Forced expiratory effort against a closed GLOTTIS.
The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.
The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.
Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.
Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.
Soft tissue formed mainly by the pelvic diaphragm, which is composed of the two levator ani and two coccygeus muscles. The pelvic diaphragm lies just below the pelvic aperture (outlet) and separates the pelvic cavity from the PERINEUM. It extends between the PUBIC BONE anteriorly and the COCCYX posteriorly.
Blockage of an artery due to passage of a clot (THROMBUS) from a systemic vein to a systemic artery without its passing through the lung which acts as a filter to remove blood clots from entering the arterial circulation. Paradoxical embolism occurs when there is a defect that allows a clot to cross directly from the right to the left side of the heart as in the cases of ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECTS or open FORAMEN OVALE. Once in the arterial circulation, a clot can travel to the brain, block an artery, and cause a STROKE.
A degenerative disease of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM that is characterized by idiopathic ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION and a greatly reduced level of CATECHOLAMINES. No other neurological deficits are present.
The position or attitude of the body.
A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.
A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.
Conditions in which the primary symptom is HEADACHE and the headache cannot be attributed to any known causes.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
The posture of an individual lying face up.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be breathed in and blown out over a sustained interval such as 15 or 20 seconds. Common abbreviations are MVV and MBC.
Presence of air or gas within the intracranial cavity (e.g., epidural space, subdural space, intracerebral, etc.) which may result from traumatic injuries, fistulous tract formation, erosions of the skull from NEOPLASMS or infection, NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES, and other conditions.
Antimuscarinic quaternary ammonium derivative of scopolamine used to treat cramps in gastrointestinal, urinary, uterine, and biliary tracts, and to facilitate radiologic visualization of the gastrointestinal tract.
Downward displacement of the UTERUS. It is classified in various degrees: in the first degree the UTERINE CERVIX is within the vaginal orifice; in the second degree the cervix is outside the orifice; in the third degree the entire uterus is outside the orifice.
The graphic recording of chest wall movement due to cardiac impulses.
An abnormally low volume of blood circulating through the body. It may result in hypovolemic shock (see SHOCK).
An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.
Moving a patient into a specific position or POSTURE to facilitate examination, surgery, or for therapeutic purposes.
A condition characterized by the dilated tortuous veins of the SPERMATIC CORD with a marked left-sided predominance. Adverse effect on male fertility occurs when varicocele leads to an increased scrotal (and testicular) temperature and reduced testicular volume.
A standard and widely accepted diagnostic test used to identify patients who have a vasodepressive and/or cardioinhibitory response as a cause of syncope. (From Braunwald, Heart Disease, 7th ed)
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.
The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Posture while lying with the head lower than the rest of the body. Extended time in this position is associated with temporary physiologic disturbances.
Control of bleeding during or after surgery.
A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.

Contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the detection of right-to-left shunts. Reproducibility, comparison of 2 agents, and distribution of microemboli. (1/358)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cardiac right-to-left shunts can be identified by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) with the use of different contrast agents and by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Systematic data are available on neither the reproducibility of contrast TCD, the comparison of different contrast agents, nor the comparison of simultaneous bilateral to unilateral recordings. Furthermore, we assessed the side distribution of thus provoked artificial cardiac emboli. METHODS: Fifty-four patients were investigated by TEE and by bilateral TCD of the middle cerebral artery. The following protocol was performed twice: injection of 9 mL of agitated saline without Valsalva maneuver, injection of 9 mL of agitated saline with Valsalva maneuver, injection of 5 mL of a commercial galactose-based contrast agent without Valsalva maneuver, and injection of 5 mL of the galactose-based contrast agent with Valsalva maneuver. RESULTS: In 18 patients, a right-to-left shunt was demonstrated by TEE and contrast TCD (shunt positive). Twenty-nine patients were negative in both investigations, 1 was positive on TEE and negative on TCD, and 6 patients were only positive on TCD. Both bilateral and repeated recordings increased the sensitivity of contrast TCD. There was a symmetrical distribution of microembolic signals in the right and left middle cerebral artery. CONCLUSIONS: TCD performed twice and with the use of saline or a galactose-based contrast agent is a sensitive method in the identification of cardiac right-to-left shunts also identified by TEE. The cardiac microemboli in this study did not show any side preference for one of the middle cerebral arteries.  (+info)

Physiological reflux and venous diameter change in the proximal lower limb veins during a standardised Valsalva manoeuvre. (2/358)

OBJECTIVES: the aim of this study was to provide normal values for venous diameter at rest, and venous diameter and physiologic venous reflux during a standardised Valsalva manoeuvre. The impact of the patient's sex, body mass index (BMI), and family history was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: eighty legs of 40 healthy volunteers were investigated in a supine position. The median age was 28 years (range 20-66 years). The common femoral vein (CFV), the proximal superficial femoral vein (SFV) and the proximal long saphenous vein (LSV) were investigated by duplex sonography. The following parameters were assessed: resting diameter (VDrest) and maximum diameter (VDmax) as well as reflux time (tr) during the Valsalva manoeuvre. The Valsalva manoeuvre was elicited by a forceful expiration into a tube system. The standard values used were a pressure of 30 mmHg, established within 0.5 seconds (s) and maintained over a time period of at least 3 s. RESULTS: mean VDrest and VDmax were 8.3+/-2.2 and 11.1+/-2.8 mm in the CFV, 5.9+/-1. 3 and 7.2+/-1.6 mm in the SFV and 3.5+/-0.9 and 4.3+/-1.4 mm in the LSV. Mean values for tr were 0.61+/-0.63 s in the CFV, 0.25+/-0.26 s in the SFV and 0.28+/-0.40 s in the LSV. A BMI >22.5 kg/m2 was associated with statistically significant larger values for VDrest and tr. If adjusted for BMI, tr in the SFV and the LSV did not differ by sex. For healthy subjects with first-degree relatives suffering from varicose veins (n=19), mean VDrest in the SFV as well as VD in the LSV was significantly larger (p=0.02, 0.05, respectively). Coefficients of variation for repeated measurements (VDrest, VDmax, tr) in the same segment varied between 3.3% and 16. 4% for the three investigated sites. CONCLUSIONS: normal values for VDrest and VDmax as well as reflux time during a standardised Valsalva manouevre were assessed in the proximal lower limb veins. The influences of BMI, sex and family history were investigated. The described standardised Valsalva manoeuvre led to highly reproducible results and can be recommended for further research projects or as a routine procedure for the assessment of venous reflux.  (+info)

Methodological parameters influence the detection of right-to-left shunts by contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. (3/358)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasonography is a new method to detect intracardiac right-to-left shunts, such as the patent foramen ovale. However, the methodology of the procedure varies considerably among investigators. This study was undertaken to assess the influence of methodological parameters on the results of the contrast transcranial Doppler examination in the detection of right-to-left shunts. METHODS: A total of 72 patients (mean age, 58.2+/-14.7 years) had a contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasonography examination. To study the influence of methodological factors, patients with evidence of a right-to-left shunt underwent repeated examinations with modified procedures. Parameters under investigation were the timing of the Valsalva maneuver, the dose of the contrast medium, and the patient's posture during the examination. RESULTS: The median contrast signal count was 58.5 and 48.0 (P<0.001) and the median latency of the first intracranially detected contrast signal was 12.5 and 8.5 seconds (P=0.05) when the Valsalva maneuver was performed 5 and 0 seconds after the start of the injection, respectively. Reducing the contrast medium dose from 10 to 5, 2.5, and 1.2 mL resulted in a decline of the median signal count from 54.5 to 28.5, 20.5, and 12.0 (P<0.01), respectively, while the latency of the first contrast signal increased from 13.3 to 14.0, 14.6, and 15.0 seconds (P<0.05). The sitting position also produced a lower signal count than the supine position (P<0.02). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that several essential methodological parameters influence the results of the contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasonography examination. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the procedure to permit comparable quantitative assessments of the shunt volume. The findings of the present study suggest that 10 mL of contrast medium be injected with the patient in the supine position and that the Valsalva maneuver be performed 5 seconds after the start of the injection.  (+info)

Ultrasonographic diagnosis and color flow Doppler sonography of internal jugular venous ectasia in children. (4/358)

We investigated the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of internal jugular venous ectasia. Eight children (six boys, two girls) were recruited into this prospective study. Sonography of internal jugular venous ectasia in these patients revealed fusiform dilation of the internal jugular vein, and the possibility of thrombus and external compression could be ruled out. Marked variation in size of ectatic jugular veins during respiration was demonstrated under real-time sonography. The mean anteroposterior diameter of these dilated internal jugular veins was 0.79+/-0.18 mm (mean+/-standard deviation), which increased to 1.58+/-0.27 mm with Valsalva maneuver. Our study showed that the anteroposterior diameters of the internal jugular veins in cases of ectasia were greater than those of contralateral jugular veins in same patients as well as those in normal children, and they showed greater increase after Valsalva maneuver. Under color Doppler flow studies, turbulent vascular flows were demonstrated in these patients with jugular venous ectasia. No progression of venous ectasia was found in any of our patients during a 6 month follow-up period. We conclude that internal jugular venous ectasia in children is a benign condition, which usually does not require surgical intervention. Ultrasonography is a good diagnostic modality for the diagnosis of internal jugular venous ectasia. Color Doppler ultrasonography demonstrate the turbulent flow in jugular venous ectasia.  (+info)

Acute manipulations of plasma volume alter arterial pressure responses during Valsalva maneuvers. (5/358)

The effects of changes in blood volume on arterial pressure patterns during the Valsalva maneuver are incompletely understood. In the present study we measured beat-to-beat arterial pressure and heart rate responses to supine Valsalva maneuvers during normovolemia, hypovolemia induced with intravenous furosemide, and hypervolemia induced with ingestion of isotonic saline. Valsalva responses were analyzed according to the four phases as previously described (W. F. Hamilton, R. A. Woodbury, and H. T. Harper, Jr. JAMA 107: 853-856, 1936; W. F. Hamilton, R. A. Woodbury, and H. T. Harper, Jr. Am. J. Physiol. 141: 42-50, 1944). Phase I is the initial onset of straining, which elicits a rise in arterial pressure; phase II is the period of straining, during which venous return is impeded and pressure falls (early) and then partially recovers (late); phase III is the initial release of straining; and phase IV consists of a rapid "overshoot" of arterial pressure after the release. During hypervolemia, early phase II arterial pressure decreases were significantly less than those during hypovolemia, thus making the response more "square." Systolic pressure hypervolemic vs. hypovolemic falls were -7.4 +/- 2.1 vs. -30.7 +/- 7 mmHg (P = 0.005). Diastolic pressure hypervolemic vs. hypovolemic falls were -2.4 +/- 1.6 vs. -15.2 +/- 2.6 mmHg (P = 0.05). A significant direct correlation was found between plasma volume and phase II systolic pressure falls, and a significant inverse correlation was found between plasma volume and phase III-IV systolic pressure overshoots. Heart rate responses to systolic pressure falls during phase II were significantly less during hypovolemia than during hypervolemia (0.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.82 +/- 0.2 beats. min-1. mmHg-1; P = 0.05) but were not different during phase III-IV overshoots. We conclude that acute changes in intravascular volume from hypovolemia to hypervolemia affect cardiovascular responses, particularly arterial pressure changes, to the Valsalva maneuver and should be considered in both clinical and research applications of this maneuver.  (+info)

Older subjects show no age-related decrease in cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity. (6/358)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between age, blood pressure and cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity derived from spectral analysis, the Valsalva manoeuvre and impulse response function. METHODS: We studied 70 healthy normotensive volunteers who were free from disease and not taking medication with cardiovascular or autonomic effects. We measured beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure and used standard surface electrocardiography to record pulse interval under standardized conditions with subjects resting supine as well as during three Valsalva manoeuvres. We performed single, multiple and stepwise regression of patient characteristics against cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity results. RESULTS: There is a non-linear decline in cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity with advancing age, increasing systolic blood pressure and heart rate values (except for the Valsalva-derived result), but little further decline after the fourth decade. Only age significantly influenced values derived using the Valsalva manoeuvre and impulse response analysis. Using spectral analysis, age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate influenced cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity, age contributing to 50% of the variability. Age also influenced the relationship between pulse interval and blood pressure, possibly indicating more non-baroreceptor-mediated changes with advancing age. CONCLUSIONS: Although age is the dominant factor influencing cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity in this normotensive population, there is little change in mean values after 40 years of age. The differences in the relationship between pulse interval and blood pressure with advancing age have implications for the calculation of cardiac baroreceptor sensitivity using spectral analysis.  (+info)

Contrast transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the detection of right-to-left shunts: comparison of different procedures and different contrast agents. (7/358)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cardiac right-to-left shunts can be identified by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) with the use of different contrast agents and different provocation procedures. Currently, data on an appropriate time window for the appearance of contrast bubbles in the TCD recording after the injection of the contrast medium and the comparison of different provocation maneuvers to increase right-to-left shunting are insufficient. METHODS: Forty-six patients were investigated by both TEE and bilateral TCD of the middle cerebral artery. The following protocol with 6 injection modes was applied in a randomized way: (1) injection of 10 mL of agitated saline without Valsalva maneuver, (2) injection of 10 mL of agitated saline with Valsalva maneuver, (3) injection of 10 mL of a commercial galactose-based contrast agent (Echovist) without Valsalva maneuver, (4) injection of 10 mL of Echovist with Valsalva maneuver, (5) injection of 10 mL of Echovist with standardized Valsalva maneuver, and (6) injection of 10 mL of Echovist with coughing. RESULTS: In 20 patients, a right-to-left shunt was demonstrated by TEE and contrast TCD (shunt-positive). Sixteen patients were negative in both investigations, no patient was positive on TEE and negative on TCD, and 10 patients were only positive on at least 1 TCD investigation but negative during TEE. The amount of microbubbles detected in the various tests decreased in the following order: Echovist and Valsalva maneuver, Echovist with coughing, Echovist and standardized Valsalva maneuver, saline with Valsalva maneuver, Echovist, and saline. With a time window of 20 to 25 seconds for the bubbles to appear in the TCD recording and with a sequence of first Echovist and Valsalva maneuver and then Echovist with coughing, all shunts were reliably identified with a specificity of 65% compared with TEE as the traditional gold standard. The time of first microbubble appearance was not helpful to distinguish between shunts detected on TEE and other shunts. CONCLUSIONS: TCD performed twice with 2 provocation maneuvers using Echovist is a sensitive method to identify cardiac right-to-left shunts also identified by TEE.  (+info)

The effect of pregnancy on the lower-limb venous system of women with varicose veins. (8/358)

OBJECTIVES: to assess the effect of pregnancy on the lower-limb venous system of women with varicose veins. Design a longitudinal prospective study of 11 pregnant women, with varicose vein disease. METHODS: eleven pregnant women with varicose veins were recruited as part of a larger study. Veins were assessed in both lower limbs using colour-flow duplex scanning at a 75 degrees head-up tilt. The diameter and velocity and duration of reflux were measured in each vein at 12, 20, 26, 34, 38 weeks gestation and 6 weeks postpartum. RESULTS: eleven women had reflux and varicose veins demonstrated at first scan. All veins dilated with increasing gestation. This was maximal in the superficial system, reaching significance (p+info)

Autonomic Nervous System Diseases (ANSDs) refer to a group of disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system (ANS), which is responsible for regulating involuntary bodily functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and breathing. The ANS is divided into two branches: the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). ANSDs can affect either or both branches of the ANS, leading to a range of symptoms and complications. Some common ANSDs include: 1. Multiple System Atrophy (MSA): a progressive disorder that affects the ANS, causing symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and difficulty swallowing. 2. Parkinson's Disease: a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the ANS, leading to symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and difficulty with balance and coordination. 3. Autonomic Failure: a group of disorders that affect the ANS, causing symptoms such as low blood pressure, dizziness, and fainting. 4. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS): a disorder that affects the ANS, causing symptoms such as rapid heart rate, dizziness, and fainting when standing up. 5. Orthostatic Hypotension: a disorder that affects the ANS, causing symptoms such as dizziness, fainting, and low blood pressure when standing up. Treatment for ANSDs depends on the specific disorder and its severity. In some cases, medications may be used to manage symptoms, while in other cases, lifestyle changes or surgery may be necessary.

Heart septal defects, atrial, also known as atrial septal defects (ASDs), are a type of heart defect that occurs when there is a hole in the wall (septum) that separates the two upper chambers of the heart, the atria. This hole allows blood to flow from one atrium to the other, which can cause a variety of symptoms and complications. ASDs can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life (acquired). They are more common in females than males and are often associated with other heart defects. Symptoms of ASDs may include shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, and a heart murmur. In some cases, ASDs may not cause any symptoms and may be discovered incidentally during a routine physical examination or imaging test. Treatment for ASDs depends on the size and location of the defect, as well as the presence of any associated heart problems. Small ASDs may not require treatment and may close on their own over time. Larger ASDs may require surgery or other medical interventions to repair the defect and improve heart function.

Embolism, paradoxical refers to a type of blood clot that forms in a vein and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs, where it can cause a blockage in the pulmonary arteries. This type of embolism is called paradoxical because it occurs in the opposite direction of normal blood flow, which is from the veins to the heart and then to the lungs. Paradoxical embolism is typically caused by a hole or abnormal connection between the veins and the heart, such as a patent foramen ovale (PFO), which is a common congenital heart defect. Other risk factors for paradoxical embolism include deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is a blood clot in a deep vein, and certain medical conditions such as cancer, pregnancy, and heart failure. Symptoms of paradoxical embolism may include shortness of breath, chest pain, coughing up blood, and rapid heartbeat. Treatment typically involves anticoagulant therapy to prevent further clots from forming and surgery to repair the abnormal connection between the veins and the heart if present.

Pure autonomic failure (PAF) is a rare disorder characterized by the gradual loss of function of the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary bodily functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and sweating. In PAF, the autonomic nervous system fails to function properly, leading to symptoms such as dizziness, fainting, fatigue, and difficulty regulating body temperature. The disorder is typically diagnosed based on a combination of symptoms, physical examination, and tests that measure autonomic function. PAF is a progressive disorder, meaning that the symptoms typically worsen over time. There is currently no cure for PAF, but treatment can help manage symptoms and prevent complications. Treatment may include medications to regulate blood pressure and heart rate, physical therapy to improve balance and prevent falls, and lifestyle changes such as a healthy diet and regular exercise.

Hypotension, orthostatic refers to a drop in blood pressure that occurs when a person stands up from a seated or lying position. This type of hypotension is also known as postural hypotension or orthostatic hypotension. When a person stands up, the blood has to work against gravity to pump blood to the brain and other parts of the body. If the blood vessels in the legs and feet do not constrict properly, as they should when a person stands up, the blood may not be able to flow to the brain quickly enough, leading to a drop in blood pressure. Symptoms of orthostatic hypotension may include dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and blurred vision. It is more common in older adults, particularly those who are taking certain medications, such as alpha blockers or diuretics, or who have certain medical conditions, such as Parkinson's disease or diabetes. Treatment for orthostatic hypotension may include lifestyle changes, such as drinking plenty of fluids and avoiding standing up too quickly, as well as medications to help constrict blood vessels and increase blood pressure. In severe cases, medical intervention may be necessary to prevent serious complications.

Primary headache disorders are a group of conditions characterized by recurrent headaches that are not caused by an underlying medical condition or neurological disorder. These disorders are classified into three main categories: migraine, tension-type headache, and cluster headache. Migraine is a severe, recurring headache that is often accompanied by other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light and sound, and visual disturbances. Tension-type headache is a common type of headache that is characterized by a dull, aching pain that is usually located on both sides of the head. Cluster headache is a rare but severe type of headache that is characterized by intense, one-sided pain around the eye, often accompanied by tearing, nasal congestion, and redness of the eye. Primary headache disorders are typically treated with medications such as analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and triptans, as well as lifestyle changes such as stress management, regular exercise, and maintaining a healthy diet. In some cases, alternative therapies such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and relaxation techniques may also be helpful in managing symptoms.

Foramen ovale, patent refers to a condition in which the foramen ovale, a small opening in the heart's septum that normally closes shortly after birth, remains open in an adult. This can be a normal variation in some individuals, but in other cases, it may be associated with certain medical conditions such as atrial septal defect (ASD), pulmonary hypertension, or venous thromboembolism. A patent foramen ovale can sometimes cause blood to flow from the right side of the heart to the left side, which can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and dizziness. Treatment options for a patent foramen ovale may include medication, catheter-based procedures, or surgery, depending on the severity of the condition and the presence of any associated symptoms.

Pneumocephalus is a medical condition in which air or gas enters the cranial cavity, causing the brain to be surrounded by air. This can occur due to a variety of causes, including head trauma, surgery, or spontaneous rupture of a blood vessel in the brain. Symptoms of pneumocephalus may include headache, nausea, vomiting, double vision, and hearing loss. Treatment typically involves the removal of the air or gas from the cranial cavity, either through a surgical procedure or by using a procedure called a decompressive craniectomy.

Butylscopolammonium Bromide is a quaternary ammonium compound that is commonly used as an antiseptic and disinfectant in the medical field. It is a white, crystalline powder that is soluble in water and has a bitter taste. Butylscopolammonium Bromide is effective against a wide range of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. It is often used in hospitals and clinics to disinfect surfaces, equipment, and medical instruments. It is also used in personal care products such as hand sanitizers, soaps, and shampoos. However, Butylscopolammonium Bromide can be toxic if ingested or inhaled in large quantities. It can cause skin irritation, eye irritation, and respiratory problems. Therefore, it is important to use it according to the instructions and to avoid contact with the skin and eyes.

Uterine prolapse is a medical condition in which the uterus, the muscular organ that contains and nourishes a developing fetus, drops down into the vagina or even outside of the body. This can occur due to weakened or damaged muscles and ligaments that support the uterus, which can be caused by childbirth, aging, menopause, or chronic coughing or constipation. Symptoms of uterine prolapse may include a feeling of heaviness in the pelvis, a bulge or lump in the vagina, difficulty emptying the bladder or bowels, and pain during intercourse or when coughing or sneezing. In severe cases, the uterus may protrude so much that it is visible outside of the body. Treatment for uterine prolapse may include lifestyle changes, such as weight loss or quitting smoking, as well as physical therapy to strengthen the muscles and ligaments that support the uterus. In more severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or remove the damaged tissues and restore the uterus to its proper position.

Hypovolemia is a medical condition characterized by a decrease in the volume of blood circulating in the body. This can occur due to various reasons, including blood loss, dehydration, or certain medical conditions that affect the body's ability to retain fluids. Symptoms of hypovolemia may include dizziness, lightheadedness, weakness, rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and cold, clammy skin. In severe cases, hypovolemia can lead to shock, which is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. Treatment for hypovolemia depends on the underlying cause. In cases of blood loss, such as from trauma or surgery, blood transfusions may be necessary to restore blood volume. In cases of dehydration, fluids and electrolytes may be administered intravenously to replace lost fluids and minerals. In some cases, medications may be prescribed to help the body retain fluids or increase blood volume.

An aortic aneurysm is a bulge or dilation in the wall of the aorta, which is the largest artery in the body. It occurs when the wall of the aorta becomes weakened and begins to balloon outwards. Aneurysms can occur in any part of the aorta, but the most common location is in the abdominal aorta, just below the kidneys. Aneurysms can be caused by a variety of factors, including high blood pressure, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), smoking, and genetic conditions such as Marfan syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. They can also be caused by injury or infection. Aortic aneurysms can be asymptomatic, meaning that they do not cause any noticeable symptoms. However, if the aneurysm becomes large enough, it can cause pain in the abdomen or back, and in severe cases, it can rupture, leading to life-threatening internal bleeding. Treatment for aortic aneurysms depends on the size and location of the aneurysm, as well as the patient's overall health. Small aneurysms may be monitored with regular imaging tests, while larger aneurysms may require surgery to repair or replace the affected section of the aorta. In some cases, endovascular repair, a minimally invasive procedure, may be used to treat aneurysms.

Varicocele is a medical condition in which the veins in the scrotum become enlarged and twisted, usually due to a blockage or weakness in the valves that control blood flow. This can lead to a buildup of blood in the veins, causing them to become engorged and twisted. Varicocele is most commonly seen in men, and it is often associated with infertility. It is typically diagnosed through a physical examination and imaging tests such as ultrasound. Treatment options for varicocele may include medication, surgery, or other procedures to improve blood flow and reduce swelling.

... effectiveness of the conventional Valsalva maneuver in terminating supraventricular tachycardia. The Valsalva maneuver is used ... The Valsalva maneuver is used to aid diagnosis of intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD) in urodynamic tests. Valsalva leak ... Valsalva retinopathy is pathological syndrome associated with the Valsalva maneuver. It presents as preretinal hemorrhage ( ... then the Valsalva maneuver may be used. This maneuver, when used as a tool to equalize middle ear pressure, carries with it the ...
Valsalva maneuver. Valsalva maneuver has utility in detecting hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). According to one ... Valsalva maneuver, as well as standing, decrease venous return to the heart. As a result, this decreases left ventricular ... In this scenario, valsalva maneuver will decrease left ventricular preload. This will move the murmur onset closer to S1. ... Valsalva maneuver will increase the intensity of the murmur. Going from squatting to standing will also increase the intensity ...
"Ocular Manifestations Of Valsalva Maneuver". Clinical and Refractive Optometry. Ophthalmology (Fifth ed.). Edinburgh: Elsevier ... "Valsalva Retinopathy: Vision loss after asthma attack". "Valsalva Retinopathy - EyeWiki". eyewiki.aao.org. Retrieved 2022-04-24 ... Valsalva retinopathy is a form of sub-retinal, sub-hyaloid or sub-internal limiting membrane hemorrhage occur due to rupture of ... Valsalva retinopathy is a form of retinopathy due to retinal bleeding secondary to rupture of retinal vessels caused by ...
... the reverse of a Valsalva maneuver. This technique is designed to look for collapsed sections of airways such as the trachea ... Müller's maneuver is used to help determine the cause of sleep apnea. A positive test result means the site of upper airway ... This maneuver is very helpful in doing MRI for sleep apnea, when sedation to patient can be avoided. There is some evidence ... In this maneuver, the patient attempts to inhale with their mouth closed and their nostrils plugged, which leads to a collapse ...
A complementary maneuver for differentiating disorders is the Valsalva maneuver, which decreases preload. Valsalva maneuver ... The handgrip maneuver is performed by clenching one's fist forcefully for a sustained time until fatigued. Variations include ... Taylor, D (1996). "The Valsalva Manoeuvre: A critical review". South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society Journal. 26 (1). ISSN ... squeezing an item such as a rolled up washcloth.[citation needed] The handgrip maneuver increases afterload by squeezing the ...
Defecation can be facilitated by the Valsalva maneuver. This maneuver involves contraction of the chest muscles on a closed ... It is further possible that people succumb on the toilet to chronic constipation, because the Valsalva maneuver is often ... According to Sharon Mantik Lewis, Margaret McLean Heitkemper and Shannon Ruff Dirksen, the "Valsalva maneuver occurs during ...
Antonio Maria Valsalva, Italian physician - Valsalva maneuver, Valsalva device. Vanadis, synonym for the Norse mythological ...
When a Valsalva maneuver is performed during descent with the intention of opening the Eustachian tubes, but they do not open, ... Most of the methods are less likely than the Valsalva maneuver to cause collateral damage to the inner ear. The Eustachian ... Over-vigorous attempts to equalise using the Valsalva maneuver can lead to inner ear barotrauma Temporary or permanent hearing ... Archived from the original on 22 July 2009.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link) "Valsalva Maneuver". www.mercy.com. ...
"Valsalva maneuver". A simple exercise used to strengthen the abdominals (rectus abdominis, internal/external obliques, and ... Postural Effects on Intra-Abdominal Pressure During Valsalva Maneuver. Arch Phys Mad Rehabil ,, Vol75, 324-327. Anderson, ...
Junqueira, L. F. (2008). "Teaching cardiac autonomic function dynamics employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver". ... They suggested that because aerobic exercise is generally done without Valsalva maneuvers, it is unlikely that ICP will ... Haykowsky, Mark J.; Eves, Neil D.; r. Warburton, Darren E.; Findlay, Max J. (2003). "Resistance Exercise, the Valsalva Maneuver ... An early investigation showed that the brief intrathoracic pressure increase during a Valsalva maneuver resulted in an ...
Valsalva retinopathy is another pathological syndrome associated with the Valsalva maneuver. Thoracic blood pressure rises and ... Fisher-Hubbard AO, Kesha K, Diaz F, Njiwaji C, Chi P, Schmidt CJ (2016). "Commode Cardia-Death by Valsalva Maneuver: A Case ... Attempting forced expiration of breath against a closed airway (the Valsalva maneuver) is sometimes practiced to induce ... in releasing the Valsalva maneuver blood pressure falls; this, coupled with standing up quickly to leave the toilet, can result ...
"Validation of the qCO cardiac output monitor during Valsalva maneuver". 2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE ...
It, like the valsalva maneuver, is a therapy for SVT. However, it is less effective than management of SVT with medications. A ... "Comparison of treatment of supraventricular tachycardia by Valsalva maneuver and carotid sinus massage". Annals of Emergency ...
The glottis is also important in the Valsalva maneuver. Voiced consonants include /v/, /z/, /ʒ/, /d͡ʒ/, /ð/, /b/, /d/, /ɡ/, /w ...
Like the valsalva maneuver, it is a treatment for acute SVT. It is less effective than pharmaceutical management of SVT with ... "Comparison of treatment of supraventricular tachycardia by Valsalva maneuver and carotid sinus massage". Ann Emerg Med. 31 (1 ...
Wood, EH (1947). "Use of the Valsalva maneuver to increase man's tolerance to positive acceleration". Fed. Proc. 6 (1 Pt 2): ... The solutions the team arrived at were the M-1 breath hold maneuver and the G-suit. The M-1 maneuver consisted of a strained ... Wood, EH; Hallenbeck, GA (1946). "Voluntary (self-protective) maneuvers which can be used to increase man's tolerance to ...
On physical examination, a prominence or mass is seen during Valsalva maneuver.[citation needed] Asymptomatic lung hernias may ...
... response to the Valsalva maneuver". Archives of Internal Medicine. 137 (11): 1623-4. doi:10.1001/archinte.1977.03630230095027. ...
Sexual intercourse can also trigger a subarachnoid hemorrhage via the Valsalva maneuver. A 2011 meta-analysis published in ...
The subject is then instructed to stand up and Valsalva maneuver is performed. The diameter is then measured and changes in ... Grade 2 Varicocele: The varicocele is palpable not only during the Valsalva maneuver but also at rest while standing. Grade 3 ... Grade III: Reflux occurs in the distal vessels located at the lower scrotum exclusively during the Valsalva maneuver, and there ... Grade II: Reflux is limited to the proximal segment of the pampiniform plexus during the Valsalva maneuver, without scrotal ...
There is increased intrathoracic pressure and decreased cardiac output following the Valsalva maneuver. This eventually leads ...
"Defecation syncope secondary to functional inferior vena caval obstruction during a Valsalva maneuver". Annals of Vascular ...
The Valsalva maneuver can be carried out voluntarily but is more generally a reflex elicited when attempting to empty the ... Although not a form of breathing, the Valsalva maneuver involves the respiratory muscles. It is, in fact, a very forceful ... Breathing ceases during this maneuver. Mechanism of gas exchange The primary purpose of the respiratory system is the ... Taylor, D (1996). "The Valsalva Manoeuvre: A critical review". South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society Journal. 26 (1). ISSN ...
Heart rate turbulence Valsalva maneuver Bär, Karl-Jürgen (2015-06-24). "Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with ...
Daly, J. J.; Gray, F. G.; Massumi, R. (1962). "Circulatory Effects of the Valsalva Maneuver in Emphysema and the Influence of ...
Valsalva maneuver is performed to delay the flow of contrast medium into the thigh. Then, the subject is tilted in head down ... position and Valsalva maneuver is relaxed for contrast medium to flow into the pelvis. Alternatively, femoral vein can be ...
This can be relieved by ear clearing using the Valsalva maneuver or other techniques. Continued increase of pressure without ...
Vagal maneuvers, such as the Valsalva maneuver, are often used as the initial treatment. If not effective and the person has a ... These manipulations are collectively referred to as vagal maneuvers.[citation needed] The Valsalva maneuver should be the first ... "BestBets: Comparing Valsalva manoeuvre with carotid sinus massage in adults with supraventricular tachycardia". Archived from ... Adenosine, an ultra-short-acting AV nodal blocking agent, is indicated if vagal maneuvers are not effective. If unsuccessful or ...
Valsalva maneuver - when the patient performs this maneuver, he or she, increases intra-abdominal venous pressure. If the great ... The sapheno-femoral junction is tested by the Valsalva maneuver with the use of color Doppler being helpful at this stage. The ... The dynamic maneuvers also need to be well executed. The need of a specialized training is mandatory which is a huge problem ... Paraná maneuver makes use of a proprioceptive reflex to test venous muscle pump induced flow. (Proprioceptive refers to a ...
Middle ear Valsalva maneuver to equalize pressure across the eardrum Anatomy of the human right ear. Brown is outer ear. Red is ...
Valsalva Maneuver. imaging. abdomen. breathing technique. breathing control. Radiology. heart. pressure. test. breath. LML. ... Patient information in Farsi on how to perform a simple breathing technique called Valsalva Maneuver to help with the ... Patient information in Farsi on how to perform a simple breathing technique called Valsalva Maneuver to help with the ... How to Do a Valsalva Maneuver (Chinese Traditional) - EC.600.H69.CN ...
Valsalva maneuver. To do this, you hold your breath and strain, as if you were trying to have a bowel movement. ... You have a history of PSVT and an episode does not go away with the Valsalva maneuver or by coughing. ...
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of CT with Valsalva maneuver for the diagnosis and ... Diagnostic performance of CT with Valsalva maneuver for the diagnosis and characterization of inguinal hernias. ... Diagnostic performance of CT with Valsalva maneuver for the diagnosis and characterization ... Valsalva-CT shows very high specificity and high accuracy for the diagnosis of inguinal hernia. Sensitivity is only moderate ...
Valsalva maneuver. The Valsalva maneuver is a breathing technique that your child can use to try to unclog their ears. To ... perform the maneuver, have your child pinch their nostrils and keep their mouth closed. Then tell them to try forcibly blowing ...
Valsalva retinopathy was first described in 1972 by Thomas Duane as ... The Valsalva maneuver was named after the Italian anatomist Antonio Maria Valsalva, who defined the Valsalva ligaments and ... Initial presentation of a Valsalva retinopathy less than 24 hours following a Valsalva maneuver in an 18-year-old man. Note the ... Initial presentation of a Valsalva retinopathy less than 24 hours following a Valsalva maneuver in an 18-year-old man. Note the ...
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of MR imaging to assess the CSF flow response to a Valsalva maneuver in ... The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of MR imaging to assess the CSF flow response to a Valsalva maneuver in ... The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of MR imaging to assess the CSF flow response to a Valsalva maneuver in ... The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of MR imaging to assess the CSF flow response to a Valsalva maneuver in ...
Behavioral management techniques include timed voiding, Valsalva and Credé maneuvers, and pelvic floor exercises. Urinary ...
Valsalva maneuver. *Hip extension past neutral (walking lunges, back/hip extensions, glute "kickbacks") ... Valsalva (holding your breath and bearing down) - This is a technique often used by experienced weightlifters during exercises ...
Headaches provoked by Valsalva maneuver. Arnold-Chiari malformation. History of sudden onset of headache. Subarachnoid ... Onset from cough or Valsalva maneuver; generalized pain; lasts from 1 second to 30 minutes; must rule out secondary causes. ...
Larger pressure changes can be more injurious, especially with forceful attempts at equilibration (e.g., the Valsalva maneuver ... Most injuries among divers are the result of chance encounters or defensive maneuvers of marine life. Wounds from marine life ...
When he performs Valsalva maneuver, urine leaks through this opening. * Close-up view in patient who has urethral fistula ...
and locking it in with a valsalva maneuver is typically part of this process. In some cases-. for example,. if you are pregnant ...
A simple test of cardiac function based upon the heart rate changes induced by the Valsalva maneuver. American Journal of ... Reflex and mechanical circulatory effects of graded Valsalva maneuvers in normal man. Journal of Applied Physiology, 1976, 40: ... Valsalva manoeuvre [13]. The valsalva manoeuvre comprises abrupt, transient and voluntary elevation of intra-thoracic and intra ... Valsalva ratio = longest R-R interval after manoeuvre (phase IV)/shortest R-R interval during manoeuvre (phase II). ...
Valsalva maneuver) with sphincter relaxation. Detrusor myomectomy may be done to decrease undesired bladder contractions. As a ... If cough triggers incontinence, the maneuver can be repeated while the examiner places 1 or 2 fingers inside the vagina to ... Incontinence may occur or worsen with maneuvers that increase intra-abdominal pressure. Postvoid dribbling is extremely common ... If bladder function is not fully restored, maneuvers to augment voiding are used. Examples include ...
Have patient perform a valsalva maneuver and reexamine the hepatic veins. Correct Answer. B. Evaluate the hepatic veins and IVC ...
If you search, "How to do the Valsalva Maneuver?" youll find some helpful instructions on how to perform the maneuver and we ... If you search, "How to do the Valsalva Maneuver?" youll find some helpful instructions on how to perform the maneuver and we ... One of the methods, the Valsalva Maneuver, involves plugging the nose while applying slight blowing pressure while holding ... One of the methods, the Valsalva Maneuver, involves plugging the nose while applying slight blowing pressure while holding ...
The subjects performed a physiologic exercise called a Valsalva maneuver to temporarily modulate the cardiovascular system. Two ...
When clinically advisable for PSVT, appropriate vagal maneuvers (eg, Valsalva maneuver), should be attempted prior to adenosine ...
If a patient moves his head during or within the 30 seconds after the Valsalva Maneuver, he can actually inhibit this reflex ... Learning about the baroreceptor reflex was very helpful in performing the Valsalva Maneuver appropriately. When performing ... Ideas and maneuvers to translate our job and its description to patients by being able to relate to generational phrases or ... Valsalva, explaining to your patients what is being done and how the test works is extremely beneficial. The baroreceptor ...
Successful fitting is defined as a comfortable fit with retention of the pessary during the Valsalva maneuver and voiding. ... Genital hiatus (GH) was measured at rest and with Valsalva during the POPQ exam; as the measures were not markedly different, ... A ring pessary that produces a Valsalva HARP ratio , 5.00 has a higher risk of dislodgment/failure to relieve POP symptoms. ... Rest HARP ratio and Valsalva HARP ratio were significantly smaller in the successful trials versus dislodgment/failure to ...
The Valsalva maneuver reduces venous return by increasing intrathoracic pressure. If there is a venous hum, this usually abates ...
BACKGROUND: The Valsalva maneuver (VL) is a well-documented assessment of autonomic function, and is characterized by 5 ... BACKGROUND: The Valsalva maneuver (VL) is a well-documented assessment of autonomic function, and is characterized by 5 ... COMBINED INFLUENCE OF POSTURE AND ISOMETRIC HANDGRIP ON PHASE IIA RESPONSES TO THE VALSALVA MANEUVER ... "COMBINED INFLUENCE OF POSTURE AND ISOMETRIC HANDGRIP ON PHASE IIA RESPONSES TO THE VALSALVA MANEUVER," International Journal of ...
... and barotrauma occurring with Valsalvas maneuver. CASE REPORT This is a case of a previously healthy 22-year-old who presented ...
Valsalva maneuver. The Valsalva maneuver provides a measure of sympathetic, vagal, and baroreceptor function. This maneuver has ... Diagnostic value of the Valsalva ratio reduction in diabetic autonomic neuropathy: use of an age-related normal range. Diabet ... as measured by changes in heart rate variability in response to Valsalva and lower body negative pressure. [20, 21] ... during the expiratory phase of the maneuver].) ...
This distention is best demonstrated by breath holding in inspiration or a Valsalva maneuver.. Do not mistake this for a hiatal ... Various maneuvers during the examination have been used to increase sensitivity, but these are generally discredited as not ...
Straining and valsalva maneuvers can put stress on this area, and herniation of abdominal contents through this potential space ...
Valsalva Maneuvers use Valsalva Maneuver Valsalva Sinus use Sinus of Valsalva Valsalvas Maneuver use Valsalva Maneuver ...
Valsalva Maneuver Think of an action that helps relieve congestion in the ears during air flight. It has a beautiful name " ... "Valsalva maneuver" and serves to equalize the pressure in the internal cavities of the skull with the pressure of the ... None of these maneuvers have been clinically tested, and therefore all of them are recommendations with a low level of evidence ... since the Valsalva maneuver increases blood pressure. ... Use the Valsalva maneuver (bear down while holding your breath ...
  • You have a history of PSVT and an episode does not go away with the Valsalva maneuver or by coughing. (medlineplus.gov)
  • and locking it in with a valsalva maneuver is typically part of this process. (lifehacker.com)
  • One of the methods, the Valsalva Maneuver, involves plugging the nose while applying slight blowing pressure while holding one's breath. (macksearplugs.com)
  • To see how well it works, the team randomized 10 women and 38 men about equally to four removal techniques: the standard expire Valsalva, the standard inspire Valsalva, and two balloon maneuvers - blowing the balloon up after a deep breath and blowing it up with residual lung volume after an initial exhalation. (mdedge.com)
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cardiac-gated fast cine-PC sequence with ≤15-second acquisition time was used to assess CSF flow in 8 healthy participants at the foramen magnum at rest, during, and immediately after a controlled Valsalva maneuver. (elsevierpure.com)
  • RESULTS: Both methods showed 1) a decrease from baseline in V̄ CSF and A pp during Valsalva and 2) an increase in V̄ CSF and A immediately after Valsalva compared with values measured both at rest and during Valsalva. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Whereas fast cine-PC produced a single CSF flow waveform that is an average over many cardiac cycles, pencil-beam imaging depicted waveforms for each heartbeat and was able to capture many dynamic features of CSF flow, including transients synchronized with the Valsalva maneuver. (elsevierpure.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Both fast cine-PC and pencil-beam imaging demonstrated expected changes in CSF flow with Valsalva maneuver in healthy participants. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Incontinence may occur or worsen with maneuvers that increase intra-abdominal pressure. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Valsalva-CT shows very high specificity and high accuracy for the diagnosis of inguinal hernia . (bvsalud.org)
  • The balloon method is being used there now in nontrauma patients, as well, but the standard maneuvers are also being used until the balloon technique shows statistically significant benefits, he said. (mdedge.com)
  • The Valsalva maneuver (VL) is a well-documented assessment of autonomic function, and is characterized by 5 distinct blood pressure phases (Phases I, IIa, IIb, III, and IV). (wku.edu)
  • The real-time capability of pencil-beam imaging may be necessary to detect Valsalva-related transient CSF flow obstruction in patients with pathologic conditions such as Chiari I malformation. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Les patients ont été répartis aléatoirement en deux groupes, le premier bénéficiant d'une intervention basée sur le yoga contrairement au second. (who.int)
  • Un effet positif important a donc été observé lorsqu'une thérapie yogique a été appliquée en tant que traitement adjuvant chez des patients atteints d'une maladie coronarienne. (who.int)
  • To apply the concept to individual patients, computed tomography of the abdomen at rest and during the Valsalva maneuver was used. (researchgate.net)
  • Instead of standard inhale or exhale Valsalva maneuvers, they have their patients blow up a party balloon as the tube is pulled. (mdedge.com)
  • First, it's easy to explain and for patients to understand and do - not much more instruction is required than "blow up the balloon" - and, secondly, the inflating balloon is a visual check to make sure patients are doing the maneuver correctly. (mdedge.com)
  • Incontinence may occur or worsen with maneuvers that increase intra-abdominal pressure. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Valsalva's maneuver. (hekint.org)
  • Factors that can lead to the development of SPM include alterations in breathing patterns such as bronchial asthma, marijuana smoking, cocaine inhalation, and barotrauma occurring with Valsalva's maneuver. (who.int)
  • Valsalva's maneuver in vasodepressive syncope]. (bvsalud.org)
  • When clinically advisable, appropriate vagal maneuvers (e.g. (nih.gov)
  • Performance of the Valsalva maneuver in patients with pulmonary hypertension should be routinely performed to identify changes in symptoms, as well as the need to adjust therapy. (medscape.com)
  • 16. Factitious pheochromocytoma: novel mimickry by Valsalva maneuver and clues to diagnosis. (nih.gov)
  • Hallpike (Nylen-Bárány) maneuver consists of having the patient lie back in bed from a sitting position 3 times in succession. (medscape.com)
  • Source It is a paradox that the discovery of the Valsalva maneuver did not relate to cardiovascular physiology but to the treatment of discharges from the ear. (hekint.org)
  • This article reported a rare case of a ruptured RAM due to the Valsalva maneuver in an elderly female with constipation and offered a review of the relevant literature. (nih.gov)
  • Participants performed various exercises to intentionally raise their blood pressure, such as completing hand grip exercises, peddling on a stationary bike, or performing the Valsalva maneuver (when one attempts to forcefully exhale when their mouth is closed and their nose is pinched shut). (nih.gov)