigger foods.[citation needed] ...
According to Asplund, the longer he stayed in Sweden, the more monotonous Breda's portraits became. He inherited his father's house and art collection, and they became a center of culture in Stockholm. Breda taught students, including his son Johan, and was known as a kind and sympathetic teacher.[2] Breda received official commissions: after the monarchy fell in 1809, he painted a series of portraits of the "four Estates of the Realm" from 1811 on, and in 1812 he was ennobled. However, the political uncertainty and upheaval in Sweden at the time often interfered with his work. He failed to complete at least two planned paintings - in 1800 he was commissioned to paint the coronation of Gustav IV Adolf, whom he had painted as a child, but there were many delays and the king was deposed in 1809 before the painting could be completed.[2] A similar commission to paint the coronation of Gustav IV Adolf's brother, Charles XIII also was delayed repeatedly. Breda had difficulties finding a suitable ...
The effects of fetal infection with BVDV are dependent upon the stage of gestation at which the dam suffers acute infection. ... 1998). Prolonged nasal shedding and viraemia of cytopathogenic bovine virus diarrhoea virus in experimental late-onset mucosal ... PIs act as viral reservoirs and are the principal source of viral infection but transiently infected animals and contaminated ... BVD infection results in a wide variety of clinical signs, due to its immunosuppressive effects, as well as having a direct ...
Expression of viral proteins and replication of viral DNA was observed, but the infection was not to be passed on to fresh ... ADVERSE EFFECTS: difficulty breathing, vomiting and ear infection, followed by bloody stool. ... PCV1 persisted in most cell lines without causing any visible changes, while PCV2-transfected cells show cytopathogenic ... Upon entry into cells, the viral ssDNA genome enters the nucleus where it is made double-stranded by host enzymes. It is then ...
"Investigation of a dual fetal infection model with bovine viral diarrhoea viruses (BVDV)-1 and BVDV-2, Archives of Virology" on ... The effects of bovine viral diarrhoea virus on cattle reproduction in relation to disease control ... Recovery of cytopathogenic and noncytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea viruses from cDNA constructs ... Investigation of a dual fetal infection model with bovine viral diarrhoea viruses (BVDV)-1 and BVDV-2. Makoschey, B.; Janssen, ...
Results show that apigenin can inhibit FMDV-mediated cytopathogenic effect and FMDV replication in vitro. Further studies ... apigenin inhibits FMDV infection at the viral post-entry stage; (ii) apigenin does not exhibit direct extracellular virucidal ... Apigenin, which is a flavonoid naturally existing in plant, possesses various pharmacological effects, including anti- ... apigein in vivo are required for drug development and further identification of potential drug targets against FDMV infection. ...
Aside from antecedents of coetaneous infection and hepatitis A viral infection, the patient reported in this revision also ... The viruses may directly infect the glomerular cells and induce a cytopathogenic effect. Patient data published in literature ... and pharyngeal infections in our environment due to streptococcus and hepatitis a viral infection, these have become ... These reactions can occur with other viral infections. The mechanisms involved in the production of the glomerular lesion ...
This is due to the structural changes within a host following a viral infection (referred to as the cytopathogenic effect). ... The baculovirus polyhedrin or p10 is normally highly expressed during the late stages of infection and is not essential for the ... A baculovirus is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that belongs to the Baculoviridae family, which affects approximately ...
... the responsible virus is said to be cytopathogenic. The degree and types of visible damage to cells caused by viral infection ... Visible morphological changes in cells caused by viral infection are called cytopathic effects (CPE); ... Inclusion bodies are areas of altered staining due to accumulation of viral nucleic acids or proteins during viral assembly or ... due to the viral scarring of the cell. Figure 1 shows Giemsa-stained bovine fetal spleen cells 24 hours post infection with ...
CTGF: connective tissue growth factor; CPE: cytopathogenic effect; TNF: tumour necrosis factor. ... Viral infections may be underestimated because colds, mostly associated with acute viral infection, predict AECOPD even in the ... Mechanisms of increased susceptibility to viral infection in COPD. The finding of increased viral load in COPD relative to ... The role of persistent viral infection (adenovirus) has also been postulated as a potential pathogenic mechanism in COPD. Viral ...
The p53 tumor suppressor protein binds to both cellular and viral proteins, which influence its biological activity. One such ... Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral * HeLa Cells * Humans * Tumor Cells, Cultured * Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / metabolism* ... p53-dependent cell death/apoptosis is required for a productive adenovirus infection Nat Med. 1998 Sep;4(9):1068-72. doi: ... In contrast, p53-deficient cells are less sensitive to the cytolytic effects of adenovirus and as such raise questions about ...
Notably, lethality is prevented and control of cytopathogenic infection is restored when viral antigen presentation is enhanced ... but adversely affects also responses to mismatch-unrelated antigens, such as CMV antigens in the specific case, with the ... Notably, lethality is prevented and control of cytopathogenic infection is restored when viral antigen presentation is enhanced ... Lethality of infection correlates with inefficient reconstitution of viral epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. ...
... of HCV infection in vitro suitable for studying the effects of antiviral drugs on the infection caused by the cytopathogenic ... The viral load on the fifth day post-infection has been assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction technique. ... The highest infection and replication efficacy have been found in cells of rat Gassers ganglion neurinoma. The peculiar ... in cell culture has been modified and the susceptibility of the cells of various origin to HCV upon their infection with HCV- ...
Short report: Observation of a cytopathogenic effect on cell lines used for routine viral cultures led to the diagnosis of ... Are we missing pharyngeal and rectal infections in women by not testing those who report oral and anal sex? (15 July, 2013) S G ... Short report: Estimating chlamydia re-infection rates: an empirical example (15 July, 2013) Elizabeth A Torrone, Catherine L ... Original article: Effect of time since exposure to Chlamydia trachomatis on chlamydia antibody detection in women: a cross- ...
Being able to simultaneously amplify the whole genome and identify enteroviruses in samples is important for studying the viral ... Being able to simultaneously amplify the whole genome and identify enteroviruses in samples is important for studying the viral ... Infections of RD cells with these extracts were followed by full cytopathogenic effect, resembling that induced by ... Viral RNA was extracted from supernatants of infected cells, using the High Pure Viral RNA kit (Roche Diagnostics, Meylan, ...
Infection by echoviruses 1 and 8 depends on the alpha 2 subunit of human VLA-2. J Virol. 1993 Nov; 67(11):6847-52. ... "Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral" by people in this website by year, and whether "Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral" was a major or ... It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable ... "Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ...
The epidemic, which started on 12 December 2019, had caused 2,794 laboratory-confirmed infections including 80 deaths by 26 ... We were only able to obtain five serum samples from the seven patients with viral infections. We monitored viral antibody ... Clear cytopathogenic effects were observed in cells after incubation for three days (Extended Data Fig. 6a, b). The identity of ... The cells were incubated at 37 °C and observed daily for cytopathogenic effects. The culture supernatant was examined for the ...
Then, the viral infection is introduced. All cells in the monolayer shrink rapidly, become dense in a process known as pyknosis ... Cytopathic effect or cytopathogenic effect (abbreviated CPE) refers to structural changes in host cells that are caused by ... Some viral infections cause a strange CPE, the formation of syncytia. Syncytia are large cycoplasmic masses that contain many ... For many viral infections, different host cell strains may have a characteristic response. Currently, there are many concerns ...
... effects on humoral and cellular immune responses after viral infection.. Oxenius A1, Bachmann MF, Zinkernagel RM, Hengartner H. ... Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral. *Epitopes/immunology. *Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology*. *Immunity, Cellular ... further support the need for different immune effector functions for protective immunity against different viral infections. ... TCR transgenic mice failed to efficiently control LCMV infection, demonstrating that functional LCMV-specific CD4+ T cells-- ...
We isolated a viral strain (DH13C120) that caused cytopathogenic effects in BHK-21, Vero, MDBK and C6/36 cells. Suckling mice ... This study provides the first evidence of TIBOV infection in livestock in Yunnan, China, and suggests that TIBOV could be a ... Isolation of Tibet orbivirus from Culicoides and associated infections in livestock in Yunnan, China. Overview of attention for ... This study was conducted to identify Culicoides-borne arboviruses and to investigate the associated infections in local ...
... te dIvoire and Ghana and found no evidence for infection in pigs. ... Because no antigen detection in cells was attempted, the cytopathogenic effect could have been caused by any other virus ... 103-105 cytopathogenic units/mL) but low levels of concomitant viral RNA by RT-PCR. ... In addition, we may have collected serum when no active virus infections occurred in tested animals. However, past infections ...
3) Results: Our results showed that several extracts reduced the viral titer and cytopathogenic effects (CPE). Leaves water- ... 1) Background: Viral respiratory infections cause life-threatening diseases in millions of people worldwide every year. Human ... In the absence of specific treatments for human viral infections, natural products offer an alternative in terms of innovative ... plant extracts: Human coronavirus and virus-related respiratory tract infections in the spotlight. Publication. Publication. ...
... they have the same morphological features under the electron microscope and the same cytopathogenic effects on cell cultures. ... Based on these findings, viral infection was suspected and the animals were tested for CAV. Two of the dogs exhibited ... The replication reaches peak levels in 3-6 days after infection. Viral load decreases rapidly with respect to antibody ... infection are those reported by Okuyan [18] and Gür and Acar [16]. The antibody prevalence of the infection is reported to vary ...
... had minimal effects on viral translation and the host translation shutoff (Fig. 1, B and C). Thus, PV infection-mediated eIF2α( ... By 8 hpi, due to the severity of the cytopathogenic effect and the extent of the host protein synthesis shut-off, this ... Tests with PVSRIPO infection over a range of multiplicities of infection (MOIs) confirmed that CReP depletion reduced viral ... phosphorylation but had no effect on viral translation (expression of viral proteins P2, 2BC, and 2C), the dynamics of host ...
While PAMs were relatively resistant to cytopathogenic effect caused by PRRSV, MDMs were much more sensitive to PRRSV infection ... Increased mortality of MDMs may be also related to a higher intensity of ROS production after infection with PRRSV. In addition ... Higher sensitivity of MDMs to PRRSV infection, which is associated with limited MDMs survival and restriction of MGC formation ... economically important infectious diseases affecting swine worldwide and can predispose pigs to secondary bacterial infections ...
Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral, Cytoplasm, pathology, Microscopy, Electron, Poxviridae, pathogenicity, Poxviridae Infections, ... Combined viral and bacterial infection. An in vitro analysis of the population dynamics and factors influencing the enhancement ... Effects of starvation on the hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride. A light and electron microscopic study.. 1966 N Krishnan ...
... as evidenced by the shorter duration of clinical signs and lower viral titre in excretions. ... However, cats vaccinated with Leucofeligen™ FeLV/RCP were able to control the infection more efficiently than those vaccinated ... They were then further incubated for 6 days and the cytopathogenic effect of FCV viruses was assessed microscopically. Cats ... Viral shedding. A peak of viral shedding was observed in all groups between DPC 2 and DPC 5 (Fig. 5). However, viral ...
  • Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) or bovine viral diarrhoea (UK English), and previously referred to as bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD), is a significant economic disease of cattle that is endemic in the majority of countries throughout the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Persistently infected animals are the most important source of the virus, continuously excreting a viral load one thousand times that shed by acutely infected animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viraemia occurs 2-4 days after exposure and virus isolation from serum or leukocytes is generally possible between 3-10 days post infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, BVD infection of a susceptible dam during a certain period of gestation can result in the production of a persistently infected (PI) fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of BVDV infections in the field are caused by the ncp biotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • BVDV infection of the dam prior to conception, and during the first 18 days of gestation, results in delayed conception and an increased calving to conception interval. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dual transplacental infection of the fetus with BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 was observed in one case, but not consistently. (deepdyve.com)
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