Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Veterinary Drugs: Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.Virology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of viruses, and VIRUS DISEASES.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Pathology, Veterinary: The field of veterinary medicine concerned with the causes of and changes produced in the body by disease.Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Legislation, Veterinary: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Animal DiseasesDog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Viruses: Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.Animal Technicians: Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Virus Physiological Phenomena: Biological properties, processes, and activities of VIRUSES.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Biography as Topic: A written account of a person's life and the branch of literature concerned with the lives of people. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Drug Residues: Drugs and their metabolites which are found in the edible tissues and milk of animals after their medication with specific drugs. This term can also apply to drugs found in adipose tissue of humans after drug treatment.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Anatomy, Veterinary: The study of the anatomical structures of animals.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Pets: Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Abortion, Veterinary: Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.Bonding, Human-Pet: The emotional attachment of individuals to PETS.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Plant Pathology: The study of infectious diseases associated with plants.Livestock: Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.Falconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Animals, LaboratoryBase Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Virus Cultivation: Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Staphylococcus intermedius: A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family STAPHYLOCOCCACEAE. It is a zoonotic organism and common commensal in dogs, but can cause disease in dogs and other animals. It also can be associated with human disease.Sindbis Virus: The type species of ALPHAVIRUS normally transmitted to birds by CULEX mosquitoes in Egypt, South Africa, India, Malaya, the Philippines, and Australia. It may be associated with fever in humans. Serotypes (differing by less than 17% in nucleotide sequence) include Babanki, Kyzylagach, and Ockelbo viruses.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Virion: The infective system of a virus, composed of the viral genome, a protein core, and a protein coat called a capsid, which may be naked or enclosed in a lipoprotein envelope called the peplos.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Gene Expression Regulation, Viral: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic factors influence the differential control of gene action in viruses.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Capsid: The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Xylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Human T-lymphotropic virus 3: A strain of PRIMATE T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 3 that is genetically similar to STLV-3.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Records as Topic: The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.Vero Cells: A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.Vaccinia virus: The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.DairyingAntigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Zolazepam: A pyrazolodiazepinone with pharmacological actions similar to ANTI-ANXIETY AGENTS. It is commonly used in combination with TILETAMINE to obtain immobilization and anesthesia in animals.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Foot Rot: A disease of the horny parts and of the adjacent soft structures of the feet of cattle, swine, and sheep. It is usually caused by Corynebacterium pyogenes or Bacteroides nodosus (see DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS). It is also known as interdigital necrobacillosis. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 18th ed)Animal Population Groups: Animals grouped according to ecological, morphological or genetic populations.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Virus Assembly: The assembly of VIRAL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS and nucleic acid (VIRAL DNA or VIRAL RNA) to form a VIRUS PARTICLE.Viral Envelope Proteins: Layers of protein which surround the capsid in animal viruses with tubular nucleocapsids. The envelope consists of an inner layer of lipids and virus specified proteins also called membrane or matrix proteins. The outer layer consists of one or more types of morphological subunits called peplomers which project from the viral envelope; this layer always consists of glycoproteins.Defective Viruses: Viruses which lack a complete genome so that they cannot completely replicate or cannot form a protein coat. Some are host-dependent defectives, meaning they can replicate only in cell systems which provide the particular genetic function which they lack. Others, called SATELLITE VIRUSES, are able to replicate only when their genetic defect is complemented by a helper virus.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Tiletamine: Proposed anesthetic with possible anticonvulsant and sedative properties.Herpesviridae: A family of enveloped, linear, double-stranded DNA viruses infecting a wide variety of animals. Subfamilies, based on biological characteristics, include: ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE; BETAHERPESVIRINAE; and GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Adenoviruses, Human: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Pathology, Clinical: A subspecialty of pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis. (Dorland, 28th ed.)Herpesvirus 1, Equid: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS causing abortion and respiratory disease in horses.BerlinSulfamethazine: A sulfanilamide anti-infective agent. It has a spectrum of antimicrobial action similar to other sulfonamides.RNA Replicase: An enzyme that catalyses RNA-template-directed extension of the 3'- end of an RNA strand by one nucleotide at a time, and can initiate a chain de novo. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p293)Veterinary Service, Military: A corps of the armed services concerned with animal medicine, the chief interest of which is the care of government-owned working dogs (as in the military police units), working horses (as in state funerals), and working military dolphins (as in undersea exploration and other activities). In the United States Army Veterinary Corps animal medicine overlaps and interconnects with biomedical research using laboratory research animals. A related activity is laboratory animal care. The Corps provides limited care for privately owned animals of military personnel through non-appropriated funds. Military service veterinarians in the United States Army must be graduates of accredited veterinary schools and must have a state license. (Telephone communication with Lt. Col. William Inskeep II, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, October 4, 1994)RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral: Visible morphologic changes in cells infected with viruses. It includes shutdown of cellular RNA and protein synthesis, cell fusion, release of lysosomal enzymes, changes in cell membrane permeability, diffuse changes in intracellular structures, presence of viral inclusion bodies, and chromosomal aberrations. It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable method for identifying and classifying the infecting viruses.Enterovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE whose members preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract of a variety of hosts. The genus contains many species. Newly described members of human enteroviruses are assigned continuous numbers with the species designated "human enterovirus".Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Influenza A virus: The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.Oxytetracycline: A TETRACYCLINE analog isolated from the actinomycete STREPTOMYCES rimosus and used in a wide variety of clinical conditions.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Nebramycin: A complex of antibiotic substances produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius.Andrology: A scientific or medical discipline concerning the study of male reproductive biology, diseases of the male genital organs, and male infertility. Major areas of interest include ENDOCRINOLOGY; SPERMATOGENESIS; semen analysis; FERTILIZATION; CONTRACEPTION; and CRYOPRESERVATION.Viral Structural Proteins: Viral proteins that are components of the mature assembled VIRUS PARTICLES. They may include nucleocapsid core proteins (gag proteins), enzymes packaged within the virus particle (pol proteins), and membrane components (env proteins). These do not include the proteins encoded in the VIRAL GENOME that are produced in infected cells but which are not packaged in the mature virus particle,i.e. the so called non-structural proteins (VIRAL NONSTRUCTURAL PROTEINS).Veterinary Sports Medicine: The field of veterinary medicine concerned with PHYSICAL FITNESS of animals in sports (horse racing, dog racing, etc.) and the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries in animals.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Brucellosis: Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Mastitis, Bovine: INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.Tick Control: Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.DNA Viruses: Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Tobacco Mosaic Virus: The type species of TOBAMOVIRUS which causes mosaic disease of tobacco. Transmission occurs by mechanical inoculation.Magnesium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain magnesium as an integral part of the molecule.Nurses, Male: Nurses of the male sex.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Tylosin: Macrolide antibiotic obtained from cultures of Streptomyces fradiae. The drug is effective against many microorganisms in animals but not in humans.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Internship, Nonmedical: Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.HIV-1: The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Viral Plaque Assay: Method for measuring viral infectivity and multiplication in CULTURED CELLS. Clear lysed areas or plaques develop as the VIRAL PARTICLES are released from the infected cells during incubation. With some VIRUSES, the cells are killed by a cytopathic effect; with others, the infected cells are not killed but can be detected by their hemadsorptive ability. Sometimes the plaque cells contain VIRAL ANTIGENS which can be measured by IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE.Receptors, Virus: Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.Colonialism: The aggregate of various economic, political, and social policies by which an imperial power maintains or extends its control over other areas or peoples. It includes the practice of or belief in acquiring and retaining colonies. The emphasis is less on its identity as an ideological political system than on its designation in a period of history. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Open Reading Frames: A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).Simplexvirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily ALPHAHERPESVIRINAE, consisting of herpes simplex-like viruses. The type species is HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.IowaSpodoptera: A genus of owlet moths of the family Noctuidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Plant Viruses: Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.Murine hepatitis virus: A species of the CORONAVIRUS genus causing hepatitis in mice. Four strains have been identified as MHV 1, MHV 2, MHV 3, and MHV 4 (also known as MHV-JHM, which is neurotropic and causes disseminated encephalomyelitis with demyelination as well as focal liver necrosis).Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Animal Care Committees: Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Carpal Joints: The articulations between the various CARPAL BONES. This does not include the WRIST JOINT which consists of the articulations between the RADIUS; ULNA; and proximal CARPAL BONES.Poliovirus: A species of ENTEROVIRUS which is the causal agent of POLIOMYELITIS in humans. Three serotypes (strains) exist. Transmission is by the fecal-oral route, pharyngeal secretions, or mechanical vector (flies). Vaccines with both inactivated and live attenuated virus have proven effective in immunizing against the infection.Camelids, New World: Ruminant mammals of South America. They are related to camels.Herpesviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the HERPESVIRIDAE.Book CollectingEnterovirus InfectionsHumanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Ethnopharmacology: The study of the actions and properties of medicinal agents, often derived from PLANTS, indigenous to populations or ETHNIC GROUPS.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Pyoderma: Any purulent skin disease (Dorland, 27th ed).Herpesvirus 1, Human: The type species of SIMPLEXVIRUS causing most forms of non-genital herpes simplex in humans. Primary infection occurs mainly in infants and young children and then the virus becomes latent in the dorsal root ganglion. It then is periodically reactivated throughout life causing mostly benign conditions.Cytomegalovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Gingivitis, Necrotizing Ulcerative: An acute or chronic GINGIVITIS characterized by redness and swelling, NECROSIS extending from the interdental papillae along the gingival margins, PAIN; HEMORRHAGE, necrotic odor, and often a pseudomembrane. The condition may extend to the ORAL MUCOSA; TONGUE; PALATE; or PHARYNX. The etiology is somewhat unclear, but may involve a complex of FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM along with spirochetes BORRELIA or TREPONEMA.Arcanobacterium: A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE, order ACTINOMYCETALES. They are obligate parasites of the PHARYNX in humans and farm animals.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Library Collection Development: Development of a library collection, including the determination and coordination of selection policy, assessment of needs of users and potential users, collection use studies, collection evaluation, identification of collection needs, selection of materials, planning for resource sharing, collection maintenance and weeding, and budgeting.Thiamphenicol: A methylsulfonyl analog of CHLORAMPHENICOL. It is an antibiotic and immunosuppressive agent.Aborted Fetus: A mammalian fetus expelled by INDUCED ABORTION or SPONTANEOUS ABORTION.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Endometritis: Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus. A non-taxonomic and historical term referring to any of two species, specifically HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. Prior to 1986, this was called human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). From 1986-1990, it was an official species called HIV. Since 1991, HIV was no longer considered an official species name; the two species were designated HIV-1 and HIV-2.Clopidol: A very effective anticoccidial agent used in poultry.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Foreign Professional Personnel: Persons who have acquired academic or specialized training in countries other than that in which they are working. The concept excludes physicians for which FOREIGN MEDICAL GRADUATES is the likely heading.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Goorha, R (1982). "Frog virus 3 DNA replication occurs in two stages". Journal of Virology. 43 (2): 519-28. PMC 256155 . PMID ... Veterinary Pathology. 44 (3): 285-97. doi:10.1354/vp.44-3-285. PMID 17491069. Blahak S., Uhlenbrok C. "Ranavirus infections in ... Chinchar, VG (2002). "Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae) emerging cold-blooded killers". Archives of Virology. 147 (3): 447-470 ... Virology. 229 (1): 212-220. doi:10.1006/viro.1996.8435. PMID 9123863. Johnson, A. J.; Pessier, A. P.; Jacobson, E. R. (2007). " ...
Fenner's veterinary virology. Maclachlan, Nigel James., Dubovi, Edward J., Fenner, Frank, 1914-2010. (4th ed.). Amsterdam: ... Carter, G.R.; Flores, E.F.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Herpesviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06-10. ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumar, Naveen; Saminathan, Mani; Tiwari ... "Molecular characterization of the genome of duck enteritis virus". Virology. 391 (2): 151-161. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2009.06.018 ...
Fenner FJ.; Gibbs EPJ; Murphy FA; Rott R; Studdert MJ; White, DO (1993). Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ...
Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-253056-X.. *^ "Parvoviruses". Microbiology Bytes. Retrieved 20 ... "Virology.net. Retrieved 20 September 2014.. *^ Cotmore SF, Agbandje-McKenna M, Chiorini JA, Mukha DV, Pintel DJ, et al. (2014 ... "Journal of Virology. 75 (8): 3896-3902. doi:10.1128/JVI.75.8.3896-3902.2001. PMC 114880 . PMID 11264378.. ... "Journal of Virology. 77 (3): 1718-26. doi:10.1128/jvi.77.3.1718-1726.2003. PMC 140992 . PMID 12525605.. ...
Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X.. ... Winter, Agnes; Charmley, Judith (1999). The Sheep Keeper's Veterinary Handbook. Crowood Press Ltd (Marlborough, UK). ISBN 1- ...
The two fields of study are called medical (or clinical) virology and veterinary virology respectively. Although not the first ... ISBN 0-12-375146-2. Murphy, FA; Gibbs, EPJ; Horzinek, MC; Studdart MJ (1999). Veterinary Virology. Boston: Academic Press. ISBN ... 4-6 Korsman NJ, van Zyl GU, Nutt L, Andersson MI, Preiser W (2012). Virology: an illustrated colour text. Churchill Livingstone ... Leppard, Keith; Nigel Dimmock; Easton, Andrew (2007). Introduction to Modern Virology. Blackwell Publishing Limited. ISBN 1- ...
Journal of Veterinary. Diagnostic. Investigation., 3:193-198. T. Vikoren; H. Li; A. Lillehaug; C. M. Jonassen; I. Bockerman; K ... 1990). "Characterization of envelope proteins of alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 & 2". Journal of Virology. 64: 3382-3390. Katz, J ...
Veterinary Microbiology 135 (3-4), 205-213. Fenner (2011). Fenners Veterinary Virology. Elsevier, 4th edition. Lindenbach and ... Fields Virology. Ridpath; et al. (1994). Segregation of bovine viral diarrhoea virus into genotypes. Virology 205 (1), 66-74. ... The Veterinary Journal. Grooms (2004). Reproductive consequences of infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus. Veterinary ... Veterinary Research 143 (22): 608-11. Chase; et al. (2004). The immune response to bovine viral diarrhea virus: a constantly ...
Carter, G.R.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Poxviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 13 June 2006. "Myxomatosis in ... "A Statement from the Chief Veterinary Officer (Australia) on myxomatosis vaccine availability in Australia". Australian ...
"A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06-08.. *^ a b Ettinger, Stephen J.; Feldman, Edward C. (1995). ... "The Merck Veterinary Manual. 2006. Retrieved 2007-01-30.. *^ "Acquired Vascular Disorders". The Merck Veterinary Manual. 2006. ... Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine (4th ed.). W.B. Saunders Company. ISBN 0-7216-6795-3.. ...
2009). Fenner's veterinary virology (4th ed.). Amsterdam: Elsevier Academic Press. p. 399. ISBN 9780123751584. Archived from ... Weese, JS (March 2011). "Bacterial enteritis in dogs and cats: diagnosis, therapy, and zoonotic potential". Veterinary Clinics ...
Veterinary Microbiology. 46: 249-255. doi:10.1016/0378-1135(95)00089-S. Chadwick, B.J. (1998). "Detection of Jembrana disease ... Journal of General Virology. 79: 101-6. doi:10.1099/0022-1317-79-1-101. PMID 9460930. Chadwick, BJ (1995). "Nucleotide sequence ... Journal of General Virology. 76 (7): 1637-50. doi:10.1099/0022-1317-76-7-1637. PMID 9049370. ...
Blake, N. (2010). "Immune evasion by gammaherpesvirus genome maintenance proteins". Journal of General Virology. 91 (4): 829- ... Williams, KJ (March 2014). "Gammaherpesviruses and Pulmonary Fibrosis: Evidence From Humans, Horses, and Rodents". Veterinary ... Ackermann, M. (2006). "Pathogenesis of gammaherpesvirus infections". Veterinary Microbiology. 113 (3-4): 211-222. doi:10.1016/j ...
ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Carter, G.R.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Poxviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06- ... Pfeffer, M (Jan 1998). "Fatal Form of Camelpox Virus Infection". The Veterinary Journal. 155 (1): 107-109. doi:10.1016/s1090- ... Bera, BC (August 2011). "Zoonotic cases of camelpox infection in India". Journal of Veterinary Microbiology. 152 (1-2): 29-38. ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ...
ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Carter, G.R.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Poxviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06- ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ... The Sheep Keeper's Veterinary Handbook. Crowood Press Ltd ( ...
ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Carter, G.R.; Flores, E.F.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Herpesviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ...
ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Carter GR, Wise DJ, Flores EF (2006). "Picornaviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved ... Carter GR, Wise DJ (2006). "Parvoviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06-10. ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ...
Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Goldstein, T.; Colegrove, K. M.; Hanson, M.; Gulland, F ... Voss, Jameson D.; Atkinson, Richard L.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V. (2015). "Role of adenoviruses in obesity". Medical Virology. 25 ( ... Virology. 409 (2): 141-147. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2010.10.020. PMC 3006489 . PMID 21056888. Jones, M. S.; Harrach, B.; Ganac, R. ... virology. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 2395. ISBN 0-7817-6060-7. Walsh, M. P.; Seto, J ...
Carter, G.R.; Flores, E.F.; Wise, we all love pigs D.J. (2006). "Herpesviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Mettenleiter (2008). "Molecular Biology of Animal ... Viruses portal Animal viruses Virology Fenner, Frank J.; Gibbs, E. Paul J.; Murphy, Frederick A.; Rott, Rudolph; Studdert, ... Amass, S.F. (2006). "Exotic Diseases: Are you Prepared? Are you Ready?". Proceedings of the North American Veterinary ...
ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Carter, G.R.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Poxviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06- ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ...
"A New Viral Disease of Rabbit". The Merck Veterinary Manual. 2006. Retrieved 2007-06-17. Center for Food Security and Public ... Journal of Virology. 86 (12): 6470-6480. doi:10.1128/JVI.07050-11. PMC 3393579 . PMID 22491457. " ... Veterinary research. 43: 12. doi:10.1186/1297-9716-43-12. PMC 3331820 . PMID 22325049. "Iberian Lynx Depends On Rabbits for ... Veterinary Research. 44 (1): 81. doi:10.1186/1297-9716-44-81. PMC 3848706 . PMID 24011218. Cooke, Brian Douglas (2014). ...
Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. ...
Carter, G.R.; Flores, E.F.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Herpesviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06-10. ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Fabricant CG, Fabricant J (November 1999). " ...
Carter, G.R.; Wise, D.J. (2006). "Poxviridae". A Concise Review of Veterinary Virology. Retrieved 2006-06-13. Fowlpox at ... Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press, Inc. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. Rossi, Gary D. Butcher and Fred (2015-06-19). " ...
Veterinary Virology (2nd ed.). Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-253056-X. ...
Journal of Virology. 1994-12, 68 (12): 8056-8063. ISSN 0022-538X. PMC 237269. PMID 7966595.. 引文格式1维护:PMC格式 (link) ... Veterinary Research. June 2018, 49 (1): 50. PMC 6006750. PMID 29914540. doi:10.1186/s13567-018-0543-9 (英语).. ... Journal of Virology. 2012-08, 86 (15): 8161-8170. ISSN 1098-5514. PMC 3421680. PMID 22623779. doi:10.1128/JVI.00889-12.. ...
Simian Virology Visit authors Marx and Voevodins website for more information and resources on Simian Virology. ... Alexander F. Voevodin, MD, PhD, DSc, FRCPath is Professor of Virology, President, Vir&Gen, Toronto, Canada. Preston A. Marx, Jr ... Simian Virology is the first text to comprehensively cover all currently known simian viruses. Chapters provide an overview of ... "Simian Virology is a comprehensive text covering the biology of viruses whose natural hosts are simian species…The authors of ...
The department has a broad-reaching program in virology covering viral infections of animals and humans. Research involves ... Related: Cornell Virology Program Faculty Hector Aguilar-Carreno, PhD , Associate Professor of Virology. Research Interest: ... Molecular Virology. The department has a broad-reaching program in virology covering viral infections of animals and humans. ... Luis Schang, PhD, Professor of Virology at Baker Institute for Animal Health. Research Interest: Chemical virology to study ...
Veterinary Virology Conference is for the researchers, scientists, scholars, engineers, academic, scientific and university ... Veterinary Virology. International Conference on Veterinary Virology. Veterinary Virology Conference aims to bring together ... and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Veterinary Virology Conference ... experiences and research results on all aspects of Veterinary Virology Conference. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary ...
Veterinary virology is the study of viruses in non-human animals. It is an important branch of veterinary medicine. ... Edward J Dubovi & MacLachlan NJ (2010). Fenners Veterinary Virology, Fourth Edition. Boston: Academic Press. p. 365. ISBN 0-12 ... Edward J Dubovi & MacLachlan NJ (2010). Fenners Veterinary Virology, Fourth Edition. Boston: Academic Press. p. 283. ISBN 0-12 ... ISBN 0-12-375144-6. Miarian C. Horzinek; Murphy, Frederick A.; Studdert, Michael J. (1999). Veterinary virology. Boston: ...
The Paperback of the Fenners Veterinary Virology by N. James Maclachlan BVSc, MS, PhD , at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $ ... Fenners Veterinary, Virology, Fourth Edition, is the long awaited new edition of Veterinary Virology, 3e, which was published ... Fenners Veterinary Virology. by N. James Maclachlan BVSc, MS, PhD (Editor), Edward J Dubovi (Editor)N. James Maclachlan BVSc ... PART I: THE PRINCIPLES OF VETERINARY AND ZOONOTIC VIROLOGY 1. The Nature of Viruses 2. Virus Replication 3. The Pathogenesis of ...
Spain invites participation at the 9th International Congress of Veterinary Virology, to be held on the Faculty of Veterinary ... IX International Congress of Veterinary Virology. Conferences and events Treatments and prevention Poultry health ... and the European Society for Veterinary Virology (ESVV). It is hoped that enjoyment of the Congress and interaction with ... this edition will be that the last day of the conference will be jointly hosted by European Society for Clinical Virology (ESCV ...
... a professor of virology at Cornell University and the director of the Baker Institute for Animal Health and the Cornell Feline ... Colin Parrish, a professor of virology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, recently won a Fulbright Scholar ... Colin Parrish, Ph.D., a professor of virology at Cornell University and the director of the Baker Institute for Animal Health ... The win will give Parrish the opportunity to share his expertise in animal virology abroad as a visiting professor at the ...
Virology. The Virology section assists in the identification of viruses and is facilitated by fluorescent antibody staining as ... Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. Iowa State University. 1850 Christensen Drive. Ames, IA 50011-1134. Phone: 515-294-1950. Fax ...
Veterinary Virology and Epidemiology Conference scheduled on March 29-30, 2021 in March 2021 in Singapore is for the ... Veterinary virology. Vaccines and antivirals. Applied veterinary virology. Biotechnological applications for veterinary ... Veterinary Virology and Epidemiology. ICVVE 2021: 15. International Conference on Veterinary Virology and Epidemiology March 29 ... Molecular virology. Retrovirology: research and treatment. Recent advances and challenges in veterinary virology. Emerging and ...
Complementary therapies used in veterinary practice response. *CVS boss did say nurses should take on vets mundane work - here ... Copyright © 2019 British Veterinary Association. All rights reserved.. 京ICP备15042040号-3 ...
PTHB 515 Veterinary Virology January 11, 2017. /by jking. (3 cr.) (Didactic) The course consists of giving veterinary students ... This course is divided into general virology and systematic virology. General virology deals with the basic nature of viruses, ... Students of veterinary medicine should have a thorough understanding of certain viruses and the major diseases of veterinary ... Systematic virology deals mainly with individual viral diseases. The major viral diseases which are of importance for ...
The Foundations of Virology, a long-standing website dedicated to the history of virology, was created and is maintained by ... The Foundations of Medical and Veterinary Virology: Discoverers and Discoveries, Inventors and Inventions, Developers and ... 2) The Foundations of Virology tab leads to the main (combined) PowerPoint slide set, Foundations of Virology, and to the same ... At the bottom of this tab there is a link to the file for a 520 page eBook, with the same title, Foundations of Virology. This ...
Virology is the study of the viral agents responsible for causing disease in humans or animals. This includes the study of ... Research in Veterinary Virology is based in new laboratories at two main sites, the ic2 Building on the main University city ... Veterinary virology research can be undertaken with a range of supervisors and research groups in the Institute, including:. * ... Our research in veterinary virology spans a range of different virus families, which are linked to a broad spectrum of clinical ...
We also undertake virological and serological investigations of EIV in other countries, among them Kyrgyzstan, in order to study the EIV situation in the local equine population. Prof. Dr. Osterrieder visited Kyrgyzstan to help set up an observation project for respiratory diseases in the local equine population. Blood and nasal swab samples were taken from 76 non-vaccinated horses. Through virus cultivation of the nose samples, EIV could not be identified. Serums were tested for antibodies to EIV subtypes (H7N7 Prague and H3N8 Wildeshausen/08). H7N7 could not be identified in the population (HI Titer: 1:8 for the H3N8-isolate Wildeshausen/08. This result is a clear indication for the presence of EIV in the local equine population.. ...
... in the institute for virology, department of veterinary medicine, Freie Universitaet Berlin ...
BMC Veterinary Research,/i, is part of the ,i,BMC,/i, series which publishes subject-specific journals focused on the needs of ... is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles in all aspects of veterinary science and medicine ... Virology. The virology section publishes research finding which focus on clinical, macro pathological, cell and molecular ... The Correction to this article has been published in BMC Veterinary Research 2018 14:303 ...
6th International Pestivirus Symposium of the European Society of Veterinary Virology. Thomas Bruun Rasmussen (Participant) ...
11th International Congress for Veterinary Virology - ESVV 2018. Organised by Epizone, ESVV and VetMedUniVienna ... We are compiling a - scientifically and socially - exciting programme, which is covering all aspects of veterinary virology ...
Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Madison: 445 Easterday Ln, Madison, WI 53706 Phone: 608-262-5432 Toll Free: 800-608- ...
... a masters degree in veterinary microbiology, and a Ph.D. in veterinary microbiology from the Madras Veterinary College, which ... Current page: In memoriam: Elankumaran Subbiah, associate professor of virology at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary ... In memoriam: Elankumaran Subbiah, associate professor of virology at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine / ... In memoriam: Elankumaran Subbiah, associate professor of virology at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. ...
Biobest is a specialist veterinary virology, serology and DNA diagnostics business. Services include rabies serology and the ...
Virology is the branch of microbiology that studies viruses, their characteristics, classification, and the relationship with ... Clinical Vs Veterinary Virology. Veterinary virology, which is a branch of virology concerned with the viral agents, animal ... Virology. Overview, Classification, Diseases - Clinical, Veterinary. Definition: What is Virology?. Virus Cell. ... Like veterinary virology, clinical virology is also concerned with the classification and characterization of these particles, ...
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  • The Foundations of Virology , a long-standing website dedicated to the history of virology, was created and is maintained by Frederick A. Murphy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. (asm.org)
  • Veterinary Virology Conference aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Veterinary Virology Conference. (waset.org)
  • Research in Veterinary Virology is based in new laboratories at two main sites, the ic2 Building on the main University city centre campus, and at our Leahurst campus on the Wirral (20 mins from Liverpool). (liverpool.ac.uk)
  • The University and Institute has state of the art facilities for undertaking research in veterinary virology, including a Containment Level 3 (CL3) Suite, Flow cytometry, Genomics and Proteomics facilities. (liverpool.ac.uk)
  • That year, he also earned the Pfizer Award for Veterinary Research Excellence, the college's highest research honor. (vt.edu)
  • This position will contribute to a cluster hire of One Health researchers at the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC), advancing interdisciplinary comparative research at the interface of animal and human health. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Other required qualifications include a minimum of two years of relevant post-doctoral experience, and a proven record of research excellence evident in high-quality publications, and demonstrated potential to establish a competitive independent research program suitable for mentoring undergraduate and graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in the area of Veterinary Virology. (uoguelph.ca)
  • In this blog, Dr Dan Horton (Lecturer in Veterinary Virology, School Research Director and Programme. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • The Nebraska Center for Virology (NCV) faculty research challenging topics addressing problems of epidemic proportions facing mankind including AIDS and HIV replication and pathogenesis, herpesvirus latency and cancer, human papilloma virus and cancers, and chlorellavirus biology. (unl.edu)
  • Each year, NCV invites applications for our Undergraduate Summer Research Experience in Virology (USREV) program from students enrolled at institutions in Nebraska as well as other states, who are motivated to explore the exciting opportunities for careers as scientists in biomedical research, while working with our experienced research faculty along side current graduate students and postdoctoral research associates in their labs. (unl.edu)
  • Veterinary Research, 42. (edu.au)
  • Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research, 82 (1). (edu.au)
  • American Journal of Veterinary Research 72: 924-931. (usda.gov)
  • An excellent gateway to all current research on medical and veterinary entomology, covering not only insects but also other arthropods that are of medical and veterinary importance in the broadest sense. (cabi.org)
  • X.J. Meng, University Distinguished Professor of Molecular Virology, described Subbiah as "a great friend and colleague. (vt.edu)
  • SPAIN - Spain invites participation at the 9th International Congress of Veterinary Virology, to be held on the Faculty of Veterinary Science of the Complutense University in Madrid between 4 and 7 September 2012. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • We are compiling a - scientifically and socially - exciting programme, which is covering all aspects of veterinary virology with a focus on current hot topics. (epizone-eu.net)
  • Very few people get the opportunity to learn about both Biology and Physics in any depth, and even fewer then have the chance to apply these in the veterinary field. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Colin Parrish, Ph.D., a professor of virology at Cornell University and the director of the Baker Institute for Animal Health and the Cornell Feline Health, recently was selected for an award from the Fulbright Scholar Program. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Dr. Paul Gibbs, a professor emeritus at the college and former associate dean for students and instruction, has been honored by a national veterinary diagnostics association for his professional achievements in the area of virology. (ufl.edu)
  • Insights into diagnosis, veterinary legislation, and the economic aspects of EBL are also provided. (waterstones.com)
  • Essential elements of any effective strategy include early diagnosis, culling of infected pigs, formulation and implementation of appropriate veterinary regulations, environmental rehabilitation, as well as prophylactic measures. (frontiersin.org)