Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Domestic Violence: Deliberate, often repetitive physical, verbal, and/or other types of abuse by one or more members against others of a household.Battered Women: Women who are physically and mentally abused over an extended period, usually by a husband or other dominant male figure. Characteristics of the battered woman syndrome are helplessness, constant fear, and a perceived inability to escape. (From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3d ed)Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Sex Offenses: Any violation of established legal or moral codes in respect to sexual behavior.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Agonistic Behavior: Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Civil Disorders: Deliberate and planned acts of unlawful behavior engaged in by aggrieved segments of the population in seeking social change.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Stereotyped Behavior: Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.United StatesParent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Social Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.War: Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Sexual Harassment: A form of discrimination in the workplace which violates the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sexual harassment takes two forms: quid pro quo, where the employee must submit to sexual advances in exchange for job benefits or be penalized for refusing; or a hostile environment, where the atmosphere of the workplace is offensive and affects the employee's well-being. Offensive sexual conduct may include unwelcome advances, comments, touching, questions about marital status and sex practices, etc. Both men and women may be aggressors or victims. (Slee and Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed, p.404). While civil rights legislation deals with sexual harassment in the workplace, the behavior is not restricted to this; it may take place outside the work environment: in schools and colleges, athletics, and other social milieus and activities.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Anomie: A state of social disorganization and demoralization in society which is largely the result of disharmony between cultural goals and the means for attaining them. This may be reflected in the behavior of the individual in many ways - non-conformity, social withdrawal, deviant behavior, etc.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Men: Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Appetitive Behavior: Animal searching behavior. The variable introductory phase of an instinctive behavior pattern or sequence, e.g., looking for food, or sequential courtship patterns prior to mating.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Spouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.IndiaAdult Survivors of Child Abuse: Persons who were child victims of violence and abuse including physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Behavior, Addictive: The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Masculinity: Male-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Weapons: Devices or tools used in combat or fighting in order to kill or incapacitate.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Women: Human females as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.ChicagoSocial Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Illness Behavior: Coordinate set of non-specific behavioral responses to non-psychiatric illness. These may include loss of APPETITE or LIBIDO; disinterest in ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING; or withdrawal from social interaction.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Schools: Educational institutions.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Human Rights Abuses: Deliberate maltreatment of groups of humans beings including violations of generally-accepted fundamental rights as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Stress Disorders, Traumatic: Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Compulsive Behavior: The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.BaltimoreProstitution: The practice of indulging in sexual relations for money.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Consummatory Behavior: An act which constitutes the termination of a given instinctive behavior pattern or sequence.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Forensic Psychiatry: Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Grooming: An animal's cleaning and caring for the body surface. This includes preening, the cleaning and oiling of feathers with the bill or of hair with the tongue.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Criminals: Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.Condoms: A sheath that is worn over the penis during sexual behavior in order to prevent pregnancy or spread of sexually transmitted disease.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Sex Workers: People who engage in occupational sexual behavior in exchange for economic rewards or other extrinsic considerations.BrazilCriminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)BostonPersonality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Child Reactive Disorders: Reactions to an event or set of events which are considered to be of pathological degree, that have not developed into a neurosis, psychosis, or personality disorder with fixed patterns.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Precipitating Factors: Factors associated with the definitive onset of a disease, illness, accident, behavioral response, or course of action. Usually one factor is more important or more obviously recognizable than others, if several are involved, and one may often be regarded as "necessary". Examples include exposure to specific disease; amount or level of an infectious organism, drug, or noxious agent, etc.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Dominance-Subordination: Relationship between individuals when one individual threatens or becomes aggressive and the other individual remains passive or attempts to escape.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Elder Abuse: Emotional, nutritional, financial, or physical maltreatment, exploitation, or abandonment of the older person generally by family members or by institutional personnel.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Escape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Paternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.PhiladelphiaLife Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.CaliforniaMultivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)PrisonersDesensitization, Psychologic: A behavior therapy technique in which deep muscle relaxation is used to inhibit the effects of graded anxiety-evoking stimuli.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.
No anti-social behavior (intimidation, verbal abuse, bullying, tagging, etc.). Drugs, alcohol, violence or threats of violence ...
Workplace Violence Issues, Trends, Strategies. Grand Rapids: Willan (UK), 2005. Cade, Valerie. "Cyber Bullying in the Workplace ... covert behaviors are those behaviors that are designed to disguise the aggressive behavior or aggressive intentions from the ... For a behavior to be considered an aggressive act, the individual committing the behavior must intend harm. In other words, if ... To delineate the range of behaviors that can be considered aggressive workplace behaviors, researchers have developed schemes ...
... violence; vagrancy, begging, drifting, drinking; lying, brawling, bullying; psychopathy, inability to make ethical decisions; ... Van der Kloot, William G. (1974). Readings in Behavior. Ardent Media. p. 289. ISBN 978-0-03-084077-7. Sarbach, Louis N. (March ... Brown, H. (1976). Brain and Behavior: A Textbook of Physiological Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press. Hart, Leslie A ... Carlson, N. R. (1994). Physiology of Behavior. p. 341. ISBN 0-205-07264-X. Arts, Matheus; Michielsen, Philip (2012). Cutting ...
Bullies, despite being quite morally competent, tend to engage in morally wrong behaviors because of several reasons, including ... Addictive Behaviors, 36(3), 256-260. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2010.10.012 Macmillan, R., & Hagan, J. (2004). Violence in the ... Ojala and Nesdale (2004) found that both victims and bullies normally come from rejected groups. Bullies chose to bully ... Aggressive Behavior, 22(1), 1-15. Boulton, M. J., & Smith, P. K. (1994). Bully/victim problems in middle-school children: ...
"Cyber Bullying and Physical Bullying in Adolescent Suicide: The Role of Violent Behavior and Substance Use". ProQuest. Journal ... and Anger in Relation to Violence and Abuse". ProQuest. Violence and victims. Retrieved 4 December 2016. Litwiller, Brett; ... "Cyber Bullying and Internalizing Difficulties: Above and Beyond the Impact of Traditional Forms of Bullying". ProQuest. Journal ... of adolescents reported being a victim of cyber bullying, 30% of which reported experiencing suicidal behavior. Online ...
The bill defines discrimination as "harassment, bullying, intimidation, and violence based on sexual orientation or gender ... That's a violation of those kids who want to express opposition to LGBT opinions or behavior." Another opponent said it ... The introduction of the legislation was part of a week of events that focused on the problem of bullying, including a White ... "Franken pushes anti-bullying amendment to education bill," October 24, 2011, accessed March 6, 2012 Fox News: Joshua Rhett ...
Workplace bullying is sometimes termed mobbing. Sexual harassment is behavior that denigrates or mistreats an individual due to ... Workplace violence is a significant health hazard for employees. -Nonfatal assault- Most workplace assaults are nonfatal, with ... Although definitions of workplace bullying vary, it involves a repeated pattern of harmful behaviors directed towards an ... Organizations can play a role in the health behavior of employees by providing resources to encourage healthy behavior in areas ...
... domestic violence victims will often blame their own behavior, rather than the violent actions of the abuser. Victims may try ... Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI).. Paper presented at the New England Conference on Workplace Bullying, Suffolk University ... National Domestic Violence Hotline; National Center for Victims of Crime; WomensLaw.org (23 July 2014). "Domestic violence". ... Felson, Richard B.; Outlaw, Maureen C. (2007). "The control motive and marital violence". Violence & Victims. 22 (4): 387-407. ...
Poor self-esteem whether it be too high or too low can result in aggression, violence, self-deprecating behavior, anxiety, and ... Not fitting in with the masses can result in bullying and other types of emotional abuse. Bullying can result in depression, ... domestic violence and bullying, has been linked to the development of mental disorders, through a complex interaction of ... This theory focuses on the impact of unconscious forces on human behavior. According to Freud, the personality is made up of ...
... and the kids modeled the behavior seen. The kids were not innately prone to violence, however when exposed to the treatment of ... LGBTIQ victims of violence, harassment and bullying". "Rethinking microaggressions and anti-social behaviour against LGBTIQ+ ... This theory is described as saying behavior is caused by what a person wants most at any given time, and not by any outside ... Only seconds after being alone the kids would model the behavior of the adults and abuse the doll with similar tactics. A ...
Anti-bullying, anti-violence, wellness strategies, and crime-prevention are frequent themes of these workshops. The program is ... making skills of the youths by exposing them to positive role models and constructive strategies to combat negative behaviors ...
Bullying of boys by their peers and domestic violence experienced by boys at home can also be expressions of toxic masculinity ... with regard to bullying and aggression. Toxic masculine traits are characteristic of the unspoken code of behavior among men in ... p. 2. ISBN 978-1-31-759534-2. In some ways, bullying and other forms of coercion and violence are part of what has been termed ... due to their promotion of violence, including sexual assault and domestic violence. Other stereotypically masculine traits, ...
... as "downward bullying" by superiors is also known as "bossing", and "upward bullying" by colleagues as "staffing", in ... She subsequently published a book on the topic in which she explored animal behavior, organizational cultures and historical ... forms of group aggression, suggesting that mobbing is a form of group aggression on a continuum of structural violence with ... British anti-bullying researchers Andrea Adams and Tim Field have used the expression "workplace bullying" instead of what ...
2. The Substance Abuse, Violence, and Other Risk Behavior program directory. . Through a partnership with the U.S. Department ... Teen dating violence; Civic engagement; Service learning; and Bullying. The Working Group seeks to develop additional ... Information includes child victimization, substance abuse, youth violence, mental health and trauma, and gang activity. In ... Topics include: Preventing youth violence; Mentoring; Transition-age youth; Positive youth development; Afterschool programs; ...
Other researchers have found that strong belief in a just world is associated with lower levels of bullying behavior. This ... Researchers have looked at how observers react to victims of rape and other violence. In a formative experiment on rape and ... Subjects judged the rape ending as inevitable and blamed the woman in the narrative for the rape on the basis of her behavior, ... Correia, I., Kamble, S. V., & Dalbert, C. (2009). Belief in a just world and well-being of bullies, victims and defenders: a ...
... who often face disproportionate amounts of bullying, harassment, discrimination, and violence. Josh Burford, assistant director ... Prior to his death, Brockington had indicated that he had experienced years of depression and destructive behavior, such as ... Many have noted that what happened to Brockington fits a dangerous pattern of harmful behavior by transgender youth - ... about his experience being bullied because he was transgender, and being hospitalized for self harming. He was active in the ...
Organizational retaliatory behavior Workplace bullying Workplace incivility Workplace violence Justice in the Workplace Getting ... The two common responses to one's unjust behavior are forgiveness and revenge. When one perceives he has been the victim of ... On the other hand, "social retaliation victimization involves antisocial behaviors that have the purpose or effect of ... interactional justice is the representation of behaviors associated with fairness of treatment by members within an ...
... self-directed violence), rehearsing suicide through behavior or imagery, and getting used to painful or dangerous experiences ... "specific skills should be available in the education system to prevent bullying and violence in and around the school premises ... Improving reporting and portrayals of negative behavior, suicidal behavior, mental illness and substance abuse in the ... "Two-year randomized controlled trial and follow-up of dialectical behavior therapy vs therapy by experts for suicidal behaviors ...
Computers in Human Behavior, 28(1), pp.107-112. Haferkamp, N., Eimler, S.C., Papadakis, A.M. and Kruck, J.V., 2012. Men are ... Gender differences in cyber-bullying. In International Multidisciplinary Scientific Conference SOCIAL SCIENCES AND ARTS ... cyber forgery and more violence based on hidden identity or presenting themselves as other person. (Sincek 2014). Although men ... Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 15(2), pp.91-98. Lewis, K., Kaufman, J., & Christakis, N. (2008). "The taste ...
... (also known as reviling, "verbal bullying", verbal violence or verbal assault/battery) is described as a negative ... This is also known as gaslighting or Jekyl and Hyde-like behavior, because the abuser keeps the target of abuse off-balance ... Bullying Domestic violence Emotional abuse Hate speech Profanity Psychological manipulation Social rejection Verbal ... Generally the bully knows no other way to connect emotionally with others. In romantic relationships, the verbal abuser may be ...
PHOTOS] "Girls with Guns" exhibit raises concerns of bullying and violence". NBC Latino. Retrieved 2016-04-12. "Claudia Alvarez ... defenseless little humans and their fighting or bullying each other demonstrates learned behavior." Claudia Alvarez comments ... She represents children without clothing or barely clothed at all in rigorous stances creating a strong focus on the violence ... "The sculptures of Claudia Alvarez engages in subjects such as immigration, violence, youth/aging, and power struggles." Alvarez ...
... domestic violence, research on classroom bullying and classroom behavior management, programs aimed at reducing violence in ... the effects of poverty and violence on children, transition to independent living for children in foster care, ...
Coon had apparently been the target of bullying by students at the school for his Gothic-appearance and eccentric behavior, and ... Stephens, Scott; Rachel Dissell (2007-10-11). "School shooter has record of violence, suicidal talk but was called genius by ... Cleveland's public school system established an anonymous hotline for students to report threats and dangerous behavior. The ... had made threats of violence in front of students and teachers the week before the shooting. Joseph Fletcher, a friend of Coon ...
PBTA games were accused on various social media and forums of promoting violence and bullish behavior. This situation pushed ... You shouldn't have to bully me as a player in order for your character to bully mine. Gaslight me to gaslight mine. No! Play ... "Violence In My Games". Retrieved 2017-12-27. Powered by the Apocalypse official site. ... Gotta divorce that play violence from the real! That's basically it. Characters & game pieces are disposable, friendship & ...
The strongest factor predicting bullying behavior seems to be exposure to incidents of bullying. This suggests that bullying is ... violence, and counterproductive work behavior - Handbook of workplace violence, 2006 Spector, Paul E.; Fox, Suzy (2010). " ... Workplace deviance is behavior at work that violates norms for appropriate behavior. Retaliation consists of harmful behaviors ... Counterproductive work behavior and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), which consists of behaviors that help ...
However, this may not automatically ensure safety from violence.[48] Japan[edit]. As of 2016, no laws were in place regarding ... Others argued for complete space separation citing the pressure on women to engage in sexual behavior to keep their jobs.[1]: ... Unisex toilets were set to be introduced into every new school to be built in Scotland in a campaign to eradicate bullying. All ... Violence, gender & WASH: A practitioner's toolkit- Making water, sanitation and hygiene safer through improved programming and ...
Hate Behavior Violence Prevention Material - ETR health lesson plans & curricula, STD pamphlets and promotion material for K-12 ... The Bullying Workbook for Teens: Activities to Help You Deal with Social Aggression and Cyberbullying ...
... survey that allows for an examination of participation in various bullying participant role behaviors including bully, ... The results of the study confirmed a five-factor structure (Bully, Assistant, Victim, Defender, and Outsider). Internal ... Correlations among the BPBQ subscales and with additional measures, including the Behavior Assessment System for Children, ... assistant to the bully, victim, defender of the victim, and outsider. The study included 801 sixth- through eighth-grade ...
Many children and adolescents suffer physically and mentally from being bullied or physically attacked and threatened by their ... Prevention of mental disorders, substance abuse, and problem behaviors. March 3, 2011 Many mental, emotional and behavioral ... Sexual violence among adolescents is also emerging as a pressing issue.. Violence and bullying have serious and long-term ... New ways to reduce bullying and youth violence. July 6, 2011, University of Cambridge ...
Behavior Surveillance -- United States, 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Surveil Summ. 2016;65(SS-06):1-. Bullying. 174. Available from ... Youth Violence. Facts at a Glance 2016 Youth Violence. · Homicide rates in 2014 among non-Hispanic, African-. American males 10 ... Violence-related Behaviors. · 5.6% did not go to school on one or more days in the 30 days preceding the survey because they ... Division of Violence Prevention. Youth Violence Facts at a Glance. Juvenile Arrests. References. · Juveniles (,18 years) ...
... exposure to violence, adult themes, and criminal behavior; personal victimization; bullying; economic hardship; and ...
... by targeting behaviors that predict violence (e.g., bullying and impulsive behavior), more serious manifestations of aggression ... Bullying and more serious violent behavior are not separate problems. Childhood bullying predicts person-oriented crime in ... outbursts of violent behavior (e.g., shootings), (2) the precursors of violence (e.g., hostile school climate, bullying), and ( ... Youth ages 8 to 15 rank bullying as more of a problem in their lives than discrimination, racism, or violence. ...
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey [1], and Carbon Monoxide measurements in adolescent breaths were used for data collection. ... This study was undertaken to address the extent to which the HPS model was able to produce changes in the risk behaviors of ... School Health Program failed to address issues of concern to adolescents with no significant differences in risk behaviors: ... violence (45.9%); bullying (33.9%); alcohol (20%); and drug use (3.4%) among grades 7 - 9 students. In 2009, Waked, Salameh, ...
Victim of a Physical/Sexual Assault or Harassing Behavior. * Relationship Challenges/Domestic Violence ... Victim of Bullying. * Alcohol or Drug Abuse. * Eating or Exercise Disorder. * Need to Access Multiple Campus Resources ...
... and that television violence may produce aggressive behavior. Frederick J. Zimmerman, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, ... Bullying was determined by the characterization of the child as a bully by his mother. Approximately thirteen percent of ... Previous research has suggested three possible predictors of future bullying behavior: that parental emotional support helps ... but the more television four-year-olds watch the more likely they are to bully later, according to an article in the April ...
... perceptions of abusive supervision are positively associated with the enactment of bullying behaviors. However, an ... DeWall, C. N., Baumeister, R. F., Stillman, T. F., & Gailliot, M. T. (2007). Violence restrained: Effects of self-regulation ... About to Burst: How State Self-Regulation Affects the Enactment of Bullying Behaviors. ... helps explain why abusive supervision is associated with bullying and that active coping helps to reduce bullying behaviors. ...
Although violence among US youth is a current major concern, bullying is infrequently addressed and no national data on the ... To measure the prevalence of bullying behaviors among US youth and to determine the association of bullying and being bullied ... different patterns of association occurred among bullies, those bullied, and those who both bullied others and were bullied ... A total of 29.9% of the sample reported moderate or frequent involvement in bullying, as a bully (13.0%), one who was bullied ( ...
victim of bullying. YRBS - Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Whats Known on This Subject:. The issues of school violence and peer ... Bullying, violence, and risk behavior in South African school students. Child Abuse Negl. 2007;31(2):161-171pmid:17313977. ... "bully-victims").26,27 Because the YRBS data set does not provide information regarding each students own bullying behaviors, ... Relationships between bullying and violence among US youth. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003;157(4):348-353pmid:12695230. ...
by Journal of Research in Childhood Education; Bullying Prevention Public schools Laws, regulations and rules Services ... Fields, S., & McNamara, J. (2003). The prevention of child and adolescent violence: A review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, ... were named as both victims and bullies. Frequency of Bullying Participants reported a significant amount of bullying behaviors ... The use of a control group to observe frequency of bullying behavior over time would be beneficial in monitoring how behaviors ...
causing a child or youth to be terrified by constant threats, intimidating behavior, and bullying ... encouraging violence in sporting activities *supplying child with drugs, alcohol and other illegal substances ... Michael Locklear is a researcher and consultant with 30 years experience, studying health, nutrition, and human behavior. He ...
Bullying can best be understood through an ecological framework since bullying or being bullied involves risk factors at ... Being bullied is a well-recognized trauma for adolescents. ... Bullying behaviors among U.S. Youth: prevalence and association ... fear and judgments of school violence as a problem. Health Education and Behavior, 29, 716-736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Bullying can best be understood through an ecological framework since bullying or being bullied involves risk factors at ...
Behavior patterns; Behavioral disorders; Bullying; Work environment; Workplace violence ... In both years, women were more likely than men to report being threatened, bullied, or harassed (9.3% compared with 6.5% in ... In 2015, 6.8% of adult workers in the United States reported being threatened, bullied, or harassed on the job during the ... In both 2010 and 2015, adult respondents were asked: "During the past 12 months, were you threatened, bullied, or harassed by ...
Bullying; Workplace violence; Psychological stress; Physical stress; Physiological stress; Author Keywords: Co-worker ... Workers; Work environment; Intervention; Employees; Quality of work life; QWL; Health care workers; Models; Behavior; Stress; ...
So does extreme behavior. Sadly, many of us have been adversely affected by both. Its hurricane season. When I say hurricane-- ... violence or vengeance; abusive speech, or bullying? ... Extreme Behavior Emergency Survival Kit. By Joan Winifred Last ... behavior. (And what they personally need to weather a storm.) Do you view extreme behavior as actions that would or could ... if you cant completely avoid it, do you have an Extreme Behavior Emergency Survival Kit? As caregivers and partners, is it ...
Workplace Violence: Harassment and Bullying. *Off-Duty Behavior and Activities. *Wage and Benefit Issues. 2:00 - 2:45, R. Brent ... Workplace Behavior and Privacy - Current Developments. 1:15 - 2:00, Stacy V. Pollock *Employee Surveillance ... Put an End to Problem Behavior Without Creating Ammunition for a Lawsuit ...
School bullying and youth violence. Causes or consequences of psychopathologic behavior? Arch Gen Psychiatry 2006; 63: 1035 - ... Bullying, violence and risk behavior in South African school students. Child Abuse Negl 2007; 31: 161 - 71. ... Do bullied children get ill, or do ill children get bullied? A prospective cohort study on the relationship between bullying ... Bullying behavior and associations with psychosomatic complaints and depression in victims. J Pediatr 2004; 144: 17 - 22. ...
... rudeness and threatening are compatible with any action of bullying. The offenders tend to practice simultaneously bullying and ... Bullying seems to be reciprocal and diachronic. Verbal aggressiveness seems to conceal a presumption of corporal aggressiveness ... typologies and determinants of verbal aggressiveness and bullying. Five students networks from various Higher Education ... Campus bullying behavior includes malicious bullying, hurt and devastating violence. According to the research by [13] , about ...
Off-Duty Behaviors and Activities. *Workplace Violence: Harassment, Bullying and More. *Workplace Privacy and Employee ... Experienced faculty will show you how to handle such issues as employee leaves, problem behaviors in the workplace, and what ...
But unlike other mammals, we periodically reconceptualize our cruelties, declaring behaviors that were once acceptable to be ... Wife-beating and marital rape, once judicious uses of husbandly authority, are now illegal domestic violence. These behaviors ... Bullies are more varied than victims. In Bazelons taxonomy, they include the thug-in-training; the clueless bully who doesnt ... The message of the anti-bullying movement isnt, it turns out, about individual bullies or victims, although these must be ...
... tip cards showing examples of lateral violence and bullying behaviors in the workplace. The flip side offers ways to ... Tip Cards: Bullying in the Workplace. Protect your staff from workplace violence with these laminated 3.5" x 6" ... Bullying in the Workplace: Reversing a Culture. This booklet will enable nurses to understand and deal with bullying and its ... effectively respond to such behavior. Each package contains 25 bullying cards.. *Not Part of the Job: How to Take a Stand ...
  • These include the use of metal detectors, the presence of security guards on campus, rules and regulations regarding student conduct and dress, profiling of potentially violent students, anti-bullying instructional programs, and counseling and mediation. (rand.org)
  • Violence is most common in large schools, and middle school students are the most likely targets of violent behavior. (rand.org)
  • What is more, official statistics are often lower than the actual rates of violent behavior because of biases in reporting. (rand.org)
  • In addition to their Concerns about violent behavior, students are fearful of and intimidated by other, less serious forms of peer hostility. (rand.org)
  • Nationwide youth in schools are experiencing more violent acts and bullying. (wikipedia.org)
  • These programs are often used to help school staff address aggressive and violent behavior between students. (crimesolutions.gov)
  • Shared and non-shared features of the definitions Shared features are normally that violence is (a) harmful or damaging, or at least threatens such harm or damage, and (b) is intended (accidental damage or hurt done by someone is not usually thought of as violent). (slideserve.com)
  • Hoang Ba Thinh - director of the Center for Population Studies and Social Work at the Hanoi University of Social Sciences and Humanities noted that over 50 percent of schoolgirls exhibiting violent behavior said their parents don't show much care for them, while nearly 15 percent said they received no care from their parents(vietnamnet 2009). (bartleby.com)
  • Violent acts are frequently the end result of longstanding disputes or unresolved arguments which can begin with a disrespectful comment or action and escalate to more serious levels of violence. (lsc.edu)
  • That will be accomplished by encouraging mutual respect among all individuals, establishing open and honest communication, and enforcing zero tolerance for any type of violent behavior. (lsc.edu)
  • The university has zero tolerance for and prohibits violent acts, threats of violence against any member of the university community or property on, or off the university premises by an employee or person acting in the capacity as a representative or agent of the university if such violence or threat of violence affects the legitimate interests of the university. (csuchico.edu)
  • This policy is intended to cover knowing or intentional behavior that a reasonable person would find objectionable and perceive as threatening, violent, or potentially violent and is work-related or arises out of a work relationship. (csuchico.edu)
  • Many schools conduct domestic violence awareness programs these days, but in almost all of these programs instructors contend that 95% of the time it is only boys who are violent in dating relationships. (cyberparent.com)
  • Preventing serious youth violence, which denotes "serious violent crime" involving youth, is the focus of this resolution. (apha.org)
  • Students who act as bullies are at increased risk for academic problems, substance use, and violent behavior later in adolescence and adulthood. (grin.com)
  • More information on student-related violence can be found at CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control including the School-Associated Violent Death Study . (cdc.gov)
  • CDC defines bullying as any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths, who are not siblings or current dating partners that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be repeated. (cdc.gov)
  • That is, bullying occurs when there is an "imbalance in strength" and the student being harassed has difficulty defending him/herself against the harasser(s) (Olweus, 1997, p. 496). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Bullying is characterised by the following: (1) It is aggressive behaviour or intentional "harm doing" (2) which is carried out "repeatedly and over time" (3) in an interpersonal relationship characterised by an imbalance of power (Rigby, 2004:288). (scielo.org.za)
  • There are many different forms of bullying which has been described as aggressive behavior toward another with intent of malice and "involves an imbalance of strength," according to a Department of Health and Human Services report. (bloggernews.net)
  • Each year, millions of youth worldwide become victims of some type of violence ( Sastre, 2016 ). (isciii.es)
  • However, this form of face-to-face bullying has made room for other forms carried out through Information and Communication Technology (ICT) due, among other reasons, to the generalized use of electronic devices and their consumption by minors ( Arnaiz, Cerezo, Giménez, & Maquilón, 2016 ). (isciii.es)
  • In Olweus' formulation: "When we talk about bullying, these things happen repeatedly and it is difficult for the student being bullied to defend himself or herself. (safekids.com)
  • More than half of bullying situations (57 percent) stop when a peer intervenes on behalf of the student being bullied. (grin.com)
  • Frederick J. Zimmerman, Ph.D., of the University of Washington, Seattle, and colleagues compared assessments of 1,266 four-year-olds enrolled in a national longitudinal study for the three potential predictors, parental emotional support, cognitive stimulation and amount of television watching at four years of age, with later bullying, reported at ages six through 11. (innovations-report.com)
  • First, we have provided some empirical support to theories that suggest that bullying might arise out of cognitive deficits as well as emotional ones. (innovations-report.com)
  • Given the concurrent behavioral and emotional difficulties associated with bullying, as well as the potential long-term negative outcomes for these youth, the issue of bullying merits serious attention, both for future research and preventive intervention. (nih.gov)
  • Families promote emotional and behavioural resilience to bullying: evidence of an environmental effect. (springer.com)
  • Does bullying cause emotional problems? (deepdyve.com)
  • Comprehensive and coordinated learning supports, such as effective discipline and positive behavior supports that directly contribute to student social-emotional wellness, mental health, and positive behavior. (nasponline.org)
  • We hypothesize that EI, which has previously been found to play a role in traditional bullying and cyberbullying, may also affect the emotional impact of cyberbullying. (frontiersin.org)
  • These days, I've personally observed this sort of overly emotional, regressive behavior more and more frequently - often in public places, like on the subway, where people seem more ready than in recent memory to dispense insults. (theconversation.com)
  • It is the deliberate, repeated and mistreatment of one person (the Target) by a perpetrator (the Bully). (angelfire.com)
  • Each of these contexts can affect individual characteristics of youth (e.g., race/ethnicity, sexual orientation) in ways that either exacerbate or attenuate the association between these individual characteristics and being the perpetrator or target of bullying, or both. (nap.edu)
  • The Origins of Antisocial Behavior: A Developmental Perspective provides an overview of the recent research on the development of antisocial behavior and synthesizes this information to inform readers not only of the risks, but also how they interact, to result in antisocial and aggressive behavior. (oup.com)
  • Experts from genetics, neuroimaging, and developmental science discuss the insights these scientific approaches have provided in understanding how nature and the environment interact in the emergence of antisocial behavior. (oup.com)
  • The Origins of Antisocial Behavior is an important and unique resource that will be of use to developmental scientists, mental health professionals, and policymakers involved in the juvenile justice system. (oup.com)
  • A peer who whacks a schoolmate with a baseball bat and sends him to the hospital -this is not technically bullying if it occurs only once or if there was no pre-existing power differential. (safekids.com)
  • For example, recent research by Professor David Farrington and Dr Maria Ttofi from the Institute of Criminology at the University of Cambridge has shown that victims of bullying are at significantly increased risk of suffering from depressive symptoms in the future. (phys.org)
  • Victims of bullying may be plagued with chronic feelings of loneliness, anxiety, depression, general health complaints, and diminished academic participation and achievement. (scirp.org)
  • In other words, is vandalism (the malicious or deliberate defacement or destruction of somebody else's property: Encarta 1999) included as violence? (slideserve.com)
  • But while its ancient ramparts symbolise an ancient technique of maintaining peace and protecting citizens from violence, it is also home to a cutting-edge study on the prevention of cyber-bullying, led by psychologist Ersilia Menesini at the University of Florence. (phys.org)
  • Cyber-bullying threatening or hurtful behaviour via electronic media such as mobile phones and the internet has become a serious problem. (phys.org)
  • For example, there is a rapidly growing literature and prevention effort around what has been termed "cyber-bullying" (Ybarra, Boyd, Korchmaros, & Oppenheim, n.d. (safekids.com)
  • In both 2010 and 2015, adult respondents were asked: "During the past 12 months, were you threatened, bullied, or harassed by anyone while you were on the job? (cdc.gov)
  • In 2015, 6.8% of adult workers in the United States reported being threatened, bullied, or harassed on the job during the preceding 12 months, down from 7.8% overall in 2010. (cdc.gov)
  • More adult presence helps reduce unusual behavior,' says Paine. (parents.com)
  • when people go from adult, rational behavior to a more emotionally charged, less reasoned way of thinking and acting. (theconversation.com)
  • Wife-beating and marital rape, once judicious uses of husbandly authority, are now illegal domestic violence. (prospect.org)
  • The Missouri team has made significant progress toward reducing domestic violence and perinatal health disparities in their state. (amchp.org)
  • In the same vein, a depressed, anxious, and fearful child may be affected by similar problems in the environment, but "internalize" his/her reactions to events such as domestic violence. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Seek help from people who are experts in domestic violence. (familycrisis.org)
  • His drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence, and cheating escalated, taking a toll on my mental health. (theatlantic.com)
  • Philip W. Cook is the author of Abused Men-The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence (Praeger/Greenwood Publishing). (cyberparent.com)
  • The frequency of bullying was higher among 6th- through 8th-grade students than among 9th- and 10th-grade students. (nih.gov)
  • In a large-scale, longitudinal Norwegian study (N = 130,000) that began in the 1970s, approximately 15 percent of students, ages 7 to 16, reported being involved in bullying, either as bullies (7 percent) or victims (9 percent) (Olweus, 1991). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • According to the Student Experience Report (2008), 7% of British higher education students had been bullied, and women students had experienced it more often than men. (scirp.org)
  • Efforts can consist of assemblies for students, parent meetings, or in-service training for teachers to make participants aware of the problem of bullying. (crimesolutions.gov)
  • Moreover, if bullies are grouped for treatment, behavior may further suffer as students reinforce antisocial and bullying behavior. (crimesolutions.gov)
  • Also, it is not bullying when two students of about the same strength or power argue or fight" (Olweus, 2007, p. 2). (safekids.com)
  • When asked if they have been bullied, most students will think about the time someone was mean to them or teased them or threatened them, whether or not it was repeated and whether or not it was in an unequal relationship (Vaillancourt et al. (safekids.com)
  • This study contributes to the incipient literature addressing anti-bullying interventions conducted in developing countries and highlights the need for approaches that do not exclusively focus on the students' individual aspects. (mdpi.com)
  • Learning Earnings embraces an incentives-based reward approach, allowing teachers to easily set goals for their students individually or as a class, reward and track students for positive behavior and even establish an online store where students can redeem their earned points for rewards. (marketwired.com)
  • Priority in funding is given to communities with high rates of health disparities in unintended pregnancy, STIs, and dating violence and sexual assault, as well as institutions of higher education that serve a large number of students of color and Pell grant recipients. (advocatesforyouth.org)
  • It is the policy of LSC and the responsibility of its employees, students, and visitors to maintain a workplace free from threats and acts of violence. (lsc.edu)
  • Bullying comes in all forms but is usually thought of as a K-12 issue that ceases to exist once students head off to college. (usatoday.com)
  • This misconception is one that could be harming many college students, according to Brian Van Brunt, President of the National Behavioral Intervention Team Association and author of the book Ending Campus Violence: New Approaches to Prevention . (usatoday.com)
  • One of the problems with teasing and bullying … it does affect a lot of students. (usatoday.com)
  • A 2011 study from the University of Indiana showed 22% of college students reported being cyberbullied while 15% reported traditional bullying. (usatoday.com)
  • The same study showed 42% of students reported seeing someone bullied by another student, and 8% reported being the bully in a situation. (usatoday.com)
  • First year college students and those in the Greek system may experience more cases of bullying or hazing than other groups, and with the development of social media and anonymous apps like Yik Yak, Van Brunt says cyberbullying among these groups is at an all time high. (usatoday.com)
  • All faculty, staff, and students are responsible for creating and maintaining an environment of mutual respect, and non-violence. (csuchico.edu)
  • 250 students staged a walk-out after three bullies who inflicted a slashed wound requiring stitches were punished with a two-day suspension in Waiuku, New Zealand â€" R. L. Tang, Blogger News Network. (bloggernews.net)
  • As schools around the country look for ways to reduce violence and bullying, they may want to consider encouraging students to participate in team sports, according to a study to be presented Sunday, May 5, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC. (redorbit.com)
  • Perhaps creating team-like environments among students such that they may feel part of a group or community could lead to less bullying. (redorbit.com)
  • Gender and grade level differences were also investigated among the bullying participant behaviors. (ed.gov)
  • 8-10 Epidemiological studies, for instance, indicate that the disproportionate burden of youth violence among blacks are for the most part explained by reference to racial differences in community contexts such as living in a high-crime neighborhood characterized by gangs, guns, and drugs rather than the intrinsic attribute of race/ethnicity. (apha.org)
  • Package for the Prevention of Youth Violence and Associated Risk Behaviors helps the specific ways to advance the communities and states prioritize youth violence prevention strategies based on the strategy through programs, policies best available evidence. (cdc.gov)
  • 1-4 Successful outcomes depend on first determining how much bullying is going on, then tracking responses to antibullying initiatives to see if they make any difference. (lww.com)