Meningitis, Pneumococcal: An acute purulent infection of the meninges and subarachnoid space caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, most prevalent in children and adults over the age of 60. This illness may be associated with OTITIS MEDIA; MASTOIDITIS; SINUSITIS; RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; sickle cell disease (ANEMIA, SICKLE CELL); skull fractures; and other disorders. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; HEADACHE; neck stiffness; and somnolence followed by SEIZURES; focal neurologic deficits (notably DEAFNESS); and COMA. (From Miller et al., Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p111)Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Pneumonia, Pneumococcal: A febrile disease caused by STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Ceftriaxone: A broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with a very long half-life and high penetrability to meninges, eyes and inner ears.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Streptococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Pneumococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Streptolysins: Exotoxins produced by certain strains of streptococci, particularly those of group A (STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES), that cause HEMOLYSIS.Klebsiella pneumoniae: Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Streptococcus pyogenes: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from skin lesions, blood, inflammatory exudates, and the upper respiratory tract of humans. It is a group A hemolytic Streptococcus that can cause SCARLET FEVER and RHEUMATIC FEVER.Pneumococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Streptococcus mutans: A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.Meningitis, Aseptic: A syndrome characterized by headache, neck stiffness, low grade fever, and CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis in the absence of an acute bacterial pathogen. Viral meningitis is the most frequent cause although MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; RICKETTSIA INFECTIONS; diagnostic or therapeutic procedures; NEOPLASTIC PROCESSES; septic perimeningeal foci; and other conditions may result in this syndrome. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p745)Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Short filamentous organism of the genus Mycoplasma, which binds firmly to the cells of the respiratory epithelium. It is one of the etiologic agents of non-viral primary atypical pneumonia in man.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Penicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.Community-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Nasopharynx: The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Streptococcus agalactiae: A bacterium which causes mastitis in cattle and occasionally in man.Meningitis, Viral: Viral infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space. TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RUBELLA; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORBIVIRUS infections; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RHABDOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; JC VIRUS infections; and RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS may cause this form of meningitis. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, neck pain, vomiting, PHOTOPHOBIA, and signs of meningeal irritation. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp1-3)Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Vaccines, Conjugate: Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Meningitis, Haemophilus: Infections of the nervous system caused by bacteria of the genus HAEMOPHILUS, and marked by prominent inflammation of the MENINGES. HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B is the most common causative organism. The condition primarily affects children under 6 years of age but may occur in adults.Bacterial Capsules: An envelope of loose gel surrounding a bacterial cell which is associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Some capsules have a well-defined border, whereas others form a slime layer that trails off into the medium. Most capsules consist of relatively simple polysaccharides but there are some bacteria whose capsules are made of polypeptides.Pneumonia, Mycoplasma: Interstitial pneumonia caused by extensive infection of the lungs (LUNG) and BRONCHI, particularly the lower lobes of the lungs, by MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE in humans. In SHEEP, it is caused by MYCOPLASMA OVIPNEUMONIAE. In CATTLE, it may be caused by MYCOPLASMA DISPAR.Vaccines, Inactivated: Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.Meningitis, Meningococcal: A fulminant infection of the meninges and subarachnoid fluid by the bacterium NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS, producing diffuse inflammation and peri-meningeal venous thromboses. Clinical manifestations include FEVER, nuchal rigidity, SEIZURES, severe HEADACHE, petechial rash, stupor, focal neurologic deficits, HYDROCEPHALUS, and COMA. The organism is usually transmitted via nasopharyngeal secretions and is a leading cause of meningitis in children and young adults. Organisms from Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, Y, and W-135 have been reported to cause meningitis. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp689-701; Curr Opin Pediatr 1998 Feb;10(1):13-8)Meningitis, Fungal: Meningitis caused by fungal agents which may occur as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS or arise in immunocompetent hosts.Macrolides: A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Streptococcus mitis: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria commensal in the respiratory tract.Fluoroquinolones: A group of QUINOLONES with at least one fluorine atom and a piperazinyl group.Viral Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.Cefotaxime: Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporin.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Polysaccharides, Bacterial: Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.Streptococcus suis: A species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from pigs. It is a pathogen of swine but rarely occurs in humans.Vaccines, Synthetic: Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.Meningitis, Cryptococcal: Meningeal inflammation produced by CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS, an encapsulated yeast that tends to infect individuals with ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other immunocompromised states. The organism enters the body through the respiratory tract, but symptomatic infections are usually limited to the lungs and nervous system. The organism may also produce parenchymal brain lesions (torulomas). Clinically, the course is subacute and may feature HEADACHE; NAUSEA; PHOTOPHOBIA; focal neurologic deficits; SEIZURES; cranial neuropathies; and HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp721-2)Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Streptococcus oralis: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria that is numerous in the mouth and throat. It is a common cause of endocarditis and is also implicated in dental plaque formation.Vaccines, DNA: Recombinant DNA vectors encoding antigens administered for the prevention or treatment of disease. The host cells take up the DNA, express the antigen, and present it to the immune system in a manner similar to that which would occur during natural infection. This induces humoral and cellular immune responses against the encoded antigens. The vector is called naked DNA because there is no need for complex formulations or delivery agents; the plasmid is injected in saline or other buffers.Haemophilus influenzae: A species of HAEMOPHILUS found on the mucous membranes of humans and a variety of animals. The species is further divided into biotypes I through VIII.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Erythromycin: A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Levofloxacin: The L-isomer of Ofloxacin.Streptococcus Phages: Viruses whose host is Streptococcus.Cephalosporin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of an organism to the action of the cephalosporins.Ofloxacin: A synthetic fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent that inhibits the supercoiling activity of bacterial DNA GYRASE, halting DNA REPLICATION.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Streptococcus bovis: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria commonly found in the alimentary tract of cows, sheep, and other ruminants. It occasionally is encountered in cases of human endocarditis. This species is nonhemolytic.Cephalosporins: A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase: An autolytic enzyme bound to the surface of bacterial cell walls. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of the link between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and L-amino acid residues in certain cell wall glycopeptides, particularly peptidoglycan. EC 3.5.1.28.Otitis Media: Inflammation of the MIDDLE EAR including the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE.Tuberculosis, Meningeal: A form of bacterial meningitis caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS or rarely MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. The organism seeds the meninges and forms microtuberculomas which subsequently rupture. The clinical course tends to be subacute, with progressions occurring over a period of several days or longer. Headache and meningeal irritation may be followed by SEIZURES, cranial neuropathies, focal neurologic deficits, somnolence, and eventually COMA. The illness may occur in immunocompetent individuals or as an OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTION in the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other immunodeficiency syndromes. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp717-9)Klebsiella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus KLEBSIELLA.Streptococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTIONS.Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia: An interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology, occurring between 21-80 years of age. It is characterized by a dramatic onset of a "pneumonia-like" illness with cough, fever, malaise, fatigue, and weight loss. Pathological features include prominent interstitial inflammation without collagen fibrosis, diffuse fibroblastic foci, and no microscopic honeycomb change. There is excessive proliferation of granulation tissue within small airways and alveolar ducts.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.AIDS Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated HIV or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent or treat AIDS. Some vaccines containing antigens are recombinantly produced.Carrier State: The condition of harboring an infective organism without manifesting symptoms of infection. The organism must be readily transmissible to another susceptible host.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Streptococcus equi: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from abscesses in submaxillary glands and mucopurulent discharges of the upper respiratory tract of horses. This organism belongs to Group C streptococci with regards to antigen response and is known to cause strangles. The subspecies S. zooepidemicus is also considered a pathogen of horses.Vaccines, Subunit: Vaccines consisting of one or more antigens that stimulate a strong immune response. They are purified from microorganisms or produced by recombinant DNA techniques, or they can be chemically synthesized peptides.Penicillin G: A penicillin derivative commonly used in the form of its sodium or potassium salts in the treatment of a variety of infections. It is effective against most gram-positive bacteria and against gram-negative cocci. It has also been used as an experimental convulsant because of its actions on GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID mediated synaptic transmission.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Ketolides: Compounds based on ERYTHROMYCIN with the 3-cladinose replaced by a ketone. They bind the 23S part of 70S bacterial RIBOSOMES.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Pneumonia, Pneumocystis: A pulmonary disease in humans occurring in immunodeficient or malnourished patients or infants, characterized by DYSPNEA, tachypnea, and HYPOXEMIA. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a frequently seen opportunistic infection in AIDS. It is caused by the fungus PNEUMOCYSTIS JIROVECII. The disease is also found in other MAMMALS where it is caused by related species of Pneumocystis.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Transformation, Bacterial: The heritable modification of the properties of a competent bacterium by naked DNA from another source. The uptake of naked DNA is a naturally occuring phenomenon in some bacteria. It is often used as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.Mice, Inbred BALB CRespiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Meningococcal Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.Pneumonia, Staphylococcal: Pneumonia caused by infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS, usually with STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Counterimmunoelectrophoresis: Immunoelectrophoresis in which immunoprecipitation occurs when antigen at the cathode is caused to migrate in an electric field through a suitable medium of diffusion against a stream of antibody migrating from the anode as a result of endosmotic flow.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis: Gram-negative aerobic cocci of low virulence that colonize the nasopharynx and occasionally cause MENINGITIS; BACTEREMIA; EMPYEMA; PERICARDITIS; and PNEUMONIA.Amoxicillin: A broad-spectrum semisynthetic antibiotic similar to AMPICILLIN except that its resistance to gastric acid permits higher serum levels with oral administration.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Penicillin-Binding Proteins: Bacterial proteins that share the property of binding irreversibly to PENICILLINS and other ANTIBACTERIAL AGENTS derived from LACTAMS. The penicillin-binding proteins are primarily enzymes involved in CELL WALL biosynthesis including MURAMOYLPENTAPEPTIDE CARBOXYPEPTIDASE; PEPTIDE SYNTHASES; TRANSPEPTIDASES; and HEXOSYLTRANSFERASES.NaphthyridinesMice, Inbred C57BLHaemophilus Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus HAEMOPHILUS.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Streptococcus sobrinus: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from the human tooth surface. Strains have been shown to be cariogenic in experimental animals and may be associated with human dental caries.DNA Topoisomerase IV: A bacterial DNA topoisomerase II that catalyzes ATP-dependent breakage of both strands of DNA, passage of the unbroken strands through the breaks, and rejoining of the broken strands. Topoisomerase IV binds to DNA as a heterotetramer consisting 2 parC and 2 parE subunits. Topoisomerase IV is a decatenating enzyme that resolves interlinked daughter chromosomes following DNA replication.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Aminoacyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an aminoacyl group from donor to acceptor resulting in the formation of an ester or amide linkage. EC 2.3.2.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
Streptococcus pneumoniae. Pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. ... Q fever vaccine. Q-Vax Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib). Epiglottitis, meningitis, pneumonia. Hib vaccine. Hiberix, Pentacel ... Rotavirus vaccine. Rotateq, Rotarix Rubella virus. Rubella. Rubella vaccine, MMR vaccine, MMRV vaccine. Priorix, MMR II, ... Japanese encephalitis vaccine. Ixiaro, Jespect, Imojev Measles virus. Measles. Measles vaccine, MMR vaccine, MMRV vaccine. ...
Pneumococcal vaccines are vaccines against the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae. Their use can prevent some cases of pneumonia ... meningitis, and sepsis. There are two types of pneumococcal vaccines: conjugate vaccines and polysaccharide vaccines. They are ... Additional pneumococcal vaccine research is taking place to find a vaccine that offers broad protection against pneumococcal ... "Pneumococcal AMC GAVI webpage" Archived 2013-06-07 at the Wayback Machine. "Pneumonia vaccine to be part of immunisation drive ...
">"Childhood Pneumonia & Meningitis: Recent Advances". "Sabin Vaccine Institute's 4th Regional Pneumococcal Symposium". ... "Burden of disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children younger than 5 years: global estimates" "PACE Call to Action ... Sabin.org/PACE Pneumococcal disease Pneumococcal vaccines World Pneumonia Day PATH PneumoADIP. ... As the three leading causes of bacterial meningitis in childhood are vaccine preventable, the regular use of conjugate vaccines ...
Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia PneumoADIP Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine "Pneumococcal 7-valent Conjugate Vaccine ( ... "Changing epidemiology of pneumococcal meningitis after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the United States ... Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is a pneumococcal vaccine and a conjugate vaccine used to protect infants, young children ... World Health Organization: Pneumococcal vaccines Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at Curlie (based on DMOZ). ...
"Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype-2 Childhood Meningitis in Bangladesh: A Newly Recognized Pneumococcal Infection Threat". PLOS ... Saha played a key role in implementing vaccines against two bacteria that cause meningitis and pneumonia in Bangladesh. It had ... mostly exploring the topics of childhood pneumonia and meningitis. A member of Pneumococcal Awareness Council of Experts (PACE ... "The Life-Saving Vaccine the World Has Never Heard Of... - Stop Pneumonia". stoppneumonia.org. Retrieved 2018-01-09. User, Super ...
Vaccine[edit]. Main article: Pneumococcal vaccine. Due to the importance of disease caused by S. pneumoniae, several vaccines ... S. pneumoniae is the main cause of community acquired pneumonia and meningitis in children and the elderly,[5] and of ... penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP)[33], Streptococcus pneumoniae penicillin resistant (SPPR)[34] or drug- ... It was renamed Streptococcus pneumoniae in 1974 because it was very similar to streptococci.[7][11] ...
... is a type of bacterial pneumonia that is specifically caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae ... A vaccine has also been developed for the prevention of pneumococcal pneumonia, recommended to children under age five as well ... While it has been commonly known that the influenza virus increases one's chances of contracting pneumonia or meningitis caused ... "Pneumococcal Pneumonia". www.niaid.nih.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-26. "Pneumococcal Disease , Facts About Pneumonia , CDC". www.cdc ...
S. pneumoniae is the main cause of community acquired pneumonia and meningitis in children and the elderly, and of septicemia ... 16: Pneumococcal Disease". In Atkinson W; Wolfe S; Hamborsky J. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ( ... It was renamed Streptococcus pneumoniae in 1974 because it was very similar to streptococci. S. pneumoniae played a central ... Optochin sensitivity in a culture of Streptococcus pneumoniae Natural competence Transformation (genetics) Pneumococcal ...
... a pneumococcal vaccine, Acel-Imune, an acellular pertussis vaccine, Meningitec, a meningococcal meningitis vaccine, Rotashield ... "Immunization Against Streptococcus pneumoniae" filed May 8, 2006 U. S. patent number 8,617,564 - Vaccines against herpes ... the first Pneumococcal Pneumonia Conjugate. Respigam was the first antibody licensed for preventing severe RSV infections in ... 2008). Pneumococcal vaccines: the impact of conjugate vaccine. Washington, DC: ASM Press. ISBN 9781555814083. George Siber's ...
... pneumoniae. In 1936, a pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine was used to abort an epidemic of pneumococcal pneumonia. In ... Pneumococcal infection is an infection caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. S. pneumoniae is a common member of ... However, it is also the cause of significant disease being a leading cause of pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and sepsis. The ... November 2nd: World Pneumonia Day Website Pneumococcal Vaccine Accelerated Development and Introduction Plan. ...
... responsible for funding and implementing a research portfolio on vaccines needed to prevent bacterial meningitis and pneumonia ... Epidemiology of clinically significant isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States. Rev Infect Dis 1981;3:277 280 ... Pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal vaccination: an alternative method to estimate the efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine. N ... Group B meningococcal vaccine efficacy in Cuba; and Haemophilus influenza type b conjugate vaccine impact on pneumonia in the ...
Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae also known as Pneumococcus. This bacteria can cause ... This vaccine protects against Hib, but not the other strains of Haemphilus Influenza Type B. It prevents meningitis, Hib ... 1 in 4 get pneumonia 1 or 2 in 100 will have convulsions (violent, uncontrolled shaking) 2/3 will have apnea 1 in 300 will have ... Pneumococcal Vaccine Side Effects Pneumococcal Side Effects Pneumococcal Treatment CDC Polio Polio vaccine Polio Vaccine Side ...
... which describes the clinical syndrome of pneumococcal meningitis, pneumonia and endocarditis, after his 1957 paper in Archives ... one of the 2 most important researchers into the biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the 20th century.[citation needed] ... When antibiotics came into use for the cure of pneumococcal infections in the 1950s and 60s, further pneumococcal vaccine ... His Lasker award reads as follows "For his persistent, dedicated efforts which permitted the development of a vaccine that soon ...
... and pneumonia, and evaluating carriage of Hib disease and Streptococcus pneumoniae. 2006: a study looking at the effectiveness ... The Group has also carried out research on pneumococcal vaccines, typhoid vaccines and, more recently, new vaccines against ... Vaccine 2009 Nov 16;27(49):6918-25. Fergus Walsh (20 October 2006). "Meningitis B vaccine trials begin". BBC News. Retrieved 25 ... "Doctors hail meningitis vaccine 'breakthrough'". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 June 2015. Primary Care and Vaccines Collaborative ...
Peterson LR (2006). "Penicillins for treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia: does in vitro resistance really matter?". Clin Infect ... Dagan R. "Treatment of acute otitis media - challenges in the era of antibiotic resistance". Vaccine. 19 Suppl 1: S9-S16. ... Neisseria meningitis, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae). ... Streptococcus pneumoniae, diplococcus pneumoniae, ose thjesht pneumococcus janë baktere diplokoke gram-pozitive të rradhitura ...
"Design of a group-randomized Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccine trial". Controlled Clinical Trials. 22 (4): 438-52. doi:10.1016/ ... Previous pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine impacts immune response to subsequent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the ... "Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis after three doses of vaccine". The Lancet. 343 (8900): 794. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(94) ... Efficacy of Heptavalent Conjugate Pneumococal Vaccine (Wyeth Lederle) in 37,000 infants and children: Impact on Pneumonia, ...
meningitis. S. mitis. human. endocarditis. S. mutans. human. dental caries. S. pneumoniae. human. pneumonia. ... Cohen-Poradosu R, Kasper DL (2007). "Group A streptococcus epidemiology and vaccine implications". Clin. Infect. Dis. 45 (7): ... Tiraby JG, Tiraby E, Fox MS (1975) Pneumococcal bacteriophages. Virology 68:566-569 ... Streptococcus pneumoniae and a group of oral streptococci (Streptococcus viridans or viridans streptococci) display alpha ...
Streptococcus. α. optochin susceptible. *S. pneumoniae *Pneumococcal infection. optochin resistant. *Viridans streptococci: S. ... Magistro, G; Stief, CG (6 August 2018). "Vaccine Development for Urinary Tract Infections: Where Do We Stand?". European ... Klebsiella pneumoniae *Rhinoscleroma, Pneumonia. *Klebsiella granulomatis *Granuloma inguinale. *Klebsiella oxytoca. * ... Huttner, A; Gambillara, V (24 May 2018). "The development and early clinical testing of the ExPEC4V conjugate vaccine against ...
... pneumonia, and meningitis, which can lead to death or long-term sequelae.[4] ... "Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for GBS" (PDF). Vaccine. 34: 2876-2879. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.12. ... Streptococcus. α. optochin susceptible. *S. pneumoniae *Pneumococcal infection. optochin resistant. *Viridans streptococci: S. ... Streptococcus agalactiae. Lehmann and Neumann, 1896. Streptococcus agalactiae (also known as group B streptococcus or GBS) is a ...
Routine vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), which is active against ... pneumonia. In adults, too, meningococcal meningitis has a lower mortality (3-7%) than pneumococcal disease. In children there ... The introduction of pneumococcal vaccine has lowered rates of pneumococcal meningitis in both children and adults. Recent skull ... 2009). "Effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal meningitis". N Engl J Med. 360 (3): 244-256. doi:10.1056/ ...
S. agalactiae, or group B Streptococcus, GBS, causes pneumonia and meningitis in neonates and the elderly, with occasional ... Streptococcus pneumoniae and a group of oral streptococci (Streptococcus viridans or viridans streptococci) display alpha ... Cohen-Poradosu R, Kasper DL (2007). "Group A streptococcus epidemiology and vaccine implications". Clin. Infect. Dis. 45 (7): ... Virology 63:577-582 Tiraby JG, Tiraby E, Fox MS (1975) Pneumococcal bacteriophages. Virology 68:566-569 López R (2004). " ...
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in early infancy, decreases the risk of acute otitis media in healthy infants. PCV is ... The most common bacteria isolated from the middle ear in AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella ... such as bacterial meningitis, brain abscess, or dural sinus thrombosis. It is estimated that each year 21,000 people die due to ... community-acquired pneumonia and acute otitis media". European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases. 32 (2): ...
"Initiative for Vaccine Research (IVR)-Group A Streptococcus". World Health Organization. Archived from the original on 13 May ... Streptococcus. α. optochin susceptible. *S. pneumoniae *Pneumococcal infection. optochin resistant. *Viridans streptococci: S. ... A few examples of the many complications which can arise from those methods of spread include endocarditis, pneumonia, or ... meningitis.[15]. Nonsuppurative complications: These complications arise from certain subtypes of the group A streptococci ...
Vaccines against bacterial pathogens include the anthrax vaccine and the pneumococcal vaccine. Many other bacterial pathogens ... such as pneumonia, which can be caused by bacteria such as Streptococcus and Pseudomonas, and foodborne illnesses, which can be ... Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Streptococcus pneumoniae.[44]. Eukaryotic pathogens are often capable of sexual interaction by a ... which can cause a severe form of meningitis. The typical fungal spore size is ,4.7 μm in length, but some spores may be larger. ...
... is a form of bacterial meningitis caused by the Haemophilus influenzae bacteria. It is usually (but not always) associated with Haemophilus influenzae type b. Meningitis involves the inflammation of the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord. Haemophilus meningitis is characterized by symptoms including fever, nausea, sensitivity to light, headaches, stiff neck, anorexia, and seizures. Haemophilus meningitis can be deadly, but antibiotics are effective in treating the infection, especially when cases are caught early enough that the inflammation has not done a great deal of damage. Before the introduction of the Hib vaccine in 1985, Haemophilus meningitis was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children under the age of five. However, since the creation of the Hib vaccine, only two in every 100,000 children contract this type of meningitis. Five to ten ...
A lumbar puncture is done by positioning the person, usually lying on the side, applying local anesthetic, and inserting a needle into the dural sac (a sac around the spinal cord) to collect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). When this has been achieved, the "opening pressure" of the CSF is measured using a manometer. The pressure is normally between 6 and 18 cm water (cmH2O);[42] in bacterial meningitis the pressure is usually elevated.[8][41] In cryptococcal meningitis, intracranial pressure is markedly elevated.[45] The initial appearance of the fluid may prove an indication of the nature of the infection: cloudy CSF indicates higher levels of protein, white and red blood cells and/or bacteria, and therefore may suggest bacterial meningitis.[8] The CSF sample is examined for presence and types of white blood cells, red blood cells, protein content and glucose level.[8] Gram staining of the sample may demonstrate bacteria in bacterial meningitis, ...
7 days of age. After confirmation of GBS, penicillin alone should be used for the rest of the treatment, including the 14-day post-sterilization therapy. For suspected Gram-negative enteric(including E. coli) meningitis a combination of cefotaxime and aminoglycoside, usually gentamicin, is recommended. This treatment should last for 14 days after sterilization and then only cefotaxime for another 7 days creating a minimum of 21 days of therapy post-sterilization. L. meningitis should be treated with a combination of ampicillin and gentamicin because it is synergistic in vitro and provides more rapid bacterial clearance in animal models of infection. After sterilization of CSF, ampicillin should be stopped and gentamicin continued for another 14 days. S. pneumonia can be treated with a combination of penicillin and ampicillin. In cases of herpes simplex virus-derived meningitis, antiviral therapy (acyclovir or vidarabine) must be started ...
... inggih punika lelara amargi wonten infèksi ing meninges ingkang nutupi utek lan sungsum balung belakang.[1] Meninges inggih punika tiga lapisan jaringan ikat ingkang kawangun saking pia mèter (paling celak tumuju organ-organ sistem saraf), arachnoid, lan dura mèter (paling tebih saking utek lan sungsum balung belakang).[1] Meningitis saged dipunjalari déning manéka jinis organisme, kados ta virus, baktèri, utawi jamur ingkang nyebar mlebet wonten salebeting getih lan pindhah tumuju salebeting cuwèran utek ingkang saged njalari meninges aboh.[2] Meninges ingkang aboh punika saged njalari karusakan ingkang wigati ing saraf, utek, lan sungsum balung belakang.[2] ...
... (Maŋok) Paŋok ee tuɛny rëprëëp nyith bud. Aye kɔc kök col Maŋok. Abuöt kënë aye pïu nyith ku köu dhïöt. Pïu kä aye tö kaam rëprëëp Paiya ku Arakanoid. Paŋok aye käm thoy-nyïn apɛi col Bakteryia, Bairäth ku Pangäth bɛi tënë kɔc Paŋok Bakteryia (Bacterial Meningitis) Paŋok aye kuatëkuatic bacteryia bɛi ku akiithic apɛi. Tök ku ye yen miith akël nɔ̈k apɛi aye cɔl Heomophiluɛ Influenza. Dët yen rac apɛi aye acɔl Neisseria Meningitidis ku aye kuat Paŋok cɔl Meningococcus meningitis bëi tënë kɔc. Dët ye kek diäk ku aa bakteryia aya, aye cɔl Streptococcus Pneumoniae. kënë aye kuat Paŋok cɔl Pneumococus bëi. Mïth akël aye paŋok bakteryia yɔŋ arët Paŋok Bairäth (Viral Meningitis) Barääth aye käm kor nyïn apɛi; arëk bakteryia adït keek. Kuat bairääth gäk apɛi paŋok yïëk kɔc akïk: Herpes Simplex aye bairäth kɔc rɔp thook(thoŋ nhial ku piny, gëm ku liep); looi dëtök thokic, kaam amok tënë rööl; ku kaam ...
V primeru zvišanega CSF tlaka je moten pretok krvi v možganih. Ko pride do problemov v pretoku likvorja to zmoti ne samo likvor sam, temveč tudi stistljivost kraniospinalnega prostora in pretok krvi znotraj lobanje, s posledično ranljivostjo nevronov in glie. Kot je bilo že omenjeno sta cerebrospinalna tekočina in limfni sistem povezana. Primer patologije ki prikazuje odnose med motnjami cerebrospinalne tekočine je primer hidrocefalusa ter motenega CSF limfatičnega transporta. Likvor se lahko testira za diagnozo mnogih nevroloških bolezni, nujno ob sumu na meningitis in subarahnoidalno krvavitev ter je dobra dodatna preiskava ob sumu na multiplo sklerozo ter razne inflamatorne (vnetne) bolezni. To se dela z lumbalno funkcijo. Lumbalna punkcija je postopek, ko zdravnik z injekcijo vbode med dvema vretencema hrbtenice (tretjim in četrtim ledvenim vretencem) in s punkcijo odvzame vzorec cerebrospinalne tekočine-likvorja za nadaljnjo diagnostiko). Pacient ob tem leži na boku, skrčen s ...
V primeru zvišanega CSF tlaka je moten pretok krvi v možganih. Ko pride do problemov v pretoku likvorja to zmoti ne samo likvor sam, temveč tudi stistljivost kraniospinalnega prostora in pretok krvi znotraj lobanje, s posledično ranljivostjo nevronov in glie.. Kot je bilo že omenjeno sta cerebrospinalna tekočina in limfni sistem povezana. Primer patologije ki prikazuje odnose med motnjami cerebrospinalne tekočine je primer hidrocefalusa ter motenega CSF limfatičnega transporta. Likvor se lahko testira za diagnozo mnogih nevroloških bolezni, nujno ob sumu na meningitis in subarahnoidalno krvavitev ter je dobra dodatna preiskava ob sumu na multiplo sklerozo ter razne inflamatorne (vnetne) bolezni. To se dela z lumbalno funkcijo.. Lumbalna punkcija je postopek, ko zdravnik z injekcijo vbode med dvema vretencema hrbtenice (tretjim in četrtim ledvenim vretencem) in s punkcijo odvzame vzorec cerebrospinalne tekočine-likvorja za nadaljnjo diagnostiko). Pacient ob tem leži na boku, skrčen s ...
V primeru zvišanega CSF tlaka je moten pretok krvi v možganih. Ko pride do problemov v pretoku likvorja to zmoti ne samo likvor sam, temveč tudi stistljivost kraniospinalnega prostora in pretok krvi znotraj lobanje, s posledično ranljivostjo nevronov in glie. Kot je bilo že omenjeno sta cerebrospinalna tekočina in limfni sistem povezana. Primer patologije ki prikazuje odnose med motnjami cerebrospinalne tekočine je primer hidrocefalusa ter motenega CSF limfatičnega transporta. Likvor se lahko testira za diagnozo mnogih nevroloških bolezni, nujno ob sumu na meningitis in subarahnoidalno krvavitev ter je dobra dodatna preiskava ob sumu na multiplo sklerozo ter razne inflamatorne (vnetne) bolezni. To se dela z lumbalno funkcijo. Lumbalna punkcija je postopek, ko zdravnik z injekcijo vbode med dvema vretencema hrbtenice (tretjim in četrtim ledvenim vretencem) in s punkcijo odvzame vzorec cerebrospinalne tekočine-likvorja za nadaljnjo diagnostiko). Pacient ob tem leži na boku, skrčen s ...
The Quellung reaction, also called the Neufeld reaction, is a biochemical reaction in which antibodies bind to the bacterial capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Bacillus anthracis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. The antibody reaction allows these species to be visualized under a microscope. If the reaction is positive, the capsule becomes opaque and appears to enlarge. Quellung is the German word for "swelling" and describes the microscopic appearance of pneumococcal or other bacterial capsules after their polysaccharide antigen has combined with a specific antibody. The antibody usually comes from a bit of serum taken from an immunized laboratory animal. As a result of this combination, and precipitation of the large, complex molecule formed, the capsule appears to swell, because of increased surface tension, and its outlines become clearly ...
... , or pneumococcus, is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic (under aerobic conditions) or beta-hemolytic (under anaerobic conditions), facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus.[1] They are usually found in pairs (diplococci) and do not form spores and are nonmotile.[2] As a significant human pathogenic bacterium S. pneumoniae was recognized as a major cause of pneumonia in the late 19th century, and is the subject of many humoral immunity studies. S. pneumoniae resides asymptomatically in healthy carriers typically colonizing the respiratory tract, sinuses, and nasal cavity. However, in susceptible individuals with weaker immune systems, such as the elderly and young children, the bacterium may become pathogenic and spread to other locations to cause disease. It spreads by direct person-to-person contact via respiratory droplets and by autoinoculation in persons carrying the bacteria in their upper respiratory tracts.[3] It can ...
Natural bacterial transformation involves the transfer of DNA from one bacterium to another through the surrounding medium. Transformation is a complex developmental process requiring energy and is dependent on expression of numerous genes. In S. pneumoniae, at least 23 genes are required for transformation. For a bacterium to bind, take up, and recombine exogenous DNA into its chromosome, it must enter a special physiological state called competence. Competence in S. pneumoniae is induced by DNA-damaging agents such as mitomycin C, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (norfloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), and topoisomerase inhibitors.[16] Transformation protects S. pneumoniae against the bactericidal effect of mitomycin C.[17] Michod et al.[18] summarized evidence that induction of competence in S. pneumoniae is associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress and increased expression of the RecA protein, a key component of the ...
Pneumokoket mund të jenë virulente dhe jo virulente. Kjo varet nga shumë faktor. Faktor kyresor është prania ose jo e kapsulës polisakaridike komplekse e cila e rrethon qelizën pneumokoke. Gjatë invazionit kapsula është esenciale për determinimin e virulencës. Kapsula ndërhyn në procesin e fagocitozës duke parandaluar opsonizimin e qelizës bakterore nga komplementi C3b. Gjatë invazionit të sipërfaqëve mukozale, shtamet e kapsuluara janë 100,000 herë më virulente se sa shtamet e pa kapsuluara. Polisakaridi nuk është toksik dhe inflamator. Përveç kapsulës, pneumokoket kanë edhe përbërës të tjerë të rëndësishëm nga ana mjekësore. Muri qelizor i pneumokokeve është gjashtë shtresor dhe i ndërtuar nga peptidoglikani me acid teikoik i cili lidhet tek çdo i treti acid N-acetilmuramik. Acidet lipoteikoike janë kimikisht të ngjashëm me acidet teikoike por për dallim janë të lidhura në membranën qelizore të qelizës. Si acidi teikoik ashtu edhe acidi ...
Felmingham D, Reinert RR, Hirakata Y, Rodloff A: Increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the PROTEKT surveillance study, and compatative in vitro activity of the ketolide, telithromycin. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2002 Sep;50 Suppl S1:25-37. PMID 12239226 ...
any of a group of gram-positive bacteria, genus Streptococcus, some of which cause disease. Streptococci are spherical and ... Looking for Streptococcus suis? Find out information about Streptococcus suis. ... divide by fission, but they... Explanation of Streptococcus suis ... It can also cause meningitis and pneumonia. The S. pneumoniae ... Vaccination against pneumococcal pneumonia is recommended for very young children and older persons; the vaccine inoculates ...
Effect of introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. N Engl J Med 2006;354: ... meningitis or empyema and a pneumonia code in another diagnosis field.15 19 Discharge diagnosis and procedure codes, including ... Changing epidemiology of pneumococcal meningitis after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the United States ... Decline in pneumonia admissions after routine childhood immunisation with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the USA: a time- ...
These bacteria are responsible for causing invasive diseases such as pneumonia, blood poisoning and meningitis. The vaccine ... Synflorix is a pneumococcal vaccine that contains extracts from 10 of the most common types of Streptococcus pneumoniae ... Synflorix is a pneumococcal vaccine that contains extracts from 10 of the most common types of Streptococcus pneumoniae ... Synflorix is a pneumococcal vaccine that contains extracts from 10 of the most common types of Streptococcus pneumoniae ...
... pneumoniae provide serotype-specific protection against pneumococcal infections. Pneumococcal vaccines are designed to cover ... Serious pneumococcal infections include pneumonia, meningitis and febrile bacteraemia; otitis media, sinusitis and bronchitis ... it is estimated that about one million children die of pneumococcal disease every year. Streptococcus pneumoniae is an ... Pneumococcal (conjugate) vaccines are prequalified for procurement by UN organization.. * Vaccine quality-prequalified vaccines ...
... pneumococcal) disease, including antibiotics, resources and protocols, the global pneumococcal strain bank, and GPS project. ... Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal) disease can range from ear and sinus infections to pneumonia, meningitis, and ... Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal disease in children and adults.. lab icon ... Streptococcus Laboratory Home * Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci) ...
Streptococcus pneumoniae is the bacterium responsible for pneumococcal disease, a leading cause of childhood pneumonia, ... Learn about the Meningitis Vaccine Projectexternal icon *Read the 2011 WHO Position Paper on meningococcal vaccines pdf icon[ ... vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), rotavirus (RV) vaccine, and rubella ... such as cholera vaccine, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, yellow fever vaccine, and typhoid vaccine ...
To assess the vaccines effectiveness for preventing pneumonia, we analyzed rates of hospitalization among children 2-24 months ... In 2010, Brazil introduced a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) to its National Immunization Program. ... Of the 197,975 hospitalizations analyzed, 30% were for pneumonia. Significant declines in hospitalizations for pneumonia were ... of age who had pneumonia from all causes from January 2005 through August 2011. We used data from the National Hospitalization ...
... genus Streptococcus, some of which cause disease. Streptococci are spherical and divide by fission, but they remain attached ... streptococcus (strĕp´təkŏk´əs), any of a group of gram-positive bacteria, ... It can also cause meningitis and pneumonia. The S. pneumoniae diseases are sometimes referred to as pneumococcal diseases. The ... Vaccination against pneumococcal pneumonia is recommended for very young children and older persons; the vaccine inoculates ...
Today, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the leading causes of bacterial meningitis. ... Before the 1990s, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, but new vaccines being ... Meningitis is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Knowing whether meningitis is caused by a virus or bacterium is ... For bacterial meningitis, it is also important to know which type of bacteria is causing the meningitis because antibiotics can ...
Talk to your healthcare professional to make sure you are up to date on these and other recommended vaccines. ... There are two vaccines that provide protection against pneumococcal disease. ... Pneumococcal meningitis kills about 1 out of 6 who get it.. Pneumococcal disease is an infection caused by Streptococcus ... Pneumococcal pneumonia kills about 1 out of 20 who get it.. •Pneumococcal bacteremia kills about 1 out of 6 who get it.. • ...
Pneumococcal Vaccination. The pneumococcal vaccine protects against infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. These ... pneumonia. *meningitis. Infections can be quite serious. For example, meningitis can cause severe complications including:. * ... There are currently two pneumococcal vaccines used in the United States. PCV13. The PCV13 (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) ... The PPSV (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) protects against 23 types of bacteria. Its recommended for all adults over 65 ...
... vaccine have been highly effective in reducing pneumonia and other invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae ... Pneumococcal Disease, Pneumonia, Research, Sepsis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Throat, Vaccine ... PCV vaccines linked to emergence of new strains causing meningitis. The PCV7 and PCV13 vaccines - targeting seven and thirteen ... Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been highly effective in reducing pneumonia and other invasive infections caused by ...
Although the etiology of the outbreak remains unclear, the identification of both S. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae among ... Among Alpha and Hotel Company trainees, the average weekly attack rates of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia were 1.4% and 1.2 ... incidence of pneumonia in the outbreak battalion and should be considered as possible etiologies in outbreaks of pneumonia in ... Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified from 31% of specimens collected from Alpha Company trainees with respiratory symptoms. ...
Pneumococcal disease is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, and includes non-invasive illnesses like pneumonia, sinusitis, and ... announced that its investigational 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was "noninferior" to a currently available 13- ... It also causes invasive diseases such as bacteremia, bacteremic pneumonia, and meningitis. ... valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in healthy babies 6 to 12 weeks of age. Phase II study, called V114-008, met its primary ...
Finally, there is pneumococcal disease, a bacterial infection caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which can cause pneumonia, ... Two main types of pneumococcal vaccine available for older adults - the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) ... In the US alone, pneumococcal pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and meningitis kill tens of thousands of people each year, ... Another vaccine, called Td, protects against tetanus and diphtheria, but not pertussis. A Td booster should be given every ten ...
Streptococcus pneumoniae. Conjugate vaccine. Additional relevant MeSH terms: Pneumonia. Meningitis. Pneumococcal Infections. ... Pneumonia Meningitis Invasive Pneumococcal Disease HIV Biological: 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar) Phase 4 ... Vaccines. Immunoglobulins. Antibodies. Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine. Immunologic Factors. Physiological Effects ... We measured pneumococcal capsular specific immunoglobulin responses to 7-valent conjugate vaccine in both lung fluid and serum ...
... such as pneumonia, blood poisoning (septicaemia) and meningitis, including when pneumococcal vaccine is recommended and ... Everything you need to know about the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine given to prevent diseases caused by pneumococcal ... The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) contains extracts from 23 of the most common types of Streptococcus pneumoniae ... Can I have the pneumococcal vaccine with other vaccines or medicines?. You should not have this pneumococcal vaccine on the ...
Pneumococcal disease is caused by a bacterium called Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus). The bacteria enter the body ... It can also cause serious pneumococcal diseases including severe bacterial pneumonia, sepsis (blood poisoning) or meningitis ( ... pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV, the type of vaccine used for childhood pneumococcal vaccination) and pneumococcal ... pneumococcal disease. Disease caused by the bacterial infection Streptococcus pneumoniae. In most people, it causes relatively ...
Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main cause of community-acquired pneumonia, bacteraemia and bacterial meningitis in adults in ... Streptococcus pneumoniae: epidemiology and risk factors, evolution of antimicrobial resistance, and impact of vaccines. Curr ... 3 pneumonia specified as S pneumoniae (J13), septicaemia due to S pneumoniae (A40.3) and pneumococcal meningitis (G00.1). ... There was no separate code for pneumococcal pneumonia in the earlier versions of ICD because pneumococcal pneumonia and lobar ...
Invasive pneumococcal disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae can result in life-threatening pneumonia, meningitis and ... The vaccine for the 2014 influenza season is now available. This year, the vaccine has been updated with two new strains, as ... Zostavax vaccine: now fully subsidised. Zostavax is a herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine that will become fully subsidised from 1 ... The management of community acquired pneumonia. Pneumonia is a significant cause of hospitalisation and mortality among both ...
It causes pneumonia along with other pneumococcal infections some of which include bacterial meningitis, sinusitis, and otitis ... The two vaccines widely used are polysaccharide vaccine (23-valent polysaccharide vaccine) and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine ( ... Current pneumococcal vaccines, Polysaccharide (23-valent) PS vaccine and conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) cover the most common and ... the role of conjugate vaccines. Vaccine 18. Pletz. MW, Maus U, Krug N, Welte T and Lode H. 2008 Pneumococcal vaccines: ...
... a bacterium that frequently causes meningitis and pneumonia in the elderly, and people with chronic illnesses. Pneumococcal ... Pneumococcal vaccine is an immunization against Streptococcus pneumoniae, ... Pneumococcal vaccine is an immunization against Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium that frequently causes meningitis and ... pneumonia in the elderly, and people with chronic illnesses. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounts for 10% to 25% of all pneumonias. ...
Streptococcus pneumoniae. Pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. ... Q fever vaccine. Q-Vax Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib). Epiglottitis, meningitis, pneumonia. Hib vaccine. Hiberix, Pentacel ... Rotavirus vaccine. Rotateq, Rotarix Rubella virus. Rubella. Rubella vaccine, MMR vaccine, MMRV vaccine. Priorix, MMR II, ... Japanese encephalitis vaccine. Ixiaro, Jespect, Imojev Measles virus. Measles. Measles vaccine, MMR vaccine, MMRV vaccine. ...
This vaccine is one of 3 vaccines now used in Australia to combat diseases that can all cause meningitis, pneumonia, ... Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pneumococcal vaccine) - 2005. While these bacteria can be linked with illnesses such as meningitis, ... pneumonia, and septicaemia (blood poisoning).. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is one of 3 vaccines now used in Australia to ... Vaccine decisions. The vaccine designed to protect against Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria is known as the "pneumococcal ...
Pneumonococcal vaccine can help protect your child against meningitis, bacteremic pneumonia, bacteremia, and sepsis. Learn more ... pneumonia vaccine, can help protect your child against certain diseases caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae, ... As with other vaccines, the pneumococcal vaccine may not protect 100% of people who have the vaccine, and it may cause side ... Your pneumococcal vaccine options There are important differences between the two pneumococcal vaccines for adults available in ...