The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.
Agents that prevent clotting.
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
A disorder of HEMOSTASIS in which there is a tendency for the occurrence of THROMBOSIS.
Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.
Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.
Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.
Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.
Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS or the inferior sagittal sinus. Sagittal sinus thrombosis can result from infections, hematological disorders, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. Clinical features are primarily related to the increased intracranial pressure causing HEADACHE; NAUSEA; and VOMITING. Severe cases can evolve to SEIZURES or COMA.
An autosomal dominant disorder showing decreased levels of plasma protein S antigen or activity, associated with venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. PROTEIN S is a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein that inhibits blood clotting by serving as a cofactor for activated PROTEIN C (also a vitamin K-dependent protein), and the clinical manifestations of its deficiency are virtually identical to those of protein C deficiency. Treatment with heparin for acute thrombotic processes is usually followed by maintenance administration of coumarin drugs for the prevention of recurrent thrombosis. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1511; Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p1523)
An absence or deficiency in PROTEIN C which leads to impaired regulation of blood coagulation. It is associated with an increased risk of severe or premature thrombosis. (Stedman's Med. Dict., 26th ed.)
A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.
DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS of an upper extremity vein (e.g., AXILLARY VEIN; SUBCLAVIAN VEIN; and JUGULAR VEINS). It is associated with mechanical factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Primary) secondary to other anatomic factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Secondary). Symptoms may include sudden onset of pain, warmth, redness, blueness, and swelling in the arm.
The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
A condition characterized by a chronically swollen limb, often a leg with stasis dermatitis and ulcerations. This syndrome can appear soon after phlebitis or years later. Postphlebitic syndrome is the result of damaged or incompetent venous valves in the limbs. Distended, tortuous VARICOSE VEINS are usually present. Leg pain may occur after long period of standing.
Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)
Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.
A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
A hemostatic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC). The activated form of Factor V (Factor Va) is more slowly degraded by activated protein C. Factor V Leiden mutation (R506Q) is the most common cause of APC resistance.
A condition caused by one or more episodes of DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS, usually the blood clots are lodged in the legs. Clinical features include EDEMA; PAIN; aching; heaviness; and MUSCLE CRAMP in the leg. When severe leg swelling leads to skin breakdown, it is called venous STASIS ULCER.
Mechanical devices inserted in the inferior vena cava that prevent the migration of blood clots from deep venous thrombosis of the leg.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.
Obstruction of a vein or VEINS (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.
Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.
The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).
The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
Tight coverings for the foot and leg that are worn to aid circulation in the legs, and prevent the formation of EDEMA and DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS. PNEUMATIC COMPRESSION STOCKINGS serve a similar purpose especially for bedridden patients, and following surgery.
The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the LATERAL SINUSES. This condition is often associated with ear infections (OTITIS MEDIA or MASTOIDITIS) without antibiotic treatment. In developed nations, lateral sinus thrombosis can result from CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; THROMBOPHILIA; and other conditions. Clinical features include HEADACHE; VERTIGO; and increased intracranial pressure.
A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.
A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation.
The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
The vitamin K-dependent cofactor of activated PROTEIN C. Together with protein C, it inhibits the action of factors VIIIa and Va. A deficiency in protein S; (PROTEIN S DEFICIENCY); can lead to recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis.
Autoantibodies directed against phospholipids. These antibodies are characteristically found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; related autoimmune diseases, some non-autoimmune diseases, and also in healthy individuals.
An absence or reduced level of Antithrombin III leading to an increased risk for thrombosis.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
An antiphospholipid antibody found in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; and in a variety of other diseases as well as in healthy individuals. In vitro, the antibody interferes with the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin and prolongs the partial thromboplastin time. In vivo, it exerts a procoagulant effect resulting in thrombosis mainly in the larger veins and arteries. It further causes obstetrical complications, including fetal death and spontaneous abortion, as well as a variety of hematologic and neurologic complications.
Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.
A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
A coumarin that is used as an anticoagulant. Its actions and uses are similar to those of WARFARIN. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p233)
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation.
Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.
The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.
Antiphospholipid antibodies found in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; and in a variety of other diseases as well as in healthy individuals. The antibodies are detected by solid-phase IMMUNOASSAY employing the purified phospholipid antigen CARDIOLIPIN.
Low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, having a 4-enopyranosuronate sodium structure at the non-reducing end of the chain. It is prepared by depolymerization of the benzylic ester of porcine mucosal heparin. Therapeutically, it is used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.
A heparin fraction with a mean molecular weight of 4500 daltons. It is isolated from porcine mucosal heparin and used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Endogenous factors and drugs that directly inhibit the action of THROMBIN, usually by blocking its enzymatic activity. They are distinguished from INDIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS, such as HEPARIN, which act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of antithrombins.
Formerly a constituent republic of Yugoslavia, comprising the Yugoslav section of the region of Macedonia. It was made a constituent republic in the 1946 constitution. It became independent on 8 February 1994 and was recognized as The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia by the United States Board on Geographic Names 16 February 1994.
Rare chronic inflammatory disease involving the small blood vessels. It is of unknown etiology and characterized by mucocutaneous ulceration in the mouth and genital region and uveitis with hypopyon. The neuro-ocular form may cause blindness and death. SYNOVITIS; THROMBOPHLEBITIS; gastrointestinal ulcerations; RETINAL VASCULITIS; and OPTIC ATROPHY may occur as well.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
Instruments that generate intermittent forces, uniformed or graduated, to facilitate the emptying of VEINS. These devices are used to reduce limb EDEMA and prevent venous THROMBOEMBOLISM, such as deep vein thrombosis in the legs.
Compounds, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. The hormones are generally estrogen or progesterone or both.
Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Oral contraceptives which owe their effectiveness to hormonal preparations.
Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
A 44-kDa highly glycosylated plasma protein that binds phospholipids including CARDIOLIPIN; APOLIPOPROTEIN E RECEPTOR; membrane phospholipids, and other anionic phospholipid-containing moieties. It plays a role in coagulation and apoptotic processes. Formerly known as apolipoprotein H, it is an autoantigen in patients with ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.
Substances, usually endogenous, that act as inhibitors of blood coagulation. They may affect one or multiple enzymes throughout the process. As a group, they also inhibit enzymes involved in processes other than blood coagulation, such as those from the complement system, fibrinolytic enzyme system, blood cells, and bacteria.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
A deficiency of blood coagulation factor V (known as proaccelerin or accelerator globulin or labile factor) leading to a rare hemorrhagic tendency known as Owren's disease or parahemophilia. It varies greatly in severity. Factor V deficiency is an autosomal recessive trait. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
A flavoprotein amine oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reversible conversion of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.1.1.171.
Double-layered inflatable suits which, when inflated, exert pressure on the lower part of the wearer's body. The suits are used to improve or stabilize the circulatory state, i.e., to prevent hypotension, control hemorrhage, and regulate blood pressure. The suits are also used by pilots under positive acceleration.
A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.
Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Extracellular vesicles generated by the shedding of CELL MEMBRANE blebs.
The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.
A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.
A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.
A plasma alpha 2 glycoprotein that accounts for the major antithrombin activity of normal plasma and also inhibits several other enzymes. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.
Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.
The vein which drains the foot and leg.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
A proteolytic enzyme that converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN where the preferential cleavage is between ARGININE and VALINE. It was isolated originally from human URINE, but is found in most tissues of most VERTEBRATES.
Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Burns produced by contact with electric current or from a sudden discharge of electricity.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.
Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.
A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.
Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.
A spectrum of congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities in BLOOD VESSELS that can adversely affect the normal blood flow in ARTERIES or VEINS. Most are congenital defects such as abnormal communications between blood vessels (fistula), shunting of arterial blood directly into veins bypassing the CAPILLARIES (arteriovenous malformations), formation of large dilated blood blood-filled vessels (cavernous angioma), and swollen capillaries (capillary telangiectases). In rare cases, vascular malformations can result from trauma or diseases.
A cell surface glycoprotein of endothelial cells that binds thrombin and serves as a cofactor in the activation of protein C and its regulation of blood coagulation.
An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.
Fixed drug combinations administered orally for contraceptive purposes.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Condition in which the plasma levels of homocysteine and related metabolites are elevated (>13.9 µmol/l). Hyperhomocysteinemia can be familial or acquired. Development of the acquired hyperhomocysteinemia is mostly associated with vitamins B and/or folate deficiency (e.g., PERNICIOUS ANEMIA, vitamin malabsorption). Familial hyperhomocysteinemia often results in a more severe elevation of total homocysteine and excretion into the urine, resulting in HOMOCYSTINURIA. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, osteoporotic fractures and complications during pregnancy.
A synthetic progestational agent with actions similar to those of PROGESTERONE. This racemic or (+-)-form has about half the potency of the levo form (LEVONORGESTREL). Norgestrel is used as a contraceptive, ovulation inhibitor, and for the control of menstrual disorders and endometriosis.
Enzymes catalyzing the dehydrogenation of secondary amines, introducing a C=N double bond as the primary reaction. In some cases this is later hydrolyzed.
A heterogeneous group of proteolytic enzymes that convert PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. They are concentrated in the lysosomes of most cells and in the vascular endothelium, particularly in the vessels of the microcirculation.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.
A member of the serpin family of proteins. It inhibits both the tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators.
The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.
A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
A condition marked by raised intracranial pressure and characterized clinically by HEADACHES; NAUSEA; PAPILLEDEMA, peripheral constriction of the visual fields, transient visual obscurations, and pulsatile TINNITUS. OBESITY is frequently associated with this condition, which primarily affects women between 20 and 44 years of age. Chronic PAPILLEDEMA may lead to optic nerve injury (see OPTIC NERVE DISEASES) and visual loss (see BLINDNESS).
A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A thiol-containing amino acid formed by a demethylation of METHIONINE.
A medicated adhesive patch placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication into the bloodstream.
An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
Oral contraceptives which owe their effectiveness to synthetic preparations.
A compression of ILIAC VEIN that results in a decreased flow in the vein and in the left LOWER EXTREMITY due to a vascular malformation. It may result in left leg EDEMA, pain, iliofemoral DEEP VENOUS THROMBOSIS and POSTTHROMBOTIC SYNDROME. Compression of the left common ILIAC VEIN by the right common ILIAC ARTERY against the underlying fifth LUMBAR VERTEBRA is the typical underlying malformation.
A fibrin-stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade.
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
A low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, prepared by nitrous acid depolymerization of porcine mucosal heparin. The mean molecular weight is 4000-6000 daltons. It is used therapeutically as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
System established by the World Health Organization and the International Committee on Thrombosis and Hemostasis for monitoring and reporting blood coagulation tests. Under this system, results are standardized using the International Sensitivity Index for the particular test reagent/instrument combination used.
Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.
Autosomal recessive inborn error of methionine metabolism usually caused by a deficiency of CYSTATHIONINE BETA-SYNTHASE and associated with elevations of homocysteine in plasma and urine. Clinical features include a tall slender habitus, SCOLIOSIS, arachnodactyly, MUSCLE WEAKNESS, genu varus, thin blond hair, malar flush, lens dislocations, an increased incidence of MENTAL RETARDATION, and a tendency to develop fibrosis of arteries, frequently complicated by CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS and MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p979)
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)
Activated form of factor X that participates in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of blood coagulation. It catalyzes the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in conjunction with other cofactors.
A thioxanthene with therapeutic actions similar to the phenothiazine antipsychotics. It is an antagonist at D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.
A condition characterized by the recurrence of HEMOGLOBINURIA caused by intravascular HEMOLYSIS. In cases occurring upon cold exposure (paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), usually after infections, there is a circulating antibody which is also a cold hemolysin. In cases occurring during or after sleep (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria), the clonal hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a global deficiency of cell membrane proteins.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.
Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.
Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders resulting from abnormalities or deficiencies of coagulation proteins.
The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.
A pharmaceutical preparation containing a mixture of esterified estrogens derived from estrogen sulfates, principally from ESTRONE sulfate. Esterified estrogen content should be 75-85% of the estrone sulfate and 6-15% of the EQUILIN sulfate.
Blockage of an artery due to passage of a clot (THROMBUS) from a systemic vein to a systemic artery without its passing through the lung which acts as a filter to remove blood clots from entering the arterial circulation. Paradoxical embolism occurs when there is a defect that allows a clot to cross directly from the right to the left side of the heart as in the cases of ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECTS or open FORAMEN OVALE. Once in the arterial circulation, a clot can travel to the brain, block an artery, and cause a STROKE.
Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
A congenital disorder that is characterized by a triad of capillary malformations (HEMANGIOMA), venous malformations (ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA), and soft tissue or bony hypertrophy of the limb. This syndrome is caused by mutations in the VG5Q gene which encodes a strong angiogenesis stimulator.
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.
The inferior and superior venae cavae.

Inherited prothrombotic risk factors and cerebral venous thrombosis. (1/2331)

Fifteen patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were ascertained retrospectively. Their case notes were reviewed, and stored or new blood was assayed for factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, prothrombin gene mutation 20201A, and 5,10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. A clinical risk factor was identified in 13 patients--the oral contraceptive pill (5), puerperium (1), HRT (1), mastoiditis (1), dehydration (1), lumbar puncture and myelography (1), carcinoma (1), lupus anticoagulant (2). In addition, two patients had the FVL mutation and five (one of whom also had the FVL mutation) were homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. The latter showed a higher than expected frequency compared to 300 healthy controls from South Wales (OR 3.15.95% Cl 1.01-9.83). No patient had the prothrombin 20201A mutation. Two patients died and three had a monocular visual deficit following anticoagulation (13) or thrombolytic (2) treatment, but there was no association between the presence of a primary prothrombotic risk factor and outcome. These results confirm the importance of investigating patients for both clinical predisposing factors and primary prothrombotic states.  (+info)

Aetiologies and prognosis of Chinese patients with deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremities. (2/2331)

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities is not frequently encountered in Oriental patients. We investigated its aetiology and prognosis in 143 patients (65 males, 78 females), presenting to the National Taiwan University Hospital over 4.3 years, diagnosed by colour Doppler ultrasonography. Swelling and pain of the lower extremities were the most frequent presenting symptoms. The left femoropopliteal veins were more frequently involved than other parts of the lower extremities. In these patients, malignancy with or without intravenous catheterization was the most frequent cause (39 patients, 27%). Other common aetiologies included coagulopathy (29 patients, 20%), immobilization (24 patients, 17%) and catheter-related (13 patients, 9%). No definite aetiology could be determined in 37 patients (26%). During follow-up, 27 patients (19%) died, mostly with malignancy. Pulmonary embolism was noted in 16 patients and was not significantly directly related to death. Compared to similar studies in Caucasian patients, there were significant differences in the aetiology of DVT, with malignancy and coagulopathy more common in these Chinese patients.  (+info)

Venous duplex scanning of the leg: range, variability and reproducibility. (3/2331)

Despite the many studies on venous haemodynamics using duplex, only a few evaluated the normal values, variability and reproducibility. Therefore, the range and variability of venous diameter, compressibility, flow and reflux were measured. To obtain normal values, 42 healthy individuals (42 limbs, 714 vein segments) with no history of venous disease were scanned by duplex. To determine the reproducibility the intra-observer variability was measured in 11 healthy individuals (187 vein segments) and the inter-observer variability in 15 healthy individuals (255 vein segments) and 13 patients (169 vein segments) previously diagnosed with deep venous thrombosis. Of the 714 normal vein segments, 708 (99%) were traceable, including the crural veins. Of the traceable vein segments, 675 (95%) were compressible and in 696 (98%) flow was present. Of the 42 common femoral vein segments, in 25 (60%) the reflux duration exceeded 1.0 s, but in the other proximal vein segments the reflux duration was less than 1.0 s (95% confidence interval 3.0-10.0). With the exception of the distal long saphenous vein, in the distal vein segments the reflux duration was less than 0.5 s (95% confidence interval 3.5-8.2). The coefficient of variation of the diameter measurements ranged from 14 to 50% and that of the reflux measurements from 28 to 60%. The kappa-coefficient of the inter-observer variability in the classification of compressibility measurements in the patients was 0. 77 and that of the reflux measurements was 0.86. This study shows that almost all veins were compressible in healthy individuals, except the distal femoral veins. In healthy individuals the duration of reflux of the proximal veins was less than 1.0 s and in the distal veins it was less than 0.5 s. The inter-observer variability of the reflux and compressibility measurements in the patients was good.  (+info)

G20210A mutation in prothrombin gene and risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thrombosis in a large cohort of US men. (4/2331)

BACKGROUND: A single base pair mutation in the prothrombin gene has recently been identified that is associated with increased prothrombin levels. Whether this mutation increases the risks of arterial and venous thrombosis among healthy individuals is controversial. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective cohort of 14 916 men, we determined the prevalence of the G20210A prothrombin gene variant in 833 men who subsequently developed myocardial infarction, stroke, or venous thrombosis (cases) and in 1774 age- and smoking status-matched men who remained free of thrombosis during a 10-year follow-up (control subjects). Gene sequencing was used to confirm mutation status in a subgroup of participants. Overall, carrier rates for the G20210A mutation were similar among case and control subjects; the relative risk of developing any thrombotic event in association with the 20210A allele was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.6; P=0.8). We observed no evidence of association between mutation and myocardial infarction (RR=0.8, P=0.4) or stroke (RR=1.1, P=0.8). For venous thrombosis, a modest nonsignificant increase in risk was observed (RR=1.7, P=0.08) that was smaller in magnitude than that associated with factor V Leiden (RR=3.0, P<0. 001). Nine individuals carried both the prothrombin mutation and factor V Leiden (5 controls and 4 cases). One individual, a control subject, was homozygous for the prothrombin mutation. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cohort of US men, the G20210A prothrombin gene variant was not associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction or stroke. For venous thrombosis, risk estimates associated with the G20210A mutation were smaller in magnitude than risk estimates associated with factor V Leiden.  (+info)

Low-molecular-weight heparin in outpatient treatment of DVT. (5/2331)

Patients with a diagnosis of acute deep venous thrombosis have traditionally been hospitalized and treated with unfractionated heparin followed by oral anticoagulation therapy. Several clinical trials have shown that low-molecular-weight heparin is at least as safe and effective as unfractionated heparin in the treatment of uncomplicated deep venous thrombosis. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin in an outpatient program for the management of deep venous thrombosis provides a treatment alternative to hospitalization in selected patients. Use of low-molecular-weight heparin on an outpatient basis requires coordination of care, laboratory monitoring, and patient education and participation in treatment. Overlapping the initiation of warfarin permits long-term anticoagulation. Advantages include a decreased incidence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and fewer episodes of bleeding complications. Future clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of low-molecular-weight heparin in the treatment of complicated deep venous thrombosis will further define appropriate indications for use and strategies for outpatient management.  (+info)

Right atrial bypass grafting for central venous obstruction associated with dialysis access: another treatment option. (6/2331)

PURPOSE: Central venous obstruction is a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo maintenance hemodialysis. We studied the use of right atrial bypass grafting in nine cases of central venous obstruction associated with upper extremity venous hypertension. To better understand the options for managing this condition, we discuss the roles of surgery and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement. METHODS: All patients had previously undergone placement of bilateral temporary subclavian vein dialysis catheters. Severe arm swelling, graft thrombosis, or graft malfunction developed because of central venous stenosis or obstruction in the absence of alternative access sites. A large-diameter (10 to 16 mm) externally reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex) graft was used to bypass the obstructed vein and was anastomosed to the right atrial appendage. This technique was used to bypass six lesions in the subclavian vein, two lesions at the innominate vein/superior vena caval junction, and one lesion in the distal axillary vein. RESULTS: All patients except one had significant resolution of symptoms without operative mortality. Bypass grafts remained patent, allowing the arteriovenous grafts to provide functional access for 1.5 to 52 months (mean, 15.4 months) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Because no mortality directly resulted from the procedure and the morbidity rate was acceptable, this bypass grafting technique was adequate in maintaining the dialysis access needed by these patients. Because of the magnitude of the procedure, we recommend it only for the occasional patient in whom all other access sites are exhausted and in whom percutaneous dilation and/or stenting has failed.  (+info)

Evaluation of lidocaine as an analgesic when added to hypertonic saline for sclerotherapy. (7/2331)

PURPOSE: The efficacy of sclerosing agents for the treatment of telangiectasias and reticular veins is well established. The injection of these agents is often associated with pain, and it is not uncommon for sclerotherapists to include lidocaine with the sclerosants in an attempt to reduce the pain associated with treatment. However, there are concerns that this may reduce the overall efficacy of the treatment because of dilution of the sclerosant. Patient comfort and overall outcome associated with treatment using HS with lidocaine (LIDO) versus that using HS alone was compared. METHODS: Forty-two patients were prospectively entered into the study and randomized blindly to sclerotherapy with 23.4% HS or 19% LIDO. Study subjects and treating physicians were blinded to the injection solution used. Injection sites were chosen for veins ranging in size from 0.1 to 3 mm. Photographs of the area to be treated were taken, and the patients rated their pain. They were then observed at regular intervals for four months, and clinical data was collected. Thirty-five subjects completed the full follow-up period, and photographs of the injected area were taken again. Three investigators blinded to the treatment assignment then evaluated the photographs and scored the treatment efficacy according to a standardized system. RESULTS: In the HS group, 61.9% (13 of 21) patients rated their pain as none or mild, whereas 90.5% (19 of 21) of patients in the LIDO group had no or mild discomfort. This difference is significant, with a P value of.034. There was no difference in the overall efficacy of treatment between the two groups. The groups had similar rates of vein thrombosis and skin necrosis. CONCLUSION: Although lidocaine is often used with sclerosing agents, there are no previous reports in the literature to evaluate its effectiveness in reducing the pain experienced by the patient. In this study, patients receiving LIDO experienced significantly less discomfort at the time of injection than patients who received HS alone. There were no differences in the effectiveness of treatment or in the incidence of complications between the two groups.  (+info)

Relief of obstructive pelvic venous symptoms with endoluminal stenting. (8/2331)

PURPOSE: To select patients for percutaneous transluminal stenting of chronic postthrombotic pelvic venous obstructions (CPPVO), we evaluated the clinical symptoms in a cohort of candidates and in a series of successfully treated patients. METHODS: The symptoms of 42 patients (39 women) with CPPVO (38 left iliac; average history, 18 years) were recorded, and the venous anatomy was studied by means of duplex scanning, subtraction venography, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Successfully stented patients were controlled by means of duplex scanning and assessment of symptoms. RESULTS: The typical symptoms of CPPVO were reported spontaneously by 24% of patients and uncovered by means of a targeted interview in an additional 47%. Of 42 patients, 15 had venous claudication, four had neurogenic claudication (caused by dilated veins in the spinal canal that arise from the collateral circulation), and 11 had both symptoms. Twelve patients had no specific symptoms. Placement of a stent was found to be technically feasible in 25 patients (60%), was attempted in 14 patients, and was primarily successful in 12 patients. One stent occluded within the first week. All other stents were fully patent after a mean of 15 months (range, 1 to 43 months). Satisfaction was high in the patients who had the typical symptoms, but low in those who lacked them. CONCLUSION: Venous claudication and neurogenic claudication caused by venous collaterals in the spinal canal are typical clinical features of CPPVO. We recommend searching for these symptoms, because recanalization by means of stenting is often feasible and rewarding.  (+info)

Venous thrombosis is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the deep veins, often in the legs (deep vein thrombosis or DVT), but it can also occur in other parts of the body such as the arms, pelvis, or lungs (pulmonary embolism).

The formation of a venous thrombus can be caused by various factors, including injury to the blood vessel wall, changes in blood flow, and alterations in the composition of the blood. These factors can lead to the activation of clotting factors and platelets, which can result in the formation of a clot that blocks the vein.

Symptoms of venous thrombosis may include swelling, pain, warmth, and redness in the affected area. In some cases, the clot can dislodge and travel to other parts of the body, causing potentially life-threatening complications such as pulmonary embolism.

Risk factors for venous thrombosis include advanced age, obesity, smoking, pregnancy, use of hormonal contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy, cancer, recent surgery or trauma, prolonged immobility, and a history of previous venous thromboembolism. Treatment typically involves the use of anticoagulant medications to prevent further clotting and dissolve existing clots.

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. When a clot forms in an artery, it can cut off the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues served by that artery, leading to damage or tissue death. If a thrombus forms in the heart, it can cause a heart attack. If a thrombus breaks off and travels through the bloodstream, it can lodge in a smaller vessel, causing blockage and potentially leading to damage in the organ that the vessel supplies. This is known as an embolism.

Thrombosis can occur due to various factors such as injury to the blood vessel wall, abnormalities in blood flow, or changes in the composition of the blood. Certain medical conditions, medications, and lifestyle factors can increase the risk of thrombosis. Treatment typically involves anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve or prevent further growth of the clot, as well as addressing any underlying causes.

Thrombophlebitis is a medical condition characterized by the inflammation and clotting of blood in a vein, usually in the legs. The term thrombophlebitis comes from two words: "thrombo" which means blood clot, and "phlebitis" which refers to inflammation of the vein.

The condition can occur in superficial or deep veins. Superficial thrombophlebitis affects the veins just below the skin's surface, while deep vein thrombophlebitis (DVT) occurs in the deeper veins. DVT is a more serious condition as it can lead to complications such as pulmonary embolism if the blood clot breaks off and travels to the lungs.

Symptoms of thrombophlebitis may include redness, warmth, pain, swelling, or discomfort in the affected area. In some cases, there may be visible surface veins that are hard, tender, or ropy to touch. If left untreated, thrombophlebitis can lead to chronic venous insufficiency and other long-term complications. Treatment typically involves medications such as anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, or thrombolytics, along with compression stockings and other supportive measures.

Intracranial thrombosis refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) within the intracranial vessels, which supply blood to the brain. This condition can occur in any of the cerebral arteries or veins and can lead to serious complications such as ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or venous sinus thrombosis.

The formation of an intracranial thrombus can be caused by various factors, including atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism, vasculitis, sickle cell disease, hypercoagulable states, and head trauma. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and extent of the thrombosis but often include sudden onset of headache, weakness or numbness in the face or limbs, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, vision changes, and loss of balance or coordination.

Diagnosis of intracranial thrombosis typically involves imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT) angiography, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), or digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Treatment options may include anticoagulation therapy, thrombolysis, endovascular intervention, or surgical intervention, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

Intracranial sinus thrombosis is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) within the intracranial venous sinuses, which are responsible for draining blood from the brain. The condition can lead to various neurological symptoms and complications, such as increased intracranial pressure, headaches, seizures, visual disturbances, and altered consciousness. Intracranial sinus thrombosis may result from various factors, including hypercoagulable states, infections, trauma, and malignancies. Immediate medical attention is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment to prevent potential long-term neurological damage or even death.

Phlebography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize and assess the veins, particularly in the legs. It involves the injection of a contrast agent into the veins, followed by X-ray imaging to capture the flow of the contrast material through the veins. This allows doctors to identify any abnormalities such as blood clots, blockages, or malformations in the venous system.

There are different types of phlebography, including ascending phlebography (where the contrast agent is injected into a foot vein and travels up the leg) and descending phlebography (where the contrast agent is injected into a vein in the groin or neck and travels down the leg).

Phlebography is an invasive procedure that requires careful preparation and monitoring, and it is typically performed by radiologists or vascular specialists. It has largely been replaced by non-invasive imaging techniques such as ultrasound and CT angiography in many clinical settings.

The iliac veins are a pair of large veins in the human body that carry deoxygenated blood from the lower extremities and the pelvic area back to the heart. They are formed by the union of the common iliac veins, which receive blood from the lower abdomen and legs, at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

The combined iliac vein is called the inferior vena cava, which continues upward to the right atrium of the heart. The iliac veins are located deep within the pelvis, lateral to the corresponding iliac arteries, and are accompanied by the iliac lymphatic vessels.

The left common iliac vein is longer than the right because it must cross the left common iliac artery to join the right common iliac vein. The external and internal iliac veins are the two branches of the common iliac vein, with the external iliac vein carrying blood from the lower limbs and the internal iliac vein carrying blood from the pelvic organs.

It is essential to maintain proper blood flow in the iliac veins to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a condition that can lead to serious complications such as pulmonary embolism.

Cerebral veins are the blood vessels that carry deoxygenated blood from the brain to the dural venous sinuses, which are located between the layers of tissue covering the brain. The largest cerebral vein is the superior sagittal sinus, which runs along the top of the brain. Other major cerebral veins include the straight sinus, transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus, and cavernous sinus. These veins receive blood from smaller veins called venules that drain the surface and deep structures of the brain. The cerebral veins play an important role in maintaining normal circulation and pressure within the brain.

The femoral vein is the large vein that runs through the thigh and carries oxygen-depleted blood from the lower limbs back to the heart. It is located in the femoral triangle, along with the femoral artery and nerve. The femoral vein begins at the knee as the popliteal vein, which then joins with the deep vein of the thigh to form the femoral vein. As it moves up the leg, it is joined by several other veins, including the great saphenous vein, before it becomes the external iliac vein at the inguinal ligament in the groin.

Anticoagulants are a class of medications that work to prevent the formation of blood clots in the body. They do this by inhibiting the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot. Anticoagulants can be given orally, intravenously, or subcutaneously, depending on the specific drug and the individual patient's needs.

There are several different types of anticoagulants, including:

1. Heparin: This is a naturally occurring anticoagulant that is often used in hospitalized patients who require immediate anticoagulation. It works by activating an enzyme called antithrombin III, which inhibits the formation of clots.
2. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH): LMWH is a form of heparin that has been broken down into smaller molecules. It has a longer half-life than standard heparin and can be given once or twice daily by subcutaneous injection.
3. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs): These are newer oral anticoagulants that work by directly inhibiting specific clotting factors in the coagulation cascade. Examples include apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran.
4. Vitamin K antagonists: These are older oral anticoagulants that work by inhibiting the action of vitamin K, which is necessary for the formation of clotting factors. Warfarin is an example of a vitamin K antagonist.

Anticoagulants are used to prevent and treat a variety of conditions, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), atrial fibrillation, and prosthetic heart valve thrombosis. It is important to note that anticoagulants can increase the risk of bleeding, so they must be used with caution and regular monitoring of blood clotting times may be required.

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot, often formed in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis), breaks off and travels to the lungs, blocking one or more pulmonary arteries. This blockage can lead to various symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, rapid heart rate, and coughing up blood. In severe cases, it can cause life-threatening complications like low oxygen levels, hypotension, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated with anticoagulant medications or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve the clot.

Thrombophilia is a medical condition characterized by an increased tendency to form blood clots (thrombi) due to various genetic or acquired abnormalities in the coagulation system. These abnormalities can lead to a hypercoagulable state, which can cause thrombosis in both veins and arteries. Commonly identified thrombophilias include factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin G20210A mutation, antithrombin deficiency, protein C deficiency, and protein S deficiency.

Acquired thrombophilias can be caused by various factors such as antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), malignancies, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement therapy, and certain medical conditions like inflammatory bowel disease or nephrotic syndrome.

It is essential to diagnose thrombophilia accurately, as it may influence the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) events and guide decisions regarding prophylactic anticoagulation in high-risk situations.

Factor V, also known as proaccelerin or labile factor, is a protein involved in the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions that leads to the formation of a blood clot. Factor V acts as a cofactor for the activation of Factor X to Factor Xa, which is a critical step in the coagulation cascade.

When blood vessels are damaged, the coagulation cascade is initiated to prevent excessive bleeding. During this process, Factor V is activated by thrombin, another protein involved in coagulation, and then forms a complex with activated Factor X and calcium ions on the surface of platelets or other cells. This complex converts prothrombin to thrombin, which then converts fibrinogen to fibrin to form a stable clot.

Deficiency or dysfunction of Factor V can lead to bleeding disorders such as hemophilia B or factor V deficiency, while mutations in the gene encoding Factor V can increase the risk of thrombosis, as seen in the Factor V Leiden mutation.

Coronary thrombosis is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a coronary artery, which supplies oxygenated blood to the heart muscle. The development of a thrombus can partially or completely obstruct blood flow, leading to insufficient oxygen supply to the heart muscle. This can cause chest pain (angina) or a heart attack (myocardial infarction), depending on the severity and duration of the blockage.

Coronary thrombosis often results from the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, a buildup of cholesterol, fat, calcium, and other substances in the inner lining (endothelium) of the coronary artery. The ruptured plaque exposes the underlying tissue to the bloodstream, triggering the coagulation cascade and resulting in the formation of a thrombus.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for managing coronary thrombosis, as timely treatment can help restore blood flow, prevent further damage to the heart muscle, and reduce the risk of complications such as heart failure or life-threatening arrhythmias. Treatment options may include medications, such as antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, and thrombolytic drugs, or interventional procedures like angioplasty and stenting to open the blocked artery. In some cases, surgical intervention, such as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), may be necessary.

The popliteal vein is the continuation of the tibial and fibular (or anterior and posterior tibial) veins, forming in the lower leg's back portion or popliteal fossa. It carries blood from the leg towards the heart. The popliteal vein is located deep within the body and is accompanied by the popliteal artery, which supplies oxygenated blood to the lower leg. This venous structure is a crucial part of the venous system in the lower extremities and is often assessed during physical examinations for signs of venous insufficiency or deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

1. Intracranial Embolism: This is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot or other particle (embolus) formed elsewhere in the body, travels through the bloodstream and lodges itself in the intracranial blood vessels, blocking the flow of blood to a part of the brain. This can lead to various neurological symptoms such as weakness, numbness, speech difficulties, or even loss of consciousness, depending on the severity and location of the blockage.

2. Intracranial Thrombosis: This is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms within the intracranial blood vessels. The clot can partially or completely obstruct the flow of blood, leading to various symptoms such as headache, confusion, seizures, or neurological deficits, depending on the severity and location of the thrombosis. Intracranial thrombosis can occur due to various factors including atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, and other medical conditions that increase the risk of blood clot formation.

The mesenteric veins are a set of blood vessels that are responsible for draining deoxygenated blood from the small and large intestines. There are two main mesenteric veins: the superior mesenteric vein and the inferior mesenteric vein. The superior mesenteric vein drains blood from the majority of the small intestine, as well as the ascending colon and proximal two-thirds of the transverse colon. The inferior mesenteric vein drains blood from the distal third of the transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum. These veins ultimately drain into the portal vein, which carries the blood to the liver for further processing.

Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is a type of heparin used as an anticoagulant, which refers to a group of medications that prevent the formation of blood clots. Heparin is a naturally occurring substance in the body, and low-molecular-weight heparins are obtained through the depolymerization of standard heparin.

LMWH has a lower molecular weight than standard heparin, which results in several pharmacological differences. LMWHs have a more predictable dose response, longer half-life, and higher bioavailability when administered subcutaneously compared to standard heparin. They also exhibit greater anti-factor Xa activity relative to their antithrombin (anti-IIa) activity, which contributes to their anticoagulant effects.

LMWHs are used for the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and other thromboembolic disorders. Common LMWHs include enoxaparin, dalteparin, tinzaparin, and nadroparin.

It is essential to monitor the patient's kidney function when using LMWH since they are primarily cleared by the kidneys. In patients with renal impairment, dose adjustments or alternative anticoagulants may be necessary to reduce the risk of bleeding complications.

Carotid artery thrombosis is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside the carotid artery, which is one of the major blood vessels that supplies oxygenated blood to the head and neck. This condition can lead to serious complications such as a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a "mini-stroke," if the clot dislodges and travels to the brain, blocking the flow of blood and oxygen.

Carotid artery thrombosis can result from various factors, including atherosclerosis (the buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in the artery walls), hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes, smoking, and genetic predisposition. Symptoms may include neck pain or stiffness, weakness or numbness in the face or limbs, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, vision problems, and sudden severe headaches. Diagnosis typically involves imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT angiography, or MRI angiography. Treatment options may include anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications, endovascular procedures to remove the clot, or surgery to clean out the artery (carotid endarterectomy).

Sagittal sinus thrombosis is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the sagittal sinus, which is a venous structure located in the brain. The sagittal sinus runs along the midline of the brain and receives blood from the superficial veins of the brain.

Sagittal sinus thrombosis can occur as a result of various conditions, such as head trauma, infection, cancer, or certain medical disorders that cause hypercoagulability (an increased tendency to form blood clots). The formation of a blood clot in the sagittal sinus can obstruct the flow of blood from the brain, leading to symptoms such as headache, seizures, altered consciousness, and focal neurological deficits.

Diagnosis of sagittal sinus thrombosis typically involves imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, which can show the presence of a blood clot in the sagittal sinus. Treatment may involve administering anticoagulant medications to prevent further growth of the blood clot and reduce the risk of complications such as pulmonary embolism or cerebral infarction. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove the blood clot or alleviate pressure on the brain.

Protein S deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to coagulate blood properly. Protein S is a naturally occurring protein in the blood that helps regulate the clotting process by deactivating clotting factors when they are no longer needed. When Protein S levels are too low, it can lead to an increased risk of abnormal blood clots forming within blood vessels, a condition known as thrombophilia.

There are three types of Protein S deficiency: Type I (quantitative deficiency), Type II (qualitative deficiency), and Type III (dysfunctional protein). These types refer to the amount or function of Protein S in the blood. In Type I, there is a decrease in both free and total Protein S levels. In Type II, there is a decrease in functional Protein S despite normal total Protein S levels. In Type III, there is a decrease in free Protein S with normal total Protein S levels.

Protein S deficiency can be inherited or acquired. Inherited forms of the disorder are caused by genetic mutations and are usually present from birth. Acquired forms of Protein S deficiency can develop later in life due to certain medical conditions, such as liver disease, vitamin K deficiency, or the use of certain medications that affect blood clotting.

Symptoms of Protein S deficiency may include recurrent blood clots, usually in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism), skin discoloration, pain, and swelling in the affected area. In severe cases, it can lead to complications such as chronic leg ulcers, pulmonary hypertension, or damage to the heart or lungs.

Diagnosis of Protein S deficiency typically involves blood tests to measure Protein S levels and function. Treatment may include anticoagulant medications to prevent blood clots from forming or growing larger. Lifestyle modifications such as regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, and avoiding smoking can also help reduce the risk of blood clots in people with Protein S deficiency.

Protein C deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to control blood clotting. Protein C is a protein in the blood that helps regulate the formation of blood clots. When blood clots form too easily or do not dissolve properly, they can block blood vessels and lead to serious medical conditions such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

People with protein C deficiency have lower than normal levels of this protein in their blood, which can increase their risk of developing abnormal blood clots. The condition is usually inherited and present from birth, but it may not cause any symptoms until later in life, such as during pregnancy, after surgery, or due to other factors that increase the risk of blood clots.

Protein C deficiency can be classified into two types: type I and type II. Type I deficiency is characterized by lower than normal levels of both functional and immunoreactive protein C in the blood. Type II deficiency is characterized by normal or near-normal levels of immunoreactive protein C, but reduced functional activity.

Protein C deficiency can be diagnosed through blood tests that measure the level and function of protein C in the blood. Treatment may include anticoagulant medications to prevent blood clots from forming or dissolve existing ones. Regular monitoring of protein C levels and careful management of risk factors for blood clots are also important parts of managing this condition.

Prothrombin is a protein present in blood plasma, and it's also known as coagulation factor II. It plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex series of reactions that leads to the formation of a blood clot.

When an injury occurs, the coagulation cascade is initiated to prevent excessive blood loss. Prothrombin is converted into its active form, thrombin, by another factor called factor Xa in the presence of calcium ions, phospholipids, and factor Va. Thrombin then catalyzes the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin, forming a stable clot.

Prothrombin levels can be measured through a blood test, which is often used to diagnose or monitor conditions related to bleeding or coagulation disorders, such as liver disease or vitamin K deficiency.

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the deep veins located in the arm or shoulder. This condition can occur due to various reasons, including trauma, surgery, cancer, certain medications, and underlying medical conditions that increase the risk of blood clotting.

The deep veins are larger vessels that run through the body's muscles and are surrounded by fascia, a connective tissue. UEDVT can cause partial or complete blockage of blood flow in the affected vein, leading to swelling, pain, redness, warmth, and decreased function in the arm or hand. In some cases, the clot can break off and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially life-threatening condition called pulmonary embolism (PE).

Diagnosis of UEDVT typically involves a physical exam, medical history, and imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI. Treatment may include anticoagulant medications to prevent the clot from growing or breaking off, thrombolytic therapy to dissolve the clot, or surgical intervention in severe cases. Compression stockings or other devices may also be used to help improve blood flow and reduce swelling.

The inferior vena cava (IVC) is the largest vein in the human body that carries deoxygenated blood from the lower extremities, pelvis, and abdomen to the right atrium of the heart. It is formed by the union of the left and right common iliac veins at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The inferior vena cava is a retroperitoneal structure, meaning it lies behind the peritoneum, the lining that covers the abdominal cavity. It ascends through the posterior abdominal wall and passes through the central tendon of the diaphragm to enter the thoracic cavity.

The inferior vena cava is composed of three parts:

1. The infrarenal portion, which lies below the renal veins
2. The renal portion, which receives blood from the renal veins
3. The suprahepatic portion, which lies above the liver and receives blood from the hepatic veins before draining into the right atrium of the heart.

The inferior vena cava plays a crucial role in maintaining venous return to the heart and contributing to cardiovascular function.

Postphlebitic syndrome, also known as postthrombotic syndrome or post-thrombotic limb, is a long-term complication that can occur after deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It's characterized by chronic venous insufficiency due to damage in the valves and walls of the affected veins. This results in impaired return of blood from the extremities back to the heart, leading to symptoms such as:

1. Swelling (edema) in the affected limb, usually the lower leg or calf.
2. Pain, aching, or cramping in the legs.
3. Heaviness or fatigue in the legs.
4. Skin changes like redness, warmth, or itchiness.
5. Development of venous ulcers or sores, particularly around the ankles.

The severity of postphlebitic syndrome can vary from mild to severe and may significantly impact a person's quality of life. Risk factors for developing this condition include having had a previous DVT, obesity, older age, lack of physical activity, and a family history of blood clotting disorders. Early diagnosis and appropriate management of deep vein thrombosis can help reduce the risk of developing postphlebitic syndrome.

Mesenteric vascular occlusion refers to the blockage or obstruction of the blood vessels that supply the intestines, specifically the mesenteric arteries and veins. This condition can result in insufficient blood flow to the intestines, leading to ischemia (inadequate oxygen supply) and potential necrosis (tissue death).

There are two primary types of mesenteric vascular occlusion:

1. Mesenteric arterial occlusion: This occurs when the mesenteric artery, which carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the intestines, becomes blocked. The most common causes include atherosclerosis (plaque buildup in the arteries), embolism (a clot or particle that travels from another part of the body and lodges in the artery), and thrombosis (a blood clot forming directly in the artery).
2. Mesenteric venous occlusion: This happens when the mesenteric vein, which returns deoxygenated blood from the intestines to the heart, becomes obstructed. The most common causes include thrombophlebitis (inflammation and clot formation in the vein), tumors, or abdominal trauma.

Symptoms of mesenteric vascular occlusion may include severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and bloody stools. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent intestinal tissue damage and potential life-threatening complications such as sepsis or shock. Treatment options typically involve surgical intervention, anticoagulation therapy, or endovascular procedures to restore blood flow.

Thromboembolism is a medical condition that refers to the obstruction of a blood vessel by a thrombus (blood clot) that has formed elsewhere in the body and then been transported by the bloodstream to a narrower vessel, where it becomes lodged. This process can occur in various parts of the body, leading to different types of thromboembolisms:

1. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): A thrombus forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs or pelvis, and then breaks off and travels to the lungs, causing a pulmonary embolism.
2. Pulmonary Embolism (PE): A thrombus formed elsewhere, often in the deep veins of the legs, dislodges and travels to the lungs, blocking one or more pulmonary arteries. This can lead to shortness of breath, chest pain, and potentially life-threatening complications if not treated promptly.
3. Cerebral Embolism: A thrombus formed in another part of the body, such as the heart or carotid artery, dislodges and travels to the brain, causing a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).
4. Arterial Thromboembolism: A thrombus forms in an artery and breaks off, traveling to another part of the body and blocking blood flow to an organ or tissue, leading to potential damage or loss of function. Examples include mesenteric ischemia (intestinal damage due to blocked blood flow) and retinal artery occlusion (vision loss due to blocked blood flow in the eye).

Prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment are crucial for managing thromboembolism and reducing the risk of severe complications.

Heparin is defined as a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan (a type of polysaccharide) that is widely present in many tissues, but is most commonly derived from the mucosal tissues of mammalian lungs or intestinal mucosa. It is an anticoagulant that acts as an inhibitor of several enzymes involved in the blood coagulation cascade, primarily by activating antithrombin III which then neutralizes thrombin and other clotting factors.

Heparin is used medically to prevent and treat thromboembolic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and certain types of heart attacks. It can also be used during hemodialysis, cardiac bypass surgery, and other medical procedures to prevent the formation of blood clots.

It's important to note that while heparin is a powerful anticoagulant, it does not have any fibrinolytic activity, meaning it cannot dissolve existing blood clots. Instead, it prevents new clots from forming and stops existing clots from growing larger.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, and Duplex are diagnostic medical techniques that use sound waves to create images of internal body structures and assess their function. Here are the definitions for each:

1. Ultrasonography: Also known as ultrasound, this is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of internal organs and tissues. A small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the skin surface, which emits and receives sound waves. The returning echoes are then processed to create real-time visual images of the internal structures.
2. Doppler: This is a type of ultrasound that measures the velocity and direction of blood flow in the body by analyzing the frequency shift of the reflected sound waves. It can be used to assess blood flow in various parts of the body, such as the heart, arteries, and veins.
3. Duplex: Duplex ultrasonography is a combination of both gray-scale ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound. It provides detailed images of internal structures, as well as information about blood flow velocity and direction. This technique is often used to evaluate conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, and peripheral arterial disease.

In summary, ultrasonography is a diagnostic imaging technique that uses sound waves to create images of internal structures, Doppler is a type of ultrasound that measures blood flow velocity and direction, and duplex is a combination of both techniques that provides detailed images and information about blood flow.

Activated Protein C (APC) resistance is a condition in which the body's natural anticoagulant system is impaired, leading to an increased risk of thrombosis or blood clot formation. APC is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in regulating blood coagulation by inactivating clotting factors Va and VIIIa.

APC resistance is most commonly caused by a genetic mutation in the Factor V gene, known as Factor V Leiden. This mutation results in the production of a variant form of Factor V called Factor V Leiden, which is resistant to APC-mediated inactivation. As a result, the body's ability to regulate blood clotting is impaired, leading to an increased risk of thrombosis.

APC resistance can be measured by performing a functional assay that compares the activity of APC in normal plasma versus plasma from a patient with suspected APC resistance. The assay measures the rate of inactivation of Factor Va by APC, and a reduced rate of inactivation indicates APC resistance.

It is important to note that not all individuals with APC resistance will develop thrombosis, and other factors such as age, obesity, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, and smoking can increase the risk of thrombosis in individuals with APC resistance.

Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS), also known as postphlebitic syndrome, is a chronic complication that can occur after deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It's characterized by a combination of symptoms including pain, swelling, cramping, itching, and skin changes in the affected limb. PTS happens when the damaged valves in the veins are unable to properly move blood back to the heart, leading to venous hypertension and fluid accumulation in the lower extremities.

The symptoms of PTS can vary in severity, but they often worsen with prolonged standing or sitting. In some cases, patients may develop open sores (ulcers) on the skin, particularly around the ankles. The risk of developing PTS is higher in individuals who have experienced a recurrent DVT, those with more extensive clotting, and those who do not receive appropriate anticoagulation therapy after their initial DVT diagnosis.

Preventive measures such as early mobilization, use of compression stockings, and maintaining adequate anticoagulation can help reduce the risk of developing PTS following a DVT.

Vena cava filters are medical devices that are implanted into the inferior vena cava, which is the largest vein in the body that returns blood from the lower half of the body to the heart. These filters are designed to trap blood clots that form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis or DVT) and prevent them from traveling to the lungs (pulmonary embolism or PE), which can be a life-threatening condition.

The filter is typically implanted using a catheter-based procedure, and it has legs or arms that extend out to trap the blood clots as they flow through the vein. Over time, the trapped clots may dissolve on their own or become organized and incorporated into the wall of the vein.

Vena cava filters are typically used in patients who are at high risk for PE but cannot take anticoagulation medication or have failed anticoagulation therapy. However, there is some controversy surrounding the use of these devices due to concerns about their long-term safety and effectiveness.

A thrombectomy is a medical procedure that involves the removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel. This is typically performed to restore blood flow in cases where the clot is causing significant blockage, which can lead to serious complications such as tissue damage or organ dysfunction.

During a thrombectomy, a surgeon makes an incision and accesses the affected blood vessel, often with the help of imaging guidance. Specialized tools are then used to extract the clot, after which the blood vessel is usually repaired. Thrombectomies can be performed on various blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the brain, heart, lungs, and limbs.

This procedure may be recommended for patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), or certain types of stroke, depending on the specific circumstances and the patient's overall health. It is generally considered when anticoagulation therapy or clot-dissolving medications are not sufficient or appropriate to treat the blood clot.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Fibrinolytic agents are medications that dissolve or break down blood clots by activating plasminogen, which is converted into plasmin. Plasmin is a proteolytic enzyme that degrades fibrin, the structural protein in blood clots. Fibrinolytic agents are used medically to treat conditions such as acute ischemic stroke, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction (heart attack) by restoring blood flow in occluded vessels. Examples of fibrinolytic agents include alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase. It is important to note that these medications carry a risk of bleeding complications and should be administered with caution.

Fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDPs) are a group of proteins that result from the breakdown of fibrinogen and fibrin, which are key components of blood clots. This process occurs during the normal physiological process of fibrinolysis, where clots are dissolved to maintain blood flow.

FDPs can be measured in the blood as a marker for the activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. Elevated levels of FDPs may indicate the presence of a disorder that causes abnormal clotting or bleeding, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), or certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that FDPs are not specific to any particular disorder and their measurement should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory findings.

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) is a medical condition that includes both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). DVT is a blood clot that forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs, while PE occurs when a clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, blocking a pulmonary artery or one of its branches. This condition can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated promptly.

The medical definition of Venous Thromboembolism is:

"The formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in a deep vein, most commonly in the legs, which can then dislodge and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially life-threatening blockage of the pulmonary artery or one of its branches (pulmonary embolism). VTE is a complex disorder resulting from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors that affect the balance between thrombosis and fibrinolysis."

Some common risk factors for VTE include immobility, surgery, trauma, cancer, hormonal therapy, pregnancy, advanced age, and inherited or acquired thrombophilia. Symptoms of DVT may include swelling, pain, warmth, and redness in the affected limb, while symptoms of PE can range from shortness of breath and chest pain to coughing up blood or even sudden death. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical assessment, imaging studies (such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI), and laboratory tests (such as D-dimer). Treatment usually includes anticoagulation therapy to prevent further clot formation and reduce the risk of recurrence.

The jugular veins are a pair of large, superficial veins that carry blood from the head and neck to the heart. They are located in the neck and are easily visible when looking at the side of a person's neck. The external jugular vein runs along the surface of the muscles in the neck, while the internal jugular vein runs within the carotid sheath along with the carotid artery and the vagus nerve.

The jugular veins are important in clinical examinations because they can provide information about a person's cardiovascular function and intracranial pressure. For example, distention of the jugular veins may indicate heart failure or increased intracranial pressure, while decreased venous pulsations may suggest a low blood pressure or shock.

It is important to note that medical conditions such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can also affect the jugular veins and can lead to serious complications if not treated promptly.

The subclavian vein is a large venous structure that carries deoxygenated blood from the upper limb and part of the thorax back to the heart. It forms when the axillary vein passes through the narrow space between the first rib and the clavicle (collarbone), becoming the subclavian vein.

On the left side, the subclavian vein joins with the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein, while on the right side, the subclavian vein directly merges with the internal jugular vein to create the brachiocephalic vein. These brachiocephalic veins then unite to form the superior vena cava, which drains blood into the right atrium of the heart.

The subclavian vein is an essential structure for venous access in various medical procedures and interventions, such as placing central venous catheters or performing blood tests.

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the blood. These antibodies are directed against phospholipids, a type of fat molecule found in cell membranes and plasma lipoproteins. The presence of these antibodies can lead to abnormal blood clotting, which can cause serious complications such as stroke, heart attack, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism.

APS can occur either on its own (primary APS) or in conjunction with other autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (secondary APS). The exact cause of APS is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Symptoms of APS can vary widely depending on the location and severity of the blood clots. They may include:

* Recurrent miscarriages or stillbirths
* Blood clots in the legs, lungs, or other parts of the body
* Skin ulcers or lesions
* Headaches, seizures, or stroke-like symptoms
* Kidney problems
* Heart valve abnormalities

Diagnosis of APS typically involves blood tests to detect the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Treatment may include medications to prevent blood clots, such as anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, as well as management of any underlying autoimmune disorders.

Blood coagulation, also known as blood clotting, is a complex process that occurs in the body to prevent excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. This process involves several different proteins and chemical reactions that ultimately lead to the formation of a clot.

The coagulation cascade is initiated when blood comes into contact with tissue factor, which is exposed after damage to the blood vessel wall. This triggers a series of enzymatic reactions that activate clotting factors, leading to the formation of a fibrin clot. Fibrin is a protein that forms a mesh-like structure that traps platelets and red blood cells to form a stable clot.

Once the bleeding has stopped, the coagulation process is regulated and inhibited to prevent excessive clotting. The fibrinolytic system degrades the clot over time, allowing for the restoration of normal blood flow.

Abnormalities in the blood coagulation process can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Peripheral catheterization is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a thin, flexible tube (catheter) into a peripheral vein, which is a blood vessel located outside of the chest and abdomen. This type of catheterization is typically performed to administer medications, fluids, or nutritional support, or to monitor various physiological parameters such as central venous pressure.

Peripheral catheters are usually inserted into veins in the hands or arms, although they can also be placed in other peripheral veins. The procedure is typically performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection. Once the catheter is in place, it may be secured with a dressing or suture to prevent movement and dislodgement.

Peripheral catheterization is a relatively safe and common procedure that is routinely performed in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. However, like any medical procedure, it carries a small risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or damage to the vein or surrounding tissues.

Compression stockings are a specialized type of hosiery that applies pressure to your legs, promoting better blood flow. They are tightest at the ankle and gradually become less constrictive up the leg. This gradient compression helps to counteract the force of gravity and promote venous return, reducing the pooling of blood in the lower extremities.

Compression stockings are often used to help prevent or treat various conditions related to poor circulation, including:

1. Varicose veins: Enlarged, swollen, and twisting veins that are easily visible just under the surface of the skin.
2. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT): A blood clot that forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs. Compression stockings can help reduce the risk of DVT after certain surgeries or during long periods of immobilization.
3. Edema: Swelling in the legs and ankles due to fluid buildup.
4. Chronic venous insufficiency: A condition where the veins have difficulty returning blood from the legs back to the heart, leading to symptoms like leg pain, swelling, and skin changes.
5. Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS): A long-term complication of DVT characterized by chronic leg pain, swelling, and skin ulcers. Compression stockings can help manage symptoms and prevent further complications.

There are different levels of compression available, ranging from mild (15-20 mmHg) to extra firm (50-60 mmHg). Your healthcare provider will recommend the appropriate level based on your specific condition and needs. It is essential to wear compression stockings correctly for them to be effective and avoid skin irritation or other complications.

The axillary vein is a large vein that runs through the axilla or armpit region. It is formed by the union of the brachial vein and the basilic vein at the lower border of the teres major muscle. The axillary vein carries deoxygenated blood from the upper limb, chest wall, and breast towards the heart. As it moves proximally, it becomes continuous with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. It is accompanied by the axillary artery and forms part of the important neurovascular bundle in the axilla.

Lateral sinus thrombosis, also known as sigmoid sinus thrombosis, is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the lateral or sigmoid sinus, which are venous structures located in the skull that help drain blood from the brain.

The lateral sinuses are situated near the mastoid process of the temporal bone and can become thrombosed due to various reasons such as infection (often associated with ear or mastoid infections), trauma, tumors, or other underlying medical conditions that increase the risk of blood clot formation.

Symptoms of lateral sinus thrombosis may include headache, fever, neck stiffness, altered mental status, and signs of increased intracranial pressure such as papilledema (swelling of the optic nerve disc). Diagnosis is typically made with the help of imaging studies like CT or MRI scans, and treatment often involves anticoagulation therapy to prevent clot expansion and potential complications. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove the clot or manage any underlying conditions.

The portal vein is the large venous trunk that carries blood from the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, pancreas, and gallbladder to the liver. It is formed by the union of the superior mesenteric vein (draining the small intestine and a portion of the large intestine) and the splenic vein (draining the spleen and pancreas). The portal vein then divides into right and left branches within the liver, where the blood flows through the sinusoids and gets enriched with oxygen and nutrients before being drained by the hepatic veins into the inferior vena cava. This unique arrangement allows the liver to process and detoxify the absorbed nutrients, remove waste products, and regulate metabolic homeostasis.

Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protease that functions as an important regulator of coagulation and inflammation. It is a plasma protein produced in the liver that, when activated, degrades clotting factors Va and VIIIa to limit thrombus formation and prevent excessive blood clotting. Protein C also has anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reducing endothelial cell activation. Inherited or acquired deficiencies in Protein C can lead to an increased risk of thrombosis, a condition characterized by abnormal blood clot formation within blood vessels.

Hemostasis is the physiological process that occurs to stop bleeding (bleeding control) when a blood vessel is damaged. This involves the interaction of platelets, vasoconstriction, and blood clotting factors leading to the formation of a clot. The ultimate goal of hemostasis is to maintain the integrity of the vascular system while preventing excessive blood loss.

Thrombolytic therapy, also known as thrombolysis, is a medical treatment that uses medications called thrombolytics or fibrinolytics to dissolve or break down blood clots (thrombi) in blood vessels. These clots can obstruct the flow of blood to vital organs such as the heart, lungs, or brain, leading to serious conditions like myocardial infarction (heart attack), pulmonary embolism, or ischemic stroke.

The goal of thrombolytic therapy is to restore blood flow as quickly and efficiently as possible to prevent further damage to the affected organ and potentially save lives. Commonly used thrombolytic drugs include alteplase (tPA), reteplase, and tenecteplase. It's essential to administer these medications as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms for optimal treatment outcomes. However, there are risks associated with thrombolytic therapy, such as an increased chance of bleeding complications, which must be carefully weighed against its benefits in each individual case.

Warfarin is a anticoagulant medication that works by inhibiting the vitamin K-dependent activation of several coagulation factors (factors II, VII, IX, and X). This results in prolonged clotting times and reduced thrombus formation. It is commonly used to prevent and treat blood clots in conditions such as atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. Warfarin is also known by its brand names Coumadin and Jantoven.

It's important to note that warfarin has a narrow therapeutic index, meaning that the difference between an effective dose and a toxic one is small. Therefore, it requires careful monitoring of the patient's coagulation status through regular blood tests (INR) to ensure that the dosage is appropriate and to minimize the risk of bleeding complications.

The renal veins are a pair of large veins that carry oxygen-depleted blood and waste products from the kidneys to the inferior vena cava, which is the largest vein in the body that returns blood to the heart. The renal veins are formed by the union of several smaller veins that drain blood from different parts of the kidney.

In humans, the right renal vein is shorter and passes directly into the inferior vena cava, while the left renal vein is longer and passes in front of the aorta before entering the inferior vena cava. The left renal vein also receives blood from the gonadal (testicular or ovarian) veins, suprarenal (adrenal) veins, and the lumbar veins.

It is important to note that the renal veins are vulnerable to compression by surrounding structures, such as the overlying artery or a tumor, which can lead to renal vein thrombosis, a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Veins are blood vessels that carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart. They have a lower pressure than arteries and contain valves to prevent the backflow of blood. Veins have a thin, flexible wall with a larger lumen compared to arteries, allowing them to accommodate more blood volume. The color of veins is often blue or green due to the absorption characteristics of light and the reduced oxygen content in the blood they carry.

Protein S is a vitamin K-dependent protein found in the blood that functions as a natural anticoagulant. It plays a crucial role in regulating the body's clotting system by inhibiting the activation of coagulation factors, thereby preventing excessive blood clotting. Protein S also acts as a cofactor for activated protein C, which is another important anticoagulant protein.

Protein S exists in two forms: free and bound to a protein called C4b-binding protein (C4BP). Only the free form of Protein S has biological activity in inhibiting coagulation. Inherited or acquired deficiencies in Protein S can lead to an increased risk of thrombosis, or abnormal blood clot formation, which can cause various medical conditions such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Regular monitoring of Protein S levels is essential for patients with a history of thrombotic events or those who have a family history of thrombophilia.

Antiphospholipid antibodies are a type of autoantibody that targets and binds to certain proteins found in the blood that attach to phospholipids (a type of fat molecule). These antibodies are associated with an increased risk of developing antiphospholipid syndrome, a disorder characterized by abnormal blood clotting.

There are several types of antiphospholipid antibodies, including:

1. Lupus anticoagulant: This type of antiphospholipid antibody can interfere with blood clotting tests and may increase the risk of thrombosis (blood clots) in both arteries and veins.
2. Anticardiolipin antibodies: These antibodies target a specific phospholipid called cardiolipin, which is found in the inner membrane of mitochondria. High levels of anticardiolipin antibodies are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and pregnancy complications such as recurrent miscarriage.
3. Anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies: These antibodies target a protein called β2 glycoprotein I, which binds to negatively charged phospholipids on the surface of cells. High levels of anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and pregnancy complications.

The exact mechanism by which antiphospholipid antibodies cause blood clotting is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve the activation of platelets, the inhibition of natural anticoagulants, and the promotion of inflammation. Antiphospholipid syndrome can be treated with medications that thin the blood or prevent clots from forming, such as aspirin, warfarin, or heparin.

Antithrombin III (ATIII) deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to regulate blood clotting. ATIII is a protein produced in the liver that inhibits the activity of thrombin and other coagulation factors, preventing excessive clot formation.

People with ATIII deficiency have lower than normal levels of this protein, which can lead to an increased risk of developing abnormal blood clots (thrombosis) in veins, particularly deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). These clots can cause serious complications, including damage to the affected veins, organ damage, and even death.

ATIII deficiency can be classified into two types: type I and type II. Type I is characterized by a quantitative decrease in ATIII levels, while type II is characterized by a qualitative defect that results in reduced functional activity of the protein.

The condition is usually inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that a person has a 50% chance of inheriting the gene mutation from an affected parent. However, some cases may occur spontaneously due to new mutations in the ATIII gene. Treatment for ATIII deficiency typically involves anticoagulation therapy with medications such as heparin or warfarin to prevent blood clots from forming.

In medical terms, the leg refers to the lower portion of the human body that extends from the knee down to the foot. It includes the thigh (femur), lower leg (tibia and fibula), foot, and ankle. The leg is primarily responsible for supporting the body's weight and enabling movements such as standing, walking, running, and jumping.

The leg contains several important structures, including bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, nerves, and joints. These structures work together to provide stability, support, and mobility to the lower extremity. Common medical conditions that can affect the leg include fractures, sprains, strains, infections, peripheral artery disease, and neurological disorders.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor" is not a recognized medical term or concept in hematology or immunology.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), often referred to simply as lupus, is an autoimmune disease where the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. However, this does not result in a specific coagulation inhibitor.

If you're asking about lupus anticoagulants, these are antibodies that can interfere with clotting tests but paradoxically increase the risk of blood clots in vivo. They are sometimes seen in patients with SLE and other autoimmune diseases.

Please provide more context if you meant something else, so I can give a more accurate response.

A bandage is a medical dressing or covering applied to a wound, injury, or sore with the intention of promoting healing or preventing infection. Bandages can be made of a variety of materials such as gauze, cotton, elastic, or adhesive tape and come in different sizes and shapes to accommodate various body parts. They can also have additional features like fasteners, non-slip surfaces, or transparent windows for monitoring the condition of the wound.

Bandages serve several purposes, including:

1. Absorbing drainage or exudate from the wound
2. Protecting the wound from external contaminants and bacteria
3. Securing other medical devices such as catheters or splints in place
4. Reducing swelling or promoting immobilization of the affected area
5. Providing compression to control bleeding or prevent fluid accumulation
6. Relieving pain by reducing pressure on sensitive nerves or structures.

Proper application and care of bandages are essential for effective wound healing and prevention of complications such as infection or delayed recovery.

Fibrinolysis is the natural process in the body that leads to the dissolution of blood clots. It is a vital part of hemostasis, the process that regulates bleeding and wound healing. Fibrinolysis occurs when plasminogen activators convert plasminogen to plasmin, an enzyme that breaks down fibrin, the insoluble protein mesh that forms the structure of a blood clot. This process helps to prevent excessive clotting and maintains the fluidity of the blood. In medical settings, fibrinolysis can also refer to the therapeutic use of drugs that stimulate this process to dissolve unwanted or harmful blood clots, such as those that cause deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the obstruction of the hepatic veins, which are the blood vessels that carry blood from the liver to the heart. This obstruction can be caused by blood clots, tumors, or other abnormalities, and it can lead to a backflow of blood in the liver, resulting in various symptoms such as abdominal pain, swelling, and liver enlargement. In severe cases, Budd-Chiari syndrome can cause liver failure and other complications if left untreated. The diagnosis of this condition typically involves imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and treatment may include anticoagulation therapy, thrombolytic therapy, or surgical intervention to remove the obstruction.

Central venous catheterization is a medical procedure in which a flexible tube called a catheter is inserted into a large vein in the body, usually in the neck (internal jugular vein), chest (subclavian vein), or groin (femoral vein). The catheter is threaded through the vein until it reaches a central location, such as the superior vena cava or the right atrium of the heart.

Central venous catheterization may be performed for several reasons, including:

1. To administer medications, fluids, or nutritional support directly into the bloodstream.
2. To monitor central venous pressure (CVP), which can help assess a patient's volume status and cardiac function.
3. To draw blood samples for laboratory tests.
4. To deliver chemotherapy drugs or other medications that may be harmful to peripheral veins.
5. To provide access for hemodialysis or other long-term therapies.

The procedure requires careful attention to sterile technique to minimize the risk of infection, and it is usually performed under local anesthesia with sedation or general anesthesia. Complications of central venous catheterization may include bleeding, infection, pneumothorax (collapsed lung), arterial puncture, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI).

Puerperal disorders are a group of medical conditions that can affect women during the period following childbirth, also known as the puerperium. The puerperium typically lasts for six to eight weeks after delivery. These disorders can be complications of childbirth or postpartum infections and include:

1. Puerperal fever: This is a febrile illness that occurs during the puerperium, usually caused by a bacterial infection. The most common causative organisms are group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli.

2. Puerperal sepsis: This is a severe form of puerperal fever characterized by the presence of bacteria in the blood (bacteremia) and widespread inflammation throughout the body. It can lead to organ failure and even death if not treated promptly with antibiotics.

3. Puerperal endometritis: This is an infection of the lining of the uterus (endometrium) that occurs during the puerperium. Symptoms may include fever, abdominal pain, and foul-smelling vaginal discharge.

4. Puerperal mastitis: This is an inflammation of the breast tissue that can occur during lactation, often caused by a bacterial infection. It is more common in women who are breastfeeding but can also occur in non-lactating women.

5. Puerperal psychosis: This is a rare but serious mental health disorder that can occur after childbirth. It is characterized by symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, and disorganized thinking.

6. Puerperal thromboembolism: This is a blood clot that forms during the puerperium, usually in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) or in the lungs (pulmonary embolism). It can be a serious complication of childbirth and requires prompt medical attention.

Overall, puerperal disorders are a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in low-income countries where access to healthcare is limited. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for improving outcomes and reducing the risk of long-term complications.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Acenocoumarol is an anticoagulant medication that is used to prevent and treat blood clots. It works by inhibiting the formation of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, which are necessary for normal blood coagulation. This results in a prolonged bleeding time and reduced risk of blood clots.

Acenocoumarol is a coumarin derivative and is available under various brand names, including Sintrom and Nicoumalone. It is typically administered orally in the form of tablets and its effects are monitored through regular blood tests to ensure that the dosage is appropriate and that the risk of bleeding complications is minimized.

Common side effects of acenocoumarol include easy bruising, nosebleeds, and skin rashes. It may also interact with a variety of other medications, including antibiotics, antifungals, and certain herbal supplements, so it is important to inform your healthcare provider of all medications and supplements you are taking before starting acenocoumarol therapy.

It is important to note that acenocoumarol has a narrow therapeutic index, meaning that the difference between an effective dose and a toxic dose is relatively small. Therefore, it is essential to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when taking this medication and to have regular blood tests to monitor its effects on your coagulation status.

Cranial sinuses are a part of the venous system in the human head. They are air-filled spaces located within the skull and are named according to their location. The cranial sinuses include:

1. Superior sagittal sinus: It runs along the top of the brain, inside the skull, and drains blood from the scalp and the veins of the brain.
2. Inferior sagittal sinus: It runs along the bottom of the brain and drains into the straight sinus.
3. Straight sinus: It is located at the back of the brain and receives blood from the inferior sagittal sinus and great cerebral vein.
4. Occipital sinuses: They are located at the back of the head and drain blood from the scalp and skull.
5. Cavernous sinuses: They are located on each side of the brain, near the temple, and receive blood from the eye and surrounding areas.
6. Sphenoparietal sinus: It is a small sinus that drains blood from the front part of the brain into the cavernous sinus.
7. Petrosquamosal sinuses: They are located near the ear and drain blood from the scalp and skull.

The cranial sinuses play an essential role in draining blood from the brain and protecting it from injury.

Blood coagulation disorders, inherited, also known as coagulopathies, are genetic conditions that affect the body's ability to form blood clots in response to injury or damage to blood vessels. These disorders can lead to excessive bleeding or hemorrhage, and in some cases, abnormal clotting.

There are several types of inherited blood coagulation disorders, including:

1. Hemophilia A and B: These are X-linked recessive disorders that affect the production of factors VIII and IX, respectively, which are essential for normal blood clotting. People with hemophilia may experience prolonged bleeding after injury or surgery, and spontaneous bleeding into joints and muscles.
2. Von Willebrand disease: This is the most common inherited coagulation disorder, affecting both men and women. It results from a deficiency or abnormality of von Willebrand factor, a protein that helps platelets stick to damaged blood vessels and assists in the activation of factor VIII. People with von Willebrand disease may experience excessive bleeding after injury, surgery, or dental work.
3. Factor XI deficiency: This is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects the production of factor XI, a protein involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. People with factor XI deficiency may have a mild to moderate bleeding tendency, particularly after surgery or trauma.
4. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies: There are several other rare inherited coagulation disorders that affect the production of other clotting factors, such as factors II, V, VII, X, and XIII. These conditions can lead to a range of bleeding symptoms, from mild to severe.

Inherited blood coagulation disorders are usually diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests that measure the levels and function of clotting factors in the blood. Treatment may include replacement therapy with purified clotting factor concentrates, medications to control bleeding, and management of bleeding symptoms as they arise.

Impedance plethysmography is a non-invasive method used to measure changes in blood volume or flow in a particular area of the body. It works by passing a small electrical current through the tissue and measuring the opposition (impedance) to that current, which varies with the amount of blood present in the area.

In impedance cardiography, this technique is used to estimate cardiac output, stroke volume, and other hemodynamic parameters. The changes in impedance are measured across the chest wall, which correlate with the ventricular ejection of blood during each heartbeat. This allows for the calculation of various cardiovascular variables, such as the amount of blood pumped by the heart per minute (cardiac output) and the resistance to blood flow in the systemic circulation (systemic vascular resistance).

Impedance plethysmography is a safe and reliable method for assessing cardiovascular function, and it has been widely used in clinical settings to evaluate patients with various cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure, hypertension, and peripheral arterial disease.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Recurrence, in a medical context, refers to the return of symptoms or signs of a disease after a period of improvement or remission. It indicates that the condition has not been fully eradicated and may require further treatment. Recurrence is often used to describe situations where a disease such as cancer comes back after initial treatment, but it can also apply to other medical conditions. The likelihood of recurrence varies depending on the type of disease and individual patient factors.

Blood coagulation tests, also known as coagulation studies or clotting tests, are a series of medical tests used to evaluate the blood's ability to clot. These tests measure the functioning of various clotting factors and regulatory proteins involved in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex process that leads to the formation of a blood clot to prevent excessive bleeding.

The most commonly performed coagulation tests include:

1. Prothrombin Time (PT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium and tissue factor, which activates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The PT is reported in seconds and can be converted to an International Normalized Ratio (INR) to monitor anticoagulant therapy.
2. Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium, phospholipid, and a contact activator, which activates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. The aPTT is reported in seconds and is used to monitor heparin therapy.
3. Thrombin Time (TT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of thrombin, which directly converts fibrinogen to fibrin. The TT is reported in seconds and can be used to detect the presence of fibrin degradation products or abnormalities in fibrinogen function.
4. Fibrinogen Level: Measures the amount of fibrinogen, a protein involved in clot formation, present in the blood. The level is reported in grams per liter (g/L) and can be used to assess bleeding risk or the effectiveness of fibrinogen replacement therapy.
5. D-dimer Level: Measures the amount of D-dimer, a protein fragment produced during the breakdown of a blood clot, present in the blood. The level is reported in micrograms per milliliter (µg/mL) and can be used to diagnose or exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

These tests are important for the diagnosis, management, and monitoring of various bleeding and clotting disorders. They can help identify the underlying cause of abnormal bleeding or clotting, guide appropriate treatment decisions, and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. It is essential to interpret these test results in conjunction with a patient's clinical presentation and medical history.

Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) is a medical laboratory test that measures the time it takes for blood to clot. It's more specifically a measure of the intrinsic and common pathways of the coagulation cascade, which are the series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot.

The test involves adding a partial thromboplastin reagent (an activator of the intrinsic pathway) and calcium to plasma, and then measuring the time it takes for a fibrin clot to form. This is compared to a control sample, and the ratio of the two times is calculated.

The PTT test is often used to help diagnose bleeding disorders or abnormal blood clotting, such as hemophilia or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of anticoagulant therapy, such as heparin. Prolonged PTT results may indicate a bleeding disorder or an increased risk of bleeding, while shortened PTT results may indicate a hypercoagulable state and an increased risk of thrombosis.

Anticardiolipin antibodies are a type of autoantibody that targets and binds to cardiolipin, a phospholipid component found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of cells. These antibodies are clinically significant because they have been associated with a variety of autoimmune disorders, including antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

APS is a condition characterized by recurrent blood clots, pregnancy losses, and thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). Anticardiolipin antibodies are one of the three main types of autoantibodies found in APS, along with lupus anticoagulant and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies.

The presence of high levels of anticardiolipin antibodies in the blood can lead to abnormal blood clotting, which can cause serious complications such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and stroke. Anticardiolipin antibodies can also contribute to pregnancy losses by causing placental insufficiency or abnormal blood clotting in the placenta.

Anticardiolipin antibodies are typically detected through a blood test that measures their levels in the serum. A positive result is usually confirmed with a second test performed at least 12 weeks later to establish persistence. Treatment for anticardiolipin antibody-related disorders typically involves anticoagulation therapy to prevent blood clots and other complications.

Enoxaparin is a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) medication that is used as an anticoagulant to prevent and treat blood clots. It works by binding to and inhibiting the activity of factor Xa, a clotting factor in the blood. This helps to reduce the risk of clot formation and can help to prevent conditions such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Enoxaparin is typically given by injection under the skin (subcutaneously) and is available under the brand names Lovenox and Clexane, among others. It is important to follow the instructions of a healthcare professional when using enoxaparin, as it can increase the risk of bleeding.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Hemorrhage is defined in the medical context as an excessive loss of blood from the circulatory system, which can occur due to various reasons such as injury, surgery, or underlying health conditions that affect blood clotting or the integrity of blood vessels. The bleeding may be internal, external, visible, or concealed, and it can vary in severity from minor to life-threatening, depending on the location and extent of the bleeding. Hemorrhage is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate attention and treatment to prevent further blood loss, organ damage, and potential death.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Fibrinogen is a soluble protein present in plasma, synthesized by the liver. It plays an essential role in blood coagulation. When an injury occurs, fibrinogen gets converted into insoluble fibrin by the action of thrombin, forming a fibrin clot that helps to stop bleeding from the injured site. Therefore, fibrinogen is crucial for hemostasis, which is the process of stopping bleeding and starting the healing process after an injury.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, color is a type of diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses the Doppler effect to produce visual images of blood flow in vessels and the heart. The Doppler effect is the change in frequency or wavelength of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to the source of the wave. In this context, it refers to the change in frequency of the ultrasound waves as they reflect off moving red blood cells.

In color Doppler ultrasonography, different colors are used to represent the direction and speed of blood flow. Red typically represents blood flowing toward the transducer (the device that sends and receives sound waves), while blue represents blood flowing away from the transducer. The intensity or brightness of the color is proportional to the velocity of blood flow.

Color Doppler ultrasonography is often used in conjunction with grayscale ultrasound imaging, which provides information about the structure and composition of tissues. Together, these techniques can help diagnose a wide range of conditions, including heart disease, blood clots, and abnormalities in blood flow.

Venous insufficiency is a medical condition that occurs when the veins, particularly in the legs, have difficulty returning blood back to the heart due to impaired valve function or obstruction in the vein. This results in blood pooling in the veins, leading to symptoms such as varicose veins, swelling, skin changes, and ulcers. Prolonged venous insufficiency can cause chronic pain and affect the quality of life if left untreated.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Blood coagulation disorders, also known as bleeding disorders or clotting disorders, refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the body's ability to form blood clots properly. Normally, when a blood vessel is injured, the body's coagulation system works to form a clot to stop the bleeding and promote healing.

In blood coagulation disorders, there can be either an increased tendency to bleed due to problems with the formation of clots (hemorrhagic disorder), or an increased tendency for clots to form inappropriately even without injury, leading to blockages in the blood vessels (thrombotic disorder).

Examples of hemorrhagic disorders include:

1. Hemophilia - a genetic disorder that affects the ability to form clots due to deficiencies in clotting factors VIII or IX.
2. Von Willebrand disease - another genetic disorder caused by a deficiency or abnormality of the von Willebrand factor, which helps platelets stick together to form a clot.
3. Liver diseases - can lead to decreased production of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) - a serious condition where clotting and bleeding occur simultaneously due to widespread activation of the coagulation system.

Examples of thrombotic disorders include:

1. Factor V Leiden mutation - a genetic disorder that increases the risk of inappropriate blood clot formation.
2. Antithrombin III deficiency - a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to break down clots, increasing the risk of thrombosis.
3. Protein C or S deficiencies - genetic disorders that lead to an increased risk of thrombosis due to impaired regulation of the coagulation system.
4. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) - an autoimmune disorder where the body produces antibodies against its own clotting factors, increasing the risk of thrombosis.

Treatment for blood coagulation disorders depends on the specific diagnosis and may include medications to manage bleeding or prevent clots, as well as lifestyle changes and monitoring to reduce the risk of complications.

Nadroparin is defined as a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) drug, which is used as an anticoagulant. It is derived from unfractionated heparin and works by inhibiting the activity of coagulation factor Xa and to a lesser extent, thrombin. Nadroparin is commonly used for the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), as well as for the management of unstable angina and non-Q wave myocardial infarction.

The drug is administered subcutaneously, and its anticoagulant effect is monitored by measuring the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) or anti-Xa activity. The half-life of nadroparin is approximately 4 hours, and it has a lower risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) compared to unfractionated heparin.

It's important to note that the use of nadroparin or any other anticoagulant medication should be under the supervision of a healthcare professional, and patients should be closely monitored for bleeding risks and other potential adverse effects.

Bleeding time is a medical test that measures the time it takes for a small blood vessel to stop bleeding after being cut. It's used to evaluate platelet function and the effectiveness of blood clotting. The most common method used to measure bleeding time is the Ivy method, which involves making a standardized incision on the forearm and measuring the time it takes for the bleeding to stop. A normal bleeding time ranges from 2 to 9 minutes, but this can vary depending on the specific method used. Prolonged bleeding time may indicate an impairment in platelet function or clotting factor deficiency.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Antithrombins are substances that prevent the formation or promote the dissolution of blood clots (thrombi). They include:

1. Anticoagulants: These are medications that reduce the ability of the blood to clot. Examples include heparin, warfarin, and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) such as apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran.
2. Thrombolytic agents: These are medications that break down existing blood clots. Examples include alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase.
3. Fibrinolytics: These are a type of thrombolytic agent that specifically target fibrin, a protein involved in the formation of blood clots.
4. Natural anticoagulants: These are substances produced by the body to regulate blood clotting. Examples include antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S.

Antithrombins are used in the prevention and treatment of various thromboembolic disorders, such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, and myocardial infarction (heart attack). It is important to note that while antithrombins can help prevent or dissolve blood clots, they also increase the risk of bleeding, so their use must be carefully monitored.

Behçet syndrome is a rare inflammatory disease that can cause symptoms in various parts of the body. It's characterized by recurrent mouth sores (aphthous ulcers), genital sores, and inflammation of the eyes (uveitis). The condition may also cause skin lesions, joint pain and swelling, and inflammation of the digestive tract, brain, or spinal cord.

The exact cause of Behçet syndrome is not known, but it's thought to be an autoimmune disorder, in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks its own healthy cells and tissues. The condition tends to affect men more often than women and typically develops during a person's 20s or 30s.

There is no cure for Behçet syndrome, but treatments can help manage symptoms and prevent complications. Treatment options may include medications such as corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, and biologics to reduce inflammation, as well as pain relievers and other supportive therapies.

Cardiovascular complications in pregnancy refer to conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels, which can arise during pregnancy, childbirth, or after delivery. These complications can be pre-existing or new-onset and can range from mild to severe, potentially threatening the life of both the mother and the fetus. Some examples of cardiovascular complications in pregnancy include:

1. Hypertension disorders: This includes chronic hypertension (high blood pressure before pregnancy), gestational hypertension (high blood pressure that develops after 20 weeks of pregnancy), and preeclampsia/eclampsia (a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria, and potential organ damage).

2. Cardiomyopathy: A condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened, leading to an enlarged heart and reduced pumping efficiency. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a specific type that occurs during pregnancy or in the months following delivery.

3. Arrhythmias: Irregularities in the heart's rhythm, such as tachycardia (rapid heartbeat) or bradycardia (slow heartbeat), can occur during pregnancy and may require medical intervention.

4. Valvular heart disease: Pre-existing valve disorders, like mitral stenosis or aortic insufficiency, can worsen during pregnancy due to increased blood volume and cardiac output. Additionally, new valve issues might develop during pregnancy.

5. Venous thromboembolism (VTE): Pregnancy increases the risk of developing blood clots in the veins, particularly deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

6. Ischemic heart disease: Although rare, coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome can occur during pregnancy, especially in women with risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, or smoking history.

7. Heart failure: Severe cardiac dysfunction leading to fluid accumulation, shortness of breath, and reduced exercise tolerance may develop due to any of the above conditions or other underlying heart diseases.

Early recognition, monitoring, and appropriate management of these cardiovascular complications in pregnancy are crucial for maternal and fetal well-being.

Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) devices are medical devices that use inflatable garments to apply controlled pressure in a rhythmic, intermittent manner to the extremities of the body, most commonly used on the legs. These devices are designed to help improve venous and lymphatic flow, reduce edema (swelling), and prevent the formation of blood clots (deep vein thrombosis) in patients who are at risk.

The IPC device typically consists of a pump, hoses, and an air-filled garment that covers the affected limb. The pump regulates the pressure and inflation pattern, while the garment applies pressure to the limb. The compression cycle usually starts with low pressure and gradually increases to a peak pressure before decreasing again. This process is repeated at regular intervals, providing intermittent compression that mimics natural muscle contractions and helps promote blood flow.

IPC devices are often used in clinical settings such as hospitals and rehabilitation centers, but they can also be prescribed for home use. They are commonly recommended for patients who have undergone surgery, experienced trauma, or have conditions that increase their risk of developing blood clots, such as prolonged immobilization, varicose veins, or certain medical disorders.

It is essential to follow the healthcare provider's instructions when using IPC devices and report any discomfort, pain, or unusual symptoms during treatment.

Oral contraceptives, also known as "birth control pills," are medications taken by mouth to prevent pregnancy. They contain synthetic hormones that mimic the effects of natural hormones estrogen and progesterone in a woman's body, thereby preventing ovulation, fertilization, or implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus.

There are two main types of oral contraceptives: combined pills, which contain both estrogen and progestin, and mini-pills, which contain only progestin. Combined pills work by preventing ovulation, thickening cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to reach the egg, and thinning the lining of the uterus to make it less likely for a fertilized egg to implant. Mini-pills work mainly by thickening cervical mucus and changing the lining of the uterus.

Oral contraceptives are highly effective when used correctly, but they do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It is important to use them consistently and as directed by a healthcare provider. Side effects may include nausea, breast tenderness, headaches, mood changes, and irregular menstrual bleeding. In rare cases, oral contraceptives may increase the risk of serious health problems such as blood clots, stroke, or liver tumors. However, for most women, the benefits of using oral contraceptives outweigh the risks.

Thromboplastin is a substance that activates the coagulation cascade, leading to the formation of a clot (thrombus). It's primarily found in damaged or injured tissues and blood vessels, as well as in platelets (thrombocytes). There are two types of thromboplastin:

1. Extrinsic thromboplastin (also known as tissue factor): This is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is primarily found in subendothelial cells and released upon injury to the blood vessels. It initiates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation by binding to and activating Factor VII, ultimately leading to the formation of thrombin and fibrin clots.
2. Intrinsic thromboplastin (also known as plasma thromboplastin or factor III): This term is used less frequently and refers to a labile phospholipid component present in platelet membranes, which plays a role in the intrinsic pathway of coagulation.

In clinical settings, the term "thromboplastin" often refers to reagents used in laboratory tests like the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). These reagents contain a source of tissue factor and calcium ions to initiate and monitor the coagulation process.

Platelet aggregation inhibitors are a class of medications that prevent platelets (small blood cells involved in clotting) from sticking together and forming a clot. These drugs work by interfering with the ability of platelets to adhere to each other and to the damaged vessel wall, thereby reducing the risk of thrombosis (blood clot formation).

Platelet aggregation inhibitors are often prescribed for people who have an increased risk of developing blood clots due to various medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, stroke, or a history of heart attack. They may also be used in patients undergoing certain medical procedures, such as angioplasty and stenting, to prevent blood clot formation in the stents.

Examples of platelet aggregation inhibitors include:

1. Aspirin: A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that irreversibly inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase, which is involved in platelet activation and aggregation.
2. Clopidogrel (Plavix): A P2Y12 receptor antagonist that selectively blocks ADP-induced platelet activation and aggregation.
3. Prasugrel (Effient): A third-generation thienopyridine P2Y12 receptor antagonist, similar to clopidogrel but with faster onset and greater potency.
4. Ticagrelor (Brilinta): A direct-acting P2Y12 receptor antagonist that does not require metabolic activation and has a reversible binding profile.
5. Dipyridamole (Persantine): An antiplatelet agent that inhibits platelet aggregation by increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in platelets, which leads to decreased platelet reactivity.
6. Iloprost (Ventavis): A prostacyclin analogue that inhibits platelet aggregation and causes vasodilation, often used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.
7. Cilostazol (Pletal): A phosphodiesterase III inhibitor that increases cAMP levels in platelets, leading to decreased platelet activation and aggregation, as well as vasodilation.
8. Ticlopidine (Ticlid): An older P2Y12 receptor antagonist with a slower onset of action and more frequent side effects compared to clopidogrel or prasugrel.

Venous valves are one-way flaps made of thin, flexible tissue that lie inside your veins. They allow blood to flow towards the heart but prevent it from flowing backward. These valves are especially important in the veins of the legs, where they help to counteract the force of gravity and ensure that blood flows back up to the heart. When venous valves become damaged or weakened, blood can pool in the veins, leading to conditions such as varicose veins or chronic venous insufficiency.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Indwelling catheters, also known as Foley catheters, are medical devices that are inserted into the bladder to drain urine. They have a small balloon at the tip that is inflated with water once the catheter is in the correct position in the bladder, allowing it to remain in place and continuously drain urine. Indwelling catheters are typically used for patients who are unable to empty their bladders on their own, such as those who are bedridden or have nerve damage that affects bladder function. They are also used during and after certain surgical procedures. Prolonged use of indwelling catheters can increase the risk of urinary tract infections and other complications.

Ultrasonography, Doppler refers to a non-invasive diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create real-time images of the movement of blood flow through vessels, tissues, or heart valves. The Doppler effect is used to measure the frequency shift of the ultrasound waves as they bounce off moving red blood cells, which allows for the calculation of the speed and direction of blood flow. This technique is commonly used to diagnose and monitor various conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, heart valve abnormalities, and fetal heart development during pregnancy. It does not use radiation or contrast agents and is considered safe with minimal risks.

Oral hormonal contraceptives, also known as "birth control pills," are a type of medication that contains synthetic hormones (estrogen and/or progestin) that are taken by mouth to prevent pregnancy. They work by preventing ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovaries), thickening cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to reach the egg, and thinning the lining of the uterus to make it less likely for a fertilized egg to implant.

There are several different types of oral hormonal contraceptives, including combined pills that contain both estrogen and progestin, and mini-pills that only contain progestin. These medications are usually taken daily for 21 days, followed by a seven-day break during which menstruation occurs. Some newer formulations may be taken continuously with no break.

It's important to note that while oral hormonal contraceptives are highly effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly, they do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Therefore, it is still important to use barrier methods of protection, such as condoms, during sexual activity to reduce the risk of STIs.

As with any medication, oral hormonal contraceptives can have side effects and may not be suitable for everyone. It's important to discuss any medical conditions, allergies, or medications you are taking with your healthcare provider before starting to take oral hormonal contraceptives.

The splenic vein is a large, thin-walled vein that carries oxygenated blood from the spleen and pancreas to the liver. It is formed by the union of several smaller veins that drain the upper part of the stomach, the pancreas, and the left side of the colon (splenic flexure). The splenic vein runs along the top border of the pancreas and merges with the superior mesenteric vein to form the portal vein. This venous system allows for the filtration and detoxification of blood by the liver before it is distributed to the rest of the body.

Blood coagulation factors, also known as clotting factors, are a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the blood coagulation process. They are essential for maintaining hemostasis, which is the body's ability to stop bleeding after injury.

There are 13 known blood coagulation factors, and they are designated by Roman numerals I through XIII. These factors are produced in the liver and are normally present in an inactive form in the blood. When there is an injury to a blood vessel, the coagulation process is initiated, leading to the activation of these factors in a specific order.

The coagulation cascade involves two pathways: the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The intrinsic pathway is activated when there is damage to the blood vessel itself, while the extrinsic pathway is activated by tissue factor released from damaged tissues. Both pathways converge at the common pathway, leading to the formation of a fibrin clot.

Blood coagulation factors work together in a complex series of reactions that involve activation, binding, and proteolysis. When one factor is activated, it activates the next factor in the cascade, and so on. This process continues until a stable fibrin clot is formed.

Deficiencies or abnormalities in blood coagulation factors can lead to bleeding disorders such as hemophilia or thrombosis. Hemophilia is a genetic disorder that affects one or more of the coagulation factors, leading to excessive bleeding and difficulty forming clots. Thrombosis, on the other hand, occurs when there is an abnormal formation of blood clots in the blood vessels, which can lead to serious complications such as stroke or pulmonary embolism.

A stent is a small mesh tube that's used to treat narrow or weak arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from your heart to other parts of your body. A stent is placed in an artery as part of a procedure called angioplasty. Angioplasty restores blood flow through narrowed or blocked arteries by inflating a tiny balloon inside the blocked artery to widen it.

The stent is then inserted into the widened artery to keep it open. The stent is usually made of metal, but some are coated with medication that is slowly and continuously released to help prevent the formation of scar tissue in the artery. This can reduce the chance of the artery narrowing again.

Stents are also used in other parts of the body, such as the neck (carotid artery) and kidneys (renal artery), to help maintain blood flow and prevent blockages. They can also be used in the urinary system to treat conditions like ureteropelvic junction obstruction or narrowing of the urethra.

Platelet aggregation is the clumping together of platelets (thrombocytes) in the blood, which is an essential step in the process of hemostasis (the stopping of bleeding) after injury to a blood vessel. When the inner lining of a blood vessel is damaged, exposure of subendothelial collagen and tissue factor triggers platelet activation. Activated platelets change shape, become sticky, and release the contents of their granules, which include ADP (adenosine diphosphate).

ADP then acts as a chemical mediator to attract and bind additional platelets to the site of injury, leading to platelet aggregation. This forms a plug that seals the damaged vessel and prevents further blood loss. Platelet aggregation is also a crucial component in the formation of blood clots (thrombosis) within blood vessels, which can have pathological consequences such as heart attacks and strokes if they obstruct blood flow to vital organs.

Vascular patency is a term used in medicine to describe the state of a blood vessel (such as an artery or vein) being open, unobstructed, and allowing for the normal flow of blood. It is an important concept in the treatment and management of various cardiovascular conditions, such as peripheral artery disease, coronary artery disease, and deep vein thrombosis.

Maintaining vascular patency can help prevent serious complications like tissue damage, organ dysfunction, or even death. This may involve medical interventions such as administering blood-thinning medications to prevent clots, performing procedures to remove blockages, or using devices like stents to keep vessels open. Regular monitoring of vascular patency is also crucial for evaluating the effectiveness of treatments and adjusting care plans accordingly.

Beta 2-glycoprotein I, also known as apolipoprotein H, is a plasma protein that belongs to the family of proteins called immunoglobulin-binding proteins. It has a molecular weight of approximately 44 kDa and is composed of five domains with similar structures.

Beta 2-glycoprotein I is primarily produced in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream, where it plays a role in several physiological processes, including coagulation, complement activation, and lipid metabolism. It has been identified as an autoantigen in certain autoimmune disorders, such as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), where autoantibodies against beta 2-glycoprotein I can cause blood clots, miscarriages, and other complications.

In medical terminology, the definition of "beta 2-glycoprotein I" is as follows:

A plasma protein that belongs to the family of immunoglobulin-binding proteins and has a molecular weight of approximately 44 kDa. It is primarily produced in the liver and circulates in the bloodstream, where it plays a role in several physiological processes, including coagulation, complement activation, and lipid metabolism. Autoantibodies against beta 2-glycoprotein I are associated with certain autoimmune disorders, such as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), where they can cause blood clots, miscarriages, and other complications.

The term "lower extremity" is used in the medical field to refer to the portion of the human body that includes the structures below the hip joint. This includes the thigh, lower leg, ankle, and foot. The lower extremities are responsible for weight-bearing and locomotion, allowing individuals to stand, walk, run, and jump. They contain many important structures such as bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels.

Hematologic pregnancy complications refer to disorders related to the blood and blood-forming tissues that occur during pregnancy. These complications can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus if not properly managed. Some common hematologic pregnancy complications include:

1. Anemia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the number of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood, which can lead to fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath. Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia during pregnancy.
2. Thrombocytopenia: A condition characterized by a decrease in the number of platelets (cells that help blood clot) in the blood. Mild thrombocytopenia is relatively common during pregnancy, but severe thrombocytopenia can increase the risk of bleeding during delivery.
3. Gestational thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (GTTP): A rare but serious disorder that can cause blood clots to form in small blood vessels throughout the body, leading to a decrease in the number of platelets and red blood cells. GTTP can cause serious complications such as stroke, kidney failure, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC): A condition characterized by abnormal clotting and bleeding throughout the body. DIC can be triggered by various conditions such as severe infections, pregnancy complications, or cancer.
5. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome: A serious complication of pregnancy that can cause damage to the liver and lead to bleeding. HELLP syndrome is often associated with preeclampsia, a condition characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys.

It's important for pregnant women to receive regular prenatal care to monitor for these and other potential complications, and to seek prompt medical attention if any concerning symptoms arise.

Fibrin is defined as a protein that is formed from fibrinogen during the clotting of blood. It plays an essential role in the formation of blood clots, also known as a clotting or coagulation cascade. When an injury occurs and bleeding starts, fibrin threads form a net-like structure that entraps platelets and red blood cells to create a stable clot, preventing further loss of blood.

The process of forming fibrin from fibrinogen is initiated by thrombin, another protein involved in the coagulation cascade. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen into fibrin monomers, which then polymerize to form long strands of fibrin. These strands cross-link with each other through a process catalyzed by factor XIIIa, forming a stable clot that protects the wound and promotes healing.

It is important to note that abnormalities in fibrin formation or breakdown can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic conditions, respectively. Proper regulation of fibrin production and degradation is crucial for maintaining healthy hemostasis and preventing excessive clotting or bleeding.

Blood coagulation factor inhibitors are substances that interfere with the normal blood clotting process by inhibiting the function of coagulation factors. These inhibitors can be either naturally occurring or artificially produced.

Naturally occurring coagulation factor inhibitors include antithrombin, protein C, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). These inhibitors play a crucial role in regulating the coagulation cascade and preventing excessive clot formation.

Artificially produced coagulation factor inhibitors are used as therapeutic agents to treat thrombotic disorders. Examples include direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) such as apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran, which selectively inhibit specific coagulation factors (factor Xa or thrombin).

Additionally, there are also antibodies that can act as coagulation factor inhibitors. These include autoantibodies that develop in some individuals and cause bleeding disorders such as acquired hemophilia A or antiphospholipid syndrome.

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the cavernous sinuses, which are located near the base of the brain and are important for draining blood from the face and brain. This condition can occur as a complication of an infection in the facial area or sinuses, or it can be associated with other medical conditions such as cancer or trauma.

Symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis may include headache, fever, eye pain, swelling or bulging of the eyes, double vision, and decreased vision. If left untreated, this condition can lead to serious complications such as meningitis, brain abscess, or even death. Treatment typically involves administering antibiotics to treat any underlying infection and anticoagulants to prevent further clot formation. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the clot.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

Factor V deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder that is caused by a mutation in the gene that produces coagulation factor V, a protein involved in the clotting process. This condition can lead to excessive bleeding following injury or surgery, and may also cause menorrhagia (heavy menstrual periods) in women.

Factor V deficiency is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene (one from each parent) in order to develop the condition. People who inherit only one copy of the mutated gene are carriers and may have a milder form of the disorder or no symptoms at all.

Treatment for factor V deficiency typically involves replacement therapy with fresh frozen plasma or clotting factor concentrates, which can help to reduce bleeding episodes and prevent complications. In some cases, medications such as desmopressin or antifibrinolytics may also be used to manage the condition.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

"Gravity suits" is not a recognized medical term. However, in the context of space medicine and space travel, gravity suits, also known as g-suits or anti-G suits, are specialized garments worn by pilots and astronauts to prevent or reduce the negative effects of high gravitational forces (G-forces) on their bodies during high-speed maneuvers or while re-entering the Earth's atmosphere.

These suits work by applying pressure to specific areas of the body, typically around the lower abdomen and legs, to prevent the pooling of blood in those areas due to the increased G-forces. This helps maintain adequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs, reducing the risk of loss of consciousness (G-induced Loss of Consciousness or G-LOC) and other symptoms associated with high G-forces such as blackouts, vision impairment, and disorientation.

It's important to note that gravity suits are not used as a medical treatment for any specific condition but rather as a protective measure during space travel and high-performance aviation.

Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic enzyme, which means it dissolves blood clots. It is naturally produced by the endothelial cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels. tPA activates plasminogen, a zymogen, to convert it into plasmin, a protease that breaks down fibrin, the structural protein in blood clots. This enzyme is used medically as a thrombolytic drug under various brand names, such as Activase and Alteplase, to treat conditions like acute ischemic stroke, pulmonary embolism, and deep vein thrombosis by dissolving the clots and restoring blood flow.

Varicose veins are defined as enlarged, swollen, and twisting veins often appearing blue or dark purple, which usually occur in the legs. They are caused by weakened valves and vein walls that can't effectively push blood back toward the heart. This results in a buildup of blood, causing the veins to bulge and become varicose.

The condition is generally harmless but may cause symptoms like aching, burning, muscle cramp, or a feeling of heaviness in the legs. In some cases, varicose veins can lead to more serious problems, such as skin ulcers, blood clots, or chronic venous insufficiency. Treatment options include lifestyle changes, compression stockings, and medical procedures like sclerotherapy, laser surgery, or endovenous ablation.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Cell-derived microparticles (CDMs), also known as microvesicles or microparticles, are small membrane-bound particles that are released from the cell surface upon activation or apoptosis of various cell types, including platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and red blood cells. CDMs range in size from 0.1 to 1.0 micrometers in diameter and contain a variety of bioactive molecules, such as lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, which can be transferred to neighboring or distant cells, thereby modulating their function.

CDMs have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including coagulation, inflammation, immune response, angiogenesis, and cancer progression. They have also emerged as potential biomarkers for various diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, sepsis, and cancer, due to their distinct molecular signature and abundance in body fluids, such as blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.

The mechanisms of CDM formation and release are complex and involve several cellular processes, including cytoskeletal rearrangement, membrane budding, and vesicle shedding. The molecular composition of CDMs reflects their cellular origin and activation state, and can be analyzed by various techniques, such as flow cytometry, proteomics, and transcriptomics, to gain insights into their biological functions and clinical relevance.

Ultrasonography, also known as sonography, is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to produce dynamic images of organs, tissues, or blood flow inside the body. These images are captured in real-time and can be used to assess the size, shape, and structure of various internal structures, as well as detect any abnormalities such as tumors, cysts, or inflammation.

During an ultrasonography procedure, a small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the patient's skin, which emits and receives sound waves. The transducer sends high-frequency sound waves into the body, and these waves bounce back off internal structures and are recorded by the transducer. The recorded data is then processed and transformed into visual images that can be interpreted by a medical professional.

Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, painless, and safe procedure that does not use radiation like other imaging techniques such as CT scans or X-rays. It is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions in various parts of the body, including the abdomen, pelvis, heart, blood vessels, and musculoskeletal system.

A point mutation is a type of genetic mutation where a single nucleotide base (A, T, C, or G) in DNA is altered, deleted, or substituted with another nucleotide. Point mutations can have various effects on the organism, depending on the location of the mutation and whether it affects the function of any genes. Some point mutations may not have any noticeable effect, while others might lead to changes in the amino acids that make up proteins, potentially causing diseases or altering traits. Point mutations can occur spontaneously due to errors during DNA replication or be inherited from parents.

Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), a type of blood cancer characterized by the overproduction of platelets (thrombocytosis) in the bone marrow. In ET, there is an excessive proliferation of megakaryocytes, the precursor cells that produce platelets. This leads to increased platelet counts in the peripheral blood, which can increase the risk of blood clots (thrombosis) and bleeding episodes (hemorrhage).

The term "essential" is used to indicate that the cause of this condition is not known or idiopathic. ET is primarily a disease of older adults, but it can also occur in younger individuals. The diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia requires careful evaluation and exclusion of secondary causes of thrombocytosis, such as reactive conditions, inflammation, or other myeloproliferative neoplasms.

The clinical presentation of ET can vary widely among patients. Some individuals may be asymptomatic and discovered only during routine blood tests, while others may experience symptoms related to thrombosis or bleeding. Common symptoms include headaches, visual disturbances, dizziness, weakness, numbness, or tingling in the extremities, if there are complications due to blood clots in the brain or other parts of the body. Excessive bruising, nosebleeds, or blood in the stool can indicate bleeding complications.

Treatment for essential thrombocythemia is aimed at reducing the risk of thrombosis and managing symptoms. Hydroxyurea is a commonly used medication to lower platelet counts, while aspirin may be prescribed to decrease the risk of blood clots. In some cases, interferon-alpha or ruxolitinib might be considered as treatment options. Regular follow-up with a hematologist and monitoring of blood counts are essential for managing this condition and detecting potential complications early.

Antithrombin III is a protein that inhibits the formation of blood clots (thrombi) in the body. It does this by inactivating several enzymes involved in coagulation, including thrombin and factor Xa. Antithrombin III is produced naturally by the liver and is also available as a medication for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders, such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It works by binding to and neutralizing excess clotting factors in the bloodstream, thereby reducing the risk of clot formation.

The brachiocephalic veins, also known as the innominate veins, are large veins in the human body. They are formed by the union of the subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein on each side of the body. The resulting vein then carries blood from the upper limbs, head, and neck to the superior vena cava, which is the large vein that returns blood to the heart.

Here's a more detailed medical definition:

The brachiocephalic veins are paired venous structures that result from the union of the subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein on each side of the body. These veins are located in the superior mediastinum, near the base of the neck, and are typically about 2 to 3 centimeters in length. The brachiocephalic veins receive blood from several sources, including the upper extremities, head, neck, and thoracic wall. They then transport this blood to the superior vena cava, which is a large vein that returns blood to the right atrium of the heart.

It's worth noting that the brachiocephalic veins are subject to various pathological conditions, including thrombosis (blood clots), stenosis (narrowing), and compression by nearby structures such as the first rib or the scalene muscles. These conditions can lead to a variety of symptoms, including swelling, pain, and difficulty breathing.

The saphenous vein is a term used in anatomical description to refer to the great or small saphenous veins, which are superficial veins located in the lower extremities of the human body.

The great saphenous vein (GSV) is the longest vein in the body and originates from the medial aspect of the foot, ascending along the medial side of the leg and thigh, and drains into the femoral vein at the saphenofemoral junction, located in the upper third of the thigh.

The small saphenous vein (SSV) is a shorter vein that originates from the lateral aspect of the foot, ascends along the posterior calf, and drains into the popliteal vein at the saphenopopliteal junction, located in the popliteal fossa.

These veins are often used as conduits for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery due to their consistent anatomy and length.

Arterial occlusive diseases are medical conditions characterized by the blockage or narrowing of the arteries, which can lead to a reduction in blood flow to various parts of the body. This reduction in blood flow can cause tissue damage and may result in serious complications such as tissue death (gangrene), organ dysfunction, or even death.

The most common cause of arterial occlusive diseases is atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of plaque made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances in the inner lining of the artery walls. Over time, this plaque can harden and narrow the arteries, restricting blood flow. Other causes of arterial occlusive diseases include blood clots, emboli (tiny particles that travel through the bloodstream and lodge in smaller vessels), inflammation, trauma, and certain inherited conditions.

Symptoms of arterial occlusive diseases depend on the location and severity of the blockage. Common symptoms include:

* Pain, cramping, or fatigue in the affected limb, often triggered by exercise and relieved by rest (claudication)
* Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected limb
* Coldness or discoloration of the skin in the affected area
* Slow-healing sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs
* Erectile dysfunction in men

Treatment for arterial occlusive diseases may include lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and eating a healthy diet. Medications to lower cholesterol, control blood pressure, prevent blood clots, or manage pain may also be prescribed. In severe cases, surgical procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, or bypass surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow.

Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease enzyme that plays a crucial role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and cell migration. It catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, which then breaks down various proteins in the extracellular matrix, leading to tissue remodeling and repair.

uPA is synthesized as a single-chain molecule, pro-uPA, which is activated by cleavage into two chains, forming the mature and active enzyme. uPA binds to its specific receptor, uPAR, on the cell surface, where it exerts its proteolytic activity.

Abnormal regulation of uPA and uPAR has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, where they contribute to tumor invasion and metastasis. Therefore, uPA is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in cancer and other diseases associated with excessive extracellular matrix degradation.

Infarction is the term used in medicine to describe the death of tissue (also known as an "area of necrosis") due to the lack of blood supply. This can occur when a blood vessel that supplies oxygen and nutrients to a particular area of the body becomes blocked or obstructed, leading to the deprivation of oxygen and nutrients necessary for the survival of cells in that region.

The blockage in the blood vessel is usually caused by a clot (thrombus) or an embolus, which is a small particle that travels through the bloodstream and lodges in a smaller vessel. The severity and extent of infarction depend on several factors, including the size and location of the affected blood vessel, the duration of the obstruction, and the presence of collateral circulation (alternative blood vessels that can compensate for the blocked one).

Common examples of infarctions include myocardial infarction (heart attack), cerebral infarction (stroke), and pulmonary infarction (lung tissue death due to obstruction in the lung's blood vessels). Infarctions can lead to various symptoms, depending on the affected organ or tissue, and may require medical intervention to manage complications and prevent further damage.

Cerebral angiography is a medical procedure that involves taking X-ray images of the blood vessels in the brain after injecting a contrast dye into them. This procedure helps doctors to diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the blood vessels in the brain, such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and stenosis (narrowing of the blood vessels).

During the procedure, a catheter is inserted into an artery in the leg and threaded through the body to the blood vessels in the neck or brain. The contrast dye is then injected through the catheter, and X-ray images are taken to visualize the blood flow through the brain's blood vessels.

Cerebral angiography provides detailed images of the blood vessels in the brain, allowing doctors to identify any abnormalities or blockages that may be causing symptoms or increasing the risk of stroke. Based on the results of the cerebral angiography, doctors can develop a treatment plan to address these issues and prevent further complications.

Electric burns are injuries to the skin and underlying tissues caused by exposure to electrical current. The damage can be both internal and external, and it depends on the voltage, amperage, type of current (alternating or direct), duration of exposure, and the pathway the current takes through the body.

Electric burns can cause extensive tissue damage, including deep burns, nerve damage, muscle damage, and fractures. They may also result in cardiac arrest, irregular heart rhythms, and respiratory failure. In some cases, electric burns may not appear severe on the surface of the skin, but they can still cause significant internal injuries.

Treatment for electric burns typically involves wound care, pain management, and monitoring for complications such as infection or organ damage. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to remove damaged tissue and repair injured muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

Angiography is a medical procedure in which an x-ray image is taken to visualize the internal structure of blood vessels, arteries, or veins. This is done by injecting a radiopaque contrast agent (dye) into the blood vessel using a thin, flexible catheter. The dye makes the blood vessels visible on an x-ray image, allowing doctors to diagnose and treat various medical conditions such as blockages, narrowing, or malformations of the blood vessels.

There are several types of angiography, including:

* Cardiac angiography (also called coronary angiography) - used to examine the blood vessels of the heart
* Cerebral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels of the brain
* Peripheral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels in the limbs or other parts of the body.

Angiography is typically performed by a radiologist, cardiologist, or vascular surgeon in a hospital setting. It can help diagnose conditions such as coronary artery disease, aneurysms, and peripheral arterial disease, among others.

Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) is a non-invasive medical imaging technique that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of the blood vessels or arteries within the body. It is a type of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) that focuses specifically on the circulatory system.

MRA can be used to diagnose and evaluate various conditions related to the blood vessels, such as aneurysms, stenosis (narrowing of the vessel), or the presence of plaques or tumors. It can also be used to plan for surgeries or other treatments related to the vascular system. The procedure does not use radiation and is generally considered safe, although people with certain implants like pacemakers may not be able to have an MRA due to safety concerns.

Drug-eluting stents (DES) are medical devices used in the treatment of coronary artery disease. They are small, flexible tubes that are coated with a medication that is slowly released (eluted) over time to prevent the formation of scar tissue and reduce the risk of renarrowing (restenosis) of the artery after it has been treated with angioplasty and stenting.

The stent is typically placed in a narrowed or blocked coronary artery during a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure, such as angioplasty, to open up the blood vessel and improve blood flow to the heart muscle. The medication on the DES helps to prevent the growth of smooth muscle cells and the formation of scar tissue in the artery, which can cause restenosis and require additional treatments.

The most commonly used medications on DES are sirolimus, paclitaxel, zotarolimus, and everolimus. These drugs work by inhibiting the growth of smooth muscle cells and reducing inflammation in the artery. While DES have been shown to reduce the risk of restenosis compared to bare-metal stents, they also carry a small increased risk of late stent thrombosis (blood clots forming in the stent), which can lead to serious complications such as heart attack or stroke. Therefore, patients who receive DES are typically prescribed long-term antiplatelet therapy to reduce this risk.

Factor VIII is a protein in the blood that is essential for normal blood clotting. It is also known as antihemophilic factor (AHF). Deficiency or dysfunction of this protein results in hemophilia A, a genetic disorder characterized by prolonged bleeding and easy bruising. Factor VIII works together with other proteins to help form a clot and stop bleeding at the site of an injury. It acts as a cofactor for another clotting factor, IX, in the so-called intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. Intravenous infusions of Factor VIII concentrate are used to treat and prevent bleeding episodes in people with hemophilia A.

Thrombocytopenia is a medical condition characterized by an abnormally low platelet count (thrombocytes) in the blood. Platelets are small cell fragments that play a crucial role in blood clotting, helping to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. A healthy adult typically has a platelet count between 150,000 and 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood. Thrombocytopenia is usually diagnosed when the platelet count falls below 150,000 platelets/µL.

Thrombocytopenia can be classified into three main categories based on its underlying cause:

1. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): An autoimmune disorder where the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys its own platelets, leading to a decreased platelet count. ITP can be further divided into primary or secondary forms, depending on whether it occurs alone or as a result of another medical condition or medication.
2. Decreased production: Thrombocytopenia can occur when there is insufficient production of platelets in the bone marrow due to various causes, such as viral infections, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, leukemia, aplastic anemia, or vitamin B12 or folate deficiency.
3. Increased destruction or consumption: Thrombocytopenia can also result from increased platelet destruction or consumption due to conditions like disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), or severe bacterial infections.

Symptoms of thrombocytopenia may include easy bruising, prolonged bleeding from cuts, spontaneous nosebleeds, bleeding gums, blood in urine or stools, and skin rashes like petechiae (small red or purple spots) or purpura (larger patches). The severity of symptoms can vary depending on the degree of thrombocytopenia and the presence of any underlying conditions. Treatment for thrombocytopenia depends on the cause and may include medications, transfusions, or addressing the underlying condition.

Plethysmography is a non-invasive medical technique used to measure changes in volume or blood flow within an organ or body part, typically in the lungs or extremities. There are several types of plethysmography, including:

1. **Whole Body Plethysmography (WBP):** This type of plethysmography is used to assess lung function and volumes by measuring changes in pressure within a sealed chamber that contains the patient's entire body except for their head. The patient breathes normally while wearing a nose clip, allowing technicians to analyze respiratory patterns, airflow, and lung volume changes.
2. **Segmental or Local Plethysmography:** This technique measures volume or blood flow changes in specific body parts, such as the limbs or digits. It can help diagnose and monitor conditions affecting peripheral circulation, like deep vein thrombosis, arterial occlusive disease, or Raynaud's phenomenon.
3. **Impedance Plethysmography (IPG):** This non-invasive method uses electrical impedance to estimate changes in blood volume within an organ or body part. By applying a small electrical current and measuring the opposition to flow (impedance), technicians can determine variations in blood volume, which can help diagnose conditions like deep vein thrombosis or heart failure.
4. **Optical Plethysmography:** This technique uses light to measure changes in blood volume, typically in the skin or mucous membranes. By shining a light on the area and analyzing the reflected or transmitted light, technicians can detect variations in blood volume related to cardiac output, respiration, or other physiological factors.

Overall, plethysmography is an essential tool for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions affecting circulation, respiratory function, and organ volumes.

Vascular malformations are abnormalities in the development and growth of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels that can occur anywhere in the body. They can be present at birth or develop later in life, and they can affect both the form and function of the affected tissues and organs. Vascular malformations can involve arteries, veins, capillaries, and/or lymphatic vessels, and they can range from simple, localized lesions to complex, multifocal disorders.

Vascular malformations are typically classified based on their location, size, flow characteristics, and the type of blood or lymphatic vessels involved. Some common types of vascular malformations include:

1. Capillary malformations (CMs): These are characterized by abnormal dilated capillaries that can cause red or pink discoloration of the skin, typically on the face or neck.
2. Venous malformations (VMs): These involve abnormal veins that can cause swelling, pain, and disfigurement in the affected area.
3. Lymphatic malformations (LMs): These involve abnormal lymphatic vessels that can cause swelling, infection, and other complications.
4. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs): These involve a tangled mass of arteries and veins that can cause high-flow lesions, bleeding, and other serious complications.
5. Combined vascular malformations: These involve a combination of different types of blood or lymphatic vessels, such as capillary-lymphatic-venous malformations (CLVMs) or arteriovenous-lymphatic malformations (AVLMs).

The exact cause of vascular malformations is not fully understood, but they are believed to result from genetic mutations that affect the development and growth of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels. Treatment options for vascular malformations depend on the type, size, location, and severity of the lesion, as well as the patient's age and overall health. Treatment may include medication, compression garments, sclerotherapy, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Thrombomodulin is a protein that is found on the surface of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels. It plays an important role in the regulation of blood coagulation (clotting) and the activation of natural anticoagulant pathways. Thrombomodulin binds to thrombin, a protein involved in blood clotting, and changes its function from promoting coagulation to inhibiting it. This interaction also activates protein C, an important anticoagulant protein, which helps to prevent the excessive formation of blood clots. Thrombomodulin also has anti-inflammatory properties and is involved in the maintenance of the integrity of the endothelial cell lining.

A heterozygote is an individual who has inherited two different alleles (versions) of a particular gene, one from each parent. This means that the individual's genotype for that gene contains both a dominant and a recessive allele. The dominant allele will be expressed phenotypically (outwardly visible), while the recessive allele may or may not have any effect on the individual's observable traits, depending on the specific gene and its function. Heterozygotes are often represented as 'Aa', where 'A' is the dominant allele and 'a' is the recessive allele.

Oral combined contraceptives, also known as "the pill," are a type of hormonal birth control that contain a combination of synthetic estrogen and progestin. These hormones work together to prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovaries), thicken cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to reach the egg, and thin the lining of the uterus to make it less likely for a fertilized egg to implant.

Combined oral contraceptives come in various brands and forms, such as monophasic, biphasic, and triphasic pills. Monophasic pills contain the same amount of hormones in each active pill, while biphasic and triphasic pills have varying amounts of hormones in different phases of the cycle.

It is important to note that oral combined contraceptives do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and should be used in conjunction with condoms for safer sex practices. Additionally, there are potential risks and side effects associated with oral combined contraceptives, including an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, and heart attack, especially in women who smoke or have certain medical conditions. It is essential to consult a healthcare provider before starting any hormonal birth control method to determine if it is safe and appropriate for individual use.

Pathological constriction refers to an abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage or organ, which can interfere with the normal flow of blood, air, or other substances through the area. This constriction can occur due to various reasons such as inflammation, scarring, or abnormal growths, and can affect different parts of the body, including blood vessels, airways, intestines, and ureters. Pathological constriction can lead to a range of symptoms and complications depending on its location and severity, and may require medical intervention to correct.

A headache is defined as pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck. It can be a symptom of various underlying conditions such as stress, sinus congestion, migraine, or more serious issues like meningitis or concussion. Headaches can vary in intensity, ranging from mild to severe, and may be accompanied by other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or sensitivity to light and sound. There are over 150 different types of headaches, including tension headaches, cluster headaches, and sinus headaches, each with their own specific characteristics and causes.

P-Selectin is a type of cell adhesion molecule, specifically a member of the selectin family, that is involved in the inflammatory response. It is primarily expressed on the surface of activated platelets and endothelial cells. P-Selectin plays a crucial role in the initial interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and the vascular endothelium, which is an essential step in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation or injury. This process helps to mediate the rolling and adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial surface, facilitating their extravasation into the surrounding tissue. P-Selectin's function is regulated by its interaction with specific ligands on the surface of leukocytes, such as PSGL-1 (P-Selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1).

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Polycythemia Vera is a type of myeloproliferative neoplasm, a group of rare blood cancers. In Polycythemia Vera, the body produces too many red blood cells, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and thickening of the blood, which can cause various symptoms such as fatigue, headache, dizziness, and itching. It can also lead to enlargement of the spleen. The exact cause of Polycythemia Vera is not known, but it is associated with genetic mutations in the JAK2 gene in most cases. It is a progressive disease that can lead to complications such as bleeding, thrombosis, and transformation into acute leukemia if left untreated.

Aspirin is the common name for acetylsalicylic acid, which is a medication used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX), which is involved in the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances that cause inflammation and pain. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet effect, which means it can help prevent blood clots from forming. This makes it useful for preventing heart attacks and strokes.

Aspirin is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and chewable tablets. It is also available in prescription strengths for certain medical conditions. As with any medication, aspirin should be taken as directed by a healthcare provider, and its use should be avoided in children and teenagers with viral infections due to the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that can affect the liver and brain.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Hyperhomocysteinemia is a medical condition characterized by an excessively high level of homocysteine, an amino acid, in the blood. Generally, a level of 15 micromoles per liter (μmol/L) or higher is considered elevated.

Homocysteine is a byproduct of methionine metabolism, an essential amino acid obtained from dietary proteins. Normally, homocysteine gets converted back to methionine with the help of vitamin B12 and folate (vitamin B9), or it can be converted to another amino acid, cysteine, with the aid of vitamin B6.

Hyperhomocysteinemia can occur due to genetic defects in these enzymes, nutritional deficiencies of vitamins B12, B6, or folate, renal insufficiency, or aging. High homocysteine levels are associated with increased risks of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. It may also contribute to neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline.

It is essential to diagnose and manage hyperhomocysteinemia early to prevent potential complications. Treatment typically involves dietary modifications, supplementation of the deficient vitamins, and, in some cases, medication.

**Norgestrel** is a synthetic form of the naturally occurring hormone **progesterone**. It is a type of **progestin**, which is often used in various forms of hormonal birth control to prevent pregnancy. Norgestrel works by thickening cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach and fertilize an egg. Additionally, norgestrel can also prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovaries) and thin the lining of the uterus, which makes it less likely for a fertilized egg to implant.

Norgestrel is available in various forms, such as oral contraceptive pills, emergency contraceptives, and hormonal intrauterine devices (IUDs). It's essential to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any hormonal birth control method to discuss potential benefits, risks, and side effects.

Here are some medical definitions related to norgestrel:

1. **Progestin**: A synthetic form of the naturally occurring hormone progesterone, used in various forms of hormonal birth control and menopausal hormone therapy. Progestins can have varying levels of androgenic, estrogenic, and anti-estrogenic activity. Norgestrel is a type of progestin.
2. **Progesterone**: A naturally occurring steroid hormone produced by the ovaries during the second half of the menstrual cycle. Progesterone plays a crucial role in preparing the uterus for pregnancy and maintaining a healthy pregnancy. Norgestrel is a synthetic form of progesterone.
3. **Hormonal birth control**: A method of preventing pregnancy that uses hormones to regulate ovulation, thicken cervical mucus, or thin the lining of the uterus. Hormonal birth control methods include oral contraceptive pills, patches, rings, injections, implants, and intrauterine devices (IUDs).
4. **Emergency contraception**: A form of hormonal birth control used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. Emergency contraception is typically more effective when taken as soon as possible after unprotected intercourse, but it can still be effective up to 120 hours afterward. Norgestrel is one of the active ingredients in some emergency contraceptive pills.
5. **Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT)**: A form of hormone replacement therapy used to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness. MHT typically involves using estrogen and progestin or a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM). Norgestrel is a type of progestin that can be used in MHT.
6. **Androgenic**: Describing the effects of hormones, such as testosterone and some progestins, that are associated with male characteristics, such as facial hair growth, deepening of the voice, and increased muscle mass. Norgestrel has weak androgenic activity.
7. **Estrogenic**: Describing the effects of hormones, such as estradiol and some selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), that are associated with female characteristics, such as breast development and menstrual cycles. Norgestrel has weak estrogenic activity.
8. **Antiestrogenic**: Describing the effects of hormones or drugs that block or oppose the actions of estrogens. Norgestrel has antiestrogenic activity.
9. **Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM)**: A type of drug that acts as an estrogen agonist in some tissues and an estrogen antagonist in others. SERMs can be used to treat or prevent breast cancer, osteoporosis, and other conditions associated with hormonal imbalances. Norgestrel is not a SERM but has antiestrogenic activity.
10. **Progestogen**: A synthetic or natural hormone that has progesterone-like effects on the body. Progestogens can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and irregular menstrual cycles. Norgestrel is a type of progestogen.
11. **Progesterone**: A natural hormone produced by the ovaries during the second half of the menstrual cycle. Progesterone prepares the uterus for pregnancy and regulates the menstrual cycle. Norgestrel is a synthetic form of progesterone.
12. **Progestin**: A synthetic hormone that has progesterone-like effects on the body. Progestins can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and irregular menstrual cycles. Norgestrel is a type of progestin.
13. **Progestational agent**: A drug or hormone that has progesterone-like effects on the body. Progestational agents can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and irregular menstrual cycles. Norgestrel is a type of progestational agent.
14. **Progestogenic**: Describing the effects of hormones or drugs that mimic or enhance the actions of progesterone. Norgestrel has progestogenic activity.
15. **Progesterone receptor modulator (PRM)**: A type of drug that binds to and activates or inhibits the progesterone receptors in the body. PRMs can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is a type of PRM.
16. **Progestogenic activity**: The ability of a drug or hormone to mimic or enhance the actions of progesterone in the body. Norgestrel has progestogenic activity.
17. **Progesterone antagonist**: A drug that blocks the action of progesterone in the body. Progesterone antagonists can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is not a progesterone antagonist.
18. **Progestogenic antagonist**: A drug that blocks the action of progestogens in the body. Progestogenic antagonists can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is not a progesterone antagonist.
19. **Progesterone agonist**: A drug that enhances the action of progesterone in the body. Progesterone agonists can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is a progesterone agonist.
20. **Progestogenic agonist**: A drug that enhances the action of progestogens in the body. Progesterogenic agonists can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is a progesterone agonist.
21. **Progesterone receptor modulator**: A drug that binds to the progesterone receptor and can either activate or inhibit its activity. Progesterone receptor modulators can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is a progesterone receptor modulator.
22. **Progestogenic receptor modulator**: A drug that binds to the progesterone receptor and can either activate or inhibit its activity. Progesterogenic receptor modulators can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is a progesterone receptor modulator.
23. **Progestin**: A synthetic form of progesterone that is used in hormonal contraceptives and menopausal hormone therapy. Progestins can be either progesterone agonists or antagonists, depending on their chemical structure and activity at the progesterone receptor. Norgestrel is a progestin.
24. **Progesterone antagonist**: A drug that binds to the progesterone receptor and inhibits its activity. Progesterone antagonists can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Norgestrel is not a progesterone antagonist.
25. **Progestogenic antagonist**: A drug that binds to the progesterone receptor and inhibits its activity. Progesterogenic antagonists can be used to treat various medical conditions, such as endometriosis, uterine fibro

Oxidoreductases acting on CH-NH group donors are a class of enzymes within the larger group of oxidoreductases, which are responsible for catalyzing oxidation-reduction reactions. Specifically, this subclass of enzymes acts on CH-NH group donors, where the CH-NH group is a chemical functional group consisting of a carbon atom (C) bonded to a nitrogen atom (N) via a single covalent bond.

These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes by transferring electrons from the CH-NH group donor to an acceptor molecule, which results in the oxidation of the donor and reduction of the acceptor. This process can lead to the formation or breakdown of chemical bonds, and plays a key role in metabolic pathways such as amino acid degradation and nitrogen fixation.

Examples of enzymes that fall within this class include:

* Amino oxidases, which catalyze the oxidative deamination of amino acids to produce alpha-keto acids, ammonia, and hydrogen peroxide.
* Transaminases, which transfer an amino group from one molecule to another, often in the process of amino acid biosynthesis or degradation.
* Amine oxidoreductases, which catalyze the oxidation of primary amines to aldehydes and secondary amines to ketones, with the concomitant reduction of molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide.

Plasminogen activators are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the body's fibrinolytic system, which is responsible for breaking down and removing blood clots. These enzymes activate plasminogen, a zymogen (inactive precursor) found in circulation, converting it into plasmin - a protease that degrades fibrin, the insoluble protein mesh that forms the structural basis of a blood clot.

There are two main types of plasminogen activators:

1. Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA): This is a serine protease primarily produced by endothelial cells lining blood vessels. tPA has a higher affinity for fibrin-bound plasminogen and is therefore more specific in activating plasmin at the site of a clot, helping to localize fibrinolysis and minimize bleeding risks.
2. Urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA): This is another serine protease found in various tissues and body fluids, including urine. uPA can be produced by different cell types, such as macrophages and fibroblasts. Unlike tPA, uPA does not have a strong preference for fibrin-bound plasminogen and can activate plasminogen in a more general manner, which might contribute to its role in processes like tissue remodeling and cancer progression.

Plasminogen activators are essential for maintaining vascular homeostasis by ensuring the proper removal of blood clots and preventing excessive fibrin accumulation. They have also been implicated in various pathological conditions, including thrombosis, hemorrhage, and tumor metastasis.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Cerebrovascular disorders are a group of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels of the brain. These disorders can be caused by narrowing, blockage, or rupture of the blood vessels, leading to decreased blood flow and oxygen supply to the brain. The most common types of cerebrovascular disorders include:

1. Stroke: A stroke occurs when a blood vessel in the brain becomes blocked or bursts, causing a lack of oxygen and nutrients to reach brain cells. This can lead to permanent damage or death of brain tissue.
2. Transient ischemic attack (TIA): Also known as a "mini-stroke," a TIA occurs when blood flow to the brain is temporarily blocked, often by a blood clot. Symptoms may last only a few minutes to a few hours and typically resolve on their own. However, a TIA is a serious warning sign that a full-blown stroke may occur in the future.
3. Aneurysm: An aneurysm is a weakened or bulging area in the wall of a blood vessel. If left untreated, an aneurysm can rupture and cause bleeding in the brain.
4. Arteriovenous malformation (AVM): An AVM is a tangled mass of abnormal blood vessels that connect arteries and veins. This can lead to bleeding in the brain or stroke.
5. Carotid stenosis: Carotid stenosis occurs when the carotid arteries, which supply blood to the brain, become narrowed or blocked due to plaque buildup. This can increase the risk of stroke.
6. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency: This condition occurs when the vertebral and basilar arteries, which supply blood to the back of the brain, become narrowed or blocked. This can lead to symptoms such as dizziness, vertigo, and difficulty swallowing.

Cerebrovascular disorders are a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Risk factors for these conditions include age, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol, and family history. Treatment may involve medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of further complications.

Genetic predisposition to disease refers to an increased susceptibility or vulnerability to develop a particular illness or condition due to inheriting specific genetic variations or mutations from one's parents. These genetic factors can make it more likely for an individual to develop a certain disease, but it does not guarantee that the person will definitely get the disease. Environmental factors, lifestyle choices, and interactions between genes also play crucial roles in determining if a genetically predisposed person will actually develop the disease. It is essential to understand that having a genetic predisposition only implies a higher risk, not an inevitable outcome.

Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a protein involved in the regulation of fibrinolysis, which is the body's natural process of breaking down blood clots. PAI-1 inhibits tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), two enzymes that convert plasminogen to plasmin, which degrades fibrin clots. Therefore, PAI-1 acts as a natural antagonist of the fibrinolytic system, promoting clot formation and stability. Increased levels of PAI-1 have been associated with thrombotic disorders, such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

The superior vena cava is a large vein that carries deoxygenated blood from the upper half of the body to the right atrium of the heart. It is formed by the union of the left and right brachiocephalic veins (also known as the internal jugular and subclavian veins) near the base of the neck. The superior vena cava runs posteriorly to the sternum and enters the upper right portion of the right atrium, just posterior to the opening of the inferior vena cava. It plays a crucial role in the circulatory system by allowing blood returning from the head, neck, upper limbs, and thorax to bypass the liver before entering the heart.

Platelet activation is the process by which platelets (also known as thrombocytes) become biologically active and change from their inactive discoid shape to a spherical shape with pseudopodia, resulting in the release of chemical mediators that are involved in hemostasis and thrombosis. This process is initiated by various stimuli such as exposure to subendothelial collagen, von Willebrand factor, or thrombin during vascular injury, leading to platelet aggregation and the formation of a platelet plug to stop bleeding. Platelet activation also plays a role in inflammation, immune response, and wound healing.

Vascular surgical procedures are operations that are performed to treat conditions and diseases related to the vascular system, which includes the arteries, veins, and capillaries. These procedures can be invasive or minimally invasive and are often used to treat conditions such as peripheral artery disease, carotid artery stenosis, aortic aneurysms, and venous insufficiency.

Some examples of vascular surgical procedures include:

* Endarterectomy: a procedure to remove plaque buildup from the inside of an artery
* Bypass surgery: creating a new path for blood to flow around a blocked or narrowed artery
* Angioplasty and stenting: using a balloon to open a narrowed artery and placing a stent to keep it open
* Aneurysm repair: surgically repairing an aneurysm, a weakened area in the wall of an artery that has bulged out and filled with blood
* Embolectomy: removing a blood clot from a blood vessel
* Thrombectomy: removing a blood clot from a vein

These procedures are typically performed by vascular surgeons, who are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular diseases.

Pseudotumor cerebri, also known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension, is a condition characterized by increased pressure around the brain without any identifiable cause such as a tumor or other space-occupying lesion. The symptoms mimic those of a brain mass, hence the term "pseudotumor."

The primary manifestation of this condition is headaches, often accompanied by vision changes like blurry vision, double vision, or temporary loss of vision, and pulsatile tinnitus (a rhythmic whooshing sound in the ears). Other symptoms can include neck pain, nausea, vomiting, and papilledema (swelling of the optic nerve disc). If left untreated, pseudotumor cerebri can lead to permanent vision loss.

The exact cause of pseudotumor cerebri remains unknown, but it has been associated with certain factors such as obesity, rapid weight gain, female gender (particularly during reproductive years), sleep apnea, and the use of certain medications like tetracyclines, vitamin A derivatives, and steroid withdrawal. Diagnosis typically involves a series of tests including neurological examination, imaging studies (such as MRI or CT scan), and lumbar puncture to measure cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Treatment usually focuses on lowering intracranial pressure through medications, weight loss, and sometimes surgical interventions like optic nerve sheath fenestration or shunting procedures.

Indium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical element with the symbol In and atomic number 49. It is a soft, silvery-white, post-transition metal that is rarely found in its pure form in nature. It is primarily used in the production of electronics, such as flat panel displays, and in nuclear medicine as a radiation source for medical imaging.

In nuclear medicine, indium-111 is used in the labeling of white blood cells to diagnose and locate abscesses, inflammation, and infection. The indium-111 labeled white blood cells are injected into the patient's body, and then a gamma camera is used to track their movement and identify areas of infection or inflammation.

Therefore, while indium itself is not a medical term, it does have important medical applications in diagnostic imaging.

Homocysteine is an amino acid that is formed in the body during the metabolism of another amino acid called methionine. It's an important intermediate in various biochemical reactions, including the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitters, and other molecules. However, elevated levels of homocysteine in the blood (a condition known as hyperhomocysteinemia) have been linked to several health issues, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline.

Homocysteine can be converted back to methionine with the help of vitamin B12 and a cofactor called betaine, or it can be converted to another amino acid called cystathionine with the help of vitamin B6 and folate (vitamin B9). Imbalances in these vitamins and other factors can lead to an increase in homocysteine levels.

It is crucial to maintain normal homocysteine levels for overall health, as high levels may contribute to the development of various diseases. Regular monitoring and maintaining a balanced diet rich in folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 can help regulate homocysteine levels and reduce the risk of related health issues.

A transdermal patch is a medicated adhesive patch that is placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication through the skin and into the bloodstream. It allows for a controlled release of medication over a certain period, typically lasting for 1-3 days. This method of administration can offer advantages such as avoiding gastrointestinal side effects, enabling self-administration, and providing consistent therapeutic drug levels. Common examples of transdermal patches include those used to deliver medications like nicotine, fentanyl, estradiol, and various pain-relieving agents.

Thrombin is a serine protease enzyme that plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex series of biochemical reactions that leads to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) to prevent excessive bleeding during an injury. Thrombin is formed from its precursor protein, prothrombin, through a process called activation, which involves cleavage by another enzyme called factor Xa.

Once activated, thrombin converts fibrinogen, a soluble plasma protein, into fibrin, an insoluble protein that forms the structural framework of a blood clot. Thrombin also activates other components of the coagulation cascade, such as factor XIII, which crosslinks and stabilizes the fibrin network, and platelets, which contribute to the formation and growth of the clot.

Thrombin has several regulatory mechanisms that control its activity, including feedback inhibition by antithrombin III, a plasma protein that inactivates thrombin and other serine proteases, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), which inhibits the activation of factor Xa, thereby preventing further thrombin formation.

Overall, thrombin is an essential enzyme in hemostasis, the process that maintains the balance between bleeding and clotting in the body. However, excessive or uncontrolled thrombin activity can lead to pathological conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

Catheterization is a medical procedure in which a catheter (a flexible tube) is inserted into the body to treat various medical conditions or for diagnostic purposes. The specific definition can vary depending on the area of medicine and the particular procedure being discussed. Here are some common types of catheterization:

1. Urinary catheterization: This involves inserting a catheter through the urethra into the bladder to drain urine. It is often performed to manage urinary retention, monitor urine output in critically ill patients, or assist with surgical procedures.
2. Cardiac catheterization: A procedure where a catheter is inserted into a blood vessel, usually in the groin or arm, and guided to the heart. This allows for various diagnostic tests and treatments, such as measuring pressures within the heart chambers, assessing blood flow, or performing angioplasty and stenting of narrowed coronary arteries.
3. Central venous catheterization: A catheter is inserted into a large vein, typically in the neck, chest, or groin, to administer medications, fluids, or nutrition, or to monitor central venous pressure.
4. Peritoneal dialysis catheterization: A catheter is placed into the abdominal cavity for individuals undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a type of kidney replacement therapy.
5. Neurological catheterization: In some cases, a catheter may be inserted into the cerebrospinal fluid space (lumbar puncture) or the brain's ventricular system (ventriculostomy) to diagnose or treat various neurological conditions.

These are just a few examples of catheterization procedures in medicine. The specific definition and purpose will depend on the medical context and the particular organ or body system involved.

Oral contraceptives, also known as "birth control pills," are synthetic hormonal medications that are taken by mouth to prevent pregnancy. They typically contain a combination of synthetic versions of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone, which work together to inhibit ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovaries), thicken cervical mucus (making it harder for sperm to reach the egg), and thin the lining of the uterus (making it less likely that a fertilized egg will implant).

There are several different types of oral contraceptives, including combination pills, progestin-only pills, and extended-cycle pills. Combination pills contain both estrogen and progestin, while progestin-only pills contain only progestin. Extended-cycle pills are a type of combination pill that are taken for 12 weeks followed by one week of placebo pills, which can help reduce the frequency of menstrual periods.

It's important to note that oral contraceptives do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so it's still important to use barrier methods like condoms if you are at risk for STIs. Additionally, oral contraceptives can have side effects and may not be suitable for everyone, so it's important to talk to your healthcare provider about the potential risks and benefits before starting to take them.

May-Thurner Syndrome, also known as iliac vein compression or Cockett's syndrome, is a rare medical condition where the left common iliac vein is compressed by the right common iliac artery. This compression can lead to the development of blood clots (deep vein thrombosis) in the left leg, which can potentially cause serious complications such as pulmonary embolism if the clots travel to the lungs. Symptoms may include swelling, pain, and discoloration in the affected leg. Diagnosis is typically made through imaging studies like CT scans or MRIs, and treatment options include anticoagulation therapy, thrombolysis, or surgical intervention to alleviate the compression.

Factor XIII, also known as fibrin stabilizing factor, is a protein involved in the clotting process of blood. It is a transglutaminase enzyme that cross-links fibrin molecules to form a stable clot. Factor XIII becomes activated during the coagulation cascade, and its activity helps strengthen the clot and protect it from premature degradation by proteolytic enzymes. A deficiency in Factor XIII can lead to a bleeding disorder characterized by prolonged bleeding after injury or surgery.

The Chi-square distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is often used in statistical hypothesis testing. It is the distribution of a sum of squares of k independent standard normal random variables. The resulting quantity follows a chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom, denoted as χ²(k).

The probability density function (pdf) of the Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom is given by:

f(x; k) = (1/ (2^(k/2) * Γ(k/2))) \* x^((k/2)-1) \* e^(-x/2), for x > 0 and 0, otherwise.

Where Γ(k/2) is the gamma function evaluated at k/2. The mean and variance of a Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom are k and 2k, respectively.

The Chi-square distribution has various applications in statistical inference, including testing goodness-of-fit, homogeneity of variances, and independence in contingency tables.

Dalteparin is a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) medication that is used as an anticoagulant to prevent and treat blood clots. It works by binding to an enzyme called antithrombin III and enhancing its ability to inhibit clotting factors in the blood.

Dalteparin is available under the brand name Fragmin and is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once or twice a day, depending on the indication and dosage prescribed by a healthcare professional. Common side effects of dalteparin include bleeding, bruising, pain at the injection site, and elevated liver enzymes.

As with all medications, it is important to use dalteparin only under the supervision of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

The International Normalized Ratio (INR) is a standardized measurement of the prothrombin time (PT), which is the time it takes for blood to clot. The INR is used to monitor and regulate the effects of anticoagulant medications, such as warfarin, that affect the blood's ability to clot.

The INR is calculated by dividing the patient's PT by a control value (the PT of normal, healthy blood), raised to the power of a sensitivity factor called the International Sensitivity Index (ISI). The ISI is specific to the thromboplastin reagent used in the PT assay.

The INR provides a consistent and comparable way to monitor anticoagulation therapy across different laboratories, regardless of the thromboplastin reagent used. This helps ensure that patients receive appropriate doses of anticoagulant medications and reduces the risk of bleeding or clotting complications.

In general, an INR range of 2.0 to 3.0 is recommended for most people taking anticoagulants for conditions such as atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, or pulmonary embolism. However, the target INR range may vary depending on individual patient factors and medical indications.

Postoperative hemorrhage is a medical term that refers to bleeding that occurs after a surgical procedure. This condition can range from minor oozing to severe, life-threatening bleeding. Postoperative hemorrhage can occur soon after surgery or even several days later, as the surgical site begins to heal.

The causes of postoperative hemorrhage can vary, but some common factors include:

1. Inadequate hemostasis during surgery: This means that all bleeding was not properly controlled during the procedure, leading to bleeding after surgery.
2. Blood vessel injury: During surgery, blood vessels may be accidentally cut or damaged, causing bleeding after the procedure.
3. Coagulopathy: This is a condition in which the body has difficulty forming blood clots, increasing the risk of postoperative hemorrhage.
4. Use of anticoagulant medications: Medications that prevent blood clots can increase the risk of bleeding after surgery.
5. Infection: An infection at the surgical site can cause inflammation and bleeding.

Symptoms of postoperative hemorrhage may include swelling, pain, warmth, or discoloration around the surgical site, as well as signs of shock such as rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and confusion. Treatment for postoperative hemorrhage depends on the severity of the bleeding and may include medications to control bleeding, transfusions of blood products, or additional surgery to stop the bleeding.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Spontaneous remission in a medical context refers to the disappearance or significant improvement of symptoms of a disease or condition without any specific treatment being administered. In other words, it's a situation where the disease resolves on its own, without any apparent cause. While spontaneous remission can occur in various conditions, it is relatively rare and not well understood. It's important to note that just because a remission occurs without treatment doesn't mean that medical care should be avoided, as many conditions can worsen or lead to complications if left untreated.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Early ambulation, also known as early mobilization or early rehabilitation, refers to the practice of encouraging patients to get out of bed and start moving around as soon as possible after a surgical procedure or medical event such as a stroke. The goal of early ambulation is to prevent complications associated with prolonged bed rest, including muscle weakness, joint stiffness, blood clots, pneumonia, and pressure ulcers. It can also help improve patients' overall recovery, strength, and functional ability.

The specific timeline for early ambulation will depend on the individual patient's medical condition and healthcare provider's recommendations. However, in general, it is recommended to start mobilizing patients as soon as they are medically stable and able to do so safely, often within the first 24-48 hours after surgery or an event. This may involve sitting up in bed, standing, taking a few steps with assistance, or walking a short distance with the help of a walker or other assistive device.

Healthcare providers such as physicians, nurses, and physical therapists work together to develop a safe and effective early ambulation plan for each patient, taking into account their individual needs, abilities, and limitations.

Homocystinuria is a genetic disorder characterized by the accumulation of homocysteine and its metabolites in the body due to a deficiency in the enzyme cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). This enzyme is responsible for converting homocysteine to cystathionine, which is a critical step in the metabolic pathway that breaks down methionine.

As a result of this deficiency, homocysteine levels in the blood increase and can lead to various health problems, including neurological impairment, ocular abnormalities (such as ectopia lentis or dislocation of the lens), skeletal abnormalities (such as Marfan-like features), and vascular complications.

Homocystinuria can be diagnosed through newborn screening or by measuring homocysteine levels in the blood or urine. Treatment typically involves a low-methionine diet, supplementation with vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), betaine, and/or methylcobalamin (a form of vitamin B12) to help reduce homocysteine levels and prevent complications associated with the disorder.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

An "aircraft" is not a medical term, but rather a general term used to describe any vehicle or machine designed to be powered and operated in the air. This includes fixed-wing aircraft such as airplanes and gliders, as well as rotary-wing aircraft such as helicopters and autogyros.

However, there are some medical conditions that can affect a person's ability to safely operate an aircraft, such as certain cardiovascular or neurological disorders. In these cases, the individual may be required to undergo medical evaluation and obtain clearance from aviation medical examiners before they are allowed to fly.

Additionally, there are some medical devices and equipment that are used in aircraft, such as oxygen systems and medical evacuation equipment. These may be used to provide medical care to passengers or crew members during flight.

Factor Xa is a serine protease that plays a crucial role in the coagulation cascade, which is a series of reactions that lead to the formation of a blood clot. It is one of the activated forms of Factor X, a pro-protein that is converted to Factor Xa through the action of other enzymes in the coagulation cascade.

Factor Xa functions as a key component of the prothrombinase complex, which also includes calcium ions, phospholipids, and activated Factor V (also known as Activated Protein C or APC). This complex is responsible for converting prothrombin to thrombin, which then converts fibrinogen to fibrin, forming a stable clot.

Inhibitors of Factor Xa are used as anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These drugs work by selectively inhibiting Factor Xa, thereby preventing the formation of the prothrombinase complex and reducing the risk of clot formation.

Clopenthixol is a type of antipsychotic medication that is primarily used to manage and treat symptoms associated with various mental health disorders, such as schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. It belongs to a class of drugs known as "typical" or "first-generation" antipsychotics, which work by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain.

Clopenthixol has potent activity at both dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2 receptors, which contributes to its efficacy in treating positive symptoms of schizophrenia, such as hallucinations and delusions, as well as negative symptoms, like apathy and social withdrawal. It is also used off-label for the treatment of agitation and aggression in individuals with dementia or intellectual disabilities.

The medication is available in two forms: immediate-release tablets (Clopenthixol decanoate) and a long-acting injectable form (Clopenthixol decanoate). The long-acting injection is typically administered every 2-4 weeks, while the oral tablet is taken daily.

Like all medications, clopenthixol can have side effects, which may include extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), such as Parkinsonism, akathisia, and dystonia; weight gain; metabolic changes; sexual dysfunction; and cardiovascular issues. It is essential to monitor patients taking clopenthixol for these potential adverse effects and adjust the treatment plan accordingly.

It's important to note that clopenthixol should only be prescribed and administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, and patients should follow their instructions carefully to ensure safe and effective use.

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired disorder of the blood characterized by the destruction of red blood cells (hemolysis), which can cause symptoms such as fatigue, dark colored urine (especially in the morning), chest pain, shortness of breath, and an increased risk of blood clots. The hemoglobin from the lysed red blood cells appears in the urine, hence the term "hemoglobinuria."

The paroxysmal nature of the disorder refers to the sudden and recurring episodes of hemolysis that can occur at any time, although they may be more frequent at night. The condition is caused by mutations in a gene called PIG-A, which leads to the production of defective red blood cell membranes that are sensitive to destruction by complement, a component of the immune system.

PNH is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that can lead to complications such as kidney damage, pulmonary hypertension, and thrombosis. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as blood transfusions, and medications to manage symptoms and prevent complications. In some cases, stem cell transplantation may be considered as a curative treatment option.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

The pelvis is the lower part of the trunk, located between the abdomen and the lower limbs. It is formed by the fusion of several bones: the ilium, ischium, and pubis (which together form the hip bone on each side), and the sacrum and coccyx in the back. The pelvis has several functions including supporting the weight of the upper body when sitting, protecting the lower abdominal organs, and providing attachment for muscles that enable movement of the lower limbs. In addition, it serves as a bony canal through which the reproductive and digestive tracts pass. The pelvic cavity contains several vital organs such as the bladder, parts of the large intestine, and in females, the uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

A homozygote is an individual who has inherited the same allele (version of a gene) from both parents and therefore possesses two identical copies of that allele at a specific genetic locus. This can result in either having two dominant alleles (homozygous dominant) or two recessive alleles (homozygous recessive). In contrast, a heterozygote has inherited different alleles from each parent for a particular gene.

The term "homozygote" is used in genetics to describe the genetic makeup of an individual at a specific locus on their chromosomes. Homozygosity can play a significant role in determining an individual's phenotype (observable traits), as having two identical alleles can strengthen the expression of certain characteristics compared to having just one dominant and one recessive allele.

Subcutaneous injection is a route of administration where a medication or vaccine is delivered into the subcutaneous tissue, which lies between the skin and the muscle. This layer contains small blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissues that help to absorb the medication slowly and steadily over a period of time. Subcutaneous injections are typically administered using a short needle, at an angle of 45-90 degrees, and the dose is injected slowly to minimize discomfort and ensure proper absorption. Common sites for subcutaneous injections include the abdomen, thigh, or upper arm. Examples of medications that may be given via subcutaneous injection include insulin, heparin, and some vaccines.

Ferric compounds are inorganic compounds that contain the iron(III) cation, Fe3+. Iron(III) is a transition metal and can form stable compounds with various anions. Ferric compounds are often colored due to the d-d transitions of the iron ion. Examples of ferric compounds include ferric chloride (FeCl3), ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3), and ferric oxide (Fe2O3). Ferric compounds have a variety of uses, including as catalysts, in dye production, and in medical applications.

Coagulation protein disorders are a group of medical conditions that affect the body's ability to form blood clots properly. These disorders can be caused by genetic defects or acquired factors, such as liver disease or vitamin K deficiency.

The coagulation system is a complex process that involves various proteins called clotting factors. When there is an injury to a blood vessel, these clotting factors work together in a specific order to form a clot and prevent excessive bleeding. In coagulation protein disorders, one or more of these clotting factors are missing or not functioning properly, leading to abnormal bleeding or clotting.

There are several types of coagulation protein disorders, including:

1. Hemophilia: This is a genetic disorder that affects the clotting factor VIII or IX. People with hemophilia may experience prolonged bleeding after injuries, surgery, or dental work.
2. Von Willebrand disease: This is another genetic disorder that affects the von Willebrand factor, a protein that helps platelets stick together and form a clot. People with this condition may have nosebleeds, easy bruising, and excessive bleeding during menstruation or after surgery.
3. Factor XI deficiency: This is a rare genetic disorder that affects the clotting factor XI. People with this condition may experience prolonged bleeding after surgery or trauma.
4. Factor VII deficiency: This is a rare genetic disorder that affects the clotting factor VII. People with this condition may have nosebleeds, easy bruising, and excessive bleeding during menstruation or after surgery.
5. Acquired coagulation protein disorders: These are conditions that develop due to other medical factors, such as liver disease, vitamin K deficiency, or the use of certain medications. These disorders can affect one or more clotting factors and may cause abnormal bleeding or clotting.

Treatment for coagulation protein disorders depends on the specific condition and severity of symptoms. In some cases, replacement therapy with the missing clotting factor may be necessary to prevent excessive bleeding. Other treatments may include medications to control bleeding, such as desmopressin or antifibrinolytic agents, and lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of injury and bleeding.

Oral administration is a route of giving medications or other substances by mouth. This can be in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids, pastes, or other forms that can be swallowed. Once ingested, the substance is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and enters the bloodstream to reach its intended target site in the body. Oral administration is a common and convenient route of medication delivery, but it may not be appropriate for all substances or in certain situations, such as when rapid onset of action is required or when the patient has difficulty swallowing.

Paradoxical embolism is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot or other material (embolus) from a vein passes through an abnormal connection between the right and left sides of the heart and lodges in an artery in the systemic circulation. This is considered "paradoxical" because the embolus originates from the venous system but bypasses the lungs and travels directly to the arterial system.

Under normal circumstances, blood flows from the body's veins into the right atrium of the heart, then through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle, where it is pumped through the pulmonary artery into the lungs for oxygenation. The now oxygen-rich blood returns to the left atrium via the pulmonary veins, passes through the mitral valve into the left ventricle, and is then pumped out to the body's arteries.

However, in certain conditions such as a patent foramen ovale (PFO) or an atrial septal defect (ASD), there can be an abnormal communication between the right and left atria. This allows for the possibility of a paradoxical embolism to occur when a clot or other material from the venous system passes through this connection into the arterial system, bypassing filtration and oxygenation in the lungs.

Paradoxical embolism can lead to serious consequences, such as stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or tissue damage in various organs, depending on where the embolus lodges. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the paradoxical embolism and may include anticoagulation therapy, surgical closure of the abnormal connection, or other interventions as necessary.

"Device Removal" in a medical context generally refers to the surgical or nonsurgical removal of a medical device that has been previously implanted in a patient's body. The purpose of removing the device may vary, depending on the individual case. Some common reasons for device removal include infection, malfunction, rejection, or when the device is no longer needed.

Examples of medical devices that may require removal include pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), artificial joints, orthopedic hardware, breast implants, cochlear implants, and intrauterine devices (IUDs). The procedure for device removal will depend on the type of device, its location in the body, and the reason for its removal.

It is important to note that device removal carries certain risks, such as bleeding, infection, damage to surrounding tissues, or complications related to anesthesia. Therefore, the decision to remove a medical device should be made carefully, considering both the potential benefits and risks of the procedure.

A fatal outcome is a term used in medical context to describe a situation where a disease, injury, or illness results in the death of an individual. It is the most severe and unfortunate possible outcome of any medical condition, and is often used as a measure of the severity and prognosis of various diseases and injuries. In clinical trials and research, fatal outcome may be used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatments or interventions.

Myocardial infarction (MI), also known as a heart attack, is a medical condition characterized by the death of a segment of heart muscle (myocardium) due to the interruption of its blood supply. This interruption is most commonly caused by the blockage of a coronary artery by a blood clot formed on the top of an atherosclerotic plaque, which is a buildup of cholesterol and other substances in the inner lining of the artery.

The lack of oxygen and nutrients supply to the heart muscle tissue results in damage or death of the cardiac cells, causing the affected area to become necrotic. The extent and severity of the MI depend on the size of the affected area, the duration of the occlusion, and the presence of collateral circulation.

Symptoms of a myocardial infarction may include chest pain or discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness, and sweating. Immediate medical attention is necessary to restore blood flow to the affected area and prevent further damage to the heart muscle. Treatment options for MI include medications, such as thrombolytics, antiplatelet agents, and pain relievers, as well as procedures such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

Graft occlusion in the context of vascular surgery refers to the complete or partial blockage of a blood vessel that has been surgically replaced or repaired with a graft. The graft can be made from either synthetic materials or autologous tissue (taken from another part of the patient's body).

Graft occlusion can occur due to various reasons, including:

1. Thrombosis: Formation of a blood clot within the graft, which can obstruct blood flow.
2. Intimal hyperplasia: Overgrowth of the inner lining (intima) of the graft or the adjacent native vessel, causing narrowing of the lumen and reducing blood flow.
3. Atherosclerosis: Deposition of cholesterol and other substances in the walls of the graft, leading to hardening and narrowing of the vessel.
4. Infection: Bacterial or fungal infection of the graft can cause inflammation, weakening, and ultimately occlusion of the graft.
5. Mechanical factors: Kinking, twisting, or compression of the graft can lead to obstruction of blood flow.

Graft occlusion is a significant complication following vascular surgery, as it can result in reduced perfusion to downstream tissues and organs, leading to ischemia (lack of oxygen supply) and potential tissue damage or loss.

Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome (KTWS) is a rare and complex congenital vascular disorder that affects the development of blood vessels, soft tissues, and bones. It is also known as Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome or KTS.

The medical definition of KTWS includes the following features:
1. Port-wine stain (capillary malformation): A red or purple birthmark caused by an abnormal collection of blood vessels in the skin, often present at birth and usually affecting one limb or part of the body.
2. Venous and lymphatic abnormalities: Varicose veins, dilated veins, or abnormal vein patterns may be present, along with lymphatic malformations that can cause swelling in the affected area.
3. Soft tissue and bone hypertrophy: Overgrowth of soft tissues and bones in the affected limb or region, leading to asymmetry and sometimes functional impairment.
4. Other possible features: May include skin abnormalities, such as increased hair growth or changes in texture; joint deformities; and orthopedic problems, like scoliosis or hip dysplasia.

It is important to note that the severity of KTWS can vary significantly from person to person, ranging from mild symptoms to severe cases with significant functional impairment. The condition is not typically life-threatening but may require ongoing medical management and surveillance to address potential complications, such as infections, bleeding, or deep vein thrombosis.

Interventional ultrasonography is a medical procedure that involves the use of real-time ultrasound imaging to guide minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This technique combines the advantages of ultrasound, such as its non-ionizing nature (no radiation exposure), relatively low cost, and portability, with the ability to perform precise and targeted procedures.

In interventional ultrasonography, a specialized physician called an interventional radiologist or an interventional sonographer uses high-frequency sound waves to create detailed images of internal organs and tissues. These images help guide the placement of needles, catheters, or other instruments used during the procedure. Common interventions include biopsies (tissue sampling), fluid drainage, tumor ablation, and targeted drug delivery.

The real-time visualization provided by ultrasonography allows for increased accuracy and safety during these procedures, minimizing complications and reducing recovery time compared to traditional surgical approaches. Additionally, interventional ultrasonography can be performed on an outpatient basis, further contributing to its appeal as a less invasive alternative in many clinical scenarios.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Vascular diseases are medical conditions that affect the circulatory system, specifically the blood vessels (arteries, veins, and capillaries). These diseases can include conditions such as:

1. Atherosclerosis: The buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in and on the walls of the arteries, which can restrict blood flow.
2. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD): A condition caused by atherosclerosis where there is narrowing or blockage of the peripheral arteries, most commonly in the legs. This can lead to pain, numbness, and cramping.
3. Coronary Artery Disease (CAD): Atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. This can lead to chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.
4. Carotid Artery Disease: Atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries in the neck that supply blood to the brain. This can increase the risk of stroke.
5. Cerebrovascular Disease: Conditions that affect blood flow to the brain, including stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA or "mini-stroke").
6. Aneurysm: A weakened area in the wall of a blood vessel that causes it to bulge outward and potentially rupture.
7. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): A blood clot that forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs, which can cause pain, swelling, and increased risk of pulmonary embolism if the clot travels to the lungs.
8. Varicose Veins: Swollen, twisted, and often painful veins that have filled with an abnormal collection of blood, usually appearing in the legs.
9. Vasculitis: Inflammation of the blood vessels, which can cause damage and narrowing, leading to reduced blood flow.
10. Raynaud's Phenomenon: A condition where the small arteries that supply blood to the skin become narrowed, causing decreased blood flow, typically in response to cold temperatures or stress.

These are just a few examples of vascular conditions that fall under the umbrella term "cerebrovascular disease." Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve outcomes for many of these conditions.

"Venae Cavae" is a term that refers to the two large veins in the human body that return deoxygenated blood from the systemic circulation to the right atrium of the heart.

The "Superior Vena Cava" receives blood from the upper half of the body, including the head, neck, upper limbs, and chest, while the "Inferior Vena Cava" collects blood from the lower half of the body, including the abdomen and lower limbs.

Together, these veins play a crucial role in the circulatory system by ensuring that oxygen-depleted blood is efficiently returned to the heart for reoxygenation in the lungs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lebanon" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in the Middle East, known officially as the Lebanese Republic. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, please provide them, and I would be happy to help.

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure in which the spleen is removed from the body. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, near the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays several important roles in the body, including fighting certain types of infections, removing old or damaged red blood cells from the circulation, and storing platelets and white blood cells.

There are several reasons why a splenectomy may be necessary, including:

* Trauma to the spleen that cannot be repaired
* Certain types of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Sickle cell disease, which can cause the spleen to enlarge and become damaged
* A ruptured spleen, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly
* Certain blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or hemolytic anemia

A splenectomy is typically performed under general anesthesia and may be done using open surgery or laparoscopically. After the spleen is removed, the incision(s) are closed with sutures or staples. Recovery time varies depending on the individual and the type of surgery performed, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within a few weeks.

It's important to note that following a splenectomy, individuals may be at increased risk for certain types of infections, so it's recommended that they receive vaccinations to help protect against these infections. They should also seek medical attention promptly if they develop fever, chills, or other signs of infection.

The term "upper extremity" is used in the medical field to refer to the portion of the upper limb that extends from the shoulder to the hand. This includes the arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. The upper extremity is responsible for various functions such as reaching, grasping, and manipulating objects, making it an essential part of a person's daily activities.

Norethindrone is a synthetic form of progesterone, a female hormone that is produced naturally in the ovaries. It is used as a medication for various purposes such as:

* Preventing pregnancy when used as a birth control pill
* Treating endometriosis
* Managing symptoms associated with menopause
* Treating abnormal menstrual bleeding

Norethindrone works by thinning the lining of the uterus, preventing ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary), and changing the cervical mucus to make it harder for sperm to reach the egg. It is important to note that norethindrone should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, leading to deprivation of oxygen and nutrients to brain cells. This can result in the death of brain tissue and cause permanent damage or temporary impairment to cognitive functions, speech, memory, movement, and other body functions controlled by the affected area of the brain.

Strokes can be caused by either a blockage in an artery that supplies blood to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a "mini-stroke," is a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain that lasts only a few minutes and does not cause permanent damage.

Symptoms of a stroke may include sudden weakness or numbness in the face, arm, or leg; difficulty speaking or understanding speech; vision problems; loss of balance or coordination; severe headache with no known cause; and confusion or disorientation. Immediate medical attention is crucial for stroke patients to receive appropriate treatment and prevent long-term complications.

An arteriovenous shunt is a surgically created connection between an artery and a vein. This procedure is typically performed to reroute blood flow or to provide vascular access for various medical treatments. In a surgical setting, the creation of an arteriovenous shunt involves connecting an artery directly to a vein, bypassing the capillary network in between.

There are different types of arteriovenous shunts used for specific medical purposes:

1. Arteriovenous Fistula (AVF): This is a surgical connection created between an artery and a vein, usually in the arm or leg. The procedure involves dissecting both the artery and vein, then suturing them directly together. Over time, the increased blood flow to the vein causes it to dilate and thicken, making it suitable for repeated needle punctures during hemodialysis treatments for patients with kidney failure.
2. Arteriovenous Graft (AVG): An arteriovenous graft is a synthetic tube used to connect an artery and a vein when a direct AVF cannot be created due to insufficient vessel size or poor quality. The graft can be made of various materials, such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or Dacron. Grafts are more prone to infection and clotting compared to native AVFs but remain an essential option for patients requiring hemodialysis access.
3. Central Venous Catheter (CVC): A central venous catheter is a flexible tube inserted into a large vein, often in the neck or groin, and advanced towards the heart. CVCs can be used as temporary arteriovenous shunts for patients who require immediate hemodialysis access but do not have time to wait for an AVF or AVG to mature. However, they are associated with higher risks of infection and thrombosis compared to native AVFs and AVGs.

In summary, a surgical arteriovenous shunt is a connection between an artery and a vein established through a medical procedure. The primary purpose of these shunts is to provide vascular access for hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease or to serve as temporary access when native AVFs or AVGs are not feasible.

Carboxypeptidase U is also known as thiol protease or thiol carboxypeptidase. It is a type of enzyme that belongs to the peptidase family, specifically the serine proteases. This enzyme plays a role in the regulation of blood pressure by cleaving and inactivating bradykinin, a potent vasodilator peptide. Carboxypeptidase U is primarily produced in the kidneys and is released into the circulation in response to various stimuli, such as renin and angiotensin II. It functions by removing the C-terminal arginine residue from bradykinin, thereby reducing its biological activity and helping to maintain blood pressure homeostasis.

A cerebral hemorrhage, also known as an intracranial hemorrhage or intracerebral hemorrhage, is a type of stroke that results from bleeding within the brain tissue. It occurs when a weakened blood vessel bursts and causes localized bleeding in the brain. This bleeding can increase pressure in the skull, damage nearby brain cells, and release toxic substances that further harm brain tissues.

Cerebral hemorrhages are often caused by chronic conditions like hypertension (high blood pressure) or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which weakens the walls of blood vessels over time. Other potential causes include trauma, aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, illicit drug use, and brain tumors. Symptoms may include sudden headache, weakness, numbness, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, vision problems, loss of balance, and altered level of consciousness. Immediate medical attention is required to diagnose and manage cerebral hemorrhage through imaging techniques, supportive care, and possible surgical interventions.

Prothrombin time (PT) is a medical laboratory test that measures the time it takes for blood to clot. It's often used to evaluate the functioning of the extrinsic and common pathways of the coagulation system, which is responsible for blood clotting. Specifically, PT measures how long it takes for prothrombin (a protein produced by the liver) to be converted into thrombin, an enzyme that converts fibrinogen into fibrin and helps form a clot.

Prolonged PT may indicate a bleeding disorder or a deficiency in coagulation factors, such as vitamin K deficiency or the use of anticoagulant medications like warfarin. It's important to note that PT is often reported with an international normalized ratio (INR), which allows for standardization and comparison of results across different laboratories and reagent types.

Ticlopidine is defined as a platelet aggregation inhibitor drug, which works by preventing certain types of blood cells (platelets) from sticking together to form clots. It is used to reduce the risk of stroke and heart attack in patients who have already had a stroke or have peripheral arterial disease.

Ticlopidine is a thienopyridine derivative that selectively inhibits platelet activation and aggregation by blocking the ADP (adenosine diphosphate) receptor on the platelet surface. This action prevents the formation of platelet plugs, which can lead to the development of blood clots in the arteries.

Ticlopidine is available in oral form as tablets and is typically taken twice daily. Common side effects include diarrhea, skin rash, and itching. More serious side effects, such as neutropenia (low white blood cell count), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), and aplastic anemia, are rare but can be life-threatening.

Due to the risk of serious side effects, ticlopidine is usually reserved for use in patients who cannot tolerate or have failed other antiplatelet therapies, such as aspirin or clopidogrel. It is important to monitor patients taking ticlopidine closely for signs of adverse reactions and to follow the prescribing instructions carefully.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a medical imaging technique used to visualize the blood vessels and blood flow within the body. It combines the use of X-ray technology with digital image processing to produce detailed images of the vascular system.

In DSA, a contrast agent is injected into the patient's bloodstream through a catheter, which is typically inserted into an artery in the leg and guided to the area of interest using fluoroscopy. As the contrast agent flows through the blood vessels, X-ray images are taken at multiple time points.

The digital subtraction process involves taking a baseline image without contrast and then subtracting it from subsequent images taken with contrast. This allows for the removal of background structures and noise, resulting in clearer images of the blood vessels. DSA can be used to diagnose and evaluate various vascular conditions, such as aneurysms, stenosis, and tumors, and can also guide interventional procedures such as angioplasty and stenting.

A platelet count is a laboratory test that measures the number of platelets, also known as thrombocytes, in a sample of blood. Platelets are small, colorless cell fragments that circulate in the blood and play a crucial role in blood clotting. They help to stop bleeding by sticking together to form a plug at the site of an injured blood vessel.

A normal platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter (µL) of blood. A lower than normal platelet count is called thrombocytopenia, while a higher than normal platelet count is known as thrombocytosis.

Abnormal platelet counts can be a sign of various medical conditions, including bleeding disorders, infections, certain medications, and some types of cancer. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your platelet count or if you experience symptoms such as easy bruising, prolonged bleeding, or excessive menstrual flow.

Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma (HHNC) is a serious complication of diabetes, specifically type 2, that occurs when blood glucose levels rise to extremely high levels, typically above 600 mg/dL. This condition is often accompanied by severe dehydration due to excessive urination and an inability to consume adequate fluids.

The term "hyperosmolar" refers to the high concentration of glucose in the blood, which increases the osmolality (or osmotic pressure) of the blood. This can lead to water moving out of cells and into the bloodstream to try to balance out the concentration, causing severe dehydration.

The term "nonketotic" means that there is no significant production of ketone bodies, which are produced when the body breaks down fat for energy in the absence of sufficient insulin. This differentiates HHNC from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), another serious complication of diabetes.

The "coma" part of the term refers to the fact that HHNC can cause altered mental status, ranging from confusion and disorientation to coma, due to the effects of dehydration and high blood glucose levels on the brain.

HHNC is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment in a hospital setting. Treatment typically involves administering fluids to rehydrate the body, insulin to lower blood glucose levels, and addressing any other underlying conditions or complications. If left untreated, HHNC can be life-threatening.

Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a large multimeric glycoprotein that plays a crucial role in hemostasis, the process which leads to the cessation of bleeding and the formation of a blood clot. It was named after Erik Adolf von Willebrand, a Finnish physician who first described the disorder associated with its deficiency, known as von Willebrand disease (vWD).

The primary functions of vWF include:

1. Platelet adhesion and aggregation: vWF mediates the initial attachment of platelets to damaged blood vessel walls by binding to exposed collagen fibers and then interacting with glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) receptors on the surface of platelets, facilitating platelet adhesion. Subsequently, vWF also promotes platelet-platelet interactions (aggregation) through its interaction with platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) receptors under high shear stress conditions found in areas of turbulent blood flow, such as arterioles and the capillary bed.

2. Transport and stabilization of coagulation factor VIII: vWF serves as a carrier protein for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), protecting it from proteolytic degradation and maintaining its stability in circulation. This interaction between vWF and FVIII is essential for the proper functioning of the coagulation cascade, particularly in the context of vWD, where impaired FVIII function can lead to bleeding disorders.

3. Wound healing: vWF contributes to wound healing by promoting platelet adhesion and aggregation at the site of injury, which facilitates the formation of a provisional fibrin-based clot that serves as a scaffold for tissue repair and regeneration.

In summary, von Willebrand factor is a vital hemostatic protein involved in platelet adhesion, aggregation, coagulation factor VIII stabilization, and wound healing. Deficiencies or dysfunctions in vWF can lead to bleeding disorders such as von Willebrand disease.

Coronary balloon angioplasty is a minimally invasive medical procedure used to widen narrowed or obstructed coronary arteries (the blood vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle) and improve blood flow to the heart. This procedure is typically performed in conjunction with the insertion of a stent, a small mesh tube that helps keep the artery open.

During coronary balloon angioplasty, a thin, flexible catheter with a deflated balloon at its tip is inserted into a blood vessel, usually through a small incision in the groin or arm. The catheter is then guided to the narrowed or obstructed section of the coronary artery. Once in position, the balloon is inflated to compress the plaque against the artery wall and widen the lumen (the inner space) of the artery. This helps restore blood flow to the heart muscle.

The procedure is typically performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation to minimize discomfort. Coronary balloon angioplasty is a relatively safe and effective treatment for many people with coronary artery disease, although complications such as bleeding, infection, or re-narrowing of the artery (restenosis) can occur in some cases.

Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in blood clotting and bone metabolism. It is essential for the production of several proteins involved in blood clotting, including factor II (prothrombin), factor VII, factor IX, and factor X. Additionally, Vitamin K is necessary for the synthesis of osteocalcin, a protein that contributes to bone health by regulating the deposition of calcium in bones.

There are two main forms of Vitamin K: Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone), which is found primarily in green leafy vegetables and some vegetable oils, and Vitamin K2 (menaquinones), which is produced by bacteria in the intestines and is also found in some fermented foods.

Vitamin K deficiency can lead to bleeding disorders such as hemorrhage and excessive bruising. While Vitamin K deficiency is rare in adults, it can occur in newborns who have not yet developed sufficient levels of the vitamin. Therefore, newborns are often given a Vitamin K injection shortly after birth to prevent bleeding problems.

Sirolimus is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called immunosuppressants. It is also known as rapamycin. Sirolimus works by inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is a protein that plays a key role in cell growth and division.

Sirolimus is primarily used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, such as kidneys, livers, and hearts. It works by suppressing the activity of the immune system, which can help to reduce the risk of the body rejecting the transplanted organ. Sirolimus is often used in combination with other immunosuppressive drugs, such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors.

Sirolimus is also being studied for its potential therapeutic benefits in a variety of other conditions, including cancer, tuberous sclerosis complex, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis. However, more research is needed to fully understand the safety and efficacy of sirolimus in these contexts.

It's important to note that sirolimus can have significant side effects, including increased risk of infections, mouth sores, high blood pressure, and kidney damage. Therefore, it should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Arthroplasty, replacement, knee is a surgical procedure where the damaged or diseased joint surface of the knee is removed and replaced with an artificial joint or prosthesis. The procedure involves resurfacing the worn-out ends of the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) with metal components, and the back of the kneecap with a plastic button. This surgery is usually performed to relieve pain and restore function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or traumatic injuries that have damaged the joint beyond repair. The goal of knee replacement surgery is to improve mobility, reduce pain, and enhance the quality of life for the patient.

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome (SVCS) is a medical condition characterized by the obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC), which is the large vein that carries blood from the upper body to the heart. This obstruction can be caused by cancerous tumors, thrombosis (blood clots), or other compressive factors.

The obstruction results in the impaired flow of blood from the head, neck, arms, and upper chest, leading to a variety of symptoms such as swelling of the face, neck, and upper extremities; shortness of breath; cough; chest pain; and distended veins visible on the skin surface. In severe cases, SVCS can cause life-threatening complications like cerebral edema (swelling of the brain) or pulmonary edema (fluid accumulation in the lungs).

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals with suspected SVCS to prevent further complications and to manage the underlying cause. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, anticoagulation therapy, or surgery, depending on the etiology of the obstruction.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ or system in the body. In SLE, the immune system produces an exaggerated response, leading to the production of autoantibodies that attack the body's own cells and tissues, causing inflammation and damage. The symptoms and severity of SLE can vary widely from person to person, but common features include fatigue, joint pain, skin rashes (particularly a "butterfly" rash across the nose and cheeks), fever, hair loss, and sensitivity to sunlight.

Systemic lupus erythematosus can also affect the kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood vessels, and other organs, leading to a wide range of symptoms such as kidney dysfunction, chest pain, shortness of breath, seizures, and anemia. The exact cause of SLE is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors. Treatment typically involves medications to suppress the immune system and manage symptoms, and may require long-term management by a team of healthcare professionals.

Hip arthroplasty, also known as hip replacement surgery, is a medical procedure where the damaged or diseased joint surfaces of the hip are removed and replaced with artificial components. These components typically include a metal or ceramic ball that replaces the head of the femur (thigh bone), and a polyethylene or ceramic socket that replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) in the pelvis.

The goal of hip arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve joint mobility, and restore function to the hip joint. This procedure is commonly performed in patients with advanced osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, hip fractures, or other conditions that cause significant damage to the hip joint.

There are several types of hip replacement surgeries, including traditional total hip arthroplasty, partial (hemi) hip arthroplasty, and resurfacing hip arthroplasty. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, such as the patient's age, activity level, overall health, and the extent of joint damage.

After surgery, patients typically require rehabilitation to regain strength, mobility, and function in the affected hip. With proper care and follow-up, most patients can expect significant pain relief and improved quality of life following hip arthroplasty.

Coronary restenosis is the re-narrowing or re-occlusion of a coronary artery after a previous successful procedure to open or widen the artery, such as angioplasty or stenting. This narrowing is usually caused by the excessive growth of scar tissue or smooth muscle cells in the artery lining, which can occur spontaneously or as a response to the initial procedure. Restenosis can lead to recurrent symptoms of coronary artery disease, such as chest pain or shortness of breath, and may require additional medical intervention.

An embolectomy is a surgical procedure to remove an embolus, which is a blockage in a blood vessel caused by a clot or air bubble that has traveled from another part of the body. During an embolectomy, the surgeon makes an incision in the affected blood vessel and removes the embolus using specialized surgical instruments. This procedure is often performed as an emergency treatment to restore blood flow and prevent tissue damage in the affected area of the body.

Genetic polymorphism refers to the occurrence of multiple forms (called alleles) of a particular gene within a population. These variations in the DNA sequence do not generally affect the function or survival of the organism, but they can contribute to differences in traits among individuals. Genetic polymorphisms can be caused by single nucleotide changes (SNPs), insertions or deletions of DNA segments, or other types of genetic rearrangements. They are important for understanding genetic diversity and evolution, as well as for identifying genetic factors that may contribute to disease susceptibility in humans.

Blood protein disorders refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the production or function of proteins in the blood. These proteins are crucial for maintaining the proper functioning of the body's immune system, transporting nutrients, and preventing excessive bleeding. Some examples of blood protein disorders include:

1. Hemophilia: A genetic disorder caused by a deficiency or absence of clotting factors in the blood, leading to prolonged bleeding and poor clot formation.
2. Von Willebrand disease: A genetic disorder characterized by abnormal or deficient von Willebrand factor, which is necessary for platelet function and proper clotting.
3. Dysproteinemias: Abnormal levels of certain proteins in the blood, such as immunoglobulins (antibodies) or paraproteins, which can indicate underlying conditions like multiple myeloma or macroglobulinemia.
4. Hypoproteinemia: Low levels of total protein in the blood, often caused by liver disease, malnutrition, or kidney disease.
5. Hyperproteinemia: Elevated levels of total protein in the blood, which can be caused by dehydration, inflammation, or certain types of cancer.
6. Hemoglobinopathies: Genetic disorders affecting the structure and function of hemoglobin, a protein found in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. Examples include sickle cell anemia and thalassemia.
7. Disorders of complement proteins: Abnormalities in the complement system, which is a group of proteins involved in the immune response, can lead to conditions like autoimmune disorders or recurrent infections.

Treatment for blood protein disorders varies depending on the specific condition and its severity but may include medications, transfusions, or other medical interventions.

Iodine radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, which decays and emits radiation in the form of gamma rays. Some commonly used iodine radioisotopes include I-123, I-125, I-131. These radioisotopes have various medical applications such as in diagnostic imaging, therapy for thyroid disorders, and cancer treatment.

For example, I-131 is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer due to its ability to destroy thyroid tissue. On the other hand, I-123 is often used in nuclear medicine scans of the thyroid gland because it emits gamma rays that can be detected by a gamma camera, allowing for detailed images of the gland's structure and function.

It is important to note that handling and administering radioisotopes require specialized training and safety precautions due to their radiation-emitting properties.

The femoral artery is the major blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the lower extremity of the human body. It is a continuation of the external iliac artery and becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through the adductor hiatus in the adductor magnus muscle of the thigh.

The femoral artery is located in the femoral triangle, which is bound by the sartorius muscle anteriorly, the adductor longus muscle medially, and the biceps femoris muscle posteriorly. It can be easily palpated in the groin region, making it a common site for taking blood samples, measuring blood pressure, and performing surgical procedures such as femoral artery catheterization and bypass grafting.

The femoral artery gives off several branches that supply blood to the lower limb, including the deep femoral artery, the superficial femoral artery, and the profunda femoris artery. These branches provide blood to the muscles, bones, skin, and other tissues of the leg, ankle, and foot.

An aneurysm is a localized, balloon-like bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. It occurs when the pressure inside the vessel causes a weakened area to swell and become enlarged. Aneurysms can develop in any blood vessel, but they are most common in arteries at the base of the brain (cerebral aneurysm) and the main artery carrying blood from the heart to the rest of the body (aortic aneurysm).

Aneurysms can be classified as saccular or fusiform, depending on their shape. A saccular aneurysm is a round or oval bulge that projects from the side of a blood vessel, while a fusiform aneurysm is a dilated segment of a blood vessel that is uniform in width and involves all three layers of the arterial wall.

The size and location of an aneurysm can affect its risk of rupture. Generally, larger aneurysms are more likely to rupture than smaller ones. Aneurysms located in areas with high blood pressure or where the vessel branches are also at higher risk of rupture.

Ruptured aneurysms can cause life-threatening bleeding and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of a ruptured aneurysm may include sudden severe headache, neck stiffness, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, or loss of consciousness. Unruptured aneurysms may not cause any symptoms and are often discovered during routine imaging tests for other conditions.

Treatment options for aneurysms depend on their size, location, and risk of rupture. Small, unruptured aneurysms may be monitored with regular imaging tests to check for growth or changes. Larger or symptomatic aneurysms may require surgical intervention, such as clipping or coiling, to prevent rupture and reduce the risk of complications.

... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, and ovarian vein thrombosis. Superficial venous thromboses cause ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... thrombosis of the hepatic vein) Thrombosis of the hepatic portal system, also known as splanchnic venous thrombosis: Thrombosis ... Venous thrombosis is blockage of a vein caused by a thrombus (blood clot). A common form of venous thrombosis is deep vein ...
... (CVST), cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis or cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), is the ... In cerebral venous thrombosis, blood clots usually form both in the veins of the brain and the venous sinuses. The thrombosis ... Disorders that cause, or increase the risk for systemic venous thrombosis are associated with central venous thromboses. In ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. "Intracranial venous thrombosis - Patient UK". UCH ...
Chronic venous thrombosis and venous insufficiency. In: Peripheral vascular sonography: a practical guide. Baltimore: Williams ... Haimovici, H. Ischemic forms of venous thrombosis: phlegmasia cerulea dolens, venous gangrene. Springfield, IlI: Charles C Tho ... Venous duplex imaging: should it replace hemodynamic tests for deep vein thrombosis? J Vasc Surg 1990; 11:53. Cronan, JJ. ... Diagnostic tests for venous thrombosis. In: Cranley JJ, ed. Vascular surgery. New York: Harper and Row, 1975. Christopoulos, D ...
It is defined by the occlusion of venous blood vessels by blood clots. There are two major types of VTE: deep-vein thrombosis ( ... Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common peripheral venous disease. ... "Venous thrombosis". Nature Reviews Disease Primers. 1 (1): 15006. doi:10.1038/nrdp.2015.6. PMID 27189130. S2CID 24689285. Furie ... On the contrary, venous clots are formed much slower, in terms of several days or even weeks. Abnormality of coagulation during ...
Ameri, A.; Bousser, M. G. (1992-02-01). "Cerebral Venous Thrombosis". Neurologic Clinics. 10 (1): 87-111. doi:10.1016/S0733- ... In 21.4% of cases, ischaemic strokes are caused by thrombosis. A thrombus is a blood clot which forms in a cerebral blood ... Stam, J. (2005-04-28). "Thrombosis of the Cerebral Veins and Sinuses". New England Journal of Medicine. 352 (17): 1791-1798. ... Enhanced platelet activation during MA has been observed which directly increases the risk of developing thrombosis. ...
Cerebral Venous Thrombosis". Stroke - Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management (4th ed.). Churchill Livingstone. pp. 301-325 ... The cerebellar veins may be affected by infarction or thrombosis. They may be the draining site of abnormal fistulas. Diagram ... http://neuroangio.org/venous-brain-anatomy/veins-posterior-fossa/ Portal: Anatomy (CS1 maint: date and year, Articles with ...
López JA, Chen J (2009). "Pathophysiology of venous thrombosis". Thromb Res. 123 (Suppl 4): S30-4. doi:10.1016/S0049-3848(09) ...
To date, arrhythmias, renal colic, venous thrombosis, and infections have been documented during space flights. The documented ... Auñón-Chancellor, Serena M.; Pattarini, James M.; Moll, Stephan; Sargsyan, Ashot (2020). "Venous Thrombosis during Spaceflight ...
CVCs are a risk factor for forming blood clots (venous thrombosis) including upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. It is ... A central venous catheter (CVC), also known as a central line (c-line), central venous line, or central venous access catheter ... Rosendaal FR, Reitsma PH (July 2009). "Genetics of venous thrombosis". Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 7 (Suppl 1): 301- ... "Central venous access sites for the prevention of venous thrombosis, stenosis and infection". The Cochrane Database of ...
López JA, Chen J (2009). "Pathophysiology of venous thrombosis". Thrombosis Research. 123 Suppl 4 (Suppl 4): S30-4. doi:10.1016 ... Bovill EG, van der Vliet A (2011). "Venous valvular stasis-associated hypoxia and thrombosis: what is the link?". Annual Review ... It is also implicated in the formation of deep vein thrombosis. As a result of activation, enthothelium releases Weibel-Palade ... Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. 36 (6): 1090-100. doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.306964. PMC 4882253. PMID 27127201. Alom-Ruiz SP, ...
Rosendaal FR (2005). "Venous thrombosis: the role of genes, environment, and behavior". Hematology Am. Soc. Hematol. Educ. ... Rosendaal FR, Reitsma PH (July 2009). "Genetics of Venous Thrombosis". J. Thromb. Haemost. 7 (Suppl 1): 301-304. doi:10.1111/j. ... Zakai, NA; McClure, LA (October 2011). "Racial differences in venous thromboembolism". Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis ( ... Behind non-O blood type and factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A is one of the most common genetic risk factors for venous ...
"Chapter 2: Risk Factors for Venous Thrombosis" (PDF). American Venous Forum. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 September ... Venous stasis can occur during the long periods of not moving. Thrombosis prevention is also recommended during air travel. ... 2016). "Wells criteria for DVT is a reliable clinical tool to assess the risk of deep venous thrombosis in trauma patients". ... Studies of the pathophysiologic mechanisms for the increased risk of Venous thrombosis embolism or VTE after long-distance ...
Martin, J. P. (May 1944). "Venous Thrombosis in the Central Nervous System". Proc R Soc Med. 37 (7): 383-392. doi:10.1177/ ... Martin, J. P. (5 April 1941). "Cerebral Venous Thrombosis after Childbirth". Br Med J. 1 (4187): 534-535. doi:10.1136/bmj. ... with H. L. Sheehan: Martin, J. P.; Sheehan, H. L. (25 April 1942). "Puerperal Cerebral Thrombosis". Br Med J. 1 (4242): 538-539 ... with H. L. Sheehan: Martin, J. P.; Sheehan, H. L. (8 March 1941). "Primary Thrombosis of Cerebral Veins (following Childbirth ...
Prevention of postoperative deep venous thrombosis. Diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis] , Request PDF". "[Doppler ultrasonic ...
"Contraceptive pills and venous thrombosis". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (3): CD010813. doi:10.1002/14651858. ... In particular, this can manifest as a deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. However, the risk with low-dose combined ... as whether the mother is breastfeeding and whether she has other medical conditions including superficial venous thrombosis and ... However, those containing higher doses of estrogen are associated with an increase in venous and arterial thromboembolism. In ...
An elevated D-dimer in the elderly population has no predictive value for deep venous thrombosis. Signs and symptoms of DVT in ... Baker, W.F. Jr (1998). "Diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism". Med. Clin. North Am. 82 (3, May): 459-476 ... Urbano, Frank L. (2001). "Review of Clinical Signs: Homans' Sign in the Diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis" (PDF). Hospital ... Urbano, Frank (March 2001). "Homans' Sign in the Diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis" (PDF). Hospital Physician. Archived from ...
Sacerdoti D, Serianni G, Gaiani S, Bolognesi M, Bombonato G, Gatta A (March 2007). "Thrombosis of the portal venous system". ... is known as hepatic vein thrombosis or Budd-Chiari syndrome. Portal vein thrombosis causes upper abdominal pain, possibly ... Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a vascular disease of the liver that occurs when a blood clot occurs in the hepatic portal vein ... If portal vein thrombosis develops due to pylephlebitis, signs of infection such as fever, chills, or night sweats may be ...
It is used in ultrasonography of deep venous thrombosis, wherein absence of vein compressibility is a strong indicator of ... Kearon, Clive; Julian, JA; Newman, TE; Ginsberg, JS (1998). "Noninvasive Diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis". Annals of ... Compression ultrasonography has both high sensitivity and specificity for detecting proximal deep vein thrombosis in ... while ultrasonography of chronic venous insufficiency of the legs focuses on more superficial veins to assist with planning of ...
Baglin T (August 2011). "Using the laboratory to predict recurrent venous thrombosis". Int J Lab Hematol. 33 (4): 333-42. doi: ... Kyrle PA, Rosendaal FR, Eichinger S (December 2010). "Risk assessment for recurrent venous thrombosis". Lancet. 376 (9757): ... "From Classical Laboratory Parameters to Novel Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Venous Thrombosis". Int J Mol Sci. 21 (6): 1920. ... menopausal hormone therapy and risk of venous thrombosis: The Women's Health Initiative". Res Pract Thromb Haemost. 2 (2): 310- ...
For patients with central venous access, a wide variation in the incidence of vein thrombosis (1 to 66 percent) is reported and ... "Catheter-related upper extremity venous thrombosis". uptodate.com. Retrieved 11 February 2016. (Orphaned articles from March ... Central venous catheters are the primary modality used for delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. The duration of central venous ... "Central Venous Catheters". Webmd. Retrieved 11 February 2016. "Central Venous Catheters". cancer.org. Retrieved 11 February ...
"Venous stasis and deep-vein thrombosis." Br J Surg. 1972 Sep;59(9):713-717. Description of pneumatic compression devices ... prevention and management of chronic venous disease, Thrombophilia and Venous Thromboembolism and The prevention of Venous ... 1994). Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism, Med-Orion Publishing. ISBN 978-9963-592-52-4 Belcaro G. et al. (1995). Venous ... He was chairman of the Committee of the American Venous Forum that created the CEAP classification of chronic venous disease. ...
Clinical examinations revealed cerebral venous thrombosis. He died on 28 July, aged 45. He left a 24-year-old son, whom he had ...
Kitchens CS (2011). "How I treat superficial venous thrombosis". Blood. 117 (1): 39-44. doi:10.1182/blood-2010-05-286690. PMID ... Jenkins JS, Michael P (2014). "Deep Venous Thrombosis: An Interventionalist's Approach". Ochsner J. 14 (4): 633-40. PMC 4295740 ... The femoral vein is often used to place a central venous catheter, or line for venous access. Ultrasound imaging for locating ... The femoral vein is a common site for a deep vein thrombosis. This can be a proximal DVT in the femoral vein, or more proximal ...
Kitchens CS (2011). "How I treat superficial venous thrombosis". Blood. 117 (1): 39-44. doi:10.1182/blood-2010-05-286690. PMID ... In particular, the adjacent femoral vein is clinically a deep vein, where deep vein thrombosis indicates anticoagulant or ... which has resulted in patients with femoral thrombosis being denied proper treatment. Therefore, the segment is alternatively ...
Recent studies describe the co-occurrence between coeliac disease, in which IBD is common in venous thrombosis. A study of ... Srirajaskanthan R, Winter M, Muller AF (2005). "Venous thrombosis in inflammatory bowel disease". European Journal of ... leg venous thrombosis, and heterozygosity for factor V Leiden". J. Gastroenterol. 37 (9): 761-762. doi:10.1007/s005350200126. ... "The factor V Leiden mutation increases the risk of venous thrombosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease". ...
Venous thrombosis associated with drainage from the brain (cerebral venous sinus thrombosis), eyes (retinal vein thrombosis), ... renal vein thrombosis), and ovaries (ovarian vein thrombosis) are more unusual forms of venous thrombosis and they are ... Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a type of venous thrombosis involving the formation of a blood clot in a deep vein, most commonly ... VTE, along with superficial vein thrombosis, are common types of venous thrombosis. DVT is classified as acute when the clots ...
Southwick, FS; Richardson EP, Jr; Swartz, MN (March 1986). "Septic thrombosis of the dural venous sinuses". Medicine. 65 (2): ... This is a rare disorder and can be of two types-septic cavernous thrombosis and aseptic cavernous thrombosis. The most common ... "Guidelines Cavernous sinus thrombosis" (PDF). "Cavernous sinus thrombosis - NHS Choices". www.nhs.uk. NHS Choices. Retrieved 27 ... Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is the formation of a blood clot within the cavernous sinus, a cavity at the base of the brain ...
Budd-Chiari syndrome (supra-hepatic venous thrombosis). Her cure was recognised on 31 May 1963. Visited Lourdes: 5 June 1958. ...
... thrombosis Dural venous sinuses Yasuda; et al. (Jun 2008). "Microsurgical anatomy and approaches to the ... forming a cavernous sinus thrombosis. From there the infection may spread to the dural venous sinuses. Infections may also be ... The cavernous sinus is one of the dural venous sinuses of the head. It is a network of veins that sit in a cavity. It sits on ... bacterial infection causing cavernous sinus thrombosis, aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis, idiopathic granulomatous disease ( ...
"Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity" (PDF). Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 6 (8): 1262-6. ... James Paget first proposed the idea of venous thrombosis causing upper extremity pain and swelling, and Leopold von Schrötter ... Mai, Cuc; Hunt, Daniel (2011-05-01). "Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis: a review". The American Journal of Medicine. 124 ... Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; Nazemian, Zohreh (2011). "Clavicular Fracture and Upper-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis". ...
... cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, and ovarian vein thrombosis. Superficial venous thromboses cause ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... thrombosis of the hepatic vein) Thrombosis of the hepatic portal system, also known as splanchnic venous thrombosis: Thrombosis ... Venous thrombosis is blockage of a vein caused by a thrombus (blood clot). A common form of venous thrombosis is deep vein ...
Thrombosis of the venous channels in the brain is an uncommon cause of cerebral infarction relative to arterial disease, but it ... encoded search term (Cerebral Venous Thrombosis) and Cerebral Venous Thrombosis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Increased risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with third- generation oral contraceptives. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis ... Knowledge of the anatomy of the venous system is essential in evaluating patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), since ...
encoded search term (Deep Venous Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery) and Deep Venous Thrombosis Prophylaxis in ... Deep Venous Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery Updated: Feb 06, 2023 * Author: David A Forsh, MD; Chief Editor: Vinod ... Deep Venous Thrombosis Prophylaxis Based on Risk Stratification. In separate studies, Rosendaal, Kearon, and Bulger et al ... Why is venous thrombosis prophylaxis needed for patients undergoing orthopedic surgery?. Which mechanical methods are used for ...
Learn how Arkansas Childrens pediatric experts can treat acute deep venous thrombosis in children. ... An acute deep venous thrombosis is a blood clot that occurs in veins. ... Thrombosis Bookmark [insert headline / title here]. Thrombosis occurs when clots form inside a blood vessel when they shouldnt ... Clots that occur in the large veins connected directly to the heart are called deep venous thrombosis (DVT). ...
MAXIMUM 150 WORDS: Remember: front load your paragraphs! This content should include a strong opening sentence describing the health topic in the Eastern Mediterranean (include key words "Eastern Mediterranean" and health topic name for search engine optimization). You should focus on the issue as it relates to the Region and the magnitude of problem in the region, as well as a brief mention of current situation/problem.. ...
Cases of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia after Receipt of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine ... This COCA Call will present the latest evidence on cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) with thrombocytopenia associated ... Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia - Update for Clinicians ... Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia - Update for Clinicians ...
More Articles about symptoms, tests, and treatments for Deep Venous Thrombosis.
... increased rates of venous thrombotic events, mainly as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), have been reported following ... However, few reports have described the occurrence of venous thrombosis after messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccination. Here, we ... Endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mRNA-based SIRS-CoV-2 vaccination.. ... Endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mRNA-based SIRS-CoV-2 vaccination. ...
DVT or Deep Venous Thrombosis) begins by showing a blood clot forming in a lower leg vein. As red blood cells flow through the ... vein, slower moving cells and other blood elements accumulate on the venous valves, creating a stationary blood clot, or ... This 3D medical animation depicting Deep Vein Thrombosis ( ... Post-operative Deep Venous Thrombosis with Resulting Pulmonary ... This 3D medical animation depicting Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT or Deep Venous Thrombosis) begins by showing a blood clot forming ...
Cases of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia after Receipt of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine ... This COCA Call will present the latest evidence on cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) with thrombocytopenia associated ... Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine and Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia - Update for Clinicians ... vaccine until the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is able to further review these cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ...
Endovascular treatment for vaccine-induced cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and thrombocytopenia following ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 ... Endovascular treatment for vaccine-induced cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and thrombocytopenia following ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 ...
The management and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may be different from that of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). ... Predictors of cerebral venous thrombosis and arterial ischemic stroke in young Asian women. ... Predictors of cerebral venous thrombosis and arterial ischemic stroke in young Asian women. Journal of Stroke and ...
Medications for Deep Venous Thrombosis - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals ... see also Deep Venous Thrombosis Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is clotting of blood in a deep vein ... Almost all patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are given anticoagulants Anticoagulants Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is ... and inferior vena cava filters Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is clotting of blood in a deep vein ...
Common risks are as follows: hemorrhage or pneumothorax complicating the insertion of central venous catheter, thrombosis or ... However, external iliac and femoro-popliteal venous thrombosis was diagnosed subsequently, inferior vena cava filter (IVC) ... Complete Recovery of Deep Venous Thrombosis From Coombs (+) Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Case Report ... We present here a case of a patient presented with Comb (+) TTP and developed catheter-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT). ...
... is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although most DVT is occult and resolves spontaneously without complication ... CT venography showing bilateral deep venous thrombosis. Arrows indicate bilateral deep venous thrombosis. View Media Gallery ... Age distribution for deep venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis usually affects individuals older than 40 years. The ... encoded search term (Deep Venous Thrombosis) and Deep Venous Thrombosis What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Thrombosis of venous channels in the brain is not a common cause of cerebral infarction relative to arterial disease but is an ... Heparin should be considered in the management of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a case of CVST in a 59- ...
Retinal venous thrombosis answers are found in the Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines powered by Unbound Medicine. Available ... "Retinal Venous Thrombosis." Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines, Duodecim Medical Publications Limited, 2019. Evidence Central, ... evidence.unboundmedicine.com/evidence/view/EBMG/454734/all/Retinal_venous_thrombosis. Retinal venous thrombosis. Evidence-Based ... Retinal Venous Thrombosis [Internet]. In: Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines. Duodecim Medical Publications Limited; 2019. [ ...
... findings that indicate transmural necrosis in patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis (AMVT). Methods: We used the ... "FACTORS PREDICTING TRANSMURAL NECROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MESENTERIC VENOUS THROMBOSIS". Iranian Congress of Radiology, 37 ... findings that indicate transmural necrosis in patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis (AMVT).. Methods:. We used the ... FACTORS PREDICTING TRANSMURAL NECROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MESENTERIC VENOUS THROMBOSIS. Iranian Congress of Radiology, 37(4 ...
Background: Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is marked by arterial, venous, or small vessel thrombosis. There have been few ... Concurrent arterial and venous thrombosis in a patient with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome ... Conclusion: Simultaneous thrombosis in large arteries and veins is a very unusual presentation for the APS. The patients should ... reported cases on APS presenting as thrombosis simultaneously involving large arteries and venous side of the blood circulation ...
... Bryushkov A.Yu.1, Ershov P.V.2, Sergeeva ... The obtained experimental data suggest that acute venous thrombosis is accompanied by alterations in the work of the ... The patients had no apparent risk factors for venous thromboembolic complications, they had not used antiplatelet drugs during ... with newly onset unilateral acute thrombosis of deep veins in the system of inferior vena cava, confirmed by the findings of ...
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) is a form of stroke resulting from the thrombosis of the venous sinuses of the brain ... Raval M, Paul A, . Cerebral venous thrombosis and venous infarction: Case report of a rare initial presentation of smokers ... Park DS, Moon CT, Chun YI, Koh YC, Kim HY, Roh HG, . Clinical characteristics of cerebral venous thrombosis in a single center ... Sirin NG, Yesilot N, Ekizoglu E, Keles N, Tuncay R, Coban O, . A case report of cerebral venous thrombosis in polycythemia vera ...
Item 2. Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) (ESM 6, Video S2, Figure S5). * We recommend that the compression applied from the common ... We recommend that the use of an integrated (lung, cardiac and venous ultrasound) approach in patients with high probability of ... Zhang R, Ni L, Di X et al (2021) Systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of venous thromboembolic events in novel ... We recommend that anatomical evaluation under USG in predicted difficult peripheral venous cannulation or after several failed ...
VENOUS: EVALUATION FOR POSSIBLE HYPERCOAGULABILITY (THROMBOPHILIA) CAUSING VENOUS THROMBOSIS answers are found in the Guide to ... "THROMBOSIS, VENOUS: EVALUATION for POSSIBLE HYPERCOAGULABILITY (THROMBOPHILIA) CAUSING VENOUS THROMBOSIS." Guide to Diagnostic ... THROMBOSIS, VENOUS: EVALUATION FOR POSSIBLE HYPERCOAGULABILITY (THROMBOPHILIA) CAUSING VENOUS THROMBOSIS. Guide to Diagnostic ... THROMBOSIS, VENOUS: EVALUATION for POSSIBLE HYPERCOAGULABILITY (THROMBOPHILIA) CAUSING VENOUS THROMBOSIS [Internet]. In: Guide ...
Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis After Cervical Spine Epidural Injection ...
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: a case series including thrombolysis. A A Mallick et al., Archives of Disease in Childhood, ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis precipitated by Graves disease. Abdul Rehman et al., BMJ Case Reports, 2018 ... Cerebral venous thrombosis: comparing characteristics of infective and non-infective aetiologies: a 12-year retrospective study ... Current endovascular treatment options of dural venous sinus thrombosis: a review of the literature. Nihar B Gala et al., ...
In this report, we present a patient with subdural empyema, brain abscess, and superior sagittal cerebral venous thrombosis as ... Postoperative brain magnetic resonance venography imaging showed superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Cultures obtained from ... In this report, we present a patient with subdural empyema, brain abscess, and superior sagittal cerebral venous thrombosis as ... Subdural empyema, brain abscess, and superior sagittal sinus venous thrombosis secondary to Streptococcus anginosus. ...
Venous thrombosis and conjugated equine estrogen in women without a uterus. J. David Curb*, Ross L. Prentice, Paul F. Bray, ... Dive into the research topics of Venous thrombosis and conjugated equine estrogen in women without a uterus. Together they ...
... deep venous thrombosis; hCG = human chorionic gonadotropin; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus ... b. Superficial venous thrombosis (acute or history). 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. 3*. ...
Is there a difference between cerebral venous thrombosis and cavernous venous sinus thrombosis?. CVT and CVST have common ... Thrombosis of the left transverse sinus can present as aphasia.. - Thrombosis of the deep venous sinus can cause behavioral ... Cerebral venous thrombosis: an update. Lancet Neurol 2007; 6:162-70.. *Stam J. Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses. N ... Piazza G. Cerebral venous thrombosis. Circulation 2012;125:1704-1709.. *Thorell SE, Parry-Jones AR, Punter M, Hurford R, ...
Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part of the body. DVT ... Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part of the body. DVT ... Venous thrombosis and embolism. In: Goldman L, Cooney KA, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 27th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ... Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part of the body. DVT ...
  • Other rarer forms include retinal vein thrombosis, mesenteric vein thrombosis (affecting veins draining blood from the gastrointestinal organs), cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, and ovarian vein thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • CDC recommends pausing the use of the J&J COVID-19 vaccine until the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is able to further review these cerebral venous sinus thrombosis cases in the context of thrombocytopenia and assess their potential significance. (cdc.gov)
  • This COCA Call will present the latest evidence on cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) with thrombocytopenia associated with the administration of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • Endovascular mechanical thrombectomy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis after mRNA-based SIRS-CoV-2 vaccination. (iasp-pain.org)
  • As vaccinations against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue worldwide, increased rates of venous thrombotic events, mainly as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), have been reported following adenovirus vector-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Heparin should be considered in the management of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). (jksem.org)
  • The objective of this study was to assess the clinical characteristics, patterns, and factors associated with headache in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT). (ruralneuropractice.com)
  • Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) is a form of stroke resulting from the thrombosis of the venous sinuses of the brain with protean clinical presentations. (ruralneuropractice.com)
  • Decompressive surgery for malignant cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: " by Emmon Raza, Muhammad Shahzad Shamim et al. (aku.edu)
  • In these cases, a type of blood clot called cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) was seen in combination with low levels of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia). (cdc.gov)
  • Use was paused during April 12-23, 2021, after detection of six cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). (cdc.gov)
  • The conditions of DVT only, DVT with PE, and PE only, are all captured by the term venous thromboembolism (VTE). (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous thromboembolism and superficial vein thrombosis account for about 90% of venous thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous thromboembolism occurs in 100-200 per 100,000 pregnant women every year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous thromboembolism (VTE, including deep vein thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolism [PE]) in surgical patients undergoing general anesthesia has been extensively studied. (medscape.com)
  • Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE). (medscape.com)
  • Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are manifestations of a single disease entity, namely, venous thromboembolism (VTE). (medscape.com)
  • Prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism--International Consensus Statement. (nih.gov)
  • There are other less common forms of venous thrombosis, some of which can also lead to pulmonary embolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The abbreviation DVT/PE refers to a VTE where a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has moved to the lungs (PE or pulmonary embolism). (wikipedia.org)
  • For more information, see Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism . (medscape.com)
  • CVST is treated with dose-adjusted heparin or heparinoid followed by warfarin to facilitate recanalization of venous sinuses. (aku.edu)
  • A common form of venous thrombosis is deep vein thrombosis (DVT), when a blood clot forms in the deep veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared with combined oral contraceptives containing levonorgestrel (LNG), and with the same dose of estrogen and duration of use, the rate ratio of deep vein thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with norethisterone is 0.98, with norgestimate 1.19, with desogestrel (DSG) 1.82, with gestodene 1.86, with drospirenone (DRSP) 1.64, and with cyproterone acetate 1.88. (wikipedia.org)
  • This 3D medical animation depicting Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT or Deep Venous Thrombosis) begins by showing a blood clot forming in a lower leg vein. (doereport.com)
  • We present here a case of a patient presented with Comb (+) TTP and developed catheter-associated deep vein thrombosis (DVT). (researchsquare.com)
  • Cortical vein thrombosis presents with motor and sensory deficits, as well as seizure. (emdocs.net)
  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part of the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pharmacomechanical Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Deep-Vein Thrombosis. (nih.gov)
  • two patients were also diagnosed with splanchnic* and portal vein thrombosis. (cdc.gov)
  • Since no findings suggested thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, the patient underwent systemic heparinization and emergent mechanical thrombectomy with balloon transluminal angioplasty, a stent retriever and an aspiration catheter. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Knowledge of the anatomy of the venous system is essential in evaluating patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), since symptoms associated with the condition are related to the area of thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • For example, cerebral infarction may occur with cortical vein or sagittal sinus thrombosis secondary to tissue congestion with obstruction. (medscape.com)
  • Lateral sinus thrombosis may be associated with headache and a pseudotumor cerebri-like picture. (medscape.com)
  • Extension into the jugular bulb may cause jugular foramen syndrome, while cranial nerve palsies may be seen in cavernous sinus thrombosis as a compressive phenomenon. (medscape.com)
  • Cerebral hemorrhage also may be a presenting feature in patients with venous sinus thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Imaging procedures have led to easier recognition of venous sinus thrombosis (see the images below), offering the opportunity for early therapeutic measures. (medscape.com)
  • Left lateral sinus thrombosis demonstrated on magnetic resonance venography (MRV). (medscape.com)
  • Postoperative brain magnetic resonance venography imaging showed superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. (bezmialem.edu.tr)
  • Sagittal sinus thrombosis may present with motor deficits, bilateral deficits, and seizures. (emdocs.net)
  • Thrombosis of the left transverse sinus can present as aphasia. (emdocs.net)
  • Thrombosis of the deep venous sinus can cause behavioral symptoms due to lesions in the thalamus. (emdocs.net)
  • Early prophylaxis in surgical patients with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) has been associated with significant reductions in postoperative venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • This finding may lead to a false sense of security because although the total number of deep venous thrombi may be similar to the numbers observed with pharmacologic prophylaxis, the proportion of the relatively more dangerous proximal clots is increased (see Table 1 below). (medscape.com)
  • Anticoagulant treatment references Almost all patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are given anticoagulants and in rare cases thrombolytics. (msdmanuals.com)
  • To determine the clinical, laboratory, and computed tomography (CT) findings that indicate transmural necrosis in patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis (AMVT). (icrjournal.ir)
  • The study included a total of 18 patients (12 women and 6 men, aged from 22 to 51 years, mean age 34 years) with newly onset unilateral acute thrombosis of deep veins in the system of inferior vena cava, confirmed by the findings of ultrasound duplex scanning. (angiolsurgery.org)
  • The patients had no apparent risk factors for venous thromboembolic complications, they had not used antiplatelet drugs during the last month and were characterized by a low level of risk for cardiovascular complications. (angiolsurgery.org)
  • Superficial venous thrombosis or phlebitis affects the superficial veins of the upper or lower extremity and only require anticoagulation in specific situations, and may be treated with anti-inflammatory pain relief only. (wikipedia.org)
  • Superficial venous thromboses cause discomfort but generally not serious consequences, as do the deep vein thromboses (DVTs) that form in the deep veins of the legs or in the pelvic veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comparison of day surgery between varicose veins with and without superficial venous thrombosis below knee: a propensity score-matched analysis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) of lower extremities is a common complication of VV. (bvsalud.org)
  • Evidence Central , evidence.unboundmedicine.com/evidence/view/EBMG/454734/all/Retinal_venous_thrombosis. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • CT venography showing bilateral deep venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • In this report, we present a patient with subdural empyema, brain abscess, and superior sagittal cerebral venous thrombosis as complications of rhinosinusitis whose purulent empyema sample yielded S. anginosus. (bezmialem.edu.tr)
  • However, external iliac and femoro-popliteal venous thrombosis was diagnosed subsequently, inferior vena cava filter (IVC) filter was immediately planting accompanied with anticoagulation therapy. (researchsquare.com)
  • Venous thrombi are caused mainly by a combination of venous stasis and hypercoagulability-but to a lesser extent endothelial damage and activation. (wikipedia.org)
  • IPC devices are designed to decrease venous stasis, improve blood flow velocity, and increase the level of circulating fibrinolysins. (medscape.com)
  • The obtained experimental data suggest that acute venous thrombosis is accompanied by alterations in the work of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, associated with endothelial dysfunction. (angiolsurgery.org)
  • acute venous thrombosis, endothelial dysfunction, von Willebrand factor. (angiolsurgery.org)
  • [ 2 ] and as many as 50% of those with image-documented venous thrombosis lack specific symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • A Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot that forms in the deep veins in the body. (southnassau.org)
  • Thrombosis of the venous channels in the brain is an uncommon cause of cerebral infarction relative to arterial disease, but it is an important consideration because of its potential morbidity. (medscape.com)
  • The management and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may be different from that of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). (nus.edu.sg)
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is marked by arterial, venous, or small vessel thrombosis. (caspjim.com)
  • Arrows indicate bilateral deep venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Antithrombotic therapy for VTE disease: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. (nih.gov)
  • citation needed] While venous thrombosis of the legs is the most common form, venous thrombosis may occur in other veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous thrombosis is blockage of a vein caused by a thrombus (blood clot). (wikipedia.org)
  • As red blood cells flow through the vein, slower moving cells and other blood elements accumulate on the venous valves, creating a stationary blood clot, or thrombus, blocking the blood flow in the vein. (doereport.com)
  • Title : A systematic review and meta‐analysis of venous thrombosis risk among users of combined oral contraception Personal Author(s) : Dragoman, Monica V.;Tepper, Naomi K.;Fu, Rongwei;Curtis, Kathryn M.;Chou, Roger;Gaffield, Mary E. (cdc.gov)
  • Anticoagulants Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is clotting of blood in a deep vein of an extremity (usually calf or thigh) or the pelvis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • There have been few reported cases on APS presenting as thrombosis simultaneously involving large arteries and venous side of the blood circulation. (caspjim.com)
  • However, few reports have described the occurrence of venous thrombosis after messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccination. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Simultaneous thrombosis in large arteries and veins is a very unusual presentation for the APS. (caspjim.com)