Urticaria: A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.Urticaria Pigmentosa: The most common form of cutaneous mastocytosis (MASTOCYTOSIS, CUTANEOUS) that occurs primarily in children. It is characterized by the multiple small reddish-brown pigmented pruritic macules and papules.Angioedema: Swelling involving the deep DERMIS, subcutaneous, or submucosal tissues, representing localized EDEMA. Angioedema often occurs in the face, lips, tongue, and larynx.Histamine H1 Antagonists, Non-Sedating: A class of non-sedating drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors (DRUG INVERSE AGONISM), thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. These antihistamines represent a heterogenous group of compounds with differing chemical structures, adverse effects, distribution, and metabolism. Compared to the early (first generation) antihistamines, these non-sedating antihistamines have greater receptor specificity, lower penetration of BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER, and are less likely to cause drowsiness or psychomotor impairment.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Histamine H1 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.Drug Hypersensitivity: Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Anaphylaxis: An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.Histamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.Anti-Allergic Agents: Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Cetirizine: A potent second-generation histamine H1 antagonist that is effective in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, chronic urticaria, and pollen-induced asthma. Unlike many traditional antihistamines, it does not cause drowsiness or anticholinergic side effects.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Loratadine: A second-generation histamine H1 receptor antagonist used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. Unlike most classical antihistamines (HISTAMINE H1 ANTAGONISTS) it lacks central nervous system depressing effects such as drowsiness.Anisakiasis: Infection with roundworms of the genus ANISAKIS. Human infection results from the consumption of fish harboring roundworm larvae. The worms may cause acute NAUSEA; VOMITING; or penetrate into the wall of the DIGESTIVE TRACT where they give rise to EOSINOPHILIC GRANULOMA in the STOMACH; INTESTINES; or the OMENTUM.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Cat's Claw: A vine (Uncaria tomentosa) indigenous to the Amazon rainforest whose name is derived from its hook-like thorns. It contains oxindole alkaloids and glycosides and has many medicinal uses.Tourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Basophil Degranulation Test: An in vitro test used in the diagnosis of allergies including drug hypersensitivity. The allergen is added to the patient's white blood cells and the subsequent histamine release is measured.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Sunlight: Irradiation directly from the sun.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Hemoglobin J: A group of abnormal hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic characteristics. They have faster electrophoretic mobility and different amino acid substitutions in either the alpha or beta chains than normal adult hemoglobin. Some of the variants produce hematologic abnormalities, others result in no clinical disorders.Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Skin DiseasesElectronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.ReadingFood Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Angioedemas, Hereditary: Inherited disorders that are characterized by subcutaneous and submucosal EDEMA in the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT and GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Hereditary Angioedema Types I and II: Forms of hereditary angioedema that occur due to mutations in the gene for COMPLEMENT C1 INHIBITOR PROTEIN. Type I hereditary angioedema is associated with reduced serum levels of complement C1 inhibitor protein. Type II hereditary angioedema is associated with the production of a non-functional complement C1 inhibitor protein.Complement C1 Inhibitor Protein: An endogenous 105-kDa plasma glycoprotein produced primarily by the LIVER and MONOCYTES. It inhibits a broad spectrum of proteases, including the COMPLEMENT C1R and the COMPLEMENT C1S proteases of the CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY, and the MANNOSE-BINDING PROTEIN-ASSOCIATED SERINE PROTEASES. C1-INH-deficient individuals suffer from HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA TYPES I AND II.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Complement C1 Inactivator Proteins: Serum proteins that inhibit, antagonize, or inactivate COMPLEMENT C1 or its subunits.Keratoderma, Palmoplantar: Group of mostly hereditary disorders characterized by thickening of the palms and soles as a result of excessive keratin formation leading to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum (hyperkeratosis).Carcinoma, Merkel Cell: A carcinoma arising from MERKEL CELLS located in the basal layer of the epidermis and occurring most commonly as a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Merkel cells are tactile cells of neuroectodermal origin and histologically show neurosecretory granules. The skin of the head and neck are a common site of Merkel cell carcinoma, occurring generally in elderly patients. (Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1245)Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Cyproheptadine: A serotonin antagonist and a histamine H1 blocker used as antipruritic, appetite stimulant, antiallergic, and for the post-gastrectomy dumping syndrome, etc.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)

Repeated hand urticaria due to contact with fishfood. (1/402)

BACKGROUND: The etiology of urticaria is often difficult to determine. However, in case of repeated circumstance-connected urticaria, the reason may be easily clarifyable. CASE: A 51-year-old healthy woman repeatedly experienced occupational hand urticaria when handling fish food. An unexpected reason for the urticaria was found in that the fishfood contained histamine as a "contaminant". CONCLUSIONS: In fishfood batches, biological degradation can produce histamine and possibly other toxic substances that can lead to occupational health problems.  (+info)

Genetic linkage of the Muckle-Wells syndrome to chromosome 1q44. (2/402)

The Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is a hereditary inflammatory disorder characterized by acute febrile inflammatory episodes comprising abdominal pain, arthritis, and urticaria. Progressive nerve deafness develops subsequently, and, after several years, the disease is complicated by multiorgan AA-type amyloidosis (i.e., amyloidosis derived from the inflammatory serum amyloid-associated protein) (MIM 191900) with renal involvement and end-stage renal failure. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant, but some sporadic cases have also been described. No specific laboratory findings have been reported. The genetic basis of MWS is unknown. Using a genomewide search strategy in three families, we identified the locus responsible for MWS, at chromosome 1q44. Our results indicate that the gene is located within a 13.9-cM region between markers D1S2811 and D1S2882, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 4. 66 (recombination fraction.00) at D1S2836 when full penetrance is assumed. Further identification of the specific gene that is responsible for MWS will therefore provide the first biological element for characterizing MWS, other than doing so on the basis of its variable clinical expression.  (+info)

Acquired lipoprotein lipase deficiency associated with chronic urticaria. A new etiology for type I hyperlipoproteinemia. (3/402)

Type I hyperlipoproteinemia (type I HLP) is a rare disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by fasting chylomicronemia and reduced postheparin plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity. Most cases of type I HLP are due to genetic defects in the LPL gene or in its activator, the apolipoprotein CII gene. Several cases of acquired type I HLP have also been described in the course of autoimmune diseases due to the presence of circulating inhibitors of LPL. Here we report a case of type I HLP due to a transient defect of LPL activity during puberty associated with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). The absence of any circulating LPL inhibitor in plasma during the disease was demonstrated. The LPL genotype showed that the patient was heterozygous for the D9N variant. This mutation, previously described, can explain only minor defects in the LPL activity. The presence of HLP just after the onset of CIU, and the elevation of the LPL activity with remission of the HLP when the patient recovered from CIU, indicate that type I HLP was caused by CIU. In summary, we report a new etiology for type I HLP - a transient decrease in LPL activity associated with CIU and with absence of circulating inhibitors. This is the first description of this association, which suggests a new mechanism for type I HLP.  (+info)

Inhibition of aminopeptidase P potentiates wheal response to bradykinin in angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-treated humans. (4/402)

Bradykinin is a nonapeptide that contributes to the cardioprotective effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. During ACE inhibition, an increased proportion of bradykinin is degraded through non-ACE pathways. Studies in animals suggest that aminopeptidase P (EC 3.4.11.9) may contribute to the metabolism of bradykinin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the contribution of aminopeptidase P to the degradation of bradykinin in humans in the presence and absence of ACE inhibition. To do this, we measured the wheal response to intradermal injection of bradykinin (0, 1, or 10 nicrog) in the presence or absence of intradermal administration of the specific aminopeptidase P inhibitor apstatin (5 or 10 microg) and oral administration of the ACE inhibitor quinapril (10 mg) in six healthy subjects. Both bradykinin (ANOVA; F = 101.18, P <.001) and apstatin alone (F = 7.01, P =.049) caused a wheal of dose-dependent size. There was no significant interaction between apstatin and bradykinin (F = 4.94, P =.175). Pretreatment with 10 mg of quinapril significantly shifted the dose-response curve for bradykinin to the left (effect of quinapril; F = 77.96, P <.001) and there was significant interaction between quinapril and bradykinin (F = 7.82, P =.041). The effect of quinapril was significantly potentiated by coinjection of 10 microg of apstatin (effect of apstatin; F = 21.60, P =.006), such that there was significant interactive effect of quinapril and apstatin (F = 20.83, P =.006) on the wheal response to bradykinin. Collectively, these data suggest that aminopeptidase P plays a minor role in the degradation of bradykinin in human skin in the absence of ACE inhibition but contributes significantly to the degradation of bradykinin in the presence of ACE inhibition.  (+info)

Pharmacodynamic interaction of eltanolone and alfentanil during lower abdominal surgery in female patients. (5/402)

We have studied the influence of eltanolone on intraoperative alfentanil requirements in 18 female patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery receiving target-controlled infusions of eltanolone and alfentanil. While target concentrations of eltanolone were maintained constant, target concentrations of alfentanil changed in response to the presence or absence of responses. With serum eltanolone concentrations increasing from 500 to 2000 ng ml-1, the EC50 of alfentanil for suppression of responses to surgical stimulation decreased from 233 to 9 ng ml-1. The findings suggest that the interaction between eltanolone and alfentanil is synergistic.  (+info)

Additive-induced urticaria: experience with monosodium glutamate (MSG). (6/402)

In patients with chronic urticaria, the incidence of reactions to any additives, including monosodium glutamate (MSG), is unknown. Although many studies have investigated the association of additives and urticaria, most have been poorly designed. This study sought to determine the prevalence of reactions to additives, including MSG, in patients with chronic urticaria using a rigorous protocol. We studied 65 subjects (44 women, 21 men; ages 14-67). All had urticaria for >6 wk without discernible etiology. Subjects with active urticaria were studied while they were taking the lowest effective dose of antihistamine. Screening challenges to the 11 additives most commonly associated with exacerbations of chronic idiopathic urticaria were performed in a single-blind fashion. The dose of MSG given was 2500 mg. Skin scores were obtained to determine a positive reaction in an objective manner. Subjects with a positive screening challenge were rechallenged (at least 2 wk later) with a double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol as in-patients in our General Clinical Research Center. Two subjects had positive single-blind, placebo-controlled challenges, but neither had a positive double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge. We conclude, with 95% confidence, that MSG is an unusual (<3% at most) exacerbant of chronic idiopathic urticaria.  (+info)

Identification of a locus on chromosome 1q44 for familial cold urticaria. (7/402)

Familial cold urticaria (FCU) is a rare autosomal dominant inflammatory disorder characterized by intermittent episodes of rash with fever, arthralgias, conjunctivitis, and leukocytosis. These symptoms develop after generalized exposure to cold. Some individuals with FCU also develop late-onset reactive renal amyloidosis, which is consistent with Muckle-Wells syndrome. By analyzing individuals with FCU from five families, we identified linkage to chromosome 1q44. Two-point linkage analysis revealed a maximum LOD score (Zmax) of 8.13 (recombination fraction 0) for marker D1S2836; multipoint linkage analysis identified a Zmax of 10. 92 in the same region; and haplotype analysis defined a 10.5-cM region between markers D1S423 and D1S2682. Muckle-Wells syndrome was recently linked to chromosome 1q44, which suggests that the two disorders may be linked to the same locus.  (+info)

Medical surveillance of allergy in laboratory animal handlers. (8/402)

Allergic disease is a serious occupational health concern for individuals who have contact with laboratory animals. The principal respiratory symptoms include allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthma. Urticaria (" hives") is the most common skin manifestation. The overall prevalence of allergic disease among laboratory animal handlers is about 23%, and respiratory allergy is much more common than skin allergy. Various studies have found annual incidence rates ranging from 2% to 12%. Prevention of animal allergy depends on control of allergenic material in the work environment. Personal protective equipment such as air filtering respirators should be used in addition to the other exposure control technologies where conditions require. Pre-placement evaluation and periodic medical surveillance of workers are important pieces of the overall occupational health program. The emphasis of these medical evaluations should be on counseling and early disease detection. The article gives recommendations for the content of the medical evaluations.  (+info)

  • Some research has suggested that the use antihistamines and antagonist in synergy are better for the treatment of physical urticarias. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the focus of treatment for physical urticaria has been on characterizing the effectiveness of antihistamines rather than analysis of receptor binding or the pathomechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Included in this management guideline are clinical classification, aetiology, diagnosis, investigations, treatment guidance with special sections on children with urticaria and the use of antihistamines in women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. (bsaci.org)
  • Cold contact urticaria (CCU) is a frequent form of physical urticaria that is characterized by the development of wheal and flare type skin reactions due to the release of histamine and other proinflammatory mast cell mediators following exposure of the skin to cold. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Chronic urticaria (CU) involves release of histamine from mast cells and/or basophils, which in turn promotes the classic inflammatory cascade. (jddonline.com)
  • To cure at least some patients from quality-of-life reducing chronic urticaria, it seems worthwhile to eradicate H pylori in all patients with chronic urticarial and H pylori infection. (h-pylori-symptoms.com)
  • They discuss the various aspects of management related to the rational and evidence-based use of this drug, including candidate population, monitoring tools (Urticaria Activity Score 7 [UASand Urticarial Control Test [UCT]), starting dose and dose adjustment as well as the definition of response and response time. (actasdermo.org)
  • See 'Chronic urticaria: Standard management and patient education' and 'Chronic urticaria: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and natural history' . (uptodate.com)
  • Levocetirizine is a new single-isomer antihistamine with a proven efficacy on chronic urticaria as documented in two recent clinical studies, which have included effectiveness and quality of life assessments. (jddonline.com)
  • Mediators secreted by mast cells and basophils correlate with clinical severity in asthma, chronic urticaria, anaphylaxis, and other diseases. (pubfacts.com)
  • Existing guidelines do not offer a quick, efficient alternative to the patient's recollection of relevant clinical features during anamnesis and physical examination for chronic urticaria (CU). This study aimed to identify specific items reflecting the main characteristics of CU that should be included in a comprehensive medical history for patients with CU. We also aimed to clarify possible eliciting factors for CU to support accurate diagnosis of the disease. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • This review summarizes current guidelines for the management and novel insights in the pathogenesis of urticaria with special focus on their impact on clinical praxis. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Dermatographic urticaria (also known as dermatographism or "skin writing") is marked by the appearance of weals or welts on the skin as a result of scratching or firm stroking of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Or can also be due to: food allergies atopy Antihistamine agents are the typically prescribed drug for the treatment of physical urticaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factitious Urticaria (dermographism): Treatment by Cimetidine and Chlorpheniramine in a Randomized Double-blind Study. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you have cold urticaria because of an underlying health problem, you may need medications or other treatment for that condition as well. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Colchicine is an anti-inflammatory agent that has been used for decades for the treatment of various diseases including gout, familial Mediterranean fever and pericarditis and in recent years for dermatological indications including chronic urticaria, cutaneous vasculitis and psoriasis. (pubfacts.com)
  • Results were used to inform the 2017 update of "The EAACI/GALEN/EDF/WAO Guideline for the definition, classification, diagnosis and management of Urticaria. (pubfacts.com)
  • This type of urticaria is uncommon and occurs in only 0.1% of the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its a type of urticaria ( hives ) triggered by sun's uv rays. (healthtap.com)
  • Urticaria is a very frequent skin condition characterised by transient wheal and flare type skin reactions associated with severe pruritus. (clinicaltrials.gov)
Urticaria
Urticaria (netdoctor.co.uk)
Acute Urticaria: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology
Acute Urticaria: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
Cold urticaria - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic
Cold urticaria - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic (mayoclinic.org)
Solar urticaria
Solar urticaria (netdoctor.co.uk)
Chronic spontaneous urticaria | CMAJ
Chronic spontaneous urticaria | CMAJ (cmaj.ca)
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Image: Urticaria - Merck Manuals Professional Edition (merckmanuals.com)
What is the prevalence of urticaria in hepatitis C (Hep C)?
What is the prevalence of urticaria in hepatitis C (Hep C)? (medscape.com)
IgE Mediated Autoallergy against Thyroid Peroxidase - A Novel Pathomechanism of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria?
IgE Mediated Autoallergy against Thyroid Peroxidase - A Novel Pathomechanism of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria? (journals.plos.org)
Allergy Medicine, Testing, Symptoms & Types
Allergy Medicine, Testing, Symptoms & Types (medicinenet.com)
ADGRE2 gene: MedlinePlus Genetics
ADGRE2 gene: MedlinePlus Genetics (medlineplus.gov)
Skin rash Archives - familydoctor.org
Skin rash Archives - familydoctor.org (familydoctor.org)
DiphenhydrAMINE (Systemic) (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com
DiphenhydrAMINE (Systemic) (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com (drugs.com)
CiteSeerX - Citation Query Does culture influence what and how we think? Effects of priming individualism and collectivism.
CiteSeerX - Citation Query Does culture influence what and how we think? Effects of priming individualism and collectivism. (citeseer.ist.psu.edu)
Skin rash: 68 pictures, causes, and treatments
Skin rash: 68 pictures, causes, and treatments (medicalnewstoday.com)
Hives (urticaria): Causes, treatment, and symptoms
Hives (urticaria): Causes, treatment, and symptoms (medicalnewstoday.com)
Hives (Urticaria & Angioedema) Center by MedicineNet.com
Hives (Urticaria & Angioedema) Center by MedicineNet.com (medicinenet.com)
Urticaria/Angioedema | SpringerLink
Urticaria/Angioedema | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Chronic Urticaria: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology
Chronic Urticaria: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
CDC - Skin- Occupational Dermatoses Slides 51 to 55 - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic
CDC - Skin- Occupational Dermatoses Slides 51 to 55 - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic (cdc.gov)
Causes Of Enlarged Prostate
Causes Of Enlarged Prostate (s3.amazonaws.com)
Solar Urticaria Medication: Antihistamines, 2nd Generation, Antimalarials, Histamine H2-Receptor Antagonists
Solar Urticaria Medication: Antihistamines, 2nd Generation, Antimalarials, Histamine H2-Receptor Antagonists (emedicine.medscape.com)
Clarinex (Desloratadine): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Clarinex (Desloratadine): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Urticaria Differential Diagnoses
Urticaria Differential Diagnoses (emedicine.medscape.com)
Famotidine (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com
Famotidine (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com (drugs.com)
Allegra - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Allegra - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations: Many Skin Clue to
Unfold Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy
Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations: Many Skin Clue to Unfold Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy (hindawi.com)
Allergy and Asthma Definitions | Glossary & Terms | ACAAI Public Website
Allergy and Asthma Definitions | Glossary & Terms | ACAAI Public Website (acaai.org)
Pressure Urticaria Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Pharmacologic Therapy
Pressure Urticaria Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Pharmacologic Therapy (emedicine.medscape.com)
Yes, You Can Be Allergic to Cold Weather - How to Treat Symptoms
Yes, You Can Be Allergic to Cold Weather - How to Treat Symptoms (menshealth.com)
Everything You Need to Know About Chronic Hives | HealthCentral
Everything You Need to Know About Chronic Hives | HealthCentral (healthcentral.com)
Is Your Rash Caused by Hepatitis C?
Is Your Rash Caused by Hepatitis C? (healthline.com)
CDC - Skin- Occupational Dermatoses Slides 129 to 135 - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic
CDC - Skin- Occupational Dermatoses Slides 129 to 135 - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic (cdc.gov)
Itchy After Cycling | LIVESTRONG.COM
Itchy After Cycling | LIVESTRONG.COM (livestrong.com)
Asthma-Related Skin Rashes | LIVESTRONG.COM
Asthma-Related Skin Rashes | LIVESTRONG.COM (livestrong.com)
Collection Details : Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association
Collection Details : Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association (journals.lww.com)
Ligelizumab May Improve Response in Chronic Urticaria
Ligelizumab May Improve Response in Chronic Urticaria (medscape.com)
Loratadine Dosage Guide with Precautions - Drugs.com
Loratadine Dosage Guide with Precautions - Drugs.com (drugs.com)
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Skin & Hair - myDr.com.au (mydr.com.au)
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10 Allergies You Never Thought Could Exist - Listverse (listverse.com)
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Types Of Rashes | HubPages (hubpages.com)
Frontiers | Role of the Pruritic Cytokine IL-31 in Autoimmune Skin Diseases | Immunology
Frontiers | Role of the Pruritic Cytokine IL-31 in Autoimmune Skin Diseases | Immunology (frontiersin.org)
Hives | Denver Health
Hives | Denver Health (denverhealth.org)
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Kidshealth: Word! Urticaria | Akron Children's Hospital (akronchildrens.org)
Carbinoxamine Dosage Guide with Precautions - Drugs.com
Carbinoxamine Dosage Guide with Precautions - Drugs.com (drugs.com)
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Vagina-itch-since-a-few-days-hives-urticaria-urticaria | Symptomchecker (symptomchecker.info)
DailyMed - LEVOCETIRIZINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE solution
DailyMed - LEVOCETIRIZINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE solution (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov)
Toddler allergic to water gets blisters every time she cries, sweats, or has a shower | Metro News
Toddler allergic to water gets blisters every time she cries, sweats, or has a shower | Metro News (metro.co.uk)
12 Causes of Itchy Legs | HubPages
12 Causes of Itchy Legs | HubPages (hubpages.com)