The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).
An adjunctive treatment for PARTIAL EPILEPSY and refractory DEPRESSION that delivers electrical impulses to the brain via the VAGUS NERVE. A battery implanted under the skin supplies the energy.
Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.
Traumatic injuries to the VAGUS NERVE. Because the vagus nerve innervates multiple organs, injuries in the nerve fibers may result in any gastrointestinal organ dysfunction downstream of the injury site.
The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.
A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.
Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.
Neurons which send impulses peripherally to activate muscles or secretory cells.
Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.
The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
The motor nerve of the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve fibers originate in the cervical spinal column (mostly C4) and travel through the cervical plexus to the diaphragm.
An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.
An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.
Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.
The major nerves supplying sympathetic innervation to the abdomen. The greater, lesser, and lowest (or smallest) splanchnic nerves are formed by preganglionic fibers from the spinal cord which pass through the paravertebral ganglia and then to the celiac ganglia and plexuses. The lumbar splanchnic nerves carry fibers which pass through the lumbar paravertebral ganglia to the mesenteric and hypogastric ganglia.
A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.
The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.
The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.
Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.
Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.
The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.
An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.
A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.
Branches of the vagus (tenth cranial) nerve. The recurrent laryngeal nerves originate more caudally than the superior laryngeal nerves and follow different paths on the right and left sides. They carry efferents to all muscles of the larynx except the cricothyroid and carry sensory and autonomic fibers to the laryngeal, pharyngeal, tracheal, and cardiac regions.
The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.
A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.
The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.
The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.
Biguanides are a class of oral hypoglycemic agents, including metformin, which primarily reduce blood glucose levels by decreasing hepatic gluconeogenesis and increasing insulin sensitivity, but not by stimulating insulin secretion, and they are commonly used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.
GRAY MATTER located in the dorsomedial part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA associated with the solitary tract. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from most organ systems including the terminations of the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves. It is a major coordinator of AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM regulation of cardiovascular, respiratory, gustatory, gastrointestinal, and chemoreceptive aspects of HOMEOSTASIS. The solitary nucleus is also notable for the large number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS which are found therein.
Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.
The biochemical and electrophysiological interactions between the NERVOUS SYSTEM and IMMUNE SYSTEM.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Stretch receptors found in the bronchi and bronchioles. Pulmonary stretch receptors are sensors for a reflex which stops inspiration. In humans, the reflex is protective and is probably not activated during normal respiration.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
NERVE GROWTH FACTOR is the first of a series of neurotrophic factors that were found to influence the growth and differentiation of sympathetic and sensory neurons. It is comprised of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The beta subunit is responsible for its growth stimulating activity.
Factors which enhance the growth potentialities of sensory and sympathetic nerve cells.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Branches of the VAGUS NERVE. The superior laryngeal nerves originate near the nodose ganglion and separate into external branches, which supply motor fibers to the cricothyroid muscles, and internal branches, which carry sensory fibers. The RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE originates more caudally and carries efferents to all muscles of the larynx except the cricothyroid. The laryngeal nerves and their various branches also carry sensory and autonomic fibers to the laryngeal, pharyngeal, tracheal, and cardiac regions.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans the fibers of the radial nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C5 to T1), travel via the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, and supply motor innervation to extensor muscles of the arm and cutaneous sensory fibers to extensor regions of the arm and hand.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.
An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.
Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.
The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.
Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.
A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)
A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.
Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.
Nerves and plexuses of the autonomic nervous system. The central nervous system structures which regulate the autonomic nervous system are not included.
A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.
Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.
Compounds containing the hexamethylenebis(trimethylammonium) cation. Members of this group frequently act as antihypertensive agents and selective ganglionic blocking agents.
A nicotinic cholinergic antagonist often referred to as the prototypical ganglionic blocker. It is poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and does not cross the blood-brain barrier. It has been used for a variety of therapeutic purposes including hypertension but, like the other ganglionic blockers, it has been replaced by more specific drugs for most purposes, although it is widely used a research tool.
A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.
Differentiated tissue of the central nervous system composed of NERVE CELLS, fibers, DENDRITES, and specialized supporting cells.
Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.
The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.
A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.
The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.
A member of the NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR subfamily of the LIGAND-GATED ION CHANNEL family. It consists entirely of pentameric a7 subunits expressed in the CNS, autonomic nervous system, vascular system, lymphocytes and spleen.
The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.
Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.
Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.
Veratrine is a mixture of alkaloids, primarily veratridine and cevadine, obtained from the seeds of various plants of the genus Schoenocaulon (formerly Veratrum), known to stimulate sodium channels in nerve membranes, leading to depolarization and prolonged action potentials.
Nerve fibers liberating catecholamines at a synapse after an impulse.
An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
A spasm of the diaphragm that causes a sudden inhalation followed by rapid closure of the glottis which produces a sound.
Specialized afferent neurons capable of transducing sensory stimuli into NERVE IMPULSES to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Sometimes sensory receptors for external stimuli are called exteroceptors; for internal stimuli are called interoceptors and proprioceptors.
Any drug used for its actions on cholinergic systems. Included here are agonists and antagonists, drugs that affect the life cycle of ACETYLCHOLINE, and drugs that affect the survival of cholinergic neurons. The term cholinergic agents is sometimes still used in the narrower sense of MUSCARINIC AGONISTS, although most modern texts discourage that usage.
The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.
A polymeric mixture of polyesters of phosphoric acid and phloretin. It blocks some cellular responses to prostaglandins.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION of nerve tissue is delivered.
Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction by causing sustained depolarization of the motor end plate. These agents are primarily used as adjuvants in surgical anesthesia to cause skeletal muscle relaxation.
Several clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells associated with blood vessels and nerves (especially the glossopharyngeal and vagus). The nonchromaffin paraganglia sense pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and participate in respiratory, and perhaps circulatory, control. They include the CAROTID BODY; AORTIC BODIES; the GLOMUS JUGULARE; and the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM.
A synthetic nondepolarizing blocking drug. The actions of gallamine triethiodide are similar to those of TUBOCURARINE, but this agent blocks the cardiac vagus and may cause sinus tachycardia and, occasionally, hypertension and increased cardiac output. It should be used cautiously in patients at risk from increased heart rate but may be preferred for patients with bradycardia. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p198)
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Injuries to the optic nerve induced by a trauma to the face or head. These may occur with closed or penetrating injuries. Relatively minor compression of the superior aspect of orbit may also result in trauma to the optic nerve. Clinical manifestations may include visual loss, PAPILLEDEMA, and an afferent pupillary defect.
Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.
The region of the STOMACH at the junction with the DUODENUM. It is marked by the thickening of circular muscle layers forming the pyloric sphincter to control the opening and closure of the lumen.
The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.
A pharmacologic congener of serotonin that contracts smooth muscle and has actions similar to those of tricyclic antidepressants. It has been proposed as an oxytocic.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
STILBENES with AMIDINES attached.
A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Nerve fibers liberating acetylcholine at the synapse after an impulse.
A condition characterized by abnormal posturing of the limbs that is associated with injury to the brainstem. This may occur as a clinical manifestation or induced experimentally in animals. The extensor reflexes are exaggerated leading to rigid extension of the limbs accompanied by hyperreflexia and opisthotonus. This condition is usually caused by lesions which occur in the region of the brainstem that lies between the red nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. In contrast, decorticate rigidity is characterized by flexion of the elbows and wrists with extension of the legs and feet. The causative lesion for this condition is located above the red nuclei and usually consists of diffuse cerebral damage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p358)
Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.
Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.
The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.
A 36-amino acid pancreatic hormone that is secreted mainly by endocrine cells found at the periphery of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS and adjacent to cells containing SOMATOSTATIN and GLUCAGON. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP), when administered peripherally, can suppress gastric secretion, gastric emptying, pancreatic enzyme secretion, and appetite. A lack of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) has been associated with OBESITY in rats and mice.
A small space in the skull between the MAXILLA and the SPHENOID BONE, medial to the pterygomaxillary fissure, and connecting to the NASAL CAVITY via the sphenopalatine foramen.
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.
The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.
Agents that inhibit the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system. The major group of drugs used therapeutically for this purpose is the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS.
The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
Compounds containing the PhCH= radical.
A highly basic, 28 amino acid neuropeptide released from intestinal mucosa. It has a wide range of biological actions affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory systems and is neuroprotective. It binds special receptors (RECEPTORS, VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE).
The sensory fibers innervating the viscera.
Ganglia of the parasympathetic nervous system, including the ciliary, pterygopalatine, submandibular, and otic ganglia in the cranial region and intrinsic (terminal) ganglia associated with target organs in the thorax and abdomen.
A sensory branch of the MANDIBULAR NERVE, which is part of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The lingual nerve carries general afferent fibers from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, the floor of the mouth, and the mandibular gingivae.
Common name for Ricinus communis, a species in the family EUPHORBIACEAE. It is the source of CASTOR OIL.
Behavioral response associated with the achieving of gratification.
A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.
The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.
Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA.
The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A nonselective alpha-adrenergic antagonist. It is used in the treatment of hypertension and hypertensive emergencies, pheochromocytoma, vasospasm of RAYNAUD DISEASE and frostbite, clonidine withdrawal syndrome, impotence, and peripheral vascular disease.
The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.
One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Nicotinic receptors were originally distinguished by their preference for NICOTINE over MUSCARINE. They are generally divided into muscle-type and neuronal-type (previously ganglionic) based on pharmacology, and subunit composition of the receptors.
An octapeptide hormone present in the intestine and brain. When secreted from the gastric mucosa, it stimulates the release of bile from the gallbladder and digestive enzymes from the pancreas.
Nerve fibers which project from parasympathetic ganglia to synapses on target organs. Parasympathetic postganglionic fibers use acetylcholine as transmitter. They may also release peptide cotransmitters.
The removal or interruption of some part of the sympathetic nervous system for therapeutic or research purposes.
Drugs that bind to and activate cholinergic receptors.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways.
Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.
An aminoperhydroquinazoline poison found mainly in the liver and ovaries of fishes in the order TETRAODONTIFORMES, which are eaten. The toxin causes paresthesia and paralysis through interference with neuromuscular conduction.
NERVE FIBERS which project from the central nervous system to AUTONOMIC GANGLIA. In the sympathetic division most preganglionic fibers originate with neurons in the intermediolateral column of the SPINAL CORD, exit via ventral roots from upper thoracic through lower lumbar segments, and project to the paravertebral ganglia; there they either terminate in SYNAPSES or continue through the SPLANCHNIC NERVES to the prevertebral ganglia. In the parasympathetic division the fibers originate in neurons of the BRAIN STEM and sacral spinal cord. In both divisions the principal transmitter is ACETYLCHOLINE but peptide cotransmitters may also be released.
Failure to respond to two or more trials of antidepressant monotherapy or failure to respond to four or more trials of different antidepressant therapies. (Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary, 9th ed.)
A class of nerve fibers as defined by their nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the unmyelinated nerve fibers are small in diameter and usually several are surrounded by a single MYELIN SHEATH. They conduct low-velocity impulses, and represent the majority of peripheral sensory and autonomic fibers, but are also found in the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.
An ergot derivative that is a congener of LYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE. It antagonizes the effects of serotonin in blood vessels and gastrointestinal smooth muscle, but has few of the properties of other ergot alkaloids. Methysergide is used prophylactically in migraine and other vascular headaches and to antagonize serotonin in the carcinoid syndrome.
Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.
A subtype of cholecystokinin receptor found primarily in the PANCREAS; STOMACH; INTESTINE; and GALLBLADDER. It plays a role in regulating digestive functions such as gallbladder contraction, pancreatic enzyme secretion and absorption in the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.
The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.
An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.
Drugs that bind to but do not activate serotonin receptors, thereby blocking the actions of serotonin or SEROTONIN RECEPTOR AGONISTS.
The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.
A peptide, of about 33 amino acids, secreted by the upper INTESTINAL MUCOSA and also found in the central nervous system. It causes gallbladder contraction, release of pancreatic exocrine (or digestive) enzymes, and affects other gastrointestinal functions. Cholecystokinin may be the mediator of satiety.
Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Neoplasms which arise from nerve sheaths formed by SCHWANN CELLS in the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM or by OLIGODENDROCYTES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, NEUROFIBROMA, and NEURILEMMOMA are relatively common tumors in this category.
Rhodanine is an organic compound with the formula S(=O)(-CH=C(SH)N(-C2H4S)) that is used as a reagent in the determination of sulfide and in the synthesis of certain types of chelating agents, but it does not have any inherent medical use or application itself.
A benzoate-cevane found in VERATRUM and Schoenocaulon. It activates SODIUM CHANNELS to stay open longer than normal.
Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.
Cell surface receptors that bind NERVE GROWTH FACTOR; (NGF) and a NGF-related family of neurotrophic factors that includes neurotrophins, BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR and CILIARY NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.
'Nerve tissue proteins' are specialized proteins found within the nervous system's biological tissue, including neurofilaments, neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, and neural cell adhesion molecules, which facilitate structural support, intracellular communication, and synaptic connectivity essential for proper neurological function.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of acetylcholine from acetyl-CoA and choline. EC 2.3.1.6.

The effect of cardiac contraction on collateral resistance in the canine heart. (1/2742)

We determined whether the coronary collateral vessels develop an increased resistance to blood flow during systole as does the cognate vascular bed. Collateral resistance was estimated by measuring retrograde flow rate from a distal branch of the left anterior descending coronary artery while the main left coronary artery was perfused at a constant pressure. Retrograde flow rate was measured before and during vagal arrest. We found that in 10 dogs the prolonged diastole experienced when the heart was stopped caused no significant change in the retrograde flow rate, which indicated that systole has little effect on the collateral resistance. However, when left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was altered by changing afterload or contractility, a direct relationship between end-diastolic pressure and collateral resistance was noted.  (+info)

Observations on some additional abnormalities in situs inversus viscerum. (2/2742)

The abnormal findings in a case of Situs inversus totalis are described. The duodenum was placed abnormally and retained its primitive mesentery. The proximal 22 in of jejunum were retroperitoneal. The attachment of the root of the mesentery to the posterior abdominal wall had a 7-shaped appearance, and there was a partial failure of the primitive mesocolon to adhere to the posterior abdominal wall. The common hepatic artery arose from the superior meseneric artery, which also provided a branch to the proximal jejunal loop. The right vagus nerve was found anterior to the oesophagus at the oesophageal hiatus in the diaphragm, and the left vagus was posterior. A double ureter was present on the right side. The findings are discussed in relation to mid-gut development.  (+info)

Pharmacodynamic actions of (S)-2-[4,5-dihydro-5-propyl-2-(3H)-furylidene]-1,3-cyclopentanedione (oudenone). (3/2742)

The pharmacodynamic actions of (S)-2-[4,5-dihydro-5-propyl-2(3H)-furylidene]-1,3-cyclopentanedione (oudenone) were studied in both anesthetized animals and isolated organs. Oudenone (10--40 mg/kg i.v.) induced an initial rise in blood pressure followed by a prolonged hypotension in the anesthetized rats. In unanesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), oudenone (5--200 mg/kg p.o.) caused a dose-related decrease in the systolic blood pressure. The initial pressor effect was diminished by pretreatments with phentolamine, guanethidine, hexamethonium and was abolished in the pithed rats. In addition, intracisternal administrations of oudenone (100--600 mug/kg) showed a marked increase in blood pressure in the anesthetized rats, suggesting that the pressor effect may be due to centrally mediated actions. Oudenone, given intra-arterially into the femoral artery (400--800 mug/kg), caused a long-lasting vasodilation in anesthetized dogs. At a relatively high dose (40 mg/kg i.v.), oudenone antagonized all pressor responses to autonomic agents and central vagus nerve stimulation in anesthetized rats and dogs, however, oudenone showed no anti-cholinergic,-histaminergic, beta-adrenergic and adrenergic neuron blocking properties.  (+info)

Adventitial delivery minimizes the proinflammatory effects of adenoviral vectors. (4/2742)

PURPOSE: Adenovirus-mediated arterial gene transfer is a promising tool in the study of vascular biology and the development of vascular gene therapy. However, intraluminal delivery of adenoviral vectors causes vascular inflammation and neointimal formation. Whether these complications could be avoided and gene transfer efficiency maintained by means of delivering adenoviral vectors via the adventitia was studied. METHODS: Replication-defective adenoviral vectors encoding a beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene (AdRSVnLacZ) or without a recombinant gene (AdNull) were infused into the lumen or the adventitia of rabbit carotid arteries. Two days after infusion of either AdRSVnLacZ (n = 8 adventitial, n = 8 luminal) or AdNull (n = 4 luminal), recombinant gene expression was quantitated by histochemistry (performed on tissue sections) and with a beta-gal activity assay (performed on vessel extracts). Inflammation caused by adenovirus infusion was assessed 14 days after infusion of either AdNull (n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6) into the carotid adventitia. Inflammation was assessed by means of examination of histologic sections for the presence of neointimal formation and infiltrating T cells and for the expression of markers of vascular cell activation (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). To measure the systemic immune response to adventitial infusion of adenovirus, plasma samples (n = 3) were drawn 14 days after infusion of AdNull and assayed for neutralizing antibodies. RESULTS: Two days after luminal infusion of AdRSVnLacZ, approximately 30% of luminal endothelial cells expressed beta-gal. Similarly, 2 days after infusion of AdRSVnLacZ to the adventitia, approximately 30% of adventitial cells expressed beta-gal. beta-gal expression was present in the carotid adventitia, the internal jugular vein adventitia, and the vagus nerve perineurium. Elevated beta-gal activity (50- to 80-fold more than background; P <.05) was detected in extracts made from all AdRSVnLacZ-transduced arteries. The amount of recombinant protein expression per vessel did not differ significantly between vessels transduced via the adventitia (17.1 mU/mg total protein [range, 8.1 to 71.5]) and those transduced via a luminal approach (10.0 mU/mg total protein [range, 3.9 to 42.6]). Notably, adventitial delivery of AdNull did not cause neointimal formation. In addition, vascular inflammation in arteries transduced via the adventitia (ie, T-cell infiltrates and ICAM-1 expression) was confined to the adventitia, sparing both the intima and media. Antiadenoviral neutralizing antibodies were present in all rabbits after adventitial delivery of AdNull. CONCLUSION: Infusion of adenoviral vectors into the carotid artery adventitia achieves recombinant gene expression at a level equivalent to that achieved by means of intraluminal vector infusion. Because adventitial gene transfer can be performed by means of direct application during open surgical procedures, this technically simple procedure may be more clinically applicable than intraluminal delivery. Moreover, despite the generation of a systemic immune response, adventitial infusion had no detectable pathologic effects on the vascular intima or media. For these reasons, adventitial gene delivery may be a particularly useful experimental and clinical tool.  (+info)

Simultaneous identification of static and dynamic vagosympathetic interactions in regulating heart rate. (5/2742)

We earlier reported that stimulation of either one of the sympathetic and vagal nerves augments the dynamic heart rate (HR) response to concurrent stimulation of its counterpart. We explained this phenomenon by assuming a sigmoidal static relationship between nerve activity and HR. To confirm this assumption, we stimulated the sympathetic and/or vagal nerve in anesthetized rabbits using large-amplitude Gaussian white noise and determined the static and dynamic characteristics of HR regulation by a neural network analysis. The static characteristics approximated a sigmoidal relationship between the linearly predicted and the measured HRs (response range: 212.4 +/- 46.3 beats/min, minimum HR: 96.0 +/- 28.4 beats/min, midpoint of operation: 196.7 +/- 31.3 beats/min, maximum slope: 1.65 +/- 0.51). The maximum step responses determined from the dynamic characteristics were 7.9 +/- 2.9 and -14.0 +/- 4.9 beats. min-1. Hz-1 for the sympathetic and the vagal system, respectively. Because of these characteristics, changes in sympathetic or vagal tone alone can alter the dynamic HR response to stimulation of the other nerve.  (+info)

Hypoxia inhibits baroreflex vagal bradycardia via a central action in anaesthetized rats. (6/2742)

It is known that arterial baroreflexes are suppressed in stressful conditions. The present study was designed to determine whether and how hypoxia affects arterial baroreflexes, especially the heart rate component, baroreflex vagal bradycardia. In chloralose-urethane-anaesthetized rats, baroreflex vagal bradycardia was evoked by electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, and the effect of 15 s inhalation of hypoxic gas (4% O2) was studied. Inhalation of hypoxic gas was found to inhibit baroreflex vagal bradycardia. The inhibition persisted after bilateral transection of the carotid sinus nerve. Cervical vagus nerves were cut bilaterally and their peripheral cut ends were stimulated to provoke vagal bradycardia of peripheral origin so as to determine whether hypoxia could inhibit vagal bradycardia by acting on a peripheral site. In contrast to baroreflex vagal bradycardia, the vagus-induced bradycardia was not affected by hypoxic gas inhalation. It is concluded that baroreflex vagal bradycardia is inhibited by hypoxia and the inhibition is largely mediated by its direct central action.  (+info)

Interleukin-1beta in immune cells of the abdominal vagus nerve: a link between the immune and nervous systems? (7/2742)

Intraperitoneal administration of the cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induces brain-mediated sickness symptoms that can be blocked by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Intraperitoneal IL-1beta also induces expression of the activation marker c-fos in vagal primary afferent neurons, suggesting that IL-1beta is a key component of vagally mediated immune-to-brain communication. The cellular sources of IL-1beta activating the vagus are unknown, but may reside in either blood or in the vagus nerve itself. We assayed IL-1beta protein after intraperitoneal endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] injection in abdominal vagus nerve, using both an ELISA and immunohistochemistry, and in blood plasma using ELISA. IL-1beta levels in abdominal vagus nerve increased by 45 min after LPS administration and were robust by 60 min. Plasma IL-1beta levels increased by 60 min, whereas little IL-1beta was detected in cervical vagus or sciatic nerve. IL-1beta-immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed in dendritic cells and macrophages within connective tissues associated with the abdominal vagus by 45 min after intraperitoneal LPS injection. By 60 min, some immune cells located within the nerve and vagal paraganglia also expressed IL-1beta-IR. Thus, intraperitoneal LPS induced IL-1beta protein within the vagus in a time-frame consistent with signaling of immune activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which IL-1beta may serve as a molecular link between the immune system and vagus nerve, and thus the CNS.  (+info)

Inspiration-promoting vagal reflex under NMDA receptor blockade in anaesthetized rabbits. (8/2742)

1. This study describes a novel vagal respiratory reflex in anaesthetized rabbits. In contrast to the well-known inspiratory (I) off-switching by vagal afferent excitation, this vagal reflex initiates and maintains the central I activity of phrenic nerve discharges in rabbits pre-treated with antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type excitatory amino acid receptors (NMDA-Rs). 2. Under NMDA-R blockade with either dizocilpine (0.025-0.3 mg kg-1), D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5, 0.5-1 mg, i.c.v.) or ketamine (10 mg kg-1), vagal stimulation at low frequencies (5-40 Hz) during the I phase prevented or markedly delayed the spontaneous I termination. In contrast, stimulation of the same vagal afferent at the same intensity but at a higher frequency (100-160 Hz) during the I phase immediately terminated the I phase. 3. In non-vagotomized rabbits, maintaining the tidal volume at end-expiratory levels during the I phase prevented spontaneous I termination and maintained apneusis after NMDA-R blockade with dizocilpine. 4. Brief stimulation of vagal afferents at low frequency (5-40 Hz) during the expiratory (E) phase constantly initiated phrenic I discharge after NMDA-R block. 5. We conclude that low-frequency discharge of vagal pulmonary stretch receptor afferents, as when lung volume is near functional residual capacity, promotes central I activity under NMDA-R blockade.  (+info)

The vagus nerve, also known as the 10th cranial nerve (CN X), is the longest of the cranial nerves and extends from the brainstem to the abdomen. It has both sensory and motor functions and plays a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, speech, and sweating, among others.

The vagus nerve is responsible for carrying sensory information from the internal organs to the brain, and it also sends motor signals from the brain to the muscles of the throat and voice box, as well as to the heart, lungs, and digestive tract. The vagus nerve helps regulate the body's involuntary responses, such as controlling heart rate and blood pressure, promoting relaxation, and reducing inflammation.

Dysfunction in the vagus nerve can lead to various medical conditions, including gastroparesis, chronic pain, and autonomic nervous system disorders. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a therapeutic intervention that involves delivering electrical impulses to the vagus nerve to treat conditions such as epilepsy, depression, and migraine headaches.

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a medical treatment that involves the use of a device to send electrical signals to the vagus nerve, which is a key part of the body's autonomic nervous system. The autonomic nervous system controls various automatic functions of the body, such as heart rate and digestion.

In VNS, a small generator is implanted in the chest, and thin wires are routed under the skin to the vagus nerve in the neck. The generator is programmed to send electrical signals to the vagus nerve at regular intervals. These signals can help regulate certain body functions and have been found to be effective in treating a number of conditions, including epilepsy and depression.

The exact mechanism by which VNS works is not fully understood, but it is thought to affect the release of neurotransmitters, chemicals that transmit signals in the brain. This can help reduce seizure activity in people with epilepsy and improve mood and other symptoms in people with depression.

VNS is typically used as a last resort for people who have not responded to other treatments. It is generally considered safe, but like any medical procedure, it does carry some risks, such as infection, bleeding, and damage to the vagus nerve or surrounding tissues.

Vagus nerve diseases, also known as vagus nerve disorders, refer to conditions that affect the functioning of the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve is the tenth cranial nerve and extends from the brainstem to the abdomen, playing a crucial role in regulating various automatic functions of the body such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, and sweating.

Diseases of the vagus nerve can result from various causes, including inflammation, infection, trauma, compression, or degeneration. Some common vagus nerve disorders include:

1. Vagus nerve dysfunction: This is a general term used to describe any abnormality in the functioning of the vagus nerve. Symptoms may vary depending on the specific functions affected but can include difficulty swallowing, hoarseness, voice changes, and abnormal heart rate or blood pressure.
2. Vagus nerve neuropathy: This is a condition that results from damage to the vagus nerve fibers. It can cause symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, voice changes, and abnormal digestive function.
3. Gastroparesis: This is a condition in which the stomach muscles fail to contract properly, leading to delayed gastric emptying. Vagus nerve dysfunction is a common cause of gastroparesis.
4. Orthostatic hypotension: This is a condition characterized by a drop in blood pressure when standing up from a sitting or lying down position. Vagus nerve dysfunction can contribute to this condition by causing an abnormal response in the heart rate and blood vessels.
5. Inflammatory disorders: Certain inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and sarcoidosis can affect the vagus nerve and cause various symptoms.

Treatment for vagus nerve diseases depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Vagus nerve injuries refer to damages or traumas affecting the vagus nerve, which is the tenth cranial nerve (CN X) in the human body. This nerve plays a crucial role in the autonomic nervous system, regulating essential functions such as heart rate, respiratory rate, and digestion.

Vagus nerve injuries can occur due to various reasons, including trauma during surgical procedures, neck or head injuries, inflammation, compression, or tumors affecting the nerve. Symptoms of vagus nerve injuries may include:

1. Hoarseness or voice changes
2. Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
3. Pain in the throat or ear
4. Changes in heart rate and blood pressure
5. Nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain
6. Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

The severity and nature of symptoms can vary depending on the location and extent of the injury to the vagus nerve. Treatment for vagus nerve injuries typically involves addressing the underlying cause, such as surgical intervention, physical therapy, or medication to manage pain and inflammation. In some cases, recovery may be incomplete, leading to long-term complications or disabilities.

A vagotomy is a surgical procedure that involves cutting or blocking the vagus nerve, which is a parasympathetic nerve that runs from the brainstem to the abdomen and helps regulate many bodily functions such as heart rate, gastrointestinal motility, and digestion. In particular, vagotomy is often performed as a treatment for peptic ulcers, as it can help reduce gastric acid secretion.

There are several types of vagotomy procedures, including:

1. Truncal vagotomy: This involves cutting the main trunks of the vagus nerve as they enter the abdomen. It is a more extensive procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion significantly but can also lead to side effects such as delayed gastric emptying and diarrhea.
2. Selective vagotomy: This involves cutting only the branches of the vagus nerve that supply the stomach, leaving the rest of the nerve intact. It is a less extensive procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion while minimizing side effects.
3. Highly selective vagotomy (HSV): Also known as parietal cell vagotomy, this involves cutting only the branches of the vagus nerve that supply the acid-secreting cells in the stomach. It is a highly targeted procedure that reduces gastric acid secretion while minimizing side effects such as delayed gastric emptying and diarrhea.

Vagotomy is typically performed using laparoscopic or open surgical techniques, depending on the patient's individual needs and the surgeon's preference. While vagotomy can be effective in treating peptic ulcers, it is not commonly performed today due to the development of less invasive treatments such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) that reduce gastric acid secretion without surgery.

The sciatic nerve is the largest and longest nerve in the human body, running from the lower back through the buttocks and down the legs to the feet. It is formed by the union of the ventral rami (branches) of the L4 to S3 spinal nerves. The sciatic nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to various muscles and skin areas in the lower limbs, including the hamstrings, calf muscles, and the sole of the foot. Sciatic nerve disorders or injuries can result in symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the lower back, hips, legs, and feet, known as sciatica.

Nerve fibers are specialized structures that constitute the long, slender processes (axons) of neurons (nerve cells). They are responsible for conducting electrical impulses, known as action potentials, away from the cell body and transmitting them to other neurons or effector organs such as muscles and glands. Nerve fibers are often surrounded by supportive cells called glial cells and are grouped together to form nerve bundles or nerves. These fibers can be myelinated (covered with a fatty insulating sheath called myelin) or unmyelinated, which influences the speed of impulse transmission.

Peripheral nerves are nerve fibers that transmit signals between the central nervous system (CNS, consisting of the brain and spinal cord) and the rest of the body. These nerves convey motor, sensory, and autonomic information, enabling us to move, feel, and respond to changes in our environment. They form a complex network that extends from the CNS to muscles, glands, skin, and internal organs, allowing for coordinated responses and functions throughout the body. Damage or injury to peripheral nerves can result in various neurological symptoms, such as numbness, weakness, or pain, depending on the type and severity of the damage.

The optic nerve, also known as the second cranial nerve, is the nerve that transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. It is composed of approximately one million nerve fibers that carry signals related to vision, such as light intensity and color, from the eye's photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) to the visual cortex in the brain. The optic nerve is responsible for carrying this visual information so that it can be processed and interpreted by the brain, allowing us to see and perceive our surroundings. Damage to the optic nerve can result in vision loss or impairment.

Electric stimulation, also known as electrical nerve stimulation or neuromuscular electrical stimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses low-voltage electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles. It is often used to help manage pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and mobility. The electrical impulses can be delivered through electrodes placed on the skin or directly implanted into the body.

In a medical context, electric stimulation may be used for various purposes such as:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help to block pain signals from reaching the brain and promote the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: Electric stimulation can help to strengthen muscles that have become weak due to injury, illness, or surgery. It can also help to prevent muscle atrophy and improve range of motion.
3. Wound healing: Electric stimulation can promote tissue growth and help to speed up the healing process in wounds, ulcers, and other types of injuries.
4. Urinary incontinence: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen the muscles that control urination and reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence.
5. Migraine prevention: Electric stimulation can be used as a preventive treatment for migraines by applying electrical impulses to specific nerves in the head and neck.

It is important to note that electric stimulation should only be administered under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

The glossopharyngeal nerve, also known as the ninth cranial nerve (IX), is a mixed nerve that carries both sensory and motor fibers. It originates from the medulla oblongata in the brainstem and has several functions:

1. Sensory function: The glossopharyngeal nerve provides general sensation to the posterior third of the tongue, the tonsils, the back of the throat (pharynx), and the middle ear. It also carries taste sensations from the back one-third of the tongue.
2. Special visceral afferent function: The nerve transmits information about the stretch of the carotid artery and blood pressure to the brainstem.
3. Motor function: The glossopharyngeal nerve innervates the stylopharyngeus muscle, which helps elevate the pharynx during swallowing. It also provides parasympathetic fibers to the parotid gland, stimulating saliva production.
4. Visceral afferent function: The glossopharyngeal nerve carries information about the condition of the internal organs in the thorax and abdomen to the brainstem.

Overall, the glossopharyngeal nerve plays a crucial role in swallowing, taste, saliva production, and monitoring blood pressure and heart rate.

Electric stimulation therapy, also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or electromyostimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses electrical impulses to stimulate muscles and nerves. The electrical signals are delivered through electrodes placed on the skin near the target muscle group or nerve.

The therapy can be used for various purposes, including:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help reduce pain by stimulating the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body. It can also help block the transmission of pain signals to the brain.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: NMES can be used to prevent muscle atrophy and maintain muscle tone in individuals who are unable to move their muscles due to injury or illness, such as spinal cord injuries or stroke.
3. Improving circulation: Electric stimulation can help improve blood flow and reduce swelling by contracting the muscles and promoting the movement of fluids in the body.
4. Wound healing: NMES can be used to promote wound healing by increasing blood flow, reducing swelling, and improving muscle function around the wound site.
5. Muscle strengthening: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen muscles by causing them to contract and relax repeatedly, which can help improve muscle strength and endurance.

It is important to note that electric stimulation therapy should only be administered under the guidance of a trained healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

Efferent neurons are specialized nerve cells that transmit signals from the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain and spinal cord, to effector organs such as muscles or glands. These signals typically result in a response or action, hence the term "efferent," derived from the Latin word "efferre" meaning "to carry away."

Efferent neurons are part of the motor pathway and can be further classified into two types:

1. Somatic efferent neurons: These neurons transmit signals to skeletal muscles, enabling voluntary movements and posture maintenance. They have their cell bodies located in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and send their axons through the ventral roots to innervate specific muscle fibers.
2. Autonomic efferent neurons: These neurons are responsible for controlling involuntary functions, such as heart rate, digestion, respiration, and pupil dilation. They have a two-neuron chain arrangement, with the preganglionic neuron having its cell body in the CNS (brainstem or spinal cord) and synapsing with the postganglionic neuron in an autonomic ganglion near the effector organ. Autonomic efferent neurons can be further divided into sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric subdivisions based on their functions and innervation patterns.

In summary, efferent neurons are a critical component of the nervous system, responsible for transmitting signals from the CNS to various effector organs, ultimately controlling and coordinating numerous bodily functions and responses.

Nerve regeneration is the process of regrowth and restoration of functional nerve connections following damage or injury to the nervous system. This complex process involves various cellular and molecular events, such as the activation of support cells called glia, the sprouting of surviving nerve fibers (axons), and the reformation of neural circuits. The goal of nerve regeneration is to enable the restoration of normal sensory, motor, and autonomic functions impaired due to nerve damage or injury.

The nodose ganglion is a part of the human autonomic nervous system. It is a collection of nerve cell bodies that are located in the upper neck, near the junction of the skull and the first vertebra (C1). The nodose ganglion is a component of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), which is a mixed nerve that carries both sensory and motor fibers.

The sensory fibers in the vagus nerve provide information about the state of the internal organs to the brain, including information about the heart, lungs, and digestive system. The cell bodies of these sensory fibers are located in the nodose ganglion.

The nodose ganglion contains neurons that have cell bodies with long processes called dendrites that extend into the mucous membranes of the respiratory and digestive tracts. These dendrites detect various stimuli, such as mechanical deformation (e.g., stretch), chemical changes (e.g., pH, osmolarity), and temperature changes in the internal environment. The information detected by these dendrites is then transmitted to the brain via the sensory fibers of the vagus nerve.

In summary, the nodose ganglion is a collection of nerve cell bodies that are part of the vagus nerve and provide sensory innervation to the internal organs in the thorax and abdomen.

A nerve block is a medical procedure in which an anesthetic or neurolytic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block the transmission of pain signals from that area to the brain. This technique can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as identifying the source of pain, providing temporary or prolonged relief, or facilitating surgical procedures in the affected region.

The injection typically contains a local anesthetic like lidocaine or bupivacaine, which numbs the nerve, preventing it from transmitting pain signals. In some cases, steroids may also be added to reduce inflammation and provide longer-lasting relief. Depending on the type of nerve block and its intended use, the injection might be administered close to the spine (neuraxial blocks), at peripheral nerves (peripheral nerve blocks), or around the sympathetic nervous system (sympathetic nerve blocks).

While nerve blocks are generally safe, they can have side effects such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, or in rare cases, systemic toxicity from the anesthetic agent. It is essential to consult with a qualified medical professional before undergoing this procedure to ensure proper evaluation, technique, and post-procedure care.

The phrenic nerve is a motor nerve that originates from the cervical spine (C3-C5) and descends through the neck to reach the diaphragm, which is the primary muscle used for breathing. The main function of the phrenic nerve is to innervate the diaphragm and control its contraction and relaxation, thereby enabling respiration.

Damage or injury to the phrenic nerve can result in paralysis of the diaphragm, leading to difficulty breathing and potentially causing respiratory failure. Certain medical conditions, such as neuromuscular disorders, spinal cord injuries, and tumors, can affect the phrenic nerve and impair its function.

Atropine is an anticholinergic drug that blocks the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the central and peripheral nervous system. It is derived from the belladonna alkaloids, which are found in plants such as deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), Jimson weed (Datura stramonium), and Duboisia spp.

In clinical medicine, atropine is used to reduce secretions, increase heart rate, and dilate the pupils. It is often used before surgery to dry up secretions in the mouth, throat, and lungs, and to reduce salivation during the procedure. Atropine is also used to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisoning, as well as to manage bradycardia (slow heart rate) and hypotension (low blood pressure) caused by beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers.

Atropine can have several side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness, confusion, and difficulty urinating. In high doses, it can cause delirium, hallucinations, and seizures. Atropine should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, prostatic hypertrophy, or other conditions that may be exacerbated by its anticholinergic effects.

A reflex is an automatic, involuntary and rapid response to a stimulus that occurs without conscious intention. In the context of physiology and neurology, it's a basic mechanism that involves the transmission of nerve impulses between neurons, resulting in a muscle contraction or glandular secretion.

Reflexes are important for maintaining homeostasis, protecting the body from harm, and coordinating movements. They can be tested clinically to assess the integrity of the nervous system, such as the knee-j jerk reflex, which tests the function of the L3-L4 spinal nerve roots and the sensitivity of the stretch reflex arc.

Nerve endings, also known as terminal branches or sensory receptors, are the specialized structures present at the termination point of nerve fibers (axons) that transmit electrical signals to and from the central nervous system (CNS). They primarily function in detecting changes in the external environment or internal body conditions and converting them into electrical impulses.

There are several types of nerve endings, including:

1. Free Nerve Endings: These are unencapsulated nerve endings that respond to various stimuli like temperature, pain, and touch. They are widely distributed throughout the body, especially in the skin, mucous membranes, and visceral organs.

2. Encapsulated Nerve Endings: These are wrapped by specialized connective tissue sheaths, which can modify their sensitivity to specific stimuli. Examples include Pacinian corpuscles (responsible for detecting deep pressure and vibration), Meissner's corpuscles (for light touch), Ruffini endings (for stretch and pressure), and Merkel cells (for sustained touch).

3. Specialised Nerve Endings: These are nerve endings that respond to specific stimuli, such as auditory, visual, olfactory, gustatory, and vestibular information. They include hair cells in the inner ear, photoreceptors in the retina, taste buds in the tongue, and olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity.

Nerve endings play a crucial role in relaying sensory information to the CNS for processing and initiating appropriate responses, such as reflex actions or conscious perception of the environment.

The splanchnic nerves are a set of nerve fibers that originate from the thoracic and lumbar regions of the spinal cord and innervate various internal organs. They are responsible for carrying both sensory information, such as pain and temperature, from the organs to the brain, and motor signals, which control the function of the organs, from the brain to the organs.

There are several splanchnic nerves, including the greater, lesser, and least splanchnic nerves, as well as the lumbar splanchnic nerves. These nerves primarily innervate the autonomic nervous system, which controls the involuntary functions of the body, such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

The greater splanchnic nerve arises from the fifth to the ninth thoracic ganglia and passes through the diaphragm to reach the abdomen. It innervates the stomach, esophagus, liver, pancreas, and adrenal glands.

The lesser splanchnic nerve arises from the tenth and eleventh thoracic ganglia and innervates the upper part of the small intestine, the pancreas, and the adrenal glands.

The least splanchnic nerve arises from the twelfth thoracic ganglion and innervates the lower part of the small intestine and the colon.

The lumbar splanchnic nerves arise from the first three or four lumbar ganglia and innervate the lower parts of the colon, the rectum, and the reproductive organs.

The sural nerve is a purely sensory peripheral nerve in the lower leg and foot. It provides sensation to the outer ( lateral) aspect of the little toe and the adjacent side of the fourth toe, as well as a small portion of the skin on the back of the leg between the ankle and knee joints.

The sural nerve is formed by the union of branches from the tibial and common fibular nerves (branches of the sciatic nerve) in the lower leg. It runs down the calf, behind the lateral malleolus (the bony prominence on the outside of the ankle), and into the foot.

The sural nerve is often used as a donor nerve during nerve grafting procedures due to its consistent anatomy and relatively low risk for morbidity at the donor site.

The median nerve is one of the major nerves in the human body, providing sensation and motor function to parts of the arm and hand. It originates from the brachial plexus, a network of nerves that arise from the spinal cord in the neck. The median nerve travels down the arm, passing through the cubital tunnel at the elbow, and continues into the forearm and hand.

In the hand, the median nerve supplies sensation to the palm side of the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. It also provides motor function to some of the muscles that control finger movements, allowing for flexion of the fingers and opposition of the thumb.

Damage to the median nerve can result in a condition called carpal tunnel syndrome, which is characterized by numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand and fingers.

Cranial nerve neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within or near the cranial nerves. These nerves are responsible for transmitting sensory and motor information between the brain and various parts of the head, neck, and trunk. There are 12 pairs of cranial nerves, each with a specific function and location in the skull.

Cranial nerve neoplasms can be benign or malignant and may arise from the nerve itself (schwannoma, neurofibroma) or from surrounding tissues that invade the nerve (meningioma, epidermoid cyst). The growth of these tumors can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and rate of growth. Common symptoms include:

* Facial weakness or numbness
* Double vision or other visual disturbances
* Hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
* Difficulty swallowing or speaking
* Loss of smell or taste
* Uncontrollable eye movements or drooping eyelids

Treatment for cranial nerve neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and extent of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or complications.

Cranial nerves are a set of twelve pairs of nerves that originate from the brainstem and skull, rather than the spinal cord. These nerves are responsible for transmitting sensory information (such as sight, smell, hearing, and taste) to the brain, as well as controlling various muscles in the head and neck (including those involved in chewing, swallowing, and eye movement). Each cranial nerve has a specific function and is named accordingly. For example, the optic nerve (cranial nerve II) transmits visual information from the eyes to the brain, while the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) controls parasympathetic functions in the body such as heart rate and digestion.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) is the part of the autonomic nervous system that primarily controls vegetative functions during rest, relaxation, and digestion. It is responsible for the body's "rest and digest" activities including decreasing heart rate, lowering blood pressure, increasing digestive activity, and stimulating sexual arousal. The PNS utilizes acetylcholine as its primary neurotransmitter and acts in opposition to the Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS), which is responsible for the "fight or flight" response.

The trigeminal nerve, also known as the fifth cranial nerve or CNV, is a paired nerve that carries both sensory and motor information. It has three major branches: ophthalmic (V1), maxillary (V2), and mandibular (V3). The ophthalmic branch provides sensation to the forehead, eyes, and upper portion of the nose; the maxillary branch supplies sensation to the lower eyelid, cheek, nasal cavity, and upper lip; and the mandibular branch is responsible for sensation in the lower lip, chin, and parts of the oral cavity, as well as motor function to the muscles involved in chewing. The trigeminal nerve plays a crucial role in sensations of touch, pain, temperature, and pressure in the face and mouth, and it also contributes to biting, chewing, and swallowing functions.

The facial nerve, also known as the seventh cranial nerve (CN VII), is a mixed nerve that carries both sensory and motor fibers. Its functions include controlling the muscles involved in facial expressions, taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, and secretomotor function to the lacrimal and salivary glands.

The facial nerve originates from the brainstem and exits the skull through the internal acoustic meatus. It then passes through the facial canal in the temporal bone before branching out to innervate various structures of the face. The main branches of the facial nerve include:

1. Temporal branch: Innervates the frontalis, corrugator supercilii, and orbicularis oculi muscles responsible for eyebrow movements and eyelid closure.
2. Zygomatic branch: Supplies the muscles that elevate the upper lip and wrinkle the nose.
3. Buccal branch: Innervates the muscles of the cheek and lips, allowing for facial expressions such as smiling and puckering.
4. Mandibular branch: Controls the muscles responsible for lower lip movement and depressing the angle of the mouth.
5. Cervical branch: Innervates the platysma muscle in the neck, which helps to depress the lower jaw and wrinkle the skin of the neck.

Damage to the facial nerve can result in various symptoms, such as facial weakness or paralysis, loss of taste sensation, and dry eyes or mouth due to impaired secretion.

Afferent neurons, also known as sensory neurons, are a type of nerve cell that conducts impulses or signals from peripheral receptors towards the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain and spinal cord. These neurons are responsible for transmitting sensory information such as touch, temperature, pain, sound, and light to the CNS for processing and interpretation. Afferent neurons have specialized receptor endings that detect changes in the environment and convert them into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the CNS via synapses with other neurons. Once the signals reach the CNS, they are processed and integrated with other information to produce a response or reaction to the stimulus.

A nerve crush injury is a type of peripheral nerve injury that occurs when there is excessive pressure or compression applied to a nerve, causing it to become damaged or dysfunctional. This can happen due to various reasons such as trauma from accidents, surgical errors, or prolonged pressure on the nerve from tight casts, clothing, or positions.

The compression disrupts the normal functioning of the nerve, leading to symptoms such as numbness, tingling, weakness, or pain in the affected area. In severe cases, a nerve crush injury can cause permanent damage to the nerve, leading to long-term disability or loss of function. Treatment for nerve crush injuries typically involves relieving the pressure on the nerve, providing supportive care, and in some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to repair the damaged nerve.

Peripheral nerve injuries refer to damage or trauma to the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These nerves transmit information between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body, including sensory, motor, and autonomic functions. Peripheral nerve injuries can result in various symptoms, depending on the type and severity of the injury, such as numbness, tingling, weakness, or paralysis in the affected area.

Peripheral nerve injuries are classified into three main categories based on the degree of damage:

1. Neuropraxia: This is the mildest form of nerve injury, where the nerve remains intact but its function is disrupted due to a local conduction block. The nerve fiber is damaged, but the supporting structures remain intact. Recovery usually occurs within 6-12 weeks without any residual deficits.
2. Axonotmesis: In this type of injury, there is damage to both the axons and the supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium). The nerve fibers are disrupted, but the connective tissue sheaths remain intact. Recovery can take several months or even up to a year, and it may be incomplete, with some residual deficits possible.
3. Neurotmesis: This is the most severe form of nerve injury, where there is complete disruption of the nerve fibers and supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium, epineurium). Recovery is unlikely without surgical intervention, which may involve nerve grafting or repair.

Peripheral nerve injuries can be caused by various factors, including trauma, compression, stretching, lacerations, or chemical exposure. Treatment options depend on the type and severity of the injury and may include conservative management, such as physical therapy and pain management, or surgical intervention for more severe cases.

The Tibial nerve is a major branch of the sciatic nerve that originates in the lower back and runs through the buttock and leg. It provides motor (nerve impulses that control muscle movement) and sensory (nerve impulses that convey information about touch, temperature, and pain) innervation to several muscles and skin regions in the lower limb.

More specifically, the Tibial nerve supplies the following structures:

1. Motor Innervation: The Tibial nerve provides motor innervation to the muscles in the back of the leg (posterior compartment), including the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) and the small muscles in the foot (intrinsic muscles). These muscles are responsible for plantarflexion (pointing the foot downward) and inversion (turning the foot inward) of the foot.
2. Sensory Innervation: The Tibial nerve provides sensory innervation to the skin on the sole of the foot, as well as the heel and some parts of the lower leg.

The Tibial nerve travels down the leg, passing behind the knee and through the calf, where it eventually joins with the common fibular (peroneal) nerve to form the tibial-fibular trunk. This trunk then divides into several smaller nerves that innervate the foot's intrinsic muscles and skin.

Damage or injury to the Tibial nerve can result in various symptoms, such as weakness or paralysis of the calf and foot muscles, numbness or tingling sensations in the sole of the foot, and difficulty walking or standing on tiptoes.

In anatomical terms, the stomach is a muscular, J-shaped organ located in the upper left portion of the abdomen. It is part of the gastrointestinal tract and plays a crucial role in digestion. The stomach's primary functions include storing food, mixing it with digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid to break down proteins, and slowly emptying the partially digested food into the small intestine for further absorption of nutrients.

The stomach is divided into several regions, including the cardia (the area nearest the esophagus), the fundus (the upper portion on the left side), the body (the main central part), and the pylorus (the narrowed region leading to the small intestine). The inner lining of the stomach, called the mucosa, is protected by a layer of mucus that prevents the digestive juices from damaging the stomach tissue itself.

In medical contexts, various conditions can affect the stomach, such as gastritis (inflammation of the stomach lining), peptic ulcers (sores in the stomach or duodenum), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and stomach cancer. Symptoms related to the stomach may include abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, and difficulty swallowing.

The Ulnar nerve is one of the major nerves in the forearm and hand, which provides motor function to the majority of the intrinsic muscles of the hand (except for those innervated by the median nerve) and sensory innervation to the little finger and half of the ring finger. It originates from the brachial plexus, passes through the cubital tunnel at the elbow, and continues down the forearm, where it runs close to the ulna bone. The ulnar nerve then passes through the Guyon's canal in the wrist before branching out to innervate the hand muscles and provide sensation to the skin on the little finger and half of the ring finger.

The Stellate Ganglion is a part of the sympathetic nervous system. It's a collection of nerve cells (a ganglion) located in the neck, more specifically at the level of the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae. The stellate ganglion is formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical ganglion and the first thoracic ganglion.

This ganglion plays a crucial role in the body's "fight or flight" response, providing sympathetic innervation to the head, neck, upper extremities, and heart. It's responsible for various functions including regulation of blood flow, sweat gland activity, and contributing to the sensory innervation of the head and neck.

Stellate ganglion block is a medical procedure used to diagnose or treat certain conditions like pain disorders, by injecting local anesthetic near the stellate ganglion to numb the area and interrupt nerve signals.

The Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN) is a branch of the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X), which is a mixed sensory, motor, and autonomic nerve. The RLN has important functions in providing motor innervation to the intrinsic muscles of the larynx, except for the cricothyroid muscle, which is supplied by the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve.

The recurrent laryngeal nerve supplies all the muscles that are responsible for adduction (bringing together) of the vocal cords, including the vocalis muscle, lateral cricoarytenoid, thyroarytenoid, and interarytenoid muscles. These muscles play a crucial role in voice production, coughing, and swallowing.

The right recurrent laryngeal nerve has a longer course than the left one. It loops around the subclavian artery in the chest before ascending to the larynx, while the left RLN hooks around the arch of the aorta. This anatomical course makes them vulnerable to injury during various surgical procedures, such as thyroidectomy and neck dissection, leading to potential voice impairment or vocal cord paralysis.

Neural conduction is the process by which electrical signals, known as action potentials, are transmitted along the axon of a neuron (nerve cell) to transmit information between different parts of the nervous system. This electrical impulse is generated by the movement of ions across the neuronal membrane, and it propagates down the length of the axon until it reaches the synapse, where it can then stimulate the release of neurotransmitters to communicate with other neurons or target cells. The speed of neural conduction can vary depending on factors such as the diameter of the axon, the presence of myelin sheaths (which act as insulation and allow for faster conduction), and the temperature of the environment.

The femoral nerve is a major nerve in the thigh region of the human body. It originates from the lumbar plexus, specifically from the ventral rami (anterior divisions) of the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves (L2-L4). The femoral nerve provides motor and sensory innervation to various muscles and areas in the lower limb.

Motor Innervation:
The femoral nerve is responsible for providing motor innervation to several muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh, including:

1. Iliacus muscle
2. Psoas major muscle
3. Quadriceps femoris muscle (consisting of four heads: rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and vastus intermedius)

These muscles are involved in hip flexion, knee extension, and stabilization of the hip joint.

Sensory Innervation:
The sensory distribution of the femoral nerve includes:

1. Anterior and medial aspects of the thigh
2. Skin over the anterior aspect of the knee and lower leg (via the saphenous nerve, a branch of the femoral nerve)

The saphenous nerve provides sensation to the skin on the inner side of the leg and foot, as well as the medial malleolus (the bony bump on the inside of the ankle).

In summary, the femoral nerve is a crucial component of the lumbar plexus that controls motor functions in the anterior thigh muscles and provides sensory innervation to the anterior and medial aspects of the thigh and lower leg.

The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a part of the autonomic nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness, and it functions to produce appropriate physiological responses to perceived danger. It's often associated with the "fight or flight" response. The SNS uses nerve impulses to stimulate target organs, causing them to speed up (e.g., increased heart rate), prepare for action, or otherwise respond to stressful situations.

The sympathetic nervous system is activated due to stressful emotional or physical situations and it prepares the body for immediate actions. It dilates the pupils, increases heart rate and blood pressure, accelerates breathing, and slows down digestion. The primary neurotransmitter involved in this system is norepinephrine (also known as noradrenaline).

Spinal nerves are the bundles of nerve fibers that transmit signals between the spinal cord and the rest of the body. There are 31 pairs of spinal nerves in the human body, which can be divided into five regions: 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal. Each spinal nerve carries both sensory information (such as touch, temperature, and pain) from the periphery to the spinal cord, and motor information (such as muscle control) from the spinal cord to the muscles and other structures in the body. Spinal nerves also contain autonomic fibers that regulate involuntary functions such as heart rate, digestion, and blood pressure.

Biguanides are a class of oral hypoglycemic agents used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The primary mechanism of action of biguanides is to decrease hepatic glucose production and increase insulin sensitivity, which leads to reduced fasting glucose levels and improved glycemic control.

The most commonly prescribed biguanide is metformin, which has been widely used for several decades due to its efficacy and low risk of hypoglycemia. Other biguanides include phenformin and buformin, but these are rarely used due to their association with a higher risk of lactic acidosis, a potentially life-threatening complication.

In addition to their glucose-lowering effects, biguanides have also been shown to have potential benefits on cardiovascular health and weight management, making them a valuable treatment option for many individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, they should be used with caution in patients with impaired renal function or other underlying medical conditions that may increase the risk of lactic acidosis.

The solitary nucleus, also known as the nucleus solitarius, is a collection of neurons located in the medulla oblongata region of the brainstem. It plays a crucial role in the processing and integration of sensory information, particularly taste and visceral afferent fibers from internal organs. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from various cranial nerves, including the glossopharyngeal (cranial nerve IX) and vagus nerves (cranial nerve X), and is involved in reflex responses related to swallowing, vomiting, and cardiovascular regulation.

Efferent pathways refer to the neural connections that carry signals from the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain and spinal cord, to the peripheral effectors such as muscles and glands. These pathways are responsible for the initiation and control of motor responses, as well as regulating various autonomic functions.

Efferent pathways can be divided into two main types:

1. Somatic efferent pathways: These pathways carry signals from the CNS to the skeletal muscles, enabling voluntary movements and postural control. The final common pathway for somatic motor innervation is the alpha-motor neuron, which synapses directly onto skeletal muscle fibers.
2. Autonomic efferent pathways: These pathways regulate the function of internal organs, smooth muscles, and glands. They are further divided into two subtypes: sympathetic and parasympathetic. The sympathetic system is responsible for the 'fight or flight' response, while the parasympathetic system promotes rest and digestion. Both systems use a two-neuron chain to transmit signals from the CNS to the effector organs. The preganglionic neuron has its cell body in the CNS and synapses with the postganglionic neuron in an autonomic ganglion located near the effector organ. The postganglionic neuron then innervates the target organ or tissue.

In summary, efferent pathways are the neural connections that carry signals from the CNS to peripheral effectors, enabling motor responses and regulating various autonomic functions. They can be divided into somatic and autonomic efferent pathways, with further subdivisions within the autonomic system.

Neuroimmunomodulation is a complex process that refers to the interaction and communication between the nervous system (including the brain, spinal cord, and nerves) and the immune system. This interaction can have modulatory effects on both systems, influencing their functions and responses.

In simpler terms, neuroimmunomodulation describes how the nervous system and the immune system can affect each other's activities, leading to changes in behavior, inflammation, and immune response. For example, stress or depression can influence the immune system's ability to fight off infections, while an overactive immune response can lead to neurological symptoms such as fatigue, confusion, or mood changes.

Neuroimmunomodulation plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis and health in the body, and its dysregulation has been implicated in various diseases, including autoimmune disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and mental health conditions. Understanding this complex interplay is essential for developing effective treatments and therapies for these conditions.

Medical Definition of Respiration:

Respiration, in physiology, is the process by which an organism takes in oxygen and gives out carbon dioxide. It's also known as breathing. This process is essential for most forms of life because it provides the necessary oxygen for cellular respiration, where the cells convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and releases waste products, primarily carbon dioxide.

In humans and other mammals, respiration is a two-stage process:

1. Breathing (or external respiration): This involves the exchange of gases with the environment. Air enters the lungs through the mouth or nose, then passes through the pharynx, larynx, trachea, and bronchi, finally reaching the alveoli where the actual gas exchange occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood, while carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled.

2. Cellular respiration (or internal respiration): This is the process by which cells convert glucose and other nutrients into ATP, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of oxygen. The carbon dioxide produced during this process then diffuses out of the cells and into the bloodstream to be exhaled during breathing.

In summary, respiration is a vital physiological function that enables organisms to obtain the necessary oxygen for cellular metabolism while eliminating waste products like carbon dioxide.

Afferent pathways, also known as sensory pathways, refer to the neural connections that transmit sensory information from the peripheral nervous system to the central nervous system (CNS), specifically to the brain and spinal cord. These pathways are responsible for carrying various types of sensory information, such as touch, temperature, pain, pressure, vibration, hearing, vision, and taste, to the CNS for processing and interpretation.

The afferent pathways begin with sensory receptors located throughout the body, which detect changes in the environment and convert them into electrical signals. These signals are then transmitted via afferent neurons, also known as sensory neurons, to the spinal cord or brainstem. Within the CNS, the information is further processed and integrated with other neural inputs before being relayed to higher cognitive centers for conscious awareness and response.

Understanding the anatomy and physiology of afferent pathways is essential for diagnosing and treating various neurological conditions that affect sensory function, such as neuropathies, spinal cord injuries, and brain disorders.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Pulmonary stretch receptors are nerve endings (receptors) located in the smooth muscle of the airways, specifically within the bronchi and bronchioles of the lungs. They are also known as irritant receptors or slowly adapting receptors. These receptors respond to mechanical deformation caused by lung inflation during breathing. When the lungs stretch, these receptors send signals to the brain via the vagus nerve, which helps regulate breathing patterns and depth. This reflex is known as the Hering-Breuer reflex, which can inhibit inspiration and promote expiration, preventing overinflation of the lungs and helping maintain lung volume within normal ranges.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is a small secreted protein that is involved in the growth, maintenance, and survival of certain neurons (nerve cells). It was the first neurotrophin to be discovered and is essential for the development and function of the nervous system. NGF binds to specific receptors on the surface of nerve cells and helps to promote their differentiation, axonal growth, and synaptic plasticity. Additionally, NGF has been implicated in various physiological processes such as inflammation, immune response, and wound healing. Deficiencies or excesses of NGF have been linked to several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and pain conditions.

Nerve Growth Factors (NGFs) are a family of proteins that play an essential role in the growth, maintenance, and survival of certain neurons (nerve cells). They were first discovered by Rita Levi-Montalcini and Stanley Cohen in 1956. NGF is particularly crucial for the development and function of the peripheral nervous system, which connects the central nervous system to various organs and tissues throughout the body.

NGF supports the differentiation and survival of sympathetic and sensory neurons during embryonic development. In adults, NGF continues to regulate the maintenance and repair of these neurons, contributing to neuroplasticity – the brain's ability to adapt and change over time. Additionally, NGF has been implicated in pain transmission and modulation, as well as inflammatory responses.

Abnormal levels or dysfunctional NGF signaling have been associated with various medical conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's), chronic pain disorders, and certain cancers (e.g., small cell lung cancer). Therefore, understanding the role of NGF in physiological and pathological processes may provide valuable insights into developing novel therapeutic strategies for these conditions.

The brainstem is the lower part of the brain that connects to the spinal cord. It consists of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brainstem controls many vital functions such as heart rate, breathing, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory and motor information between the cerebral cortex and the rest of the body. Additionally, several cranial nerves originate from the brainstem, including those that control eye movements, facial movements, and hearing.

Denervation is a medical term that refers to the loss or removal of nerve supply to an organ or body part. This can occur as a result of surgical intervention, injury, or disease processes that damage the nerves leading to the affected area. The consequences of denervation depend on the specific organ or tissue involved, but generally, it can lead to changes in function, sensation, and muscle tone. For example, denervation of a skeletal muscle can cause weakness, atrophy, and altered reflexes. Similarly, denervation of an organ such as the heart can lead to abnormalities in heart rate and rhythm. In some cases, denervation may be intentional, such as during surgical procedures aimed at treating chronic pain or spasticity.

The laryngeal nerves are a pair of nerves that originate from the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X) and provide motor and sensory innervation to the larynx. There are two branches of the laryngeal nerves: the superior laryngeal nerve and the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

The superior laryngeal nerve has two branches: the external branch, which provides motor innervation to the cricothyroid muscle and sensation to the mucous membrane of the laryngeal vestibule; and the internal branch, which provides sensory innervation to the mucous membrane of the laryngeal vestibule.

The recurrent laryngeal nerve provides motor innervation to all the intrinsic muscles of the larynx, except for the cricothyroid muscle, and sensation to the mucous membrane below the vocal folds. The right recurrent laryngeal nerve has a longer course than the left one, as it hooks around the subclavian artery before ascending to the larynx.

Damage to the laryngeal nerves can result in voice changes, difficulty swallowing, and respiratory distress.

The Radial nerve is a major peripheral nerve in the human body that originates from the brachial plexus, which is a network of nerves formed by the union of the ventral rami (anterior divisions) of spinal nerves C5-T1. The radial nerve provides motor function to extensor muscles of the upper limb and sensation to parts of the skin on the back of the arm, forearm, and hand.

More specifically, the radial nerve supplies motor innervation to:

* Extensor muscles of the shoulder (e.g., teres minor, infraspinatus)
* Rotator cuff muscles
* Elbow joint stabilizers (e.g., lateral head of the triceps)
* Extensors of the wrist, fingers, and thumb

The radial nerve also provides sensory innervation to:

* Posterior aspect of the upper arm (from the lower third of the humerus to the elbow)
* Lateral forearm (from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus to the wrist)
* Dorsum of the hand (skin over the radial side of the dorsum, including the first web space)

Damage or injury to the radial nerve may result in various symptoms, such as weakness or paralysis of the extensor muscles, numbness or tingling sensations in the affected areas, and difficulty with extension movements of the wrist, fingers, and thumb. Common causes of radial nerve injuries include fractures of the humerus bone, compression during sleep or prolonged pressure on the nerve (e.g., from crutches), and entrapment syndromes like radial tunnel syndrome.

"Cat" is a common name that refers to various species of small carnivorous mammals that belong to the family Felidae. The domestic cat, also known as Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus, is a popular pet and companion animal. It is a subspecies of the wildcat, which is found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Domestic cats are often kept as pets because of their companionship, playful behavior, and ability to hunt vermin. They are also valued for their ability to provide emotional support and therapy to people. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they require a diet that consists mainly of meat to meet their nutritional needs.

Cats are known for their agility, sharp senses, and predatory instincts. They have retractable claws, which they use for hunting and self-defense. Cats also have a keen sense of smell, hearing, and vision, which allow them to detect prey and navigate their environment.

In medical terms, cats can be hosts to various parasites and diseases that can affect humans and other animals. Some common feline diseases include rabies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and toxoplasmosis. It is important for cat owners to keep their pets healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations and preventative treatments to protect both the cats and their human companions.

Mechanoreceptors are specialized sensory receptor cells that convert mechanical stimuli such as pressure, tension, or deformation into electrical signals that can be processed and interpreted by the nervous system. They are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the skin, muscles, tendons, joints, and internal organs. Mechanoreceptors can detect different types of mechanical stimuli depending on their specific structure and location. For example, Pacinian corpuscles in the skin respond to vibrations, while Ruffini endings in the joints detect changes in joint angle and pressure. Overall, mechanoreceptors play a crucial role in our ability to perceive and interact with our environment through touch, proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts), and visceral sensation (awareness of internal organ activity).

Capsaicin is defined in medical terms as the active component of chili peppers (genus Capsicum) that produces a burning sensation when it comes into contact with mucous membranes or skin. It is a potent irritant and is used topically as a counterirritant in some creams and patches to relieve pain. Capsaicin works by depleting substance P, a neurotransmitter that relays pain signals to the brain, from nerve endings.

Here is the medical definition of capsaicin from the Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary:

caпсаісіn : an alkaloid (C18H27NO3) that is the active principle of red peppers and is used in topical preparations as a counterirritant and analgesic.

An action potential is a brief electrical signal that travels along the membrane of a nerve cell (neuron) or muscle cell. It is initiated by a rapid, localized change in the permeability of the cell membrane to specific ions, such as sodium and potassium, resulting in a rapid influx of sodium ions and a subsequent efflux of potassium ions. This ion movement causes a brief reversal of the electrical potential across the membrane, which is known as depolarization. The action potential then propagates along the cell membrane as a wave, allowing the electrical signal to be transmitted over long distances within the body. Action potentials play a crucial role in the communication and functioning of the nervous system and muscle tissue.

Gastrointestinal motility refers to the coordinated muscular contractions and relaxations that propel food, digestive enzymes, and waste products through the gastrointestinal tract. This process involves the movement of food from the mouth through the esophagus into the stomach, where it is mixed with digestive enzymes and acids to break down food particles.

The contents are then emptied into the small intestine, where nutrients are absorbed, and the remaining waste products are moved into the large intestine for further absorption of water and electrolytes and eventual elimination through the rectum and anus.

Gastrointestinal motility is controlled by a complex interplay between the autonomic nervous system, hormones, and local reflexes. Abnormalities in gastrointestinal motility can lead to various symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation.

The accessory nerve, also known as the eleventh cranial nerve (XI), has both a cranial and spinal component. It primarily controls the function of certain muscles in the back of the neck and shoulder.

The cranial part arises from nuclei in the brainstem and innervates some of the muscles that help with head rotation, including the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The spinal root originates from nerve roots in the upper spinal cord (C1-C5), exits the spine, and joins the cranial part to form a single trunk. This trunk then innervates the trapezius muscle, which helps with shoulder movement and stability.

Damage to the accessory nerve can result in weakness or paralysis of the affected muscles, causing symptoms such as difficulty turning the head, weak shoulder shrugging, or winged scapula (a condition where the shoulder blade protrudes from the back).

Spinal nerve roots are the initial parts of spinal nerves that emerge from the spinal cord through the intervertebral foramen, which are small openings between each vertebra in the spine. These nerve roots carry motor, sensory, and autonomic fibers to and from specific regions of the body. There are 31 pairs of spinal nerve roots in total, with 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal pair. Each root has a dorsal (posterior) and ventral (anterior) ramus that branch off to form the peripheral nervous system. Irritation or compression of these nerve roots can result in pain, numbness, weakness, or loss of reflexes in the affected area.

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These seizures are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain, which can result in a wide range of symptoms, including convulsions, loss of consciousness, and altered sensations or behaviors. Epilepsy can have many different causes, including genetic factors, brain injury, infection, or stroke. In some cases, the cause may be unknown.

There are many different types of seizures that can occur in people with epilepsy, and the specific type of seizure will depend on the location and extent of the abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Some people may experience only one type of seizure, while others may have several different types. Seizures can vary in frequency, from a few per year to dozens or even hundreds per day.

Epilepsy is typically diagnosed based on the patient's history of recurrent seizures and the results of an electroencephalogram (EEG), which measures the electrical activity in the brain. Imaging tests such as MRI or CT scans may also be used to help identify any structural abnormalities in the brain that may be contributing to the seizures.

While there is no cure for epilepsy, it can often be effectively managed with medication. In some cases, surgery may be recommended to remove the area of the brain responsible for the seizures. With proper treatment and management, many people with epilepsy are able to lead normal, productive lives.

Myelinated nerve fibers are neuronal processes that are surrounded by a myelin sheath, a fatty insulating substance that is produced by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. This myelin sheath helps to increase the speed of electrical impulse transmission, also known as action potentials, along the nerve fiber. The myelin sheath has gaps called nodes of Ranvier where the electrical impulses can jump from one node to the next, which also contributes to the rapid conduction of signals. Myelinated nerve fibers are typically found in the peripheral nerves and the optic nerve, but not in the central nervous system (CNS) tracts that are located within the brain and spinal cord.

Nerve compression syndromes refer to a group of conditions characterized by the pressure or irritation of a peripheral nerve, causing various symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the affected area. This compression can occur due to several reasons, including injury, repetitive motion, bone spurs, tumors, or swelling. Common examples of nerve compression syndromes include carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, radial nerve compression, and ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist or elbow. Treatment options may include physical therapy, splinting, medications, injections, or surgery, depending on the severity and underlying cause of the condition.

The hypoglossal nerve, also known as the 12th cranial nerve (CN XII), is primarily responsible for innervating the muscles of the tongue, allowing for its movement and function. These muscles include the intrinsic muscles that alter the shape of the tongue and the extrinsic muscles that position it in the oral cavity. The hypoglossal nerve also has some minor contributions to the innervation of two muscles in the neck: the sternocleidomastoid and the trapezius. These functions are related to head turning and maintaining head position. Any damage to this nerve can lead to weakness or paralysis of the tongue, causing difficulty with speech, swallowing, and tongue movements.

Heart rate is the number of heartbeats per unit of time, often expressed as beats per minute (bpm). It can vary significantly depending on factors such as age, physical fitness, emotions, and overall health status. A resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm is generally considered normal for adults, but athletes and individuals with high levels of physical fitness may have a resting heart rate below 60 bpm due to their enhanced cardiovascular efficiency. Monitoring heart rate can provide valuable insights into an individual's health status, exercise intensity, and response to various treatments or interventions.

Chemoreceptor cells are specialized sensory neurons that detect and respond to chemical changes in the internal or external environment. They play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis within the body by converting chemical signals into electrical impulses, which are then transmitted to the central nervous system for further processing and response.

There are two main types of chemoreceptor cells:

1. Oxygen Chemoreceptors: These cells are located in the carotid bodies near the bifurcation of the common carotid artery and in the aortic bodies close to the aortic arch. They monitor the levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood and respond to decreases in oxygen concentration or increases in carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions (indicating acidity) by increasing their firing rate. This signals the brain to increase respiratory rate and depth, thereby restoring normal oxygen levels.

2. Taste Cells: These chemoreceptor cells are found within the taste buds of the tongue and other areas of the oral cavity. They detect specific tastes (salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami) by interacting with molecules from food. When a tastant binds to receptors on the surface of a taste cell, it triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to the generation of an action potential. This information is then relayed to the brain, where it is interpreted as taste sensation.

In summary, chemoreceptor cells are essential for maintaining physiological balance by detecting and responding to chemical stimuli in the body. They play a critical role in regulating vital functions such as respiration and digestion.

The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a component of the peripheral nervous system that regulates involuntary physiological functions, such as heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, pupillary response, urination, and sexual arousal. The autonomic pathways refer to the neural connections and signaling processes that allow the ANS to carry out these functions.

The autonomic pathways consist of two main subdivisions: the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). These systems have opposing effects on many organs, with the SNS generally stimulating activity and the PNS inhibiting it. The enteric nervous system, which controls gut function, is sometimes considered a third subdivision of the ANS.

The sympathetic pathway originates in the thoracic and lumbar regions of the spinal cord, with preganglionic neurons synapsing on postganglionic neurons in paravertebral ganglia or prevertebral ganglia. The parasympathetic pathway originates in the brainstem (cranial nerves III, VII, IX, and X) and the sacral region of the spinal cord (S2-S4), with preganglionic neurons synapsing on postganglionic neurons near or within the target organ.

Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter used in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways, although norepinephrine (noradrenaline) is also released by some postganglionic sympathetic neurons. The specific pattern of neural activation and inhibition within the autonomic pathways helps maintain homeostasis and allows for adaptive responses to changes in the internal and external environment.

The ophthalmic nerve, also known as the first cranial nerve or CN I, is a sensory nerve that primarily transmits information about vision, including light intensity and color, and sensation in the eye and surrounding areas. It is responsible for the sensory innervation of the upper eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, iris, ciliary body, and nasal cavity. The ophthalmic nerve has three major branches: the lacrimal nerve, frontal nerve, and nasociliary nerve. Damage to this nerve can result in various visual disturbances and loss of sensation in the affected areas.

An axon is a long, slender extension of a neuron (a type of nerve cell) that conducts electrical impulses (nerve impulses) away from the cell body to target cells, such as other neurons or muscle cells. Axons can vary in length from a few micrometers to over a meter long and are typically surrounded by a myelin sheath, which helps to insulate and protect the axon and allows for faster transmission of nerve impulses.

Axons play a critical role in the functioning of the nervous system, as they provide the means by which neurons communicate with one another and with other cells in the body. Damage to axons can result in serious neurological problems, such as those seen in spinal cord injuries or neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Hexamethonium compounds are a type of ganglionic blocker, which are medications that block the transmission of nerve impulses at the ganglia ( clusters of nerve cells) in the autonomic nervous system. These compounds contain hexamethonium as the active ingredient, which is a compound with the chemical formula C16H32N2O4.

Hexamethonium works by blocking the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the ganglia, which prevents the release of neurotransmitters and ultimately inhibits the transmission of nerve impulses. This can have various effects on the body, depending on which part of the autonomic nervous system is affected.

Hexamethonium compounds were once used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), but they are rarely used today due to their numerous side effects and the availability of safer and more effective medications. Some of the side effects associated with hexamethonium include dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, and dizziness upon standing.

Hexamethonium is defined as a ganglionic blocker, which is a type of medication that blocks the activity at the junction between two nerve cells (neurons) called the neurotransmitter receptor site. It is a non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent, which means it works by binding to and inhibiting the action of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the motor endplate, where the nerve meets the muscle.

Hexamethonium was historically used in anesthesia practice as a adjunct to provide muscle relaxation during surgical procedures. However, its use has largely been replaced by other neuromuscular blocking agents that have a faster onset and shorter duration of action. It is still used in research settings to study the autonomic nervous system and for the treatment of hypertensive emergencies in some cases.

It's important to note that the use of Hexamethonium requires careful monitoring and management, as it can have significant effects on cardiovascular function and other body systems.

Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter, a type of chemical messenger that transmits signals across a chemical synapse from one neuron (nerve cell) to another "target" neuron, muscle cell, or gland cell. It is involved in both peripheral and central nervous system functions.

In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholine acts as a neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, where it transmits signals from motor neurons to activate muscles. Acetylcholine also acts as a neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system, where it is involved in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems.

In the central nervous system, acetylcholine plays a role in learning, memory, attention, and arousal. Disruptions in cholinergic neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

Acetylcholine is synthesized from choline and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase and is stored in vesicles at the presynaptic terminal of the neuron. When a nerve impulse arrives, the vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane, releasing acetylcholine into the synapse. The acetylcholine then binds to receptors on the postsynaptic membrane, triggering a response in the target cell. Acetylcholine is subsequently degraded by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which terminates its action and allows for signal transduction to be repeated.

Nerve tissue, also known as neural tissue, is a type of specialized tissue that is responsible for the transmission of electrical signals and the processing of information in the body. It is a key component of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. Nerve tissue is composed of two main types of cells: neurons and glial cells.

Neurons are the primary functional units of nerve tissue. They are specialized cells that are capable of generating and transmitting electrical signals, known as action potentials. Neurons have a unique structure, with a cell body (also called the soma) that contains the nucleus and other organelles, and processes (dendrites and axons) that extend from the cell body and are used to receive and transmit signals.

Glial cells, also known as neuroglia or glia, are non-neuronal cells that provide support and protection for neurons. There are several different types of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia, and Schwann cells. These cells play a variety of roles in the nervous system, such as providing structural support, maintaining the proper environment for neurons, and helping to repair and regenerate nerve tissue after injury.

Nerve tissue is found throughout the body, but it is most highly concentrated in the brain and spinal cord, which make up the central nervous system (CNS). The peripheral nerves, which are the nerves that extend from the CNS to the rest of the body, also contain nerve tissue. Nerve tissue is responsible for transmitting sensory information from the body to the brain, controlling muscle movements, and regulating various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Pressoreceptors are specialized sensory nerve endings found in the walls of blood vessels, particularly in the carotid sinus and aortic arch. They respond to changes in blood pressure by converting the mechanical stimulus into electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain. This information helps regulate cardiovascular function and maintain blood pressure homeostasis.

The carotid sinus is a small, dilated area located at the bifurcation (or fork) of the common carotid artery into the internal and external carotid arteries. It is a baroreceptor region, which means it contains specialized sensory nerve endings that can detect changes in blood pressure. When the blood pressure increases, the walls of the carotid sinus stretch, activating these nerve endings and sending signals to the brain. The brain then responds by reducing the heart rate and relaxing the blood vessels, which helps to lower the blood pressure back to normal.

The carotid sinus is an important part of the body's autonomic nervous system, which regulates various involuntary functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and digestion. It plays a crucial role in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and preventing excessive increases in blood pressure that could potentially damage vital organs.

The mandibular nerve is a branch of the trigeminal nerve (the fifth cranial nerve), which is responsible for sensations in the face and motor functions such as biting and chewing. The mandibular nerve provides both sensory and motor innervation to the lower third of the face, below the eye and nose down to the chin.

More specifically, it carries sensory information from the lower teeth, lower lip, and parts of the oral cavity, as well as the skin over the jaw and chin. It also provides motor innervation to the muscles of mastication (chewing), which include the masseter, temporalis, medial pterygoid, and lateral pterygoid muscles.

Damage to the mandibular nerve can result in numbness or loss of sensation in the lower face and mouth, as well as weakness or difficulty with chewing and biting.

The trachea, also known as the windpipe, is a tube-like structure in the respiratory system that connects the larynx (voice box) to the bronchi (the two branches leading to each lung). It is composed of several incomplete rings of cartilage and smooth muscle, which provide support and flexibility. The trachea plays a crucial role in directing incoming air to the lungs during inspiration and outgoing air to the larynx during expiration.

The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) is a type of cholinergic receptor found in the nervous system that is activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is a ligand-gated ion channel that is widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, including in the hippocampus, cortex, thalamus, and autonomic ganglia.

The α7nAChR is composed of five subunits arranged around a central pore, and it has a high permeability to calcium ions (Ca2+). When acetylcholine binds to the receptor, it triggers a conformational change that opens the ion channel, allowing Ca2+ to flow into the cell. This influx of Ca2+ can activate various intracellular signaling pathways and have excitatory or inhibitory effects on neuronal activity, depending on the location and function of the receptor.

The α7nAChR has been implicated in a variety of physiological processes, including learning and memory, attention, sensory perception, and motor control. It has also been studied as a potential therapeutic target for various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and pain.

The medulla oblongata is a part of the brainstem that is located in the posterior portion of the brainstem and continues with the spinal cord. It plays a vital role in controlling several critical bodily functions, such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. The medulla oblongata also contains nerve pathways that transmit sensory information from the body to the brain and motor commands from the brain to the muscles. Additionally, it is responsible for reflexes such as vomiting, swallowing, coughing, and sneezing.

Implanted electrodes are medical devices that are surgically placed inside the body to interface directly with nerves, neurons, or other electrically excitable tissue for various therapeutic purposes. These electrodes can be used to stimulate or record electrical activity from specific areas of the body, depending on their design and application.

There are several types of implanted electrodes, including:

1. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) electrodes: These are placed deep within the brain to treat movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. DBS electrodes deliver electrical impulses that modulate abnormal neural activity in targeted brain regions.
2. Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) electrodes: These are implanted along the spinal cord to treat chronic pain syndromes. SCS electrodes emit low-level electrical pulses that interfere with pain signals traveling to the brain, providing relief for patients.
3. Cochlear Implant electrodes: These are surgically inserted into the cochlea of the inner ear to restore hearing in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. The electrodes stimulate the auditory nerve directly, bypassing damaged hair cells within the cochlea.
4. Retinal Implant electrodes: These are implanted in the retina to treat certain forms of blindness caused by degenerative eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The electrodes convert visual information from a camera into electrical signals, which stimulate remaining retinal cells and transmit the information to the brain via the optic nerve.
5. Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) electrodes: These are placed near the sacral nerves in the lower back to treat urinary or fecal incontinence and overactive bladder syndrome. SNS electrodes deliver electrical impulses that regulate the function of the affected muscles and nerves.
6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) electrodes: These are wrapped around the vagus nerve in the neck to treat epilepsy and depression. VNS electrodes provide intermittent electrical stimulation to the vagus nerve, which has connections to various regions of the brain involved in these conditions.

Overall, implanted electrodes serve as a crucial component in many neuromodulation therapies, offering an effective treatment option for numerous neurological and sensory disorders.

Motor neurons are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that play a crucial role in controlling voluntary muscle movements. They transmit electrical signals from the brain to the muscles, enabling us to perform actions such as walking, talking, and swallowing. There are two types of motor neurons: upper motor neurons, which originate in the brain's motor cortex and travel down to the brainstem and spinal cord; and lower motor neurons, which extend from the brainstem and spinal cord to the muscles. Damage or degeneration of these motor neurons can lead to various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

Veratrine is not a medical term, but it is a pharmacological term that refers to a mixture of alkaloids (veratridine and cevadine) extracted from the seeds of the sabadilla lily (Schoenocaulon officinale). Veratrine has been used in research and medicine for its effects on nerve cells, particularly in studying sodium channels. It can cause prolonged depolarization of nerve membranes leading to repetitive firing of action potentials. However, due to its high toxicity, it is not used clinically.

Adrenergic fibers are a type of nerve fiber that releases neurotransmitters known as catecholamines, such as norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and epinephrine (adrenaline). These neurotransmitters bind to adrenergic receptors in various target organs, including the heart, blood vessels, lungs, glands, and other tissues, and mediate the "fight or flight" response to stress.

Adrenergic fibers can be classified into two types based on their neurotransmitter content:

1. Noradrenergic fibers: These fibers release norepinephrine as their primary neurotransmitter and are widely distributed throughout the autonomic nervous system, including the sympathetic and some parasympathetic ganglia. They play a crucial role in regulating cardiovascular function, respiration, metabolism, and other physiological processes.
2. Adrenergic fibers with dual innervation: These fibers contain both norepinephrine and epinephrine as neurotransmitters and are primarily located in the adrenal medulla. They release epinephrine into the bloodstream, which acts on distant target organs to produce a more widespread and intense "fight or flight" response than norepinephrine alone.

Overall, adrenergic fibers play a critical role in maintaining homeostasis and responding to stress by modulating various physiological functions through the release of catecholamines.

Carnivora is an order of mammals that consists of animals whose primary diet consists of flesh. The term "Carnivora" comes from the Latin words "caro", meaning flesh, and "vorare", meaning to devour. This order includes a wide variety of species, ranging from large predators such as lions, tigers, and bears, to smaller animals such as weasels, otters, and raccoons.

While members of the Carnivora order are often referred to as "carnivores," it is important to note that not all members exclusively eat meat. Some species, such as raccoons and bears, have an omnivorous diet that includes both plants and animals. Additionally, some species within this order have evolved specialized adaptations for their specific diets, such as the elongated canines and carnassial teeth of felids (cats) and canids (dogs), which are adapted for tearing and shearing meat.

Overall, the medical definition of Carnivora refers to an order of mammals that have a diet primarily consisting of flesh, although not all members exclusively eat meat.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

The cochlear nerve, also known as the auditory nerve, is the sensory nerve that transmits sound signals from the inner ear to the brain. It consists of two parts: the outer spiral ganglion and the inner vestibular portion. The spiral ganglion contains the cell bodies of the bipolar neurons that receive input from hair cells in the cochlea, which is the snail-shaped organ in the inner ear responsible for hearing. These neurons then send their axons to form the cochlear nerve, which travels through the internal auditory meatus and synapses with neurons in the cochlear nuclei located in the brainstem.

Damage to the cochlear nerve can result in hearing loss or deafness, depending on the severity of the injury. Common causes of cochlear nerve damage include acoustic trauma, such as exposure to loud noises, viral infections, meningitis, and tumors affecting the nerve or surrounding structures. In some cases, cochlear nerve damage may be treated with hearing aids, cochlear implants, or other assistive devices to help restore or improve hearing function.

The esophagus is the muscular tube that connects the throat (pharynx) to the stomach. It is located in the midline of the neck and chest, passing through the diaphragm to enter the abdomen and join the stomach. The main function of the esophagus is to transport food and liquids from the mouth to the stomach for digestion.

The esophagus has a few distinct parts: the upper esophageal sphincter (a ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the throat), the middle esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (another ring of muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach). The lower esophageal sphincter relaxes to allow food and liquids to enter the stomach and then contracts to prevent stomach contents from flowing back into the esophagus.

The walls of the esophagus are made up of several layers, including mucosa (a moist tissue that lines the inside of the tube), submucosa (a layer of connective tissue), muscle (both voluntary and involuntary types), and adventitia (an outer layer of connective tissue).

Common conditions affecting the esophagus include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, esophageal cancer, esophageal strictures, and eosinophilic esophagitis.

A hiccup, also known as singultus, is an involuntary spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm and intercostal muscles, followed by a sudden closure of the glottis (the opening between the vocal cords in the larynx), which produces the characteristic "hic" sound. Hiccups occur when the phrenic nerve, which runs from the neck to the diaphragm, is irritated or stimulated. This can be caused by various factors such as eating too quickly, consuming alcohol or carbonated drinks, stress, excitement, or sudden temperature changes. In most cases, hiccups are harmless and resolve on their own within a few minutes to a few hours. However, persistent hiccups lasting for more than 48 hours may indicate an underlying medical condition and should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

Sensory receptor cells are specialized structures that convert physical stimuli from our environment into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain for interpretation. These receptors can be found in various tissues throughout the body and are responsible for detecting sensations such as touch, pressure, temperature, taste, and smell. They can be classified into two main types: exteroceptors, which respond to stimuli from the external environment, and interoceptors, which react to internal conditions within the body. Examples of sensory receptor cells include hair cells in the inner ear, photoreceptors in the eye, and taste buds on the tongue.

Cholinergic agents are a class of drugs that mimic the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter in the body that is involved in the transmission of nerve impulses. These agents work by either increasing the amount of acetylcholine in the synapse (the space between two neurons) or enhancing its action on receptors.

Cholinergic agents can be classified into two main categories: direct-acting and indirect-acting. Direct-acting cholinergic agents, also known as parasympathomimetics, directly stimulate muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Examples of direct-acting cholinergic agents include pilocarpine, bethanechol, and carbamate.

Indirect-acting cholinergic agents, on the other hand, work by inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which is responsible for breaking down acetylcholine in the synapse. By inhibiting this enzyme, indirect-acting cholinergic agents increase the amount of acetylcholine available to stimulate receptors. Examples of indirect-acting cholinergic agents include physostigmine, neostigmine, and edrophonium.

Cholinergic agents are used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including myasthenia gravis, Alzheimer's disease, glaucoma, and gastrointestinal disorders. However, they can also have significant side effects, such as bradycardia, bronchoconstriction, and increased salivation, due to their stimulation of muscarinic receptors. Therefore, they must be used with caution and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

The Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is a part of the peripheral nervous system that operates largely below the level of consciousness and controls visceral functions. It is divided into two main subdivisions: the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which generally have opposing effects and maintain homeostasis in the body.

The Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) prepares the body for stressful or emergency situations, often referred to as the "fight or flight" response. It increases heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, and metabolic rate, while also decreasing digestive activity. This response helps the body respond quickly to perceived threats.

The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS), on the other hand, promotes the "rest and digest" state, allowing the body to conserve energy and restore itself after the stress response has subsided. It decreases heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate, while increasing digestive activity and promoting relaxation.

These two systems work together to maintain balance in the body by adjusting various functions based on internal and external demands. Disorders of the Autonomic Nervous System can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis, and cardiac arrhythmias, among others.

Polyphloretin phosphate is not a widely recognized or established medical term. It appears to be a chemical compound that has been studied in the field of pharmacology and biochemistry, particularly for its potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as it is not a clinically used medication or a standard diagnostic term.

Polyphloretin phosphate is a derivative of polyphloretin, which is a polyphenolic compound found in the bark of trees such as apple and cherry. It has been suggested that this compound may have various health benefits due to its antioxidant properties, but more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish its safety and efficacy in clinical settings.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

An implantable neurostimulator is a type of medical device that is surgically placed inside the body to deliver electrical stimulation to specific nerves or areas of the brain. This can be used to treat a variety of neurological conditions, such as chronic pain, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and essential tremor.

The device typically consists of one or more electrodes that are implanted near the target nerve or brain region, connected to a pulse generator that is implanted under the skin, usually in the chest or abdomen. The patient or healthcare provider can program the pulse generator to deliver electrical stimulation at specific times and intensities, which can help to modulate the activity of the targeted nerves and alleviate symptoms.

Implantable neurostimulators are typically considered when other treatments have failed or are not well-tolerated. While they are generally safe and effective, there are some risks associated with surgery and long-term use, such as infection, device malfunction, and discomfort at the implantation site. Therefore, careful consideration and discussion with a healthcare provider is necessary before deciding to proceed with this type of treatment.

Neuromuscular depolarizing agents are a type of muscle relaxant used in anesthesia and critical care medicine. These drugs work by causing depolarization of the post-synaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction, which is the site where nerve impulses are transmitted to muscles. This results in the binding of the drug to the receptor and the activation of ion channels, leading to muscle contraction.

The most commonly used depolarizing agent is suxamethonium (also known as succinylcholine), which has a rapid onset and short duration of action. It is often used during rapid sequence intubation, where there is a need for immediate muscle relaxation to facilitate endotracheal intubation.

However, the use of depolarizing agents can also lead to several side effects, including increased potassium levels in the blood (hyperkalemia), muscle fasciculations, and an increase in intracranial and intraocular pressure. Therefore, these drugs should be used with caution and only under the close supervision of a trained healthcare provider.

Paraganglia, nonchromaffin are neuroendocrine tissues that originate from the neural crest and are widely distributed throughout the body. They are similar to chromaffin paraganglia (which contain catecholamines) but do not contain catecholamines or only contain them in trace amounts. Instead, they produce and secrete various neuropeptides and hormones, such as serotonin, somatostatin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP).

Nonchromaffin paraganglia are divided into two main groups: the head and neck (HNP) and the thoracoabdominal (TAP) paraganglia. The HNP include the carotid body, jugular body, vagal body, and laryngeal paraganglia, while the TAP include the aorticopulmonary, organ of Zuckerkandl, and other abdominal and pelvic paraganglia.

Nonchromaffin paragangliomas are rare tumors that arise from these tissues. They can be functional or nonfunctional, depending on whether they produce and secrete hormones or not. Functional tumors can cause a variety of symptoms due to the excessive release of hormones, while nonfunctional tumors usually present as masses that may compress surrounding structures.

Gallamine triethiodide is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a pharmacological substance with historical use in anesthesia. It is a quaternary ammonium compound with muscarinic anticholinergic and skeletal muscle relaxant properties. The chemical formula for gallamine triethiodide is C17H24I3N2O2.

In a medical or clinical context, gallamine triethiodide has been used as an adjunct to general anesthesia to provide muscle relaxation during surgical procedures. However, due to its significant side effects and the availability of safer alternatives, it is no longer commonly used in modern anesthetic practice.

Blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the blood vessels. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures:

1. Systolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart pushes blood out into the arteries.
2. Diastolic pressure: This is the pressure when the heart rests between beats, allowing it to fill with blood.

Normal blood pressure for adults is typically around 120/80 mmHg, although this can vary slightly depending on age, sex, and other factors. High blood pressure (hypertension) is generally considered to be a reading of 130/80 mmHg or higher, while low blood pressure (hypotension) is usually defined as a reading below 90/60 mmHg. It's important to note that blood pressure can fluctuate throughout the day and may be affected by factors such as stress, physical activity, and medication use.

Optic nerve injuries refer to damages or trauma inflicted on the optic nerve, which is a crucial component of the visual system. The optic nerve transmits visual information from the retina to the brain, enabling us to see. Injuries to the optic nerve can result in various visual impairments, including partial or complete vision loss, decreased visual acuity, changes in color perception, and reduced field of view.

These injuries may occur due to several reasons, such as:

1. Direct trauma to the eye or head
2. Increased pressure inside the eye (glaucoma)
3. Optic neuritis, an inflammation of the optic nerve
4. Ischemia, or insufficient blood supply to the optic nerve
5. Compression from tumors or other space-occupying lesions
6. Intrinsic degenerative conditions affecting the optic nerve
7. Toxic exposure to certain chemicals or medications

Optic nerve injuries are diagnosed through a comprehensive eye examination, including visual acuity testing, slit-lamp examination, dilated fundus exam, and additional diagnostic tests like optical coherence tomography (OCT) and visual field testing. Treatment options vary depending on the cause and severity of the injury but may include medications, surgery, or vision rehabilitation.

Optic nerve diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as vision loss, decreased visual acuity, changes in color vision, and visual field defects. Examples of optic nerve diseases include optic neuritis (inflammation of the optic nerve), glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve due to high eye pressure), optic nerve damage from trauma or injury, ischemic optic neuropathy (lack of blood flow to the optic nerve), and optic nerve tumors. Treatment for optic nerve diseases varies depending on the specific condition and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

The pylorus is the lower, narrow part of the stomach that connects to the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). It consists of the pyloric canal, which is a short muscular tube, and the pyloric sphincter, a circular muscle that controls the passage of food from the stomach into the duodenum. The pylorus regulates the entry of chyme (partially digested food) into the small intestine by adjusting the size and frequency of the muscular contractions that push the chyme through the pyloric sphincter. This process helps in further digestion and absorption of nutrients in the small intestine.

Thoracic nerves are the 12 paired nerves that originate from the thoracic segment (T1-T12) of the spinal cord. These nerves provide motor and sensory innervation to the trunk and abdomen, specifically to the muscles of the chest wall, the skin over the back and chest, and some parts of the abdomen. They also contribute to the formation of the sympathetic trunk, which is a part of the autonomic nervous system that regulates unconscious bodily functions such as heart rate and digestion. Each thoracic nerve emerges from the intervertebral foramen, a small opening between each vertebra, and splits into anterior and posterior branches to innervate the corresponding dermatomes and myotomes.

Quipazine is not generally considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that has been studied in the field of medicine and neuroscience. Quipazine is a type of drug known as a serotonin receptor agonist, which means it binds to and activates serotonin receptors in the brain.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter, a chemical that transmits signals in the brain and nervous system, that plays a role in regulating mood, appetite, sleep, and other functions. Quipazine has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various conditions, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and substance abuse disorders. However, it is not currently approved for use as a medication in any country.

It's important to note that while quipazine may have potential therapeutic benefits, it also has significant side effects, including seizures, changes in heart rate and blood pressure, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by muscle rigidity, fever, and autonomic dysfunction. As such, its use is generally limited to research settings.

"Wistar rats" are a strain of albino rats that are widely used in laboratory research. They were developed at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, USA, and were first introduced in 1906. Wistar rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not have a fixed set of genetic characteristics like inbred strains.

Wistar rats are commonly used as animal models in biomedical research because of their size, ease of handling, and relatively low cost. They are used in a wide range of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and behavioral studies. Wistar rats are also used in safety testing of drugs, medical devices, and other products.

Wistar rats are typically larger than many other rat strains, with males weighing between 500-700 grams and females weighing between 250-350 grams. They have a lifespan of approximately 2-3 years. Wistar rats are also known for their docile and friendly nature, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory setting.

Stilbamidines are a class of chemical compounds that are primarily used as veterinary medicines, specifically as parasiticides for the treatment and prevention of ectoparasites such as ticks and lice in livestock animals. Stilbamidines belong to the family of chemicals known as formamidines, which are known to have insecticidal and acaricidal properties.

The most common stilbamidine compound is chlorphentermine, which has been used as an appetite suppressant in human medicine. However, its use as a weight loss drug was discontinued due to its addictive properties and potential for serious side effects.

It's important to note that Stilbamidines are not approved for use in humans and should only be used under the supervision of a veterinarian for the intended purpose of treating and preventing ectoparasites in animals.

Anesthesia is a medical term that refers to the loss of sensation or awareness, usually induced by the administration of various drugs. It is commonly used during surgical procedures to prevent pain and discomfort. There are several types of anesthesia, including:

1. General anesthesia: This type of anesthesia causes a complete loss of consciousness and is typically used for major surgeries.
2. Regional anesthesia: This type of anesthesia numbs a specific area of the body, such as an arm or leg, while the patient remains conscious.
3. Local anesthesia: This type of anesthesia numbs a small area of the body, such as a cut or wound, and is typically used for minor procedures.

Anesthesia can be administered through various routes, including injection, inhalation, or topical application. The choice of anesthesia depends on several factors, including the type and duration of the procedure, the patient's medical history, and their overall health. Anesthesiologists are medical professionals who specialize in administering anesthesia and monitoring patients during surgical procedures to ensure their safety and comfort.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Cholinergic fibers are nerve cell extensions (neurons) that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at their synapses, which are the junctions where they transmit signals to other neurons or effector cells such as muscles and glands. These fibers are a part of the cholinergic system, which plays crucial roles in various physiological processes including learning and memory, attention, arousal, sleep, and muscle contraction.

Cholinergic fibers can be found in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In the CNS, cholinergic neurons are primarily located in the basal forebrain and brainstem, and their projections innervate various regions of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and other brain areas. In the PNS, cholinergic fibers are responsible for activating skeletal muscles through neuromuscular junctions, as well as regulating functions in smooth muscles, cardiac muscles, and glands via the autonomic nervous system.

Dysfunction of the cholinergic system has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and myasthenia gravis.

A decerebrate state is a medical condition that results from severe damage to the brainstem, specifically to the midbrain and above. This type of injury can cause motor responses characterized by rigid extension of the arms and legs, with the arms rotated outward and the wrists and fingers extended. The legs are also extended and the toes pointed downward. These postures are often referred to as "decerebrate rigidity" or "posturing."

The decerebrate state is typically seen in patients who have experienced severe trauma, such as a car accident or gunshot wound, or who have suffered from a large stroke or other type of brain hemorrhage. It can also occur in some cases of severe hypoxia (lack of oxygen) to the brain, such as during cardiac arrest or drowning.

The decerebrate state is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate treatment. If left untreated, it can lead to further brain damage and even death. Treatment typically involves providing supportive care, such as mechanical ventilation to help with breathing, medications to control blood pressure and prevent seizures, and surgery to repair any underlying injuries or bleeding. In some cases, patients may require long-term rehabilitation to regain lost function and improve their quality of life.

Bradycardia is a medical term that refers to an abnormally slow heart rate, typically defined as a resting heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute in adults. While some people, particularly well-trained athletes, may have a naturally low resting heart rate, bradycardia can also be a sign of an underlying health problem.

There are several potential causes of bradycardia, including:

* Damage to the heart's electrical conduction system, such as from heart disease or aging
* Certain medications, including beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and digoxin
* Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
* Sleep apnea
* Infection of the heart (endocarditis or myocarditis)
* Infiltrative diseases such as amyloidosis or sarcoidosis

Symptoms of bradycardia can vary depending on the severity and underlying cause. Some people with bradycardia may not experience any symptoms, while others may feel weak, fatigued, dizzy, or short of breath. In severe cases, bradycardia can lead to fainting, confusion, or even cardiac arrest.

Treatment for bradycardia depends on the underlying cause. If a medication is causing the slow heart rate, adjusting the dosage or switching to a different medication may help. In other cases, a pacemaker may be necessary to regulate the heart's rhythm. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of bradycardia, as it can be a sign of a serious underlying condition.

Facial nerve injuries refer to damages or trauma inflicted on the facial nerve, also known as the seventh cranial nerve (CN VII). This nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles involved in facial expressions, eyelid movement, and taste sensation in the front two-thirds of the tongue.

There are two main types of facial nerve injuries:

1. Peripheral facial nerve injury: This type of injury occurs when damage affects the facial nerve outside the skull base, usually due to trauma from cuts, blunt force, or surgical procedures in the parotid gland or neck region. The injury may result in weakness or paralysis on one side of the face, known as Bell's palsy, and may also impact taste sensation and salivary function.

2. Central facial nerve injury: This type of injury occurs when damage affects the facial nerve within the skull base, often due to stroke, brain tumors, or traumatic brain injuries. Central facial nerve injuries typically result in weakness or paralysis only on the lower half of the face, as the upper motor neurons responsible for controlling the upper face receive innervation from both sides of the brain.

Treatment for facial nerve injuries depends on the severity and location of the damage. For mild to moderate injuries, physical therapy, protective eyewear, and medications like corticosteroids and antivirals may be prescribed. Severe cases might require surgical intervention, such as nerve grafts or muscle transfers, to restore function. In some instances, facial nerve injuries may heal on their own over time, particularly when the injury is mild and there is no ongoing compression or tension on the nerve.

The abducens nerve, also known as the sixth cranial nerve (CN VI), is a motor nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle of the eye. This muscle is responsible for moving the eye away from the midline (towards the temple) and enables the eyes to look towards the side while keeping them aligned. Any damage or dysfunction of the abducens nerve can result in strabismus, where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions, specifically an adduction deficit, also known as abducens palsy or sixth nerve palsy.

The oculomotor nerve, also known as the third cranial nerve (CN III), is a motor nerve that originates from the midbrain. It controls the majority of the eye muscles, including the levator palpebrae superioris muscle that raises the upper eyelid, and the extraocular muscles that enable various movements of the eye such as looking upward, downward, inward, and outward. Additionally, it carries parasympathetic fibers responsible for pupillary constriction and accommodation (focusing on near objects). Damage to this nerve can result in various ocular motor disorders, including strabismus, ptosis, and pupillary abnormalities.

Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas, specifically by the F cells located in the islets of Langerhans. It is a small protein consisting of 36 amino acids, and it plays a role in regulating digestive functions, particularly by inhibiting pancreatic enzyme secretion and gastric acid secretion.

PP is released into the bloodstream in response to food intake, especially when nutrients such as proteins and fats are present in the stomach. It acts on the brain to produce a feeling of fullness or satiety, which helps to regulate appetite and eating behavior. Additionally, PP has been shown to have effects on glucose metabolism, insulin secretion, and energy balance.

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the potential therapeutic uses of PP for a variety of conditions, including obesity, diabetes, and gastrointestinal disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action and clinical applications.

The pterygopalatine fossa is a small, irregularly shaped space located in the skull, lateral to the nasal cavity and inferior to the orbit. It serves as a critical communications center for several important nerves, arteries, and veins that provide sensory innervation, vasomotor control, and blood supply to various structures in the head and neck region.

The following are some key components of the pterygopalatine fossa:

1. Nerves: The pterygopalatine ganglion is a major component of this fossa, which contains postganglionic parasympathetic fibers, sympathetic fibers, and sensory fibers from various nerves, including the maxillary nerve (V2), greater petrosal nerve, deep petrosal nerve, and nerve of the pterygoid canal.

2. Arteries: The maxillary artery, a branch of the external carotid artery, enters the fossa through the foramen rotundum and divides into several branches that supply various structures in the head and neck region, such as the sphenopalatine artery, posterior superior alveolar artery, infraorbital artery, and greater palatine artery.

3. Veins: The pterygoid venous plexus is a complex network of veins located in and around the fossa that communicates with various venous systems, including the facial vein, cavernous sinus, and inferior ophthalmic vein.

The pterygopalatine fossa plays an essential role in several physiological functions, such as lacrimation, salivation, and vasodilation of blood vessels in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Additionally, it is a potential site for the spread of infection or neoplasm from the oral cavity, nasal cavity, or paranasal sinuses to other regions of the head and neck.

Facial nerve diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the function of the facial nerve, also known as the seventh cranial nerve. This nerve is responsible for controlling the muscles of facial expression, and it also carries sensory information from the taste buds in the front two-thirds of the tongue, and regulates saliva flow and tear production.

Facial nerve diseases can cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the specific location and extent of the nerve damage. Common symptoms include:

* Facial weakness or paralysis on one or both sides of the face
* Drooping of the eyelid and corner of the mouth
* Difficulty closing the eye or keeping it closed
* Changes in taste sensation or dryness of the mouth and eyes
* Abnormal sensitivity to sound (hyperacusis)
* Twitching or spasms of the facial muscles

Facial nerve diseases can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

* Infections such as Bell's palsy, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, and Lyme disease
* Trauma or injury to the face or skull
* Tumors that compress or invade the facial nerve
* Neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barre syndrome
* Genetic disorders such as Moebius syndrome or hemifacial microsomia

Treatment for facial nerve diseases depends on the underlying cause and severity of the symptoms. In some cases, medication, physical therapy, or surgery may be necessary to restore function and relieve symptoms.

Gastric emptying is the process by which the stomach empties its contents into the small intestine. In medical terms, it refers to the rate and amount of food that leaves the stomach and enters the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This process is regulated by several factors, including the volume and composition of the meal, hormonal signals, and neural mechanisms. Abnormalities in gastric emptying can lead to various gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders, such as gastroparesis, where the stomach's ability to empty food is delayed.

Parasympatholytics are a type of medication that blocks the action of the parasympathetic nervous system. The parasympathetic nervous system is responsible for the body's rest and digest response, which includes slowing the heart rate, increasing intestinal and glandular activity, and promoting urination and defecation.

Parasympatholytics work by selectively binding to muscarinic receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the heart, lungs, and digestive system. By blocking these receptors, parasympatholytics can cause a range of effects, such as an increased heart rate, decreased glandular secretions, and reduced intestinal motility.

Some common examples of parasympatholytics include atropine, scopolamine, and ipratropium. These medications are often used to treat conditions such as bradycardia (slow heart rate), excessive salivation, and gastrointestinal cramping or diarrhea. However, because they can have significant side effects, parasympatholytics are typically used only when necessary and under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

The ear is the sensory organ responsible for hearing and maintaining balance. It can be divided into three parts: the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. The outer ear consists of the pinna (the visible part of the ear) and the external auditory canal, which directs sound waves toward the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called ossicles that transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. The inner ear contains the cochlea, a spiral-shaped organ responsible for converting sound vibrations into electrical signals that are sent to the brain, and the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance.

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

Benzylidene compounds are organic chemical compounds that contain a benzylidene group, which is a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to a carbonyl group and single-bonded to a phenyl ring. The general structure of a benzylidene compound can be represented as R-CH=C(Ph)-O-, where R is an organic residue and Ph represents the phenyl group.

These compounds are known for their wide range of applications in various fields, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, dyes, and perfumes. Some benzylidene compounds exhibit biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer properties, making them valuable candidates for drug development.

It is important to note that the term 'benzylidene' refers only to the functional group and not to a specific class of compounds. Therefore, there are many different types of benzylidene compounds with varying chemical structures and properties.

Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) is a 28-amino acid polypeptide hormone that has potent vasodilatory, secretory, and neurotransmitter effects. It is widely distributed throughout the body, including in the gastrointestinal tract, where it is synthesized and released by nerve cells (neurons) in the intestinal mucosa. VIP plays a crucial role in regulating various physiological functions such as intestinal secretion, motility, and blood flow. It also has immunomodulatory effects and may play a role in neuroprotection. High levels of VIP are found in the brain, where it acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and is involved in various cognitive functions such as learning, memory, and social behavior.

Visceral afferents are specialized nerve fibers that carry sensory information from the internal organs (viscera) to the central nervous system. These afferent neurons detect and transmit information about various visceral stimuli, such as pain, temperature, touch, pressure, chemical changes, and the state of organ distension or fullness. The information they relay helps regulate physiological functions, including digestion, respiration, and cardiovascular activity, and contributes to the perception of bodily sensations and visceral pain. Visceral afferents are an essential component of the autonomic nervous system and have their cell bodies located in the dorsal root ganglia or nodose ganglia.

Parasympathetic ganglia are collections of neurons located outside the central nervous system (CNS) that serve as relay stations for parasympathetic nerve impulses. The parasympathetic nervous system is one of the two subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary physiological responses.

The parasympathetic ganglia receive preganglionic fibers from the brainstem and sacral regions of the spinal cord. After synapsing in these ganglia, postganglionic fibers innervate target organs such as the heart, glands, and smooth muscles. The primary function of the parasympathetic nervous system is to promote rest, digestion, and energy conservation.

Parasympathetic ganglia are typically located close to or within the target organs they innervate. Examples include:

1. Ciliary ganglion: Innervates the ciliary muscle and iris sphincter in the eye, controlling accommodation and pupil constriction.
2. Pterygopalatine (sphenopalatine) ganglion: Supplies the lacrimal gland, mucous membranes of the nasal cavity, and palate, regulating tear production and nasal secretions.
3. Otic ganglion: Innervates the parotid gland, controlling salivary secretion.
4. Submandibular ganglion: Supplies the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands, regulating salivation.
5. Sacral parasympathetic ganglia: Located in the sacrum, they innervate the distal colon, rectum, and genitourinary organs, controlling defecation, urination, and sexual arousal.

These parasympathetic ganglia play crucial roles in maintaining homeostasis by regulating various bodily functions during rest and relaxation.

The lingual nerve is a branch of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V). It provides general sensory innervation to the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, including taste sensation from the same region. It also supplies sensory innervation to the floor of the mouth and the lingual gingiva (gum tissue). The lingual nerve is closely associated with the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands and their ducts.

A castor bean, also known as Ricinus communis, is a plant that produces seeds called castor beans. The seed of the castor bean contains ricin, a highly toxic protein that can cause serious illness or death if ingested, inhaled, or injected. Despite its toxicity, the oil from the castor bean, known as castor oil, is used in a variety of industrial and medicinal applications due to its unique chemical properties.

It's important to note that all parts of the castor bean plant are considered poisonous, but the seed is the most toxic. Handling or coming into contact with the plant or seeds can cause skin irritation and other adverse reactions in some people. It is recommended to handle the plant with care and keep it out of reach of children and pets.

Satiety response is a term used in the field of nutrition and physiology to describe the feeling of fullness or satisfaction that follows food consumption. It is a complex process regulated by several factors, including the mechanical and chemical signals generated during digestion, hormonal responses, and psychological factors. The satiety response helps control food intake and energy balance by inhibiting further eating until the body has had enough time to metabolize and absorb the nutrients from the meal.

The satiety response can be influenced by various factors such as the type, volume, and texture of food consumed, as well as individual differences in appetite regulation and metabolism. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the satiety response is important for developing strategies to promote healthy eating behaviors and prevent overeating, which can contribute to obesity and other health problems.

Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a monoamine neurotransmitter that is found primarily in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, blood platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of humans and other animals. It is produced by the conversion of the amino acid tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), and then to serotonin.

In the CNS, serotonin plays a role in regulating mood, appetite, sleep, memory, learning, and behavior, among other functions. It also acts as a vasoconstrictor, helping to regulate blood flow and blood pressure. In the GI tract, it is involved in peristalsis, the contraction and relaxation of muscles that moves food through the digestive system.

Serotonin is synthesized and stored in serotonergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use serotonin as their primary neurotransmitter. These neurons are found throughout the brain and spinal cord, and they communicate with other neurons by releasing serotonin into the synapse, the small gap between two neurons.

Abnormal levels of serotonin have been linked to a variety of disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and migraines. Medications that affect serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are commonly used to treat these conditions.

The olfactory nerve, also known as the first cranial nerve (I), is a specialized sensory nerve that is responsible for the sense of smell. It consists of thin, delicate fibers called olfactory neurons that are located in the upper part of the nasal cavity. These neurons have hair-like structures called cilia that detect and transmit information about odors to the brain.

The olfactory nerve has two main parts: the peripheral process and the central process. The peripheral process extends from the olfactory neuron to the nasal cavity, where it picks up odor molecules. These molecules bind to receptors on the cilia, which triggers an electrical signal that travels along the nerve fiber to the brain.

The central process of the olfactory nerve extends from the olfactory bulb, a structure at the base of the brain, to several areas in the brain involved in smell and memory, including the amygdala, hippocampus, and thalamus. Damage to the olfactory nerve can result in a loss of smell (anosmia) or distorted smells (parosmia).

Vocal cord paralysis is a medical condition characterized by the inability of one or both vocal cords to move or function properly due to nerve damage or disruption. The vocal cords are two bands of muscle located in the larynx (voice box) that vibrate to produce sound during speech, singing, and breathing. When the nerves that control the vocal cord movements are damaged or not functioning correctly, the vocal cords may become paralyzed or weakened, leading to voice changes, breathing difficulties, and other symptoms.

The causes of vocal cord paralysis can vary, including neurological disorders, trauma, tumors, surgery, or infections. The diagnosis typically involves a physical examination, including a laryngoscopy, to assess the movement and function of the vocal cords. Treatment options may include voice therapy, surgical procedures, or other interventions to improve voice quality and breathing functions.

Electrophysiology is a branch of medicine that deals with the electrical activities of the body, particularly the heart. In a medical context, electrophysiology studies (EPS) are performed to assess abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as medication or pacemakers.

During an EPS, electrode catheters are inserted into the heart through blood vessels in the groin or neck. These catheters can record the electrical activity of the heart and stimulate it to help identify the source of the arrhythmia. The information gathered during the study can help doctors determine the best course of treatment for each patient.

In addition to cardiac electrophysiology, there are also other subspecialties within electrophysiology, such as neuromuscular electrophysiology, which deals with the electrical activity of the nervous system and muscles.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

Phentolamine is a non-selective alpha-blocker drug, which means it blocks both alpha-1 and alpha-2 receptors. It works by relaxing the muscle around blood vessels, which increases blood flow and lowers blood pressure. Phentolamine is used medically for various purposes, including the treatment of high blood pressure, the diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytoma (a tumor that releases hormones causing high blood pressure), and as an antidote to prevent severe hypertension caused by certain medications or substances. It may also be used in diagnostic tests to determine if a patient's blood pressure is reactive to drugs, and it can be used during some surgical procedures to help lower the risk of hypertensive crises.

Phentolamine is available in two forms: an injectable solution and oral tablets. The injectable form is typically administered by healthcare professionals in a clinical setting, while the oral tablets are less commonly used due to their short duration of action and potential for causing severe drops in blood pressure. As with any medication, phentolamine should be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and patients should follow their doctor's instructions carefully to minimize the risk of side effects and ensure the drug's effectiveness.

Synaptic transmission is the process by which a neuron communicates with another cell, such as another neuron or a muscle cell, across a junction called a synapse. It involves the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic terminal of the neuron, which then cross the synaptic cleft and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, leading to changes in the electrical or chemical properties of the target cell. This process is critical for the transmission of signals within the nervous system and for controlling various physiological functions in the body.

Nicotinic receptors are a type of ligand-gated ion channel receptor that are activated by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and the alkaloid nicotine. They are widely distributed throughout the nervous system and play important roles in various physiological processes, including neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Nicotinic receptors are composed of five subunits that form a ion channel pore, which opens to allow the flow of cations (positively charged ions) when the receptor is activated by acetylcholine or nicotine. There are several subtypes of nicotinic receptors, which differ in their subunit composition and functional properties. These receptors have been implicated in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia.

Sincalide is a synthetic hormone that stimulates the contraction of the gallbladder and the release of digestive enzymes from the pancreas. It is used in diagnostic procedures to help diagnose conditions such as gallstones or obstructions of the bile ducts.

Sincalide is a synthetic form of cholecystokinin (CCK), a hormone that is naturally produced in the body and stimulates the contraction of the gallbladder and the release of digestive enzymes from the pancreas. When sincalide is administered, it mimics the effects of CCK and causes the gallbladder to contract and release bile into the small intestine. This can help doctors see if there are any obstructions or abnormalities in the bile ducts or gallbladder.

Sincalide is usually given as an injection, and its effects can be monitored through imaging tests such as ultrasound or CT scans. It is important to note that sincalide should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause side effects such as abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.

Parasympathetic fibers, postganglionic, refer to the portion of the parasympathetic nervous system's peripheral nerves that arise from ganglia (clusters of neurons) located near or within the target organs. These postganglionic fibers are responsible for transmitting signals from the ganglia to the effector organs such as glands, smooth muscles, and heart, instructing them to carry out specific functions.

The parasympathetic nervous system is one of the two subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system (the other being the sympathetic nervous system). Its primary role is to conserve energy and maintain homeostasis during rest or digestion. The preganglionic fibers originate in the brainstem and sacral spinal cord, synapsing in the ganglia located near or within the target organs. Upon receiving signals from the preganglionic fibers, the postganglionic fibers release neurotransmitters like acetylcholine to activate muscarinic receptors on the effector organ, leading to responses such as decreased heart rate, increased gastrointestinal motility and secretion, and contraction of the urinary bladder.

Sympathectomy is a surgical procedure that involves interrupting the sympathetic nerve pathways. These nerves are part of the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary bodily functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, sweating, and digestion. The goal of sympathectomy is to manage conditions like hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), Raynaud's phenomenon, and certain types of chronic pain.

There are different types of sympathectomy, including thoracic sympathectomy (which targets the sympathetic nerves in the chest), lumbar sympathectomy (which targets the sympathetic nerves in the lower back), and cervical sympathectomy (which targets the sympathetic nerves in the neck). The specific type of procedure depends on the location of the affected nerves and the condition being treated.

Sympathectomy is usually performed using minimally invasive techniques, such as endoscopic surgery, which involves making small incisions and using specialized instruments to access the nerves. While sympathectomy can be effective in managing certain conditions, it carries risks such as nerve damage, bleeding, infection, and chronic pain.

Cholinergic agonists are substances that bind to and activate cholinergic receptors, which are neuroreceptors that respond to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. These agents can mimic the effects of acetylcholine in the body and are used in medical treatment to produce effects such as pupil constriction, increased gastrointestinal motility, bronchodilation, and improved cognition. Examples of cholinergic agonists include pilocarpine, bethanechol, and donepezil.

In medical terms, pressure is defined as the force applied per unit area on an object or body surface. It is often measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) in clinical settings. For example, blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the arteries and is recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (when the heart beats and pushes blood out) and diastolic pressure (when the heart rests between beats).

Pressure can also refer to the pressure exerted on a wound or incision to help control bleeding, or the pressure inside the skull or spinal canal. High or low pressure in different body systems can indicate various medical conditions and require appropriate treatment.

Nerve degeneration, also known as neurodegeneration, is the progressive loss of structure and function of neurons, which can lead to cognitive decline, motor impairment, and various other symptoms. This process occurs due to a variety of factors, including genetics, environmental influences, and aging. It is a key feature in several neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis. The degeneration can affect any part of the nervous system, leading to different symptoms depending on the location and extent of the damage.

Nicotine is defined as a highly addictive psychoactive alkaloid and stimulant found in the nightshade family of plants, primarily in tobacco leaves. It is the primary component responsible for the addiction to cigarettes and other forms of tobacco. Nicotine can also be produced synthetically.

When nicotine enters the body, it activates the release of several neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, leading to feelings of pleasure, stimulation, and relaxation. However, with regular use, tolerance develops, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effects, which can contribute to the development of nicotine dependence.

Nicotine has both short-term and long-term health effects. Short-term effects include increased heart rate and blood pressure, increased alertness and concentration, and arousal. Long-term use can lead to addiction, lung disease, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive problems. It is important to note that nicotine itself is not the primary cause of many tobacco-related diseases, but rather the result of other harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke.

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that is primarily found in certain species of pufferfish, blue-ringed octopuses, and other marine animals. It blocks voltage-gated sodium channels in nerve cell membranes, leading to muscle paralysis and potentially respiratory failure. TTX has no known antidote, and medical treatment focuses on supportive care for symptoms. Exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation, or skin absorption, depending on the route of toxicity.

Preganglionic autonomic fibers are the nerve fibers that originate from neurons located in the brainstem and spinal cord, and synapse with postganglionic neurons in autonomic ganglia. These preganglionic fibers release acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter to activate the postganglionic neurons, which then innervate effector organs such as smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and glands.

The autonomic nervous system is divided into two main subdivisions: the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. The preganglionic fibers of the sympathetic nervous system originate from the lateral horn of the spinal cord from levels T1 to L2/L3, while those of the parasympathetic nervous system originate from cranial nerves III, VII, IX, and X, as well as sacral segments S2 to S4.

Preganglionic fibers are generally longer than postganglionic fibers, and their cell bodies are located in the central nervous system. They are responsible for transmitting signals from the CNS to the peripheral autonomic ganglia, where they synapse with postganglionic neurons that innervate target organs.

Treatment-resistant depressive disorder is a severe form of depression that does not respond to standard treatments. It is also known as refractory depression or treatment-refractory depression.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) defines treatment-resistant depressive disorder as a major depressive disorder that has not responded to at least two trials of adequate doses of appropriately chosen antidepressant medications, either singly or in combination, for a sufficient duration of time.

The definition may also include cases where the patient has not responded to psychotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), or other forms of treatment.

It is important to note that determining whether a depression is truly treatment-resistant can be challenging and requires careful evaluation by a mental health professional. Factors such as medication adherence, dosage, duration of treatment, and the presence of co-occurring medical or psychiatric conditions must be taken into account before making this diagnosis.

Unmyelinated nerve fibers, also known as unmyelinated axons or non-myelinated fibers, are nerve cells that lack a myelin sheath. Myelin is a fatty, insulating substance that surrounds the axon of many nerve cells and helps to increase the speed of electrical impulses traveling along the nerve fiber.

In unmyelinated nerve fibers, the axons are surrounded by a thin layer of Schwann cell processes called the endoneurium, but there is no continuous myelin sheath. Instead, the axons are packed closely together in bundles, with several axons lying within the same Schwann cell.

Unmyelinated nerve fibers tend to be smaller in diameter than myelinated fibers and conduct electrical impulses more slowly. They are commonly found in the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and digestion, as well as in sensory nerves that transmit pain and temperature signals.

Muscarinic antagonists, also known as muscarinic receptor antagonists or parasympatholytics, are a class of drugs that block the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the parasympathetic nervous system, which helps to regulate various bodily functions such as heart rate, digestion, and respiration.

Muscarinic antagonists work by binding to muscarinic receptors, which are found in various organs throughout the body, including the eyes, lungs, heart, and gastrointestinal tract. By blocking the action of acetylcholine at these receptors, muscarinic antagonists can produce a range of effects depending on the specific receptor subtype that is affected.

For example, muscarinic antagonists may be used to treat conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma by relaxing the smooth muscle in the airways and reducing bronchoconstriction. They may also be used to treat conditions such as urinary incontinence or overactive bladder by reducing bladder contractions.

Some common muscarinic antagonists include atropine, scopolamine, ipratropium, and tiotropium. It's important to note that these drugs can have significant side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and confusion, especially when used in high doses or for prolonged periods of time.

The abducens nerve, also known as the sixth cranial nerve, is responsible for controlling the lateral rectus muscle of the eye, which enables the eye to move outward. Abducens nerve diseases refer to conditions that affect this nerve and can result in various symptoms, primarily affecting eye movement.

Here are some medical definitions related to abducens nerve diseases:

1. Abducens Nerve Palsy: A condition characterized by weakness or paralysis of the abducens nerve, causing difficulty in moving the affected eye outward. This results in double vision (diplopia), especially when gazing towards the side of the weakened nerve. Abducens nerve palsy can be congenital, acquired, or caused by various factors such as trauma, tumors, aneurysms, infections, or diseases like diabetes and multiple sclerosis.
2. Sixth Nerve Palsy: Another term for abducens nerve palsy, referring to the weakness or paralysis of the sixth cranial nerve.
3. Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia (INO): A neurological condition affecting eye movement, often caused by a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF), a bundle of nerve fibers that connects the abducens nucleus with the oculomotor nucleus. INO results in impaired adduction (inward movement) of the eye on the side of the lesion and nystagmus (involuntary eye movements) of the abducting eye on the opposite side when attempting to look towards the side of the lesion.
4. One-and-a-Half Syndrome: A rare neurological condition characterized by a combination of INO and internuclear ophthalmoplegia with horizontal gaze palsy on the same side, caused by damage to both the abducens nerve and the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF). This results in limited or no ability to move the eyes towards the side of the lesion and impaired adduction of the eye on the opposite side.
5. Brainstem Encephalitis: Inflammation of the brainstem, which can affect the abducens nerve and other cranial nerves, leading to various neurological symptoms such as diplopia (double vision), ataxia (loss of balance and coordination), and facial weakness. Brainstem encephalitis can be caused by infectious agents, autoimmune disorders, or paraneoplastic syndromes.
6. Multiple Sclerosis (MS): An autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation and demyelination of the central nervous system, including the brainstem and optic nerves. MS can cause various neurological symptoms, such as diplopia, nystagmus, and INO, due to damage to the abducens nerve and other cranial nerves.
7. Wernicke's Encephalopathy: A neurological disorder caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, often seen in alcoholics or individuals with malnutrition. Wernicke's encephalopathy can affect the brainstem and cause various symptoms such as diplopia, ataxia, confusion, and oculomotor abnormalities.
8. Pontine Glioma: A rare type of brain tumor that arises from the glial cells in the pons (a part of the brainstem). Pontine gliomas can cause various neurological symptoms such as diplopia, facial weakness, and difficulty swallowing due to their location in the brainstem.
9. Brainstem Cavernous Malformation: A benign vascular lesion that arises from the small blood vessels in the brainstem. Brainstem cavernous malformations can cause various neurological symptoms such as diplopia, ataxia, and facial weakness due to their location in the brainstem.
10. Pituitary Adenoma: A benign tumor that arises from the pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain. Large pituitary adenomas can compress the optic nerves and cause various visual symptoms such as diplopia, visual field defects, and decreased vision.
11. Craniopharyngioma: A benign tumor that arises from the remnants of the Rathke's pouch, a structure that gives rise to the anterior pituitary gland. Craniopharyngiomas can cause various neurological and endocrine symptoms such as diplopia, visual field defects, headaches, and hormonal imbalances due to their location near the optic nerves and pituitary gland.
12. Meningioma: A benign tumor that arises from the meninges, the protective covering of the brain and spinal cord. Meningiomas can cause various neurological symptoms such as diplopia, headaches, and seizures depending on their location in the brain or spinal cord.
13. Chordoma: A rare type of malignant tumor that arises from the remnants of the notochord, a structure that gives rise to the spine during embryonic development. Chordomas can cause various neurological and endocrine symptoms such as diplopia, visual field defects, headaches, and hormonal imbalances due to their location near the brainstem and spinal cord.
14. Metastatic Brain Tumors: Malignant tumors that spread from other parts of the body to the brain. Metastatic brain tumors can cause various neurological symptoms such as diplopia, headaches, seizures, and cognitive impairment depending on their location in the brain.
15. Other Rare Brain Tumors: There are many other rare types of brain tumors that can cause diplopia or other neurological symptoms, including gliomas, ependymomas, pineal region tumors, and others. These tumors require specialized diagnosis and treatment by neuro-oncologists and neurosurgeons with expertise in these rare conditions.

In summary, diplopia can be caused by various brain tumors, including pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, chordomas, metastatic brain tumors, and other rare types of tumors. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you experience diplopia or other neurological symptoms, as early diagnosis and treatment can improve outcomes and quality of life.

Methysergide is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called ergot alkaloids. It is primarily used for the prophylaxis (prevention) of migraine headaches. Methysergide works by narrowing blood vessels around the brain, which is thought to help prevent migraines.

The medical definition of Methysergide is:
A semisynthetic ergot alkaloid derivative used in the prophylaxis of migraine and cluster headaches. It has both agonist and antagonist properties at serotonin receptors, and its therapeutic effects are thought to be related to its ability to block the binding of serotonin to its receptors. However, methysergide can have serious side effects, including fibrotic reactions in various organs, such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys, so it is usually used only for short periods of time and under close medical supervision.

Evoked potentials (EPs) are medical tests that measure the electrical activity in the brain or spinal cord in response to specific sensory stimuli, such as sight, sound, or touch. These tests are often used to help diagnose and monitor conditions that affect the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis, brainstem tumors, and spinal cord injuries.

There are several types of EPs, including:

1. Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs): These are used to assess the function of the visual pathway from the eyes to the back of the brain. A patient is typically asked to look at a patterned image or flashing light while electrodes placed on the scalp record the electrical responses.
2. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs): These are used to evaluate the function of the auditory nerve and brainstem. Clicking sounds are presented to one or both ears, and electrodes placed on the scalp measure the response.
3. Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEPs): These are used to assess the function of the peripheral nerves and spinal cord. Small electrical shocks are applied to a nerve at the wrist or ankle, and electrodes placed on the scalp record the response as it travels up the spinal cord to the brain.
4. Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs): These are used to assess the function of the motor pathways in the brain and spinal cord. A magnetic or electrical stimulus is applied to the brain or spinal cord, and electrodes placed on a muscle measure the response as it travels down the motor pathway.

EPs can help identify abnormalities in the nervous system that may not be apparent through other diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies or clinical examinations. They are generally safe, non-invasive procedures with few risks or side effects.

Cholecystokinin A (CCK-A) receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). CCK is a peptide hormone that is released by cells in the duodenum in response to food intake, particularly fat and protein. The binding of CCK to the CCK-A receptor triggers several physiological responses, including contraction of the gallbladder and relaxation of the sphincter of Oddi, which controls the flow of bile from the gallbladder into the small intestine.

The CCK-A receptor is also found in the central nervous system, where it plays a role in regulating satiety and feeding behavior. Activation of the CCK-A receptor in the brain can lead to a decrease in food intake, making it a potential target for the development of anti-obesity drugs.

In summary, the Cholecystokinin A (CCK-A) receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), and plays a role in regulating several physiological responses including gallbladder contraction, relaxation of the sphincter of Oddi, satiety and feeding behavior.

The maxillary nerve, also known as the second division of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V2), is a primary sensory nerve that provides innervation to the skin of the lower eyelid, side of the nose, part of the cheek, upper lip, and roof of the mouth. It also supplies sensory fibers to the mucous membranes of the nasal cavity, maxillary sinus, palate, and upper teeth. Furthermore, it contributes motor innervation to the muscles involved in chewing (muscles of mastication), specifically the tensor veli palatini and tensor tympani. The maxillary nerve originates from the trigeminal ganglion and passes through the foramen rotundum in the skull before reaching its target areas.

The duodenum is the first part of the small intestine, immediately following the stomach. It is a C-shaped structure that is about 10-12 inches long and is responsible for continuing the digestion process that begins in the stomach. The duodenum receives partially digested food from the stomach through the pyloric valve and mixes it with digestive enzymes and bile produced by the pancreas and liver, respectively. These enzymes help break down proteins, fats, and carbohydrates into smaller molecules, allowing for efficient absorption in the remaining sections of the small intestine.

Substance P is an undecapeptide neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, belonging to the tachykinin family of peptides. It is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is primarily found in sensory neurons. Substance P plays a crucial role in pain transmission, inflammation, and various autonomic functions. It exerts its effects by binding to neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, which are expressed on the surface of target cells. Apart from nociception and inflammation, Substance P is also involved in regulating emotional behaviors, smooth muscle contraction, and fluid balance.

Serotonin antagonists are a class of drugs that block the action of serotonin, a neurotransmitter, at specific receptor sites in the brain and elsewhere in the body. They work by binding to the serotonin receptors without activating them, thereby preventing the natural serotonin from binding and transmitting signals.

Serotonin antagonists are used in the treatment of various conditions such as psychiatric disorders, migraines, and nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. They can have varying degrees of affinity for different types of serotonin receptors (e.g., 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, etc.), which contributes to their specific therapeutic effects and side effect profiles.

Examples of serotonin antagonists include ondansetron (used to treat nausea and vomiting), risperidone and olanzapine (used to treat psychiatric disorders), and methysergide (used to prevent migraines). It's important to note that these medications should be used under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as they can have potential risks and interactions with other drugs.

The abomasum is the fourth and final stomach chamber in ruminant animals, such as cows, sheep, and goats. It is often referred to as the "true" stomach because its structure and function are most similar to the stomachs of non-ruminant animals, including humans.

In the abomasum, gastric juices containing hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes are secreted, which help to break down proteins and fats in the ingested feed. The abomasum also serves as a site for nutrient absorption and further mechanical breakdown of food particles before they enter the small intestine.

The term "abomasum" is derived from Latin, where "ab-" means "away from," and "omassum" refers to the "stomach." This name reflects its location away from the other three stomach chambers in ruminants.

Bronchoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of the airways in the lungs (the bronchi and bronchioles) due to the contraction of the smooth muscles surrounding them. This constriction can cause difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath, which are common symptoms of asthma and other respiratory conditions.

Bronchoconstriction can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens, irritants, cold air, exercise, and emotional stress. In some cases, it may also be caused by certain medications, such as beta-blockers or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Treatment for bronchoconstriction typically involves the use of bronchodilators, which are medications that help to relax the smooth muscles around the airways and widen them, making it easier to breathe.

Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone that is produced in the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) and in the brain. It is released into the bloodstream in response to food, particularly fatty foods, and plays several roles in the digestive process.

In the digestive system, CCK stimulates the contraction of the gallbladder, which releases bile into the small intestine to help digest fats. It also inhibits the release of acid from the stomach and slows down the movement of food through the intestines.

In the brain, CCK acts as a neurotransmitter and has been shown to have effects on appetite regulation, mood, and memory. It may play a role in the feeling of fullness or satiety after eating, and may also be involved in anxiety and panic disorders.

CCK is sometimes referred to as "gallbladder-stimulating hormone" or "pancreozymin," although these terms are less commonly used than "cholecystokinin."

The oculomotor nerve, also known as the third cranial nerve (CN III), is responsible for controlling several important eye movements and functions. Oculomotor nerve diseases refer to conditions that affect this nerve and can lead to various symptoms related to eye movement and function. Here's a medical definition of oculomotor nerve diseases:

Oculomotor nerve diseases are a group of medical disorders characterized by the dysfunction or damage to the oculomotor nerve (CN III), resulting in impaired eye movements, abnormalities in pupillary response, and potential effects on eyelid position. These conditions can be congenital, acquired, or traumatic in nature and may lead to partial or complete paralysis of the nerve. Common oculomotor nerve diseases include oculomotor nerve palsy, third nerve ganglionopathies, and compressive oculomotor neuropathies caused by various pathologies such as aneurysms, tumors, or infections.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Nerve sheath neoplasms are a group of tumors that arise from the cells surrounding and supporting the nerves. These tumors can be benign or malignant and include schwannomas, neurofibromas, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Schwannomas develop from the Schwann cells that produce the myelin sheath of the nerve, while neurofibromas arise from the nerve's supporting cells called fibroblasts. MPNSTs are cancerous tumors that can grow rapidly and invade surrounding tissues. Nerve sheath neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size, including pain, numbness, weakness, or paralysis in the affected area.

Rhodanine is not a medical term itself, but it is a chemical compound with the formula R-SC(=S)NH-C(=O)NH-R', where R and R' are organic groups. It is used in the synthesis of certain types of chelating agents, which are compounds that can form stable complexes with metal ions.

In a medical context, rhodanine derivatives have been studied for their potential therapeutic applications, particularly as antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agents. For example, some rhodanine derivatives have shown activity against bacteria, fungi, and parasites, including those that are resistant to other antibiotics.

However, it is important to note that while rhodanine itself has potential therapeutic applications, most of the research in this area focuses on its derivatives rather than the compound itself. Therefore, any medical definition would more accurately refer to specific rhodanine derivatives and their uses, rather than the compound itself.

Veratridine is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that has been used in scientific research. It's a plant alkaloid found primarily in the seeds and roots of various Veratrum species (also known as false hellebore or white hellebore).

In a pharmacological context, veratridine can be defined as:

A steroidal alkaloid that acts as a potent agonist at voltage-gated sodium channels in excitable membranes. It causes persistent activation of these channels, leading to sustained depolarization and increased neuronal excitability. Veratridine has been used in research to study the properties and functions of sodium channels, as well as neurotransmission and nerve impulse transmission.

However, it is not a term typically used in clinical medicine or patient care.

Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) diseases, also known as Peripheral Neuropathies, refer to conditions that affect the functioning of the peripheral nervous system, which includes all the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These nerves transmit signals between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body, controlling sensations, movements, and automatic functions such as heart rate and digestion.

PNS diseases can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, toxins, metabolic disorders, trauma, or autoimmune conditions. The symptoms of PNS diseases depend on the type and extent of nerve damage but often include:

1. Numbness, tingling, or pain in the hands and feet
2. Muscle weakness or cramps
3. Loss of reflexes
4. Decreased sensation to touch, temperature, or vibration
5. Coordination problems and difficulty with balance
6. Sexual dysfunction
7. Digestive issues, such as constipation or diarrhea
8. Dizziness or fainting due to changes in blood pressure

Examples of PNS diseases include Guillain-Barre syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, diabetic neuropathy, and peripheral nerve injuries. Treatment for these conditions varies depending on the underlying cause but may involve medications, physical therapy, lifestyle changes, or surgery.

Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) receptors are a type of protein molecule found on the surface of certain cells, specifically those associated with the nervous system. They play a crucial role in the development, maintenance, and survival of neurons (nerve cells). There are two main types of NGF receptors:

1. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor A (TrkA): This is a high-affinity receptor for NGF and is primarily found on sensory neurons and sympathetic neurons. TrkA activation by NGF leads to the initiation of various intracellular signaling pathways that promote neuronal survival, differentiation, and growth.
2. P75 Neurotrophin Receptor (p75NTR): This is a low-affinity receptor for NGF and other neurotrophins. It can function as a coreceptor with Trk receptors to modulate their signals or act independently to mediate cell death under certain conditions.

Together, these two types of NGF receptors help regulate the complex interactions between neurons and their targets during development and throughout adult life.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Histamine is defined as a biogenic amine that is widely distributed throughout the body and is involved in various physiological functions. It is derived primarily from the amino acid histidine by the action of histidine decarboxylase. Histamine is stored in granules (along with heparin and proteases) within mast cells and basophils, and is released upon stimulation or degranulation of these cells.

Once released into the tissues and circulation, histamine exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions through its interaction with four types of G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors). Histamine's effects are diverse and include modulation of immune responses, contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, stimulation of gastric acid secretion, and regulation of neurotransmission.

Histamine is also a potent mediator of allergic reactions and inflammation, causing symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheezing. Antihistamines are commonly used to block the actions of histamine at H1 receptors, providing relief from these symptoms.

Nerve tissue proteins are specialized proteins found in the nervous system that provide structural and functional support to nerve cells, also known as neurons. These proteins include:

1. Neurofilaments: These are type IV intermediate filaments that provide structural support to neurons and help maintain their shape and size. They are composed of three subunits - NFL (light), NFM (medium), and NFH (heavy).

2. Neuronal Cytoskeletal Proteins: These include tubulins, actins, and spectrins that provide structural support to the neuronal cytoskeleton and help maintain its integrity.

3. Neurotransmitter Receptors: These are specialized proteins located on the postsynaptic membrane of neurons that bind neurotransmitters released by presynaptic neurons, triggering a response in the target cell.

4. Ion Channels: These are transmembrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the neuronal membrane and play a crucial role in generating and transmitting electrical signals in neurons.

5. Signaling Proteins: These include enzymes, receptors, and adaptor proteins that mediate intracellular signaling pathways involved in neuronal development, differentiation, survival, and death.

6. Adhesion Proteins: These are cell surface proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, playing a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of neural circuits.

7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins: These include proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens that provide structural support to nerve tissue and regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and survival.

Choline O-Acetyltransferase (COAT, ChAT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl CoA to choline, resulting in the formation of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is a vital neurotransmitter involved in various physiological processes such as memory, cognition, and muscle contraction. COAT is primarily located in cholinergic neurons, which are nerve cells that use acetylcholine to transmit signals to other neurons or muscles. Inhibition of ChAT can lead to a decrease in acetylcholine levels and may contribute to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and myasthenia gravis.

The vagus nerve, also known as the tenth cranial nerve, cranial nerve X, or simply CN X, is a cranial nerve that carries ... Pharyngeal nerve Superior laryngeal nerve Aortic nerve Superior cervical cardiac branches of vagus nerve Inferior cervical ... exposed in situ Deep dissection of vagus nerve Vagus nerve - dissection Porphyria - A rare disorder can cause seizures and ... Stimulation of the vagus nerve in the cervix uteri (as in some medical procedures) can lead to a vasovagal response. The vagus ...
... (VNS) is a medical treatment that involves delivering electrical impulses to the vagus nerve. It is ... so that the surgeon can access the vagus nerve. The surgeon then wraps the leads around the left branch of the vagus nerve, and ... "The Effectiveness of Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Drug-Resistant Epilepsy Correlates with Vagus Nerve Stimulation-Induced ... the generator sends electric impulses to the vagus nerve at regular intervals. The left vagus nerve is stimulated rather than ...
... may refer to: Inferior ganglion of vagus nerve Superior ganglion of vagus nerve This disambiguation ... page lists articles associated with the title Ganglion of vagus nerve. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change ...
It is situated just below the superior ganglion of vagus nerve. The inferior ganglion of vagus nerve is elongated. It is larger ... The inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve (also known as the nodose ganglion) is one of the two sensory ganglia of each vagus ... The neurons in the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve are pseudounipolar and provide sensory innervation (general somatic ... The neurons in the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve innervate the taste buds on the epiglottis, the chemoreceptors of the ...
The meningeal branch of the vagus nerve is one of the first branches of the vagus nerve at the level of the superior ganglion. ... Portal: Anatomy (Articles with TA98 identifiers, Vagus nerve). ...
The pharyngeal branch of the vagus nerve is the principal motor nerve of the pharynx. It represents the motor component of the ... Vagus nerve, Human throat, Nerves of the head and neck, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy stubs). ... The pharyngeal branch arises from the superior portion of the inferior ganglion of vagus nerve. It passes in between the ... Putative contribution from cranial root of accessory nerve (CN XI) It is unclear whether the cranial root of accessory nerve ( ...
... where the vagus nerve exits the skull. It is smaller than and proximal to the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve. The neurons ... Tekdemir I, Aslan A, Elhan A (1998). "A clinico-anatomic study of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve and Arnold's ear- ... The neurons in the superior ganglion of the vagus nerve are embryonically derived from the neural crest. Pain in the external ... The superior ganglion of the vagus nerve, (jugular ganglion) is a sensory ganglion of the peripheral nervous system. It is ...
... derived from the vagus nerve (cranial nerve X)), a sensory component (derived from the glossopharyngeal nerve (cranial nerve IX ... pharyngeal branch of vagus nerve (CN X) which arises from the superior portion of the inferior ganglion of vagus nerve, with ... Nerve plexus, Vagus nerve, Human throat, Nerves of the head and neck, Pharynx). ... It is unclear whether the cranial root of accessory nerve (CN XI) Sensory - pharyngeal branches of glossopharyngeal nerve. ...
The dorsal nucleus of vagus nerve (or posterior nucleus of vagus nerve or dorsal vagal nucleus or nucleus dorsalis nervi vagi ... or nucleus posterior nervi vagi) is a cranial nerve nucleus of the vagus nerve (CN X) situated in the medulla oblongata of the ... Vagus nerve, Cranial nerve nuclei, Medulla oblongata, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy stubs). ... Dorsal nucleus of vagus nerve[permanent dead link] via the Neuroscience Information Framework v t e (All pages needing factual ...
The auricular branch of the vagus nerve is often termed the Alderman's nerve or Arnold's nerve. The latter name is an eponym ... this is a referred pain through the vagus nerve to the nerve of Arnold. In a small portion of individuals, the auricular nerve ... This nerve may be stimulated as a diagnostic or therapeutic technique Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) was ... Vagus nerve, Nerves of the head and neck). ... It arises from the superior ganglion of the vagus nerve, and is ...
v t e (Articles with TA98 identifiers, Vagus nerve, Nerves of the torso, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy stubs). ... The celiac (or coeliac) branches of vagus nerve are small branches which provide parasympathetic innervation to the celiac ...
The pulmonary branches of the vagus nerve can be divided into two groups: anterior and posterior. The Anterior Bronchial ...
Renal plexus v t e (Articles with TA98 identifiers, Vagus nerve, Nerves of the torso, Kidney, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy ... The renal branches of vagus nerve are small branches which provide parasympathetic innervation to the kidney. ...
The specific branches are the cervical cardiac branches of vagus nerve and the thoracic cardiac branches of vagus nerve. The ... The cardiac branches of the vagus nerve are two sets of nerves found in the upper torso, in close proximity to the larynx. ... of vagus nerve, on the right side, arise from the trunk of the vagus as it lies by the side of the trachea, and from its ... of vagus nerve, two or three in number, arise from the vagus, at the upper and lower parts of the neck. The upper branches are ...
Autonomic nervous system Parasympathetic nervous system Vagus nerve Vagus nerve stimulation Heart rate variability Sinus ... Vagal tone is activity of the vagus nerve, the 10th cranial nerve and a fundamental component of the parasympathetic branch of ... The vagus nerve acts on the sinoatrial node, slowing its conduction and modulating vagal tone, via the neurotransmitter ... Instead the processes affected by the vagus nerve - specifically heart rate and heart rate variability - are measured and used ...
The vagus nerve stimulator is a device that can be implanted into patients with epilepsy, especially that which originates from ... "Vagus nerve stimulation". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 20 July 2023. AAN Guideline Summary for Clinicians - Efficacy and Tolerability ... Pyridoxine (1939). The ketogenic diet and vagus nerve stimulation are alternative treatments for epilepsy without the ...
They mark the terminus of the recurrent nerve. nervous system neuron ganglion "vagus nerve." Encyclopædia Britannica. ... A vagus ganglion (plural: vagus ganglia) is a small, elongated ganglion located between the esophagus and aorta. ... www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/621522/vagus-nerve v t e (Articles needing additional references from March 2014, All ... articles needing additional references, Nervous ganglia of the torso, Vagus nerve, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy stubs). ...
... of the carotid artery due to the carotid sinus reflex initiates a stimulus of the heart inhibitory branches of the vagus nerve ...
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) Hypoglossal nerve stimulation, an option for some patients who have obstructive sleep apnea ... and may be considered to include occipital or sacral nerve stimulation) Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) Sacral nerve ... George MS, Nahas Z, Borckardt JJ, Anderson B, Burns C, Kose S, Short EB (January 2007). "Vagus nerve stimulation for the ... Ben-Menachem E (September 2001). "Vagus nerve stimulation, side effects, and long-term safety". Journal of Clinical ...
The aortic nerve, also known as the aortic depressor nerve, is a branch of the vagus nerve. It supplies autonomic afferent ... It joins the vagus nerve. This allows for impulses to reach the solitary tract of the brainstem. The aortic nerve is part of ... The aortic nerve is an autonomic afferent nerve, and runs from the peripheral baroreceptors and chemoreceptors found in the ... Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Vagus nerve, Aorta). ...
Once activated, they send action potentials through large myelinated fibers of the vagus nerve to the inspiratory area in the ... Increased sensory activity of the pulmonary-stretch lung afferents (via the vagus nerve) results in inhibition of the central ... Prescott SL, Liberles SD (February 2022). "Internal senses of the vagus nerve". Neuron. 110 (4): 579-599. doi:10.1016/j.neuron. ... CS1 German-language sources (de), Respiratory physiology, Reflexes, Vagus nerve). ...
The intermediate compartment transmits the glossopharyngeal nerve, the vagus nerve, and the accessory nerve. The posterior ... Anatomy of the Vagus Nerve". Nerves and Nerve Injuries. Vol. 1: History, Embryology, Anatomy, Imaging, and Diagnostics. ... The larger, posterolateral, "pars vascularis" compartment contains CN X, CN XI, Arnold's nerve (or the auricular branch of CN X ... It allows many structures to pass, including the inferior petrosal sinus, three cranial nerves, the sigmoid sinus, and ...
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is performed by sending small pulses of energy to the brain through vagus nerves, which is one of ... Vagus nerve stimulation is an operation where a small battery is place into the chest wall. Small wires are then attached to ... Vagus nerve stimulation can have side effects such as hoarse voice, pain in the throat, or change in voice. In responsive ... ISBN 978-1-61002-608-6. Panebianco M, Rigby A, Marson AG (July 2022). "Vagus nerve stimulation for focal seizures". The ...
Three types have been used in those who do not respond to medications: vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), anterior thalamic ... Panebianco M, Rigby A, Marson AG (14 July 2022). "Vagus nerve stimulation for focal seizures". The Cochrane Database of ... pulsatile electrical stimulation of specific nerve or brain regions, alongside standard care. ...
Cannon examined research on dogs performed by Sherrington, who separated the spinal cord and vagus nerves from all connections ... "Vagus nerve stimulation therapy: A research update". Neurology. 59 (6, Supplement 4): S56-S61. doi:10.1212/WNL.59.6_suppl_4.S56 ... J.N. Langley had shown that there was a period of two to four seconds between when the chorda tympani nerve was stimulated and ... The only noticeable changes in the participants were physical, such as activation of the sympathetic nerve impulse, which ...
"Epilepsy surgery, Temporal lobectomy, Vagus Nerve Stimulation , Cincinnati Ohio Mayfield Brain & Spine". mayfieldclinic.com. ...
The vagus nerve innervates the G cells. Gastrin-releasing peptide is released by the post-ganglionic fibers of the vagus nerve ...
This signal is transmitted by vagus nerve. Increased firing from the stretch receptors also increases production of pulmonary ...
The glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves;[citation needed] the sympathetic trunk leaving from the cranial ... with vagus nerve involvement there may be laryngeal hemiplegia (roaring) or difficulty swallowing (also if glossopharyngeal ... nerve is involved); and Horner's syndrome from the involvement of sympathetic nerves. Involvement of the facial nerve is rare. ... The facial nerve is in contact with the dorsal part of the pouch. The external carotid artery passes ventral to the medial ...
... release is inhibited by the Vagus nerve. In the anterior pituitary gland, the effects of somatostatin are: ... These neurons project to the median eminence, where somatostatin is released from neurosecretory nerve endings into the ...
The vagus nerve, also known as the tenth cranial nerve, cranial nerve X, or simply CN X, is a cranial nerve that carries ... Pharyngeal nerve Superior laryngeal nerve Aortic nerve Superior cervical cardiac branches of vagus nerve Inferior cervical ... exposed in situ Deep dissection of vagus nerve Vagus nerve - dissection Porphyria - A rare disorder can cause seizures and ... Stimulation of the vagus nerve in the cervix uteri (as in some medical procedures) can lead to a vasovagal response. The vagus ...
This study aims to determine whether a novel, non-invasive form of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcutaneous auricular VNS ... Assessing the Feasibility and Acceptability of Using Non-invasive Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation (taVNS) to ...
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established form of neuromodulation with a long history of promising applications. Earliest ... Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established form of neuromodulation with a long history of promising applications. Earliest ... The vagus nerve is a bundle of thousands of nerves, each with their own activation thresholds. The majority of these ascending ... Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in healthy humans reduces sympathetic nerve activity. Brain Stimul. 7, 871-877. doi: ...
Electrical Stimulation of the Auricular Branch Vagus Nerve Using Random and Alternating Frequencies Triggers a Rapid Onset and ... Electrical Stimulation of the Auricular Branch Vagus Nerve Using Random and Alternating Frequencies Triggers a Rapid Onset and ... This study evaluated the antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of percutaneous vagus nerve electrical stimulation ( ...
Long-term treatment with vagus nerve stimulation in patients with refractory epilepsy. The Vagus Nerve Stimulation Study Group ... Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS, Livanova, Houston, TX). In July 1997, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use ... Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (t-VNS). Non-invasive t-VNS is a device that stimulates the afferent auricular branch of ... Effects of vagus nerve stimulation on sleep-related breathing in epilepsy patients. Epilepsia. 2003 Jul. 44 (7):930-5. [QxMD ...
Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation reduces pain and fatigue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a ... Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation reduces pain and fatigue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a ... Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation reduces pain and fatigue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a ... Correction: Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation reduces pain and fatigue in patients with systemic lupus ...
Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in a hungry state decreases heart rate variability and wanting of a palatable drink. View ... Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in a hungry state decreases heart rate variability and wanting of a palatable drink ... Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in a hungry state decreases heart rate variability and wanting of a palatable drink ... Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in a hungry state decreases heart rate variability and wanting of a palatable drink ...
The vagus nerve plays an important role in your bodys calming response. ... What is the vagus nerve and why is it important? The vagus nerve is your bodys longest cranial nerve, stretching from your ... Quick Read Getting up the nerve … to relax *Your vagus nerve is your longest cranial nerve, connecting your brain with your ... Your vagus nerve is part of the parasympathetic, or calming, nervous system. When the vagus nerve activates, it slows your ...
Registered nutritionist who understands that balancing food, family and life can often end in needing a glass of wine! . Read More » ...
Cranial nerves. 0 Terminal nerve , I olfactory nerve , II optic nerve , III oculomotor nerve , IV trochlear nerve , V ... VI abducens nerve , VII Facial nerve , VIII Vestibulocochlear Nerve , IX Glossopharyngeal Nerve , X vagus nerve , XI accessory ... The paired vagus nerve just vagus is also the tenth cranial nerve , N. X called. It is the largest nerve of the parasympathetic ... Jackson syndrome (cranial nerve syndrome) (lesions of the vagus nerve, accessory nerve, and hypoglossal nerve) ...
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment that uses electrical impulses to stimulate the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve is a ... How the Vagus Nerve Works. The vagus nerve is the longest cranial nerve in the human body. It extends from the brain stem down ... Understanding Vagus Nerve Function. Has a doctor ever told you you have a vagus nerve disorder? Are you curious about how this ... Your Vagus Nerve Function Matters. The vagus nerve is an essential part of the human body and its function is the key to ...
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Targeted and practical course to learn clinician-led and patient-led treatment techniques for the vagus nerve ... This targeted masterclass is for anyone who needs a better understanding of hands-on Vagus nerve treatment techniques. Whether ... Expand your downtraining toolkit with practical Vagus Nerve Techniques youll use daily ...
... vagus nerve, vagus nerve exercise, vagus nerve facelift, vagus nerve for stress, vagus nerve for stress and anxiety, vagus ... Tag: vagus nerve for stress. Vagus Nerve Hack , 4-minute Facelift. Posted on December 14, 2023. December 14, 2023. by Arianne ... nerve stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation for anxietyLeave a Comment on Vagus Nerve Hack , 4-minute Facelift ... Our vagus nerve is 80% of our parasympathetic nervous system. However, we also want to consider our facial nerve, trigeminal ...
Discover the power of the vagus nerve for improved well-being, emotional balance, and inner calm through a simple practice. ... Utilize this simple practice to unlock the secrets of the vagus nerve to enhance well-being, balance emotions and cultivate ...
The Vagus Nerve, and The Sympathetic Nervous System and Parasympathetic Nervous System. ... the vagus nerve) and sacral nerves. It is the vagus nerve that connects to most of your organs, including the heart and lungs. ... The vagus nerve isnt only a fuzzy, warm, helps-you-regulate-and-feel-good nerve. It is also involved-through its ... "The vagus nerve, which runs from the neck to the abdomen, is in charge of turning off the fight or flight reflex." (source) ...
The vagus nerve activates the bodys relaxation response and helps regulate stress. A synergistic blend of essential oils ... Vagus Nerve Pillow Mist Save Liquid error (snippets/product-badge line 48): Computation results in -Infinity% ... The vagus nerve activates the bodys relaxation response and helps regulate stress. A synergistic blend of essential oils ...
The vagus nerve is one of the twelve cranial nerves that begin from the back of the brain. Each cranial nerve has a unique role ... The vagus nerve is crucial for keeping the body alive by mainta ... What is vagus nerve stimulation?. The vagus nerve is one of the ... Methods of vagus nerve stimulation. There are two common types of vagus nerve stimulation: device implantation or TENS machine ... Benefits of Vagus Nerve Stimulation. More research is needed to conclude the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation. Currently, it ...
A Vagus Nerve Belly Bloat Rescue. By. Sadie Nardini. Dec 12, 2023. ... The Vagus Nerve Miracle. By. Melissa Romano. Apr 27, 2023. The Vagus Nerve Miracle ...
Are you ready to discover the power of the vagus nerve to help you get rid of inf ... Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Access Your Natural Healing Ability with Self Help Exercises to Activate Your Vagus Nerve for Anxiety ... Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Access Your Natural Healing Ability with Self Help Exercises to Activate Your Vagus Nerve for Anxiety ... In Vagus Nerve Stimulation, youre going to learn how to utilize this powerful nerve to help you get rid of not just minor ...
Home Cannabis Treatments Anxious to Serene - Meet Your Vagus Nerve Anxious to Serene - Meet Your Vagus Nerve. Graine de ... Meet your Vagus Nerve. The Parasympathetic Nervous System Aka. The best thing? The best part? This will make you more calm, ... anxious Attention calm calmness focus meditate meet relax relaxing Rick Green serene serenity serenity now still vagus your ...
The vagus nerve is the longest cranial nerve. It contains motor and sensory fibers and, because it passes through the neck and ... The recurrent laryngeal nerve is also known as the inferior laryngeal nerve. The right nerve branches from the vagus at the ... Distribution of Vagus Nerve Fibers. The types of fibers that constitute the vagus nerve perform different physiologic roles ( ... Course of the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve descends vertically within the carotid sheath posterolateral to the internal and ...
The vagus nerve is the longest cranial nerve. It contains motor and sensory fibers and, because it passes through the neck and ... The recurrent laryngeal nerve is also known as the inferior laryngeal nerve. The right nerve branches from the vagus at the ... Distribution of Vagus Nerve Fibers. The types of fibers that constitute the vagus nerve perform different physiologic roles ( ... Course of the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve descends vertically within the carotid sheath posterolateral to the internal and ...
The vagus nerve is one of 12 (or 13, depending on how they are defined) cranial nerves that emerge directly from the brain to ... The vagus nerve, however, which is the longest nerve of the automatic nervous system, provides sensory and autonomic ( ... "The vagus nerve wanders through your body, starting right up at the top of your spinal cord. It goes to muscles in your neck ... Trauma and the Vagus Nerve: When Mindfulness is Not Enough By Craig Lewis , Buddhistdoor Global , 2016-04-28 ,. 02/05/2016 11: ...
Among these, the vagus nerve, often hailed as the bodys superhighway of relaxation, plays a pivotal role. ... Understanding the Vagus Nerve:. The vagus nerve, also known as the 10th cranial nerve, is a crucial component of the ... Ways to Activate the Vagus Nerve:. *Deep Breathing Exercises: Deep, diaphragmatic breathing stimulates the vagus nerve, ... the vagus nerve, often hailed as the bodys superhighway of relaxation, plays a pivotal role. Activating this nerve can ...
Tags excess weight loss, obesity, research, vagal blocking, vagus nerve, vbloc therapy, weight loss Decoded Neurofeedback ( ... 1 thought on "VBLOC Therapy For Weight Loss: A Neuroscience-Based Technology Blocks Vagus Nerve Signals". * Dolores T. Morgan. ... That said, the vagus nerve remains a therapeutic target for many conditions including: epilepsy, gasteroparesis, and major ... I have problem with my vagus nerves and have lost 18 lbs in past year and increasing faster. (I weighed 134 before). Surgeries ...
Vagus Nerve Stimulation for RA Pain. Vagus nerve stimulation is a treatment in which an implanted electronic device delivers ... Vagus Nerve Stimulation Inhibits Cytokine Production and Attenuates Disease Severity in Rheumatoid Arthritis. PNAS. July 2016. ... A proof-of-concept study found that vagus nerve stimulation reduced markers of systemic inflammation in patients with RA, as ... LB0009: First-in-Human Study of Novel Implanted Vagus Nerve Stimulation Device to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis. Annual European ...
8. These studies show that in the human and pig heart the left vagus nerve can profoundly decrease the inotropic state of the ... 2. The present study was designed to determine the effect of direct electrical stimulation of the left vagus nerve on left ... 4. In six anaesthetised open chest pigs, stimulation of the peripheral cut end of the left cervical vagus nerve induced a ... In nine patients electrical stimulation of the left thoracic vagus nerve close to its cardiac branch resulted in a significant ...
Effect of Non-invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation on Cognitive Functions in Diabetic Polyneuropathy Patients ... Device: Vagus nerve stimulation. stimulation will be applied on cymba conchae of left external ear. A stimulation of frequency ... determine the effect of non-invasive Vagus nerve stimulation on cognitive functions in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. ... Effect of Non-invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation on Cognitive Functions in Diabetic Polyneuropathy Patients. ...
branches of vagus nerve: The Accessory Nerve. cells: The Liver. cylinders: The Liver. duct: The Liver. flexure of colon: The ... nerve, inferior: The Sympathetic Nerves. plexuses of nerves: The Great Plexuses of the Sympathetic System. ... Hypoglossal nerve: The Hypoglossal Nerve. composition and central connections of: Composition and Central Connections of the ... nerves of: The Heart. sinoatrial node of: The Heart. size and weight of: The Heart. structure of: The Heart. surface marking of ...
  • In addition, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated afferent vagus stimulation in the gut due to gastroenteritis is a cause of vomiting. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stimulation of the vagus nerve in the cervix uteri (as in some medical procedures) can lead to a vasovagal response. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study aims to determine whether a novel, non-invasive form of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcutaneous auricular VNS (taVNS), is acceptable and feasible for use with WTC responders who have PTSD and whether the methodology to test the efficacy of taVNS in reducing PTSD symptoms in a larger trial is acceptable and feasible. (cdc.gov)
  • From 1997 to 2013, the only neurostimulation modality approved in the United States was vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). (medscape.com)
  • Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established form of neuromodulation with a long history of promising applications. (frontiersin.org)
  • The earliest description of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve began in the 1880's in New York. (frontiersin.org)
  • Since then, researchers have been seeking to refine and optimize vagus nerve stimulation VNS parameters to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric and medical disorders. (frontiersin.org)
  • Electrical Stimulation of the Auricular Branch Vagus Nerve Using Random and Alternating Frequencies Triggers a Rapid Onset and Pronounced Antihyperalgesia via Peripheral Annexin A1-Formyl Peptide Receptor 2/ALX Pathway in a Mouse Model of Persistent Inflammatory Pain. (iasp-pain.org)
  • This study evaluated the antihyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of percutaneous vagus nerve electrical stimulation (pVNS) by comparing the effects of alternating and random frequencies in an animal model of persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia. (iasp-pain.org)
  • Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Hack or Myth? (uwmedicine.org)
  • Can Vagus Nerve Stimulation Reduce Your Stress Levels? (uwmedicine.org)
  • There is a scarcity of clear research on how to influence the vagus nerve, but there is a lot of interest in it, and we can engage in simple practices that, at the very least, can help calm our nervous systems in the face of so much stimulation," says Dr. Amelia Dubovsky , a UW Medicine psychiatrist. (uwmedicine.org)
  • Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment that uses electrical impulses to stimulate the vagus nerve. (buzzytricks.com)
  • What is vagus nerve stimulation? (caremax.com.au)
  • Health professionals may recommend vagus nerve stimulation as a treatment for these conditions. (caremax.com.au)
  • There are two common types of vagus nerve stimulation: device implantation or TENS machine . (caremax.com.au)
  • More research is needed to conclude the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation . (caremax.com.au)
  • With adequate attachments, TENS can also provide vagus nerve stimulation treatment. (caremax.com.au)
  • Using a TENS machine for vagus nerve stimulation is a less invasive approach than surgical implantation. (caremax.com.au)
  • In Vagus Nerve Stimulation , you're going to learn how to utilize this powerful nerve to help you get rid of not just minor symptoms, but serious mental issues such as deep-seated trauma, chronic pains, extreme depression and more. (mepa.me)
  • To ensure that neuroregulation is occurring at optimal intervals, a physician will adjust the frequency (how often) the electrical stimulation is sent to the nerves. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • Vagus nerve stimulation decreases left ventricular contractility in vivo in the human and pig heart. (ox.ac.uk)
  • 1. Studies of the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on ventricular myocardial function in mammals are limited, particularly in the human. (ox.ac.uk)
  • 2. The present study was designed to determine the effect of direct electrical stimulation of the left vagus nerve on left ventricular contractile state in hearts paced at 10 % above the natural rate, in anaesthetised pigs and anaesthetised human subjects undergoing open chest surgery for coronary artery bypass grafting. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Background: This study aims to investigate the effects of adding transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) to exercise therapy on back extensor muscle endurance of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain (CLBP). (unair.ac.id)
  • Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) is a new non-invasive technique developed as treatment option for drug resistant epilepsy. (itu.dk)
  • Stimulation of the vagus nerve after surgery is also being examined. (medscape.com)
  • Vagus nerve stimulation in children with drug-resistant epilepsy of monogenic etiology. (cdc.gov)
  • It also has some afferent fibers that innervate the inner (canal) portion of the outer ear (via the auricular branch, also known as Arnold's or Alderman's nerve) and part of the meninges. (wikipedia.org)
  • The role of the vagus nerve includes controlling the movement of food through the digestive system, regulating heart rate, stimulating the production of saliva, and controlling the muscles of the voice box. (buzzytricks.com)
  • Given the core role of the vagus nerve, it should come as no surprise that impaired functioning can lead to a host of conditions and problems, physical, emotional, and mental-indeed, some neurological diseases actually originate in the digestive system, spreading to the brain via the vagus nerve. (phathoc.net)
  • Instead of placing a device inside a body, a TENS machine can target the vagus nerve outside the body. (caremax.com.au)
  • This is considered the first form of therapy to target the vagus nerve via "vagal blocking" for the management of obesity. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • The right vagus nerve gives rise to the right recurrent laryngeal nerve, which hooks around the right subclavian artery and ascends into the neck between the trachea and esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • It courses behind the root of the left lung and then deviates medially and downwards to reach the esophagus and form the esophageal plexus by joining the opposite (right) vagus nerve. (medscape.com)
  • A healthy vagus nerve is essential for proper bodily function. (buzzytricks.com)
  • A healthy vagus nerve is associated with a lower risk of inflammation, heart disease, and death. (buzzytricks.com)
  • Additionally, a healthy vagus nerve is important for maintaining a healthy heart and digestive system, as well as a strong immune system. (buzzytricks.com)
  • Balanced Heart Rate: A healthy vagus nerve helps maintain a steady heart rate variability, which is associated with better cardiovascular health. (asherlongevity.com)
  • Besides giving some output to various organs, the vagus nerve comprises between 80% and 90% of afferent nerves mostly conveying sensory information about the state of the body's organs to the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagus nerve is your body's longest cranial nerve, stretching from your brain down into your digestive system, with branches reaching each side of your body as well as connecting with your heart and lungs. (uwmedicine.org)
  • A better understanding of vagus nerve function can help you regulate your body's natural rhythms and maintain your overall health. (buzzytricks.com)
  • The vagus nerve activates the body's relaxation response and helps regulate stress. (milkandhoney.com)
  • So whether you're simply looking for methods to help you control your mental disorders and inflammatory issues, or you're looking to understand the powerful connection between the organs of the body and the nervous system, this book will quickly become your reference guide to harnessing the power of the body's most vital nerve. (mepa.me)
  • The functioning of the vagus nerve, which is unique to mammals, is closely tied to immune system response, and recent evidence suggests that the nerve also regulates the body's inflammation response to disease, according to University of California, Berkeley psychologist and faculty director of the Greater Good Science Center Dacher Keltner, who describes the vagus as "one of the great mind-body nexuses in the human nervous system. (phathoc.net)
  • Among these, the vagus nerve, often hailed as the body's superhighway of relaxation, plays a pivotal role. (asherlongevity.com)
  • Activation of the vagus nerve can dampen inflammation and boost immune function, aiding in the body's defense against infections. (asherlongevity.com)
  • The parasympathetic nervous system is compromised in part of the cranial nerves 3, 7, 9, 10 (the vagus nerve) and sacral nerves. (rolandbal.com)
  • The vagus nerve is one of the twelve cranial nerves that begin from the back of the brain. (caremax.com.au)
  • The vagus nerve is one of 12 (or 13, depending on how they are defined) cranial nerves that emerge directly from the brain to relay information between it and other parts of the body-primarily in the head and neck. (phathoc.net)
  • The effect of vagus nerve stimulator in controlling status epilepticus in children. (bvsalud.org)
  • This study explores the effect of Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS) on Status Epilepticus (SE) in children with medically intractable epilepsy . (bvsalud.org)
  • The vagus nerve, also known as the tenth cranial nerve, cranial nerve X, or simply CN X, is a cranial nerve that carries sensory fibers that create a pathway that interfaces with the parasympathetic control of the heart, lungs, and digestive tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagus nerve supplies motor parasympathetic fibers to all the organs (except the adrenal glands), from the neck down to the second segment of the transverse colon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parasympathetic innervation of the heart is partially controlled by the vagus nerve and is shared by the thoracic ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your vagus nerve is part of the parasympathetic, or calming, nervous system. (uwmedicine.org)
  • The vagus thus contains the following fiber qualities: somatomotor (voluntary control), somatosensitive (consciously perceptible), sensory (taste), visceromotor and visceromotor (parasympathetic). (zxc.wiki)
  • Our vagus nerve is 80% of our parasympathetic nervous system. (themovementparadigm.com)
  • It is only when your fight-flight sympathetic nervous system starts to calm down that your parasympathetic nervous system-and thus your vagus nerve-can start to properly function again, thereby restoring balance. (rolandbal.com)
  • You can breathe, stand on your head, sing mantras, and visualize all the colors that you want-and it might certainly help to temporarily manage your situation-but without addressing the often underlying emotional issues that keep your fight-flight autonomic system high, you will never be able to help regulate your parasympathetic nervous system, and thus your vagus nerve, to successfully come out of a freeze response. (rolandbal.com)
  • When the parasympathetic nervous system and the vagus nerve come out of a hyperactivation-or freeze response-they can restore proper digestion and immune system functioning. (rolandbal.com)
  • Stephen Porges started talking about the vagus nerve and it's different sympathetic and parasympathetic functions, and divided those functions according to the dorsal and ventral part of this particular nerve. (rolandbal.com)
  • The vagus nerve, however, which is the longest nerve of the automatic nervous system, provides sensory and autonomic (parasympathetic) motor innervation to most of the organs in the chest and abdomen as well as to the neck, including the digestive system, liver, spleen, pancreas, heart, and lungs. (phathoc.net)
  • Medical devices designed to stimulate the vagus nerve have been used to treat conditions like epilepsy and severe treatment-resistant depression. (uwmedicine.org)
  • These electrical impulses change abnormal brain or nerve activity that may contribute to conditions such as depression, epilepsy and migraines. (caremax.com.au)
  • Aside from these devices, nothing else is proven to stimulate your vagus nerve to treat stress or anxiety - but - more research still needs to be done. (uwmedicine.org)
  • Surprisingly, the act of gargling with water can stimulate the vagus nerve, leading to relaxation and improved digestion. (asherlongevity.com)
  • According to vagus nerve stimulator reviews , it is also being investigated as a treatment for a variety of other conditions, including migraines, chronic pain, tinnitus, and Alzheimer's disease. (buzzytricks.com)
  • A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator (TENS) machine is a handheld device that creates electrical impulses. (caremax.com.au)
  • He did receive a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS), which also proved ineffective in controlling his seizures. (medscape.com)
  • However, we also want to consider our facial nerve, trigeminal nerve, and glossopharyngeal nerve, which are all involved in the expressions of our faces. (themovementparadigm.com)
  • Use the tongue on the roof of the mouth, moving through the alphabet to activate the glossopharyngeal nerve and enhance awareness in the tongue area. (themovementparadigm.com)
  • The vagus is the longest nerve of the autonomic nervous system in the human body and comprises both sensory and motor fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sensory fibers originate from neurons of the nodose ganglion, whereas the motor fibers come from neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the nucleus ambiguus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cell bodies of visceral afferent fibers of the vagus nerve are located bilaterally in the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve (nodose ganglia). (wikipedia.org)
  • Efferent vagus nerve fibers innervating the pharynx and back of the throat are responsible for the gag reflex. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nerve cell bodies of the motor fibers are located in the nucleus motorius nervi vagi (also nucleus ambiguus ) in the medullary brain. (zxc.wiki)
  • The somata of the afferent fibers (a distinction between sensory and sensory is no longer made) of the vagus nerve are located in these two ganglia. (zxc.wiki)
  • The anterior gastric is formed mainly from the left vagus, but it does contain fibers from the right vagus. (medscape.com)
  • Similarly, the posterior gastric nerve is formed mainly from the right vagus but contains fibers from the left vagus nerve. (medscape.com)
  • The left vagus further gives off thoracic cardiac branches, breaks up into the pulmonary plexus, continues into the esophageal plexus, and enters the abdomen as the anterior vagal trunk in the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the vagus nerve activates, it slows your heart rate, promotes digestion and helps regulate your immune response. (uwmedicine.org)
  • Exposure to cold temperatures, such as cold showers or ice baths, activates the vagus nerve's "fight-or-flight" response, followed by a rebound relaxation effect. (asherlongevity.com)
  • Upon leaving the medulla oblongata between the olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle, the vagus nerve extends through the jugular foramen, then passes into the carotid sheath between the internal carotid artery and the internal jugular vein down to the neck, chest, and abdomen, where it contributes to the innervation of the viscera, reaching all the way to the colon. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagus nerve runs along the neck together with the common carotid artery and the internal jugular vein in a shared connective tissue sheath , the carotid vagina , in the direction of the chest cavity. (zxc.wiki)
  • The vagus nerve, which runs from the neck to the abdomen, is in charge of turning off the 'fight or flight' reflex. (rolandbal.com)
  • Each cranial nerve has a unique role in controlling the movement and sensation of the head, face and neck. (caremax.com.au)
  • Device implantation requires surgery to place a little machine underneath the skin of the chest, which has wires running to the vagus nerve (around the neck). (caremax.com.au)
  • The vagus nerve descends vertically within the carotid sheath posterolateral to the internal and common carotid arteries and medial to the internal jugular vein (IJV) at the root of the neck. (medscape.com)
  • Since the vagal nerve also transmits signals to the heart, neck, and influences the autonomic nervous system - the specifics regarding the mechanism of action haven't been clarified. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • This is a great way, as many of the other vagus nerve exercises are, to be able to use this sensory information to provide input to the brain, to be able to regulate our nervous system, and to bring us to a state of safety and connection. (themovementparadigm.com)
  • It leaves the skull through the middle compartment of the jugular foramen, where it has upper and lower ganglionic swellings, which are the sensory ganglia of the nerve. (medscape.com)
  • The vagus nerve exits from the medulla oblongata in the groove between the olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle. (medscape.com)
  • More research is needed to fully understand all of the vagus nerve's functions, but this current info can help to improve the lives of those who suffer from conditions that involve this nerve. (buzzytricks.com)
  • Diagram of the vagus nerve demonstrating the different branches. (medscape.com)
  • It gives rise to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, which hooks around the aortic arch to the left of the ligamentum arteriosum and ascends between the trachea and esophagus. (wikipedia.org)
  • It then inclines behind the hilum of the right lung and courses medially toward the esophagus to form the esophageal plexus with the left vagus nerve. (medscape.com)
  • The vagus nerve is joined by the cranial root of the accessory nerve (cranial nerve XI), just below the inferior ganglion. (medscape.com)
  • I think there is far too much hype about the vagus nerve these days, especially given that the discussions occur without providing any context for what is happening on a broader emotional and nervous system level. (rolandbal.com)
  • It is the vagus nerve that connects to most of your organs, including the heart and lungs. (rolandbal.com)
  • The paired vagus nerve just vagus is also the tenth cranial nerve , N. X called. (zxc.wiki)
  • Some relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing or acupuncture, may activate the vagus nerve and help decrease stress. (uwmedicine.org)
  • Research has shown certain relaxation techniques appear to activate the vagus nerve and can help reduce inflammation in chronic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease, Wang says. (uwmedicine.org)
  • In this blog post, we delve into the depths of the vagus nerve, exploring its functions and providing practical tips on how to activate it for optimal wellness. (asherlongevity.com)
  • Watching funny movies, spending time with humorous friends, or engaging in laughter yoga can activate the vagus nerve and elevate mood. (asherlongevity.com)
  • The left vagus nerve enters the thorax between left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery and descends on the aortic arch. (wikipedia.org)
  • The right and left vagus nerves descend from the cranial vault through the jugular foramina, penetrating the carotid sheath between the internal and external carotid arteries, then passing posterolateral to the common carotid artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagus runs parallel to the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein inside the carotid sheath. (wikipedia.org)
  • With a good ultrasound device, the nerve in the area of ​​the carotid arteries can also be localized sonographically. (zxc.wiki)
  • The left vagus crosses in front of the left subclavian artery to enter the thorax between the left common carotid and subclavian arteries. (medscape.com)
  • The vagus nerve isn't only a fuzzy, warm, helps-you-regulate-and-feel-good nerve. (rolandbal.com)
  • It is thought to specifically regulate the functionality of the vagus nerve, thereby promoting clinically significant weight loss. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • The brainstem is an area of the brain that connects the brain hemispheres to the spinal cord and is home to a part of the vagus nerve that is known to regulate the energy balance in the body. (lu.se)
  • Enter the vagus nerve, which, when activated, can do everything from easing treatment-resistant depression to reducing inflammation to increasing your immune system's response - or so people claim. (uwmedicine.org)
  • One study* in particular found that stimulating the vagus nerve dramatically reduced the severity of depression, while another** concluded that mindfulness meditation optimized the functional connectivity of the nerve, lowering inflammation and improving the brain's ability to manage stress and anxiety. (phathoc.net)
  • A separate attachment called an 'ear clip' is needed to help deliver electrical impulses from the TENS machine to the vagus nerve. (caremax.com.au)
  • The vagus nerve modulates inflammation by releasing a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, which acts as a messenger to dampen the inflammatory response," Wang explains. (uwmedicine.org)
  • The vagus also controls a few skeletal muscles, including: Cricothyroid muscle Levator veli palatini muscle Salpingopharyngeus muscle Palatoglossus muscle Palatopharyngeus muscle Superior, middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictors Muscles of the larynx (speech). (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagus nerve is a long nerve that runs from the brainstem to the abdomen. (buzzytricks.com)
  • A well-regulated vagus nerve contributes to emotional resilience, promoting feelings of calmness and reducing anxiety. (asherlongevity.com)
  • The right vagus then crosses anterior to the right subclavian artery, runs posterior to the superior vena cava, descends posterior to the right main bronchus, and contributes to cardiac, pulmonary, and esophageal plexuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The right vagus crosses in front of the first part of the subclavian artery and then travels into the fat behind the innominate vessels. (medscape.com)
  • Mechanical therapy may be useful in macroglossia with hypotonicity due to hypoglossal nerve deficit. (medscape.com)
  • In the chest cavity, the vagus runs through the upper mediastinum , later the posterior mediastinum. (zxc.wiki)
  • The anterior and posterior gastric nerves are then formed from the esophageal plexus. (medscape.com)
  • nucleus parasympathicus nervi vagi ), a core area in the myelencephalon (medullary brain). (zxc.wiki)
  • Knocking out vagal nerve receptors has been shown to cause hyperphagia (greatly increased food intake). (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagal nerve has been associated with alterations in activation of "brown fat" - a healthy type of fat that promotes weight loss. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • It is known that the vagal nerve is highly complex, transmitting signals throughout the entire body. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • Essentially, the vagus nerve tells the immune system to calm down. (uwmedicine.org)
  • The gastric nerves supply all abdominal organs and the gastrointestinal tract ending just before the left colonic (splenic) flexure (see the images below). (medscape.com)
  • Since the vagus nerve was discovered, scientists have never ceased to be amazed at how one single nerve can be connected to so many different organs in the body. (mepa.me)
  • The system itself is comprised of 3 specific hardware implants: a pulse generator (to send electrical signals) and two wires that are strategically positioned on the vagus nerve in the abdominal area. (mentalhealthdaily.com)
  • Vagal and spinal ganglionic nerves mediate the lowering of the heart rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electric impulses are delivered from the device through the wires and into the vagus nerve for its effect [ 2 ]. (caremax.com.au)
  • It descends on the left side of the aortic arch, which separates it from the left pleura, and travels behind the phrenic nerve. (medscape.com)
  • There are lots of disorders where vagus nerve symptoms like voice changes or difficulty swallowing happen. (buzzytricks.com)
  • Are you ready to discover the power of the vagus nerve to help you get rid of inflammatory symptoms and mental disorders? (mepa.me)

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