The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.
The bones of the upper and lower ARM. They include the CLAVICLE and SCAPULA.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.
General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.
DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS of an upper extremity vein (e.g., AXILLARY VEIN; SUBCLAVIAN VEIN; and JUGULAR VEINS). It is associated with mechanical factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Primary) secondary to other anatomic factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Secondary). Symptoms may include sudden onset of pain, warmth, redness, blueness, and swelling in the arm.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.
Congenital structural abnormalities of the UPPER EXTREMITY.
Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.
Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.
General or unspecified injuries to the hand.
Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.
Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.
The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.
The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.
The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.
Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.
The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.
A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.
A neurovascular syndrome associated with compression of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS; SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY; and SUBCLAVIAN VEIN at the superior thoracic outlet. This may result from a variety of anomalies such as a CERVICAL RIB, anomalous fascial bands, and abnormalities of the origin or insertion of the anterior or medial scalene muscles. Clinical features may include pain in the shoulder and neck region which radiates into the arm, PARESIS or PARALYSIS of brachial plexus innervated muscles, PARESTHESIA, loss of sensation, reduction of arterial pulses in the affected extremity, ISCHEMIA, and EDEMA. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp214-5).
The continuation of the subclavian artery; it distributes over the upper limb, axilla, chest and shoulder.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A system in which the functions of the man and the machine are interrelated and necessary for the operation of the system.
The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.
Force exerted when gripping or grasping.
Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.
Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.
Edema due to obstruction of lymph vessels or disorders of the lymph nodes.
A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
Chairs mounted on wheels and designed to be propelled by the occupant.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).
General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.
Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
Performance of complex motor acts.
Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.
The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.
Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm backward or downward. When referring to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements in the tarsal and metatarsal joints (turning the foot up and in toward the midline of the body).
General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.
The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.
The position or attitude of the body.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
Movement of a body part initiated and maintained by a mechanical or electrical device to restore normal range of motion to joints, muscles, or tendons after surgery, prosthesis implantation, contracture flexion, or long immobilization.
Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.
A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.
A weapon designed to explode when deployed. It frequently refers to a hollow case filled with EXPLOSIVE AGENTS.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.
Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.
The portion of the leg in humans and other animals found between the HIP and KNEE.
Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
Wooden or metal staffs designed to aid a person in walking. (UMDNS,1999)
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.
Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.
Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".
A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
The segment of GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the ESOPHAGUS; the STOMACH; and the DUODENUM.
A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)
Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.
Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.
A form of muscle hypertonia associated with upper MOTOR NEURON DISEASE. Resistance to passive stretch of a spastic muscle results in minimal initial resistance (a "free interval") followed by an incremental increase in muscle tone. Tone increases in proportion to the velocity of stretch. Spasticity is usually accompanied by HYPERREFLEXIA and variable degrees of MUSCLE WEAKNESS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p54)
A syndrome associated with inflammation of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical features include severe pain in the shoulder region which may be accompanied by MUSCLE WEAKNESS and loss of sensation in the upper extremity. This condition may be associated with VIRUS DISEASES; IMMUNIZATION; SURGERY; heroin use (see HEROIN DEPENDENCE); and other conditions. The term brachial neuralgia generally refers to pain associated with brachial plexus injury. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1355-6)
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
The bones of the upper and lower LEG. They include the PELVIC BONES.
A heterogeneous group of nonprogressive motor disorders caused by chronic brain injuries that originate in the prenatal period, perinatal period, or first few years of life. The four major subtypes are spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed cerebral palsy, with spastic forms being the most common. The motor disorder may range from difficulties with fine motor control to severe spasticity (see MUSCLE SPASTICITY) in all limbs. Spastic diplegia (Little disease) is the most common subtype, and is characterized by spasticity that is more prominent in the legs than in the arms. Pathologically, this condition may be associated with LEUKOMALACIA, PERIVENTRICULAR. (From Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Aug;40(8):520-7)
The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.
A game whose object is to sink a ball into each of 9 or 18 successive holes on a golf course using as few strokes as possible.
Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. The fibers of the musculocutaneous nerve originate in the lower cervical spinal cord (usually C5 to C7), travel via the lateral cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to the upper arm, elbow, and forearm.
The continuation of the axillary artery; it branches into the radial and ulnar arteries.
Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.
A group of recessively inherited diseases that feature progressive muscular atrophy and hypotonia. They are classified as type I (Werdnig-Hoffman disease), type II (intermediate form), and type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease). Type I is fatal in infancy, type II has a late infantile onset and is associated with survival into the second or third decade. Type III has its onset in childhood, and is slowly progressive. (J Med Genet 1996 Apr:33(4):281-3)
The therapy technique of providing the status of one's own AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM function (e.g., skin temperature, heartbeats, brain waves) as visual or auditory feedback in order to self-control related conditions (e.g., hypertension, migraine headaches).
Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.
A game played by two or four players with rackets and an elastic ball on a level court divided by a low net.
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the hand occurring at or before birth.
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.
Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.
Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans the fibers of the radial nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C5 to T1), travel via the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, and supply motor innervation to extensor muscles of the arm and cutaneous sensory fibers to extensor regions of the arm and hand.
Breaks in bones.
Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.
Ulnar neuropathies caused by mechanical compression of the nerve at any location from its origin at the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its terminations in the hand. Common sites of compression include the retroepicondylar groove, cubital tunnel at the elbow (CUBITAL TUNNEL SYNDROME), and Guyon's canal at the wrist. Clinical features depend on the site of injury, but may include weakness or paralysis of wrist flexion, finger flexion, and ulnar innervated intrinsic hand muscles, and impaired sensation over the ulnar aspect of the hand, fifth finger, and ulnar half of the ring finger. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p43)
Systematic physical exercise. This includes calisthenics, a system of light gymnastics for promoting strength and grace of carriage.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).
Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.
Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.
The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A clinically significant reduction in blood supply to the BRAIN STEM and CEREBELLUM (i.e., VERTEBROBASILAR INSUFFICIENCY) resulting from reversal of blood flow through the VERTEBRAL ARTERY from occlusion or stenosis of the proximal subclavian or brachiocephalic artery. Common symptoms include VERTIGO; SYNCOPE; and INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION of the involved upper extremity. Subclavian steal may also occur in asymptomatic individuals. (From J Cardiovasc Surg 1994;35(1):11-4; Acta Neurol Scand 1994;90(3):174-8)
Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.
'Amputee' is a medical term used to describe an individual who has undergone the surgical removal of a limb or extremity, such as an arm, leg, foot, or hand, due to various reasons like trauma, disease, or congenital defects.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Walking aids generally having two handgrips and four legs.
Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)
Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.
A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)
The central part of the body to which the neck and limbs are attached.
The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.
Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.
Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)
Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
An occupational disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to vibration, affecting the fingers, hands, and forearms. It occurs in workers who regularly use vibrating tools such as jackhammers, power chain saws, riveters, etc. Symptoms include episodic finger blanching, NUMBNESS, tingling, and loss of nerve sensitivity.
Strips of elastic material used to apply pressure to body parts to control EDEMA and aid circulation.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.
The use of mental images produced by the imagination as a form of psychotherapy. It can be classified by the modality of its content: visual, verbal, auditory, olfactory, tactile, gustatory, or kinesthetic. Common themes derive from nature imagery (e.g., forests and mountains), water imagery (e.g., brooks and oceans), travel imagery, etc. Imagery is used in the treatment of mental disorders and in helping patients cope with other diseases. Imagery often forms a part of HYPNOSIS, of AUTOGENIC TRAINING, of RELAXATION TECHNIQUES, and of BEHAVIOR THERAPY. (From Encyclopedia of Human Behavior, vol. 4, pp29-30, 1994)
The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.
Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).
Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).
Decrease, loss, or removal of the mineral constituents of bones. Temporary loss of bone mineral content is especially associated with space flight, weightlessness, and extended immobilization. OSTEOPOROSIS is permanent, includes reduction of total bone mass, and is associated with increased rate of fractures. CALCIFICATION, PHYSIOLOGIC is the process of bone remineralizing. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed; Nicogossian, Space Physiology and Medicine, 2d ed, pp327-33)
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
A tumor made up of nerve cells and nerve fibers. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
Treatment technique in a virtual environment which allows the participant to experience a sense of presence in an immersive, computer-generated, three-dimensional, interactive environment that minimizes avoidance behavior and facilitates emotional involvement. (from Curr Psychiatry Rep (2010) 12:298)
Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
Sense of movement of a part of the body, such as movement of fingers, elbows, knees, limbs, or weights.
General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.
Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.
Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.
Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.
Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.
A syndrome characterized by severe burning pain in an extremity accompanied by sudomotor, vasomotor, and trophic changes in bone without an associated specific nerve injury. This condition is most often precipitated by trauma to soft tissue or nerve complexes. The skin over the affected region is usually erythematous and demonstrates hypersensitivity to tactile stimuli and erythema. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1360; Pain 1995 Oct;63(1):127-33)
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.
The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.
An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.
A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.
A computer in a medical context is an electronic device that processes, stores, and retrieves data, often used in medical settings for tasks such as maintaining patient records, managing diagnostic images, and supporting clinical decision-making through software applications and tools.
A serious complication of TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by extreme HYPERGLYCEMIA; DEHYDRATION; serum hyperosmolarity; and depressed consciousness leading to COMA in the absence of KETOSIS and ACIDOSIS.
A tumor composed of cells resembling those of the hair matrix, which undergo 'mummification' and may calcify. It is a relatively uncommon tumor, which may occur at any age from infancy. The majority of patients are under 20, and females are affected more than males. The lesion is usually a solitary deep dermal or subcutaneous tumor 3-30 mm in diameter, situated in the head, neck, or upper extremity. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2401)
Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.
An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.
The injection of drugs, most often analgesics, into the spinal canal without puncturing the dura mater.
A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)
Use of a device for the purpose of controlling movement of all or part of the body. Splinting and casting are FRACTURE FIXATION.
Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)
A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A country in northern Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between MOROCCO and TUNISIA. Its capital is Algiers.
Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.
The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.
MOTOR NEURONS in the anterior (ventral) horn of the SPINAL CORD which project to SKELETAL MUSCLES.

Peripheral nerve injuries and repair in the upper extremity. (1/835)

Peripheral nerve injuries are commonly seen as a result of domestic, industrial, or military trauma. Sharp objects usually cause these nerve injuries. When assessing these injuries, it is important to evaluate each nerves' motor and sensory function. One must be cognizant of associated injuries such as fractures, vascular damage, and musculotendinous lacerations. The time since the injury, level of injury, and age of the patient are important prognosticators impacting the return of function. Intraoperatively, one must assess the vascularity of the soft tissue bed and the nerve itself, the nerve gap, conduction, and the topography of the fascicles to insure proper orientation. Application of the principles of nerve repair (magnification, minimal tension, meticulous soft tissue handling, experienced surgeon and staff) can enhance the chances for a successful result. Additionally, to maximize functional recovery following peripheral nerve repair, a carefully planned program of postoperative occupational therapy and rehabilitation must be instituted.  (+info)

Cervical myelopathy due to a "tight dural canal in flexion" with a posterior epidural cavity. (2/835)

A 41-year-old man noticed weakness and atrophy in his right hand and forearm resembling the non-progressive juvenile muscular atrophy of unilateral upper extremity (Hirayama's disease). MRI showed an abnormal cavity in the posterior epidural space which appeared on neck flexion communicating with the subarachnoid space in addition to the flattening of the lower cervical spinal cord on neck flexion. When evaluating atypical cases of Hirayama's disease, the pathomechanism demonstrated in the present case should be taken into consideration.  (+info)

A review of functional status measures for workers with upper extremity disorders. (3/835)

In order to identify functional status measures for epidemiological studies among workers with mild to moderate disorders of the neck and upper extremity, a literature search was conducted for the years 1966 to 2001. Inclusion criteria were: (1) relevance to neck and upper extremity; (2) assessment among workers; and (3) relevance to mild to moderate disorders. Of 13 instruments reviewed, six measures were tested among workers. The three best measures, depending on the purpose of research, included the standardised Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, the Upper Extremity Questionnaire, and the Neck and Upper Limb Instrument. Development of a functional protocol is regarded as a realistic enhancement for research of neck and upper extremity disorders in the workplace. For research and clinical practice, measures of functional status, sensitive enough to measure the subtle conditions in mild to moderate disorders, may provide prognostic information about the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders in apparently healthy patients. Appropriate use of functional status questionnaires is imperative for a meaningful portrayal of health.  (+info)

Peripheral mechanisms in tremor after traumatic neck injury. (4/835)

Tremor is a rare manifestation after neck injury, and its physiological mechanism has not been elucidated. We studied the effects of torque loading and ischaemic nerve block on coarse postural tremor in the right upper extremity, which had developed in association with a C7-C8 radiculopathy after traumatic neck injury in a 55 year old man. Loading reduced the tremor frequency from 6.1 Hz to 4.2 Hz with corresponding electromyography (EMG) bursts at the same frequencies as the tremor. Ischaemic nerve block also reduced the tremor frequency from 6.2 Hz to 2.8 Hz, and the time course of the frequency was not in parallel with that of the size of the maximal M wave. A significant reduction of the tremor frequency by loading and ischaemic nerve block indicates a mechanical reflex mechanism underlying the tremor, and association of synchronous EMG bursts suggests an increase in gain in the stretch reflex loop. The stretch reflex loop plays an important role in generation of oscillation in tremor after neck injury.  (+info)

The effects of a contoured foam seat on postural alignment and upper-extremity function in infants with neuromotor impairments. (5/835)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Physical therapists and occupational therapists frequently use adaptive seating devices to improve stability in sitting for children with neuromotor impairments. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a contoured foam seat (CFS) on postural alignment and on the ability of infants with neuromotor impairments to engage with toys. Parental perceptions regarding the use and effects of the CFS also were assessed via semistructured interviews. SUBJECTS: Subjects were 4 infants, ages 9 to 18 months, who were unable to sit independently. METHOD: A time-series, alternating-treatments design was used, with data collected under 3 conditions: (1) a regular highchair, (2) a regular highchair with a thin foam liner, and (3) a CFS used as an insert in a regular highchair. The primary dependent measures were postural alignment and engagement with toys. Engagement with toys was defined as percentage of intervals with 2 hands on a toy and percentage of intervals with no hands on a highchair tray and 1 or 2 hands on a toy. RESULTS: Results showed a sustained effect of the CFS on improving postural alignment for all subjects. Effects of the CFS on increasing the number of intervals of bimanual play were not demonstrated for any subjects, although some improvement in the infant's ability to free the arms from support was observed for 2 subjects. Mothers reported acceptability of the CFS for everyday use and described benefits for themselves and their infants. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results support the use of a CFS for improving postural alignment. Future research on adaptive seating should focus on interventions and outcomes that help children participate in functional activities relevant to them and their families.  (+info)

Low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparin) and very low doses of warfarin in the prevention of upper extremity thrombosis in cancer patients with indwelling long-term central venous catheters: a pilot randomized trial. (6/835)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Upper extremity thrombosis is a major complication of central venous catheters implanted for chemotherapy in cancer patients. Vitamin K antagonists and low-molecular-weight heparins have been recommended in this setting, but their relative benefit-to-risk ratios have never been compared. DESIGN AND METHODS: A prospective, randomized, open, parallel-group, multicenter trial was performed comparing the antithrombotic efficacy and safety of warfarin and the low-molecular-weight heparin, nadroparin, in cancer patients who had undergone central venous catheter implantation. Warfarin was given orally at a fixed daily dose of 1 mg and nadroparin was injected subcutaneously at a fixed daily dose of 2,850 IU for 90 days, or until venographically-confirmed thrombosis occurred. The primary efficacy outcome was the occurrence of upper extremity thrombosis confirmed by venography performed 90 days after insertion of the catheter, or earlier if symptoms of thrombosis had appeared. Safety end-points were bleeding and thrombocytopenia. RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients were included in the study. A total of 21 and 24 patients in the nadroparin and warfarin groups, respectively, were evaluable for primary efficacy. Six out of the 21 patients in the nadroparin group (28.6%) and 4 out of the 24 patients in the warfarin group (16.7%) had venographically-documented upper extremity thrombosis at day 90 (p=0.48). Safety was satisfactory and similar with both treatments. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Warfarin at a fixed, very low dose and nadroparin at a fixed, prophylactic dose had comparable benefit-to-risk ratios in the prevention of thrombosis associated with central venous catheters in cancer patients.  (+info)

Kinematics and kinetics of multijoint reaching in nonhuman primates. (7/835)

The present study identifies the mechanics of planar reaching movements performed by monkeys (Macaca mulatta) wearing a robotic exoskeleton. This device maintained the limb in the horizontal plane such that hand motion was generated only by flexor and extensor motions at the shoulder and elbow. The study describes the kinematic and kinetic features of the shoulder, elbow, and hand during reaching movements from a central target to peripheral targets located on the circumference of a circle: the center-out task. While subjects made reaching movements with relatively straight smooth hand paths and little variation in peak hand velocity, there were large variations in joint motion, torque, and power for movements in different spatial directions. Unlike single-joint movements, joint kinematics and kinetics were not tightly coupled for these multijoint movements. For most movements, power generation was predominantly generated at only one of the two joints. The present analysis illustrates the complexities inherent in multijoint movements and forms the basis for understanding strategies used by the motor system to control reaching movements and for interpreting the response of neurons in different brain regions during this task.  (+info)

Evidence for cortical functional changes in patients with migraine and white matter abnormalities on conventional and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. (8/835)

BACKGROUND: In this study, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate the pattern of cortical activations after a simple motor task in patients with migraine and white matter (WM) abnormalities on conventional MRI scans of the brain. We also investigated whether the extent of brain activations was correlated with WM structural pathology measured using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI. METHODS: From 15 right-handed patients with migraine and 15 sex- and age-matched, right-handed healthy volunteers, we obtained the following: (1) fMRI (repetitive flexion-extension of the last 4 fingers of the right hand), (2) dual-echo turbo spin echo scans, and (3) pulsed-gradient spin-echo echo-planar sequence to calculate DT-MRI maps. fMRI analysis was performed using SPM99 and cluster detection. We measured the volume, the average mean diffusivity (), and the average fractional anisotropy of all lesions seen on the dual-echo scans. histograms of the normal-appearing WM were also produced. RESULTS: Compared with healthy volunteers, migraine patients had a larger relative activation of the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex (P=0.01) and a rostral displacement of the supplementary motor area (P=0.03). The shapes of the curves reflecting the time course for fMRI signal intensity changes were similar between migraine patients and controls for all of the cortical areas we studied. Compared with healthy subjects, migraine patients had significantly lower histogram peak height of the normal-appearing WM histogram (P=0.02), which was found to be correlated with the extent of displacement of the supplementary motor area (r=-0.80, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that functional cortical changes occur in patients with migraine and brain MRI abnormalities and that they might be secondary to the extent of subcortical structural damage.  (+info)

The term "upper extremity" is used in the medical field to refer to the portion of the upper limb that extends from the shoulder to the hand. This includes the arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. The upper extremity is responsible for various functions such as reaching, grasping, and manipulating objects, making it an essential part of a person's daily activities.

The bones that make up the upper extremity, also known as the upper limb, include those found in the arm, shoulder, and wrist. Here is a medical definition of each bone in the upper extremity:

1. Clavicle (Collarbone): A long, S-shaped bone located in the anterior part of the shoulder region that connects the trunk to the arm. It acts as a strut between the scapula and the sternum, providing support and protection for the underlying structures such as blood vessels and nerves.
2. Scapula (Shoulder Blade): A flat, triangular bone located on the posterior aspect of the shoulder region. The scapula has several important functions, including anchoring muscles that move the arm and serving as a site of attachment for the clavicle.
3. Humerus: The longest bone in the upper extremity, located in the arm between the shoulder and elbow. It has a proximal end (head) that articulates with the glenoid fossa of the scapula to form the shoulder joint, and a distal end (epicondyles) that articulates with the radius and ulna bones to form the elbow joint.
4. Radius: One of two bones in the forearm located laterally (on the thumb side). It has a proximal end that articulates with the humerus at the elbow joint, and a distal end that articulates with the carpals of the wrist. The radius also has a unique feature called the radial head, which is a rounded articular surface that allows for rotation of the forearm.
5. Ulna: One of two bones in the forearm located medially (on the pinky side). It has a proximal end that articulates with the humerus at the elbow joint, and a distal end that articulates with the carpals of the wrist. The ulna also has a prominent process called the olecranon, which forms the bony prominence on the back of the elbow (olecranon process).
6. Carpals: Eight small bones located in the wrist region that form the proximal row of the carpus. They include the scaphoid, lunate, triquetral, and pisiform bones. The carpals articulate with the radius and ulna proximally, and the metacarpals distally.
7. Metacarpals: Five long bones located in the hand region that form the middle part of the hand. They articulate with the carpals proximally and the phalanges distally. The metacarpals are numbered 1-5, with the thumb being metacarpal 1 and the little finger being metacarpal 5.
8. Phalanges: Fifteen small bones located in the fingers and thumb region that form the distal part of the hand. Each digit has three phalanges (proximal, middle, and distal), except for the thumb, which only has two (proximal and distal). The phalanges articulate with the metacarpals proximally and each other distally.

Understanding the anatomy of the upper limb is essential for healthcare professionals to accurately diagnose and treat conditions affecting this region. Familiarity with the bones, joints, muscles, and nerves that make up the upper limb can help clinicians identify areas of injury or dysfunction, develop appropriate treatment plans, and monitor patient progress over time.

The term "lower extremity" is used in the medical field to refer to the portion of the human body that includes the structures below the hip joint. This includes the thigh, lower leg, ankle, and foot. The lower extremities are responsible for weight-bearing and locomotion, allowing individuals to stand, walk, run, and jump. They contain many important structures such as bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels.

In medical terms, the arm refers to the upper limb of the human body, extending from the shoulder to the wrist. It is composed of three major bones: the humerus in the upper arm, and the radius and ulna in the lower arm. The arm contains several joints, including the shoulder joint, elbow joint, and wrist joint, which allow for a wide range of motion. The arm also contains muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and other soft tissues that are essential for normal function.

Arm injuries refer to any damage or harm sustained by the structures of the upper limb, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions. Common arm injuries include fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, tendonitis, and nerve damage. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, limited mobility, numbness, or weakness in the affected area. Treatment varies depending on the type and severity of the injury, and may include rest, ice, compression, elevation, physical therapy, medication, or surgery.

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the deep veins located in the arm or shoulder. This condition can occur due to various reasons, including trauma, surgery, cancer, certain medications, and underlying medical conditions that increase the risk of blood clotting.

The deep veins are larger vessels that run through the body's muscles and are surrounded by fascia, a connective tissue. UEDVT can cause partial or complete blockage of blood flow in the affected vein, leading to swelling, pain, redness, warmth, and decreased function in the arm or hand. In some cases, the clot can break off and travel to the lungs, causing a potentially life-threatening condition called pulmonary embolism (PE).

Diagnosis of UEDVT typically involves a physical exam, medical history, and imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI. Treatment may include anticoagulant medications to prevent the clot from growing or breaking off, thrombolytic therapy to dissolve the clot, or surgical intervention in severe cases. Compression stockings or other devices may also be used to help improve blood flow and reduce swelling.

The term "extremities" in a medical context refers to the most distant parts of the body, including the hands and feet (both fingers and toes), as well as the arms and legs. These are the farthest parts from the torso and head. Medical professionals may examine a patient's extremities for various reasons, such as checking circulation, assessing nerve function, or looking for injuries or abnormalities.

Paresis is a medical term that refers to a partial loss of voluntary muscle function. It is often described as muscle weakness, and it can affect one or several parts of the body. Paresis can be caused by various conditions, including nerve damage, stroke, spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, and infections like polio or botulism. The severity of paresis can range from mild to severe, depending on the underlying cause and the specific muscles involved. Treatment for paresis typically focuses on addressing the underlying condition causing it.

Congenital Upper Extremity Deformities refer to physical abnormalities or malformations of the upper limb (arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand) that are present at birth. These deformities can vary greatly in severity, complexity, and impact on function and appearance. They may result from genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both during fetal development. Examples of congenital upper extremity deformities include:

1. Radial club hand: A condition where the radius bone in the forearm is underdeveloped or absent, causing the hand to turn outward and the wrist to bend inward.
2. Club foot of the arm: Also known as congenital vertical talus, this deformity affects the ankle and foot, causing them to point upwards. In the upper extremity, it can lead to limited mobility and function.
3. Polydactyly: The presence of extra fingers or toes, which can be fully formed or rudimentary.
4. Syndactyly: Fusion or webbing of fingers or toes.
5. Radial longitudinal deficiency: A spectrum of radial ray anomalies that includes radial club hand and other associated malformations.
6. Ulnar longitudinal deficiency: Underdevelopment or absence of the ulna bone, which can lead to deformities in the forearm, wrist, and hand.
7. Amniotic band syndrome: A condition where fibrous bands in the amniotic sac entangle and restrict the growth of fetal parts, including the upper limbs.
8. Cleidocranial dysplasia: A genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent collarbones, delayed closing of the skull bones, and other skeletal abnormalities, including shortened or deformed upper extremities.
9. Arthrogryposis: A group of conditions characterized by joint contractures and stiffness, which can affect any part of the body, including the upper extremities.

Treatment for congenital upper extremity deformities typically involves a combination of surgical interventions, physical therapy, bracing, or prosthetics to improve function, appearance, and quality of life.

Musculoskeletal diseases are a group of medical conditions that affect the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. These diseases can cause pain, stiffness, limited mobility, and decreased function in the affected areas of the body. They include a wide range of conditions such as:

1. Osteoarthritis: A degenerative joint disease characterized by the breakdown of cartilage in joints, leading to pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility.
2. Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation in the lining of the joints, resulting in swelling, pain, and bone erosion.
3. Gout: A form of arthritis caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, leading to severe pain, redness, and swelling.
4. Osteoporosis: A condition characterized by weakened bones that are more susceptible to fractures due to decreased bone density.
5. Fibromyalgia: A disorder that causes widespread muscle pain, fatigue, and tenderness in specific areas of the body.
6. Spinal disorders: Conditions affecting the spine, such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, or degenerative disc disease, which can cause back pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness.
7. Soft tissue injuries: Damage to muscles, tendons, and ligaments, often caused by overuse, strain, or trauma.
8. Infections: Bone and joint infections (septic arthritis or osteomyelitis) can cause pain, swelling, and fever.
9. Tumors: Benign or malignant growths in bones, muscles, or soft tissues can lead to pain, swelling, and limited mobility.
10. Genetic disorders: Certain genetic conditions, such as Marfan syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, can affect the musculoskeletal system and cause various symptoms.

Treatment for musculoskeletal diseases varies depending on the specific condition but may include medications, physical therapy, exercise, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTDs) are a group of conditions that result from repeated exposure to biomechanical stressors, often related to work activities. These disorders can affect the muscles, tendons, nerves, and joints, leading to symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and reduced range of motion.

CTDs are also known as repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) or overuse injuries. They occur when there is a mismatch between the demands placed on the body and its ability to recover from those demands. Over time, this imbalance can lead to tissue damage and inflammation, resulting in chronic pain and functional limitations.

Examples of CTDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, epicondylitis (tennis elbow), rotator cuff injuries, and trigger finger. Prevention strategies for CTDs include proper ergonomics, workstation design, body mechanics, taking regular breaks to stretch and rest, and performing exercises to strengthen and condition the affected muscles and joints.

Hand injuries refer to any damage or harm caused to the structures of the hand, including the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, blood vessels, and skin. These injuries can result from various causes such as trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions. Examples of hand injuries include fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, cuts, burns, and insect bites. Symptoms may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury, but they often include pain, swelling, stiffness, numbness, weakness, or loss of function in the hand. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal recovery and prevent long-term complications.

In anatomical terms, the shoulder refers to the complex joint of the human body that connects the upper limb to the trunk. It is formed by the union of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), scapula (shoulder blade), and humerus (upper arm bone). The shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket type of synovial joint, allowing for a wide range of movements such as flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation.

The shoulder complex includes not only the glenohumeral joint but also other structures that contribute to its movement and stability, including:

1. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint: where the clavicle meets the acromion process of the scapula.
2. The coracoclavicular (CC) ligament: connects the coracoid process of the scapula to the clavicle, providing additional stability to the AC joint.
3. The rotator cuff: a group of four muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) that surround and reinforce the shoulder joint, contributing to its stability and range of motion.
4. The biceps tendon: originates from the supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula and passes through the shoulder joint, helping with flexion, supination, and stability.
5. Various ligaments and capsular structures that provide additional support and limit excessive movement in the shoulder joint.

The shoulder is a remarkable joint due to its wide range of motion, but this also makes it susceptible to injuries and disorders such as dislocations, subluxations, sprains, strains, tendinitis, bursitis, and degenerative conditions like osteoarthritis. Proper care, exercise, and maintenance are essential for maintaining shoulder health and function throughout one's life.

Hemiplegia is a medical term that refers to paralysis affecting one side of the body. It is typically caused by damage to the motor center of the brain, such as from a stroke, head injury, or brain tumor. The symptoms can vary in severity but often include muscle weakness, stiffness, and difficulty with coordination and balance on the affected side. In severe cases, the individual may be unable to move or feel anything on that side of the body. Hemiplegia can also affect speech, vision, and other functions controlled by the damaged area of the brain. Rehabilitation therapy is often recommended to help individuals with hemiplegia regain as much function as possible.

The axillary vein is a large vein that runs through the axilla or armpit region. It is formed by the union of the brachial vein and the basilic vein at the lower border of the teres major muscle. The axillary vein carries deoxygenated blood from the upper limb, chest wall, and breast towards the heart. As it moves proximally, it becomes continuous with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. It is accompanied by the axillary artery and forms part of the important neurovascular bundle in the axilla.

Amputation is defined as the surgical removal of all or part of a limb or extremity such as an arm, leg, foot, hand, toe, or finger. This procedure is typically performed to remove damaged or dead tissue due to various reasons like severe injury, infection, tumors, or chronic conditions that impair circulation, such as diabetes or peripheral arterial disease. The goal of amputation is to alleviate pain, prevent further complications, and improve the patient's quality of life. Following the surgery, patients may require rehabilitation and prosthetic devices to help them adapt to their new physical condition.

In medical terms, the leg refers to the lower portion of the human body that extends from the knee down to the foot. It includes the thigh (femur), lower leg (tibia and fibula), foot, and ankle. The leg is primarily responsible for supporting the body's weight and enabling movements such as standing, walking, running, and jumping.

The leg contains several important structures, including bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, nerves, and joints. These structures work together to provide stability, support, and mobility to the lower extremity. Common medical conditions that can affect the leg include fractures, sprains, strains, infections, peripheral artery disease, and neurological disorders.

The subclavian vein is a large venous structure that carries deoxygenated blood from the upper limb and part of the thorax back to the heart. It forms when the axillary vein passes through the narrow space between the first rib and the clavicle (collarbone), becoming the subclavian vein.

On the left side, the subclavian vein joins with the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein, while on the right side, the subclavian vein directly merges with the internal jugular vein to create the brachiocephalic vein. These brachiocephalic veins then unite to form the superior vena cava, which drains blood into the right atrium of the heart.

The subclavian vein is an essential structure for venous access in various medical procedures and interventions, such as placing central venous catheters or performing blood tests.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

Leg injuries refer to damages or harm caused to any part of the lower extremity, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and other soft tissues. These injuries can result from various causes such as trauma, overuse, or degenerative conditions. Common leg injuries include fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, contusions, and cuts. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, stiffness, weakness, or difficulty walking. The specific treatment for a leg injury depends on the type and severity of the injury.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, "movement" refers to the act or process of changing physical location or position. It involves the contraction and relaxation of muscles, which allows for the joints to move and the body to be in motion. Movement can also refer to the ability of a patient to move a specific body part or limb, which is assessed during physical examinations. Additionally, "movement" can describe the progression or spread of a disease within the body.

In medical terms, a hand is the part of the human body that is attached to the forearm and consists of the carpus (wrist), metacarpus, and phalanges. It is made up of 27 bones, along with muscles, tendons, ligaments, and other soft tissues. The hand is a highly specialized organ that is capable of performing a wide range of complex movements and functions, including grasping, holding, manipulating objects, and communicating through gestures. It is also richly innervated with sensory receptors that provide information about touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts).

Neck pain is discomfort or soreness in the neck region, which can extend from the base of the skull to the upper part of the shoulder blades, caused by injury, irritation, or inflammation of the muscles, ligaments, or nerves in the cervical spine. The pain may worsen with movement and can be accompanied by stiffness, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the neck, arms, or hands. In some cases, headaches can also occur as a result of neck pain.

An arteriovenous shunt is a surgically created connection between an artery and a vein. This procedure is typically performed to reroute blood flow or to provide vascular access for various medical treatments. In a surgical setting, the creation of an arteriovenous shunt involves connecting an artery directly to a vein, bypassing the capillary network in between.

There are different types of arteriovenous shunts used for specific medical purposes:

1. Arteriovenous Fistula (AVF): This is a surgical connection created between an artery and a vein, usually in the arm or leg. The procedure involves dissecting both the artery and vein, then suturing them directly together. Over time, the increased blood flow to the vein causes it to dilate and thicken, making it suitable for repeated needle punctures during hemodialysis treatments for patients with kidney failure.
2. Arteriovenous Graft (AVG): An arteriovenous graft is a synthetic tube used to connect an artery and a vein when a direct AVF cannot be created due to insufficient vessel size or poor quality. The graft can be made of various materials, such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or Dacron. Grafts are more prone to infection and clotting compared to native AVFs but remain an essential option for patients requiring hemodialysis access.
3. Central Venous Catheter (CVC): A central venous catheter is a flexible tube inserted into a large vein, often in the neck or groin, and advanced towards the heart. CVCs can be used as temporary arteriovenous shunts for patients who require immediate hemodialysis access but do not have time to wait for an AVF or AVG to mature. However, they are associated with higher risks of infection and thrombosis compared to native AVFs and AVGs.

In summary, a surgical arteriovenous shunt is a connection between an artery and a vein established through a medical procedure. The primary purpose of these shunts is to provide vascular access for hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease or to serve as temporary access when native AVFs or AVGs are not feasible.

A medical definition of the wrist is the complex joint that connects the forearm to the hand, composed of eight carpal bones arranged in two rows. The wrist allows for movement and flexibility in the hand, enabling us to perform various activities such as grasping, writing, and typing. It also provides stability and support for the hand during these movements. Additionally, numerous ligaments, tendons, and nerves pass through or near the wrist, making it susceptible to injuries and conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome.

I believe you may be looking for the term "human factors engineering" or "ergonomics," as there is no widely recognized medical definition for "human engineering." Human factors engineering is a multidisciplinary field that focuses on the design and integration of systems, products, and environments to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. This includes considering human capabilities, limitations, and characteristics in the design process to ensure safe, efficient, and effective interactions between humans and technology.

I apologize for any confusion, but "baseball" is not a medical term. It is a sport that involves two teams of nine players each trying to score runs by hitting a ball with a bat and running around four bases on a field. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of disorders that occur when the blood vessels or nerves in the thoracic outlet, the space between the collarbone (clavicle) and the first rib, become compressed. This compression can cause pain, numbness, and weakness in the neck, shoulder, arm, and hand.

There are three types of TOS:

1. Neurogenic TOS: This is the most common type and occurs when the nerves (brachial plexus) that pass through the thoracic outlet become compressed, causing symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the arm and hand.
2. Venous TOS: This type occurs when the veins that pass through the thoracic outlet become compressed, leading to swelling, pain, and discoloration of the arm.
3. Arterial TOS: This is the least common type and occurs when the arteries that pass through the thoracic outlet become compressed, causing decreased blood flow to the arm, which can result in pain, numbness, and coldness in the arm and hand.

TOS can be caused by a variety of factors, including an extra rib (cervical rib), muscle tightness or spasm, poor posture, repetitive motions, trauma, or tumors. Treatment for TOS may include physical therapy, pain management, and in some cases, surgery.

The axillary artery is a major blood vessel in the upper limb. It is the continuation of the subclavian artery and begins at the lateral border of the first rib, where it becomes the brachial artery. The axillary artery supplies oxygenated blood to the upper extremity, chest wall, and breast.

The axillary artery is divided into three parts based on the surrounding structures:

1. First part: From its origin at the lateral border of the first rib to the medial border of the pectoralis minor muscle. It lies deep to the clavicle and is covered by the scalene muscles, the anterior and middle scalene being the most important. The branches arising from this portion are the superior thoracic artery and the thyrocervical trunk.
2. Second part: Behind the pectoralis minor muscle. The branches arising from this portion are the lateral thoracic artery and the subscapular artery.
3. Third part: After leaving the lower border of the pectoralis minor muscle, it becomes the brachial artery. The branches arising from this portion are the anterior circumflex humeral artery and the posterior circumflex humeral artery.

The axillary artery is a common site for surgical interventions such as angioplasty and stenting to treat peripheral arterial disease, as well as for bypass grafting in cases of severe atherosclerosis or occlusion.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Man-Machine Systems" is not a commonly used medical term or concept in the field of medicine or healthcare. It is more commonly associated with fields such as engineering, human factors, and ergonomics.

In those contexts, "Man-Machine Systems" typically refers to systems where humans and machines work together to achieve a common goal. The human operator provides intelligence, decision-making capabilities, and the ability to adapt to new situations, while the machine provides strength, precision, and the ability to process large amounts of data quickly.

Examples of Man-Machine Systems in healthcare might include robotic surgical systems, where a surgeon uses a robot to perform precise movements during surgery, or computerized decision support systems that help healthcare providers make informed decisions based on patient data.

The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originates from the spinal cord in the neck region and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the upper limb. It is formed by the ventral rami (branches) of the lower four cervical nerves (C5-C8) and the first thoracic nerve (T1). In some cases, contributions from C4 and T2 may also be included.

The brachial plexus nerves exit the intervertebral foramen, pass through the neck, and travel down the upper chest before branching out to form major peripheral nerves of the upper limb. These include the axillary, radial, musculocutaneous, median, and ulnar nerves, which further innervate specific muscles and sensory areas in the arm, forearm, and hand.

Damage to the brachial plexus can result in various neurological deficits, such as weakness or paralysis of the upper limb, numbness, or loss of sensation in the affected area, depending on the severity and location of the injury.

Hand strength refers to the measure of force or power that an individual can generate using the muscles of the hand and forearm. It is often assessed through various tests, such as grip strength dynamometry, which measures the maximum force exerted by the hand when squeezing a device called a handgrip dynanometer. Hand strength is important for performing daily activities, maintaining independence, and can be indicative of overall health and well-being. Reduced hand strength may be associated with conditions such as neuromuscular disorders, arthritis, or injuries.

Electromyography (EMG) is a medical diagnostic procedure that measures the electrical activity of skeletal muscles during contraction and at rest. It involves inserting a thin needle electrode into the muscle to record the electrical signals generated by the muscle fibers. These signals are then displayed on an oscilloscope and may be heard through a speaker.

EMG can help diagnose various neuromuscular disorders, such as muscle weakness, numbness, or pain, and can distinguish between muscle and nerve disorders. It is often used in conjunction with other diagnostic tests, such as nerve conduction studies, to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the nervous system.

EMG is typically performed by a neurologist or a physiatrist, and the procedure may cause some discomfort or pain, although this is usually minimal. The results of an EMG can help guide treatment decisions and monitor the progression of neuromuscular conditions over time.

Movement disorders are a group of neurological conditions that affect the control and coordination of voluntary movements. These disorders can result from damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, basal ganglia, or other parts of the brain that regulate movement. Symptoms may include tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), akathisia (restlessness and inability to remain still), dystonia (sustained muscle contractions leading to abnormal postures), chorea (rapid, unpredictable movements), tics, and gait disturbances. Examples of movement disorders include Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette syndrome, and dystonic disorders.

Lymphedema is a chronic condition characterized by swelling in one or more parts of the body, usually an arm or leg, due to the accumulation of lymph fluid. This occurs when the lymphatic system is unable to properly drain the fluid, often as a result of damage or removal of lymph nodes, or because of a genetic abnormality that affects lymphatic vessel development.

The swelling can range from mild to severe and may cause discomfort, tightness, or a feeling of heaviness in the affected limb. In some cases, lymphedema can also lead to skin changes, recurrent infections, and reduced mobility. The condition is currently not curable but can be managed effectively with various treatments such as compression garments, manual lymphatic drainage, exercise, and skincare routines.

The elbow joint, also known as the cubitus joint, is a hinge joint that connects the humerus bone of the upper arm to the radius and ulna bones of the forearm. It allows for flexion and extension movements of the forearm, as well as some degree of rotation. The main articulation occurs between the trochlea of the humerus and the trochlear notch of the ulna, while the radial head of the radius also contributes to the joint's stability and motion. Ligaments, muscles, and tendons surround and support the elbow joint, providing strength and protection during movement.

Biomechanics is the application of mechanical laws to living structures and systems, particularly in the field of medicine and healthcare. A biomechanical phenomenon refers to a observable event or occurrence that involves the interaction of biological tissues or systems with mechanical forces. These phenomena can be studied at various levels, from the molecular and cellular level to the tissue, organ, and whole-body level.

Examples of biomechanical phenomena include:

1. The way that bones and muscles work together to produce movement (known as joint kinematics).
2. The mechanical behavior of biological tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments under various loads and stresses.
3. The response of cells and tissues to mechanical stimuli, such as the way that bone tissue adapts to changes in loading conditions (known as Wolff's law).
4. The biomechanics of injury and disease processes, such as the mechanisms of joint injury or the development of osteoarthritis.
5. The use of mechanical devices and interventions to treat medical conditions, such as orthopedic implants or assistive devices for mobility impairments.

Understanding biomechanical phenomena is essential for developing effective treatments and prevention strategies for a wide range of medical conditions, from musculoskeletal injuries to neurological disorders.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.

A wheelchair is defined medically as a mobility aid with wheels, providing the user with increased independence and freedom of movement. It is designed to accommodate individuals who have difficulty walking or are unable to walk due to various reasons such as physical disabilities, illnesses, or injuries. Wheelchairs can be manually propelled by the user or others, or they can be power-driven (motorized). They come in different types and designs, including standard, lightweight, sports, pediatric, bariatric, and reclining wheelchairs, to cater to the diverse needs of users. Some wheelchairs are custom-made to ensure optimal comfort, safety, and functionality for the user.

A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, leading to deprivation of oxygen and nutrients to brain cells. This can result in the death of brain tissue and cause permanent damage or temporary impairment to cognitive functions, speech, memory, movement, and other body functions controlled by the affected area of the brain.

Strokes can be caused by either a blockage in an artery that supplies blood to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a "mini-stroke," is a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain that lasts only a few minutes and does not cause permanent damage.

Symptoms of a stroke may include sudden weakness or numbness in the face, arm, or leg; difficulty speaking or understanding speech; vision problems; loss of balance or coordination; severe headache with no known cause; and confusion or disorientation. Immediate medical attention is crucial for stroke patients to receive appropriate treatment and prevent long-term complications.

Phlebography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize and assess the veins, particularly in the legs. It involves the injection of a contrast agent into the veins, followed by X-ray imaging to capture the flow of the contrast material through the veins. This allows doctors to identify any abnormalities such as blood clots, blockages, or malformations in the venous system.

There are different types of phlebography, including ascending phlebography (where the contrast agent is injected into a foot vein and travels up the leg) and descending phlebography (where the contrast agent is injected into a vein in the groin or neck and travels down the leg).

Phlebography is an invasive procedure that requires careful preparation and monitoring, and it is typically performed by radiologists or vascular specialists. It has largely been replaced by non-invasive imaging techniques such as ultrasound and CT angiography in many clinical settings.

The wrist joint, also known as the radiocarpal joint, is a condyloid joint that connects the distal end of the radius bone in the forearm to the proximal row of carpal bones in the hand (scaphoid, lunate, and triquetral bones). It allows for flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation movements of the hand. The wrist joint is surrounded by a capsule and reinforced by several ligaments that provide stability and strength to the joint.

Neck injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in any part of the neck, including soft tissues (muscles, ligaments, tendons), nerves, bones (vertebrae), and joints (facet joints, intervertebral discs). These injuries can result from various incidents such as road accidents, falls, sports-related activities, or work-related tasks. Common neck injuries include whiplash, strain or sprain of the neck muscles, herniated discs, fractured vertebrae, and pinched nerves, which may cause symptoms like pain, stiffness, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the neck, shoulders, arms, or hands. Immediate medical attention is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment to prevent further complications and ensure optimal recovery.

Physical therapy modalities refer to the various forms of treatment that physical therapists use to help reduce pain, promote healing, and restore function to the body. These modalities can include:

1. Heat therapy: This includes the use of hot packs, paraffin baths, and infrared heat to increase blood flow, relax muscles, and relieve pain.
2. Cold therapy: Also known as cryotherapy, this involves the use of ice packs, cold compresses, or cooling gels to reduce inflammation, numb the area, and relieve pain.
3. Electrical stimulation: This uses electrical currents to stimulate nerves and muscles, which can help to reduce pain, promote healing, and improve muscle strength and function.
4. Ultrasound: This uses high-frequency sound waves to penetrate deep into tissues, increasing blood flow, reducing inflammation, and promoting healing.
5. Manual therapy: This includes techniques such as massage, joint mobilization, and stretching, which are used to improve range of motion, reduce pain, and promote relaxation.
6. Traction: This is a technique that uses gentle pulling on the spine or other joints to help relieve pressure and improve alignment.
7. Light therapy: Also known as phototherapy, this involves the use of low-level lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to promote healing and reduce pain and inflammation.
8. Therapeutic exercise: This includes a range of exercises that are designed to improve strength, flexibility, balance, and coordination, and help patients recover from injury or illness.

Physical therapy modalities are often used in combination with other treatments, such as manual therapy and therapeutic exercise, to provide a comprehensive approach to rehabilitation and pain management.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

Motor skills are defined as the abilities required to plan, control and execute physical movements. They involve a complex interplay between the brain, nerves, muscles, and the environment. Motor skills can be broadly categorized into two types: fine motor skills, which involve small, precise movements (such as writing or picking up small objects), and gross motor skills, which involve larger movements using the arms, legs, and torso (such as crawling, walking, or running).

Motor skills development is an essential aspect of child growth and development, and it continues to evolve throughout adulthood. Difficulties with motor skills can impact a person's ability to perform daily activities and can be associated with various neurological and musculoskeletal conditions.

The elbow is a joint formed by the articulation between the humerus bone of the upper arm and the radius and ulna bones of the forearm. It allows for flexion, extension, and rotation of the forearm. The medical definition of "elbow" refers to this specific anatomical structure and its associated functions in human anatomy.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

Ischemia is the medical term used to describe a lack of blood flow to a part of the body, often due to blocked or narrowed blood vessels. This can lead to a shortage of oxygen and nutrients in the tissues, which can cause them to become damaged or die. Ischemia can affect many different parts of the body, including the heart, brain, legs, and intestines. Symptoms of ischemia depend on the location and severity of the blockage, but they may include pain, cramping, numbness, weakness, or coldness in the affected area. In severe cases, ischemia can lead to tissue death (gangrene) or organ failure. Treatment for ischemia typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the blocked blood flow, such as through medication, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Athletic injuries are damages or injuries to the body that occur while participating in sports, physical activities, or exercise. These injuries can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

1. Trauma: Direct blows, falls, collisions, or crushing injuries can cause fractures, dislocations, contusions, lacerations, or concussions.
2. Overuse: Repetitive motions or stress on a particular body part can lead to injuries such as tendonitis, stress fractures, or muscle strains.
3. Poor technique: Using incorrect form or technique during exercise or sports can put additional stress on muscles, joints, and ligaments, leading to injury.
4. Inadequate warm-up or cool-down: Failing to properly prepare the body for physical activity or neglecting to cool down afterwards can increase the risk of injury.
5. Lack of fitness or flexibility: Insufficient strength, endurance, or flexibility can make individuals more susceptible to injuries during sports and exercise.
6. Environmental factors: Extreme weather conditions, poor field or court surfaces, or inadequate equipment can contribute to the risk of athletic injuries.

Common athletic injuries include ankle sprains, knee injuries, shoulder dislocations, tennis elbow, shin splints, and concussions. Proper training, warm-up and cool-down routines, use of appropriate protective gear, and attention to technique can help prevent many athletic injuries.

The Ulnar Artery is a major blood vessel that supplies the forearm, hand, and fingers with oxygenated blood. It originates from the brachial artery in the upper arm and travels down the medial (towards the body's midline) side of the forearm, passing through the Guyon's canal at the wrist before branching out to supply the hand and fingers.

The ulnar artery provides blood to the palmar aspect of the hand and the ulnar side of the little finger and half of the ring finger. It also contributes to the formation of the deep palmar arch, which supplies blood to the deep structures of the hand. The ulnar artery is an important structure in the circulatory system, providing critical blood flow to the upper limb.

Pronation is a term used in the medical field, particularly in the study of human biomechanics and orthopedics. It refers to the normal motion that occurs in the subtalar joint of the foot, which allows the foot to adapt to various surfaces and absorb shock during walking or running.

During pronation, the arch of the foot collapses, and the heel rolls inward, causing the forefoot to rotate outward. This motion helps distribute the forces of impact evenly across the foot and lower limb, reducing stress on individual structures and providing stability during weight-bearing activities.

However, excessive pronation can lead to biomechanical issues and increase the risk of injuries such as plantar fasciitis, shin splints, and knee pain. Proper assessment and management of foot mechanics, including orthotics or physical therapy interventions, may be necessary to address excessive pronation and related conditions.

Finger injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the fingers, which can include cuts, bruises, dislocations, fractures, and sprains. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as accidents, sports activities, falls, or direct blows to the finger. Symptoms of finger injuries may include pain, swelling, stiffness, deformity, numbness, or inability to move the finger. The treatment for finger injuries varies depending on the type and severity of the injury, but may include rest, immobilization, ice, compression, elevation, physical therapy, medication, or surgery. It is essential to seek medical attention promptly for proper diagnosis and treatment of finger injuries to prevent further complications and ensure optimal recovery.

Veins are blood vessels that carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart. They have a lower pressure than arteries and contain valves to prevent the backflow of blood. Veins have a thin, flexible wall with a larger lumen compared to arteries, allowing them to accommodate more blood volume. The color of veins is often blue or green due to the absorption characteristics of light and the reduced oxygen content in the blood they carry.

Soft tissue neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the soft tissues of the body. Soft tissues include muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and synovial membranes (the thin layer of cells that line joints and tendons). Neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and their behavior and potential for spread depend on the specific type of neoplasm.

Benign soft tissue neoplasms are typically slow-growing, well-circumscribed, and rarely spread to other parts of the body. They can often be removed surgically with a low risk of recurrence. Examples of benign soft tissue neoplasms include lipomas (fat tumors), schwannomas (nerve sheath tumors), and hemangiomas (blood vessel tumors).

Malignant soft tissue neoplasms, on the other hand, can grow rapidly, invade surrounding tissues, and may metastasize (spread) to distant parts of the body. They are often more difficult to treat than benign neoplasms and require a multidisciplinary approach, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Examples of malignant soft tissue neoplasms include sarcomas, such as rhabdomyosarcoma (arising from skeletal muscle), leiomyosarcoma (arising from smooth muscle), and angiosarcoma (arising from blood vessels).

It is important to note that soft tissue neoplasms can occur in any part of the body, and their diagnosis and treatment require a thorough evaluation by a healthcare professional with expertise in this area.

Robotics, in the medical context, refers to the branch of technology that deals with the design, construction, operation, and application of robots in medical fields. These machines are capable of performing a variety of tasks that can aid or replicate human actions, often with high precision and accuracy. They can be used for various medical applications such as surgery, rehabilitation, prosthetics, patient care, and diagnostics. Surgical robotics, for example, allows surgeons to perform complex procedures with increased dexterity, control, and reduced fatigue, while minimizing invasiveness and improving patient outcomes.

Posture is the position or alignment of body parts supported by the muscles, especially the spine and head in relation to the vertebral column. It can be described as static (related to a stationary position) or dynamic (related to movement). Good posture involves training your body to stand, walk, sit, and lie in positions where the least strain is placed on supporting muscles and ligaments during movement or weight-bearing activities. Poor posture can lead to various health issues such as back pain, neck pain, headaches, and respiratory problems.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

In medical terms, the "neck" is defined as the portion of the body that extends from the skull/head to the thorax or chest region. It contains 7 cervical vertebrae, muscles, nerves, blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and glands (such as the thyroid gland). The neck is responsible for supporting the head, allowing its movement in various directions, and housing vital structures that enable functions like respiration and circulation.

Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) therapy is a type of motion therapy that is often used in physical rehabilitation following surgery or injury. In CPM therapy, the affected body part is moved continuously through a range of motion without any active participation from the patient. This is typically accomplished with the use of a motorized device that gently and slowly moves the limb.

The goal of CPM therapy is to help prevent stiffness, reduce pain, improve circulation, and promote healing in the affected area. It is often used following joint replacement surgery, such as knee or hip replacements, as well as after injuries that limit mobility and range of motion. By providing continuous, passive movement to the affected limb, CPM therapy can help prevent the formation of scar tissue and adhesions, which can restrict movement and cause pain.

CPM therapy is usually prescribed by a healthcare provider and administered under the supervision of a physical therapist or other rehabilitation specialist. The range of motion and speed of the movement are carefully controlled to ensure safety and effectiveness. While CPM therapy can be an important part of the recovery process, it is typically used in conjunction with other rehabilitation techniques, such as exercises and manual therapy, to achieve optimal outcomes.

Supination is a term used in the medical field, particularly in the study of anatomy and orthopedics. It refers to the external rotation of the forearm so that the palm faces forward or upward. This motion allows for the hand to be in a position to perform actions such as lifting, holding, or throwing objects. It's also used to describe the movement of the foot when it rolls outward, which is important for normal walking and running gait. Abnormal supination can lead to issues with mobility and pain in the affected limb.

Sarcoma is a type of cancer that develops from certain types of connective tissue (such as muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or nerves) found throughout the body. It can occur in any part of the body, but it most commonly occurs in the arms, legs, chest, and abdomen.

Sarcomas are classified into two main groups: bone sarcomas and soft tissue sarcomas. Bone sarcomas develop in the bones, while soft tissue sarcomas develop in the soft tissues of the body, such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, fat, blood vessels, and nerves.

Sarcomas can be further classified into many subtypes based on their specific characteristics, such as the type of tissue they originate from, their genetic makeup, and their appearance under a microscope. The different subtypes of sarcoma have varying symptoms, prognoses, and treatment options.

Overall, sarcomas are relatively rare cancers, accounting for less than 1% of all cancer diagnoses in the United States each year. However, they can be aggressive and may require intensive treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "bombs." The term is most commonly used in non-medical contexts to refer to explosive devices or, metaphorically, to something that has a sudden and major impact. If you are looking for information about a specific medical concept or condition, please provide more context or try rephrasing your question. I'm here to help!

An embolectomy is a surgical procedure to remove an embolus, which is a blockage in a blood vessel caused by a clot or air bubble that has traveled from another part of the body. During an embolectomy, the surgeon makes an incision in the affected blood vessel and removes the embolus using specialized surgical instruments. This procedure is often performed as an emergency treatment to restore blood flow and prevent tissue damage in the affected area of the body.

The cervical vertebrae are the seven vertebrae that make up the upper part of the spine, also known as the neck region. They are labeled C1 to C7, with C1 being closest to the skull and C7 connecting to the thoracic vertebrae in the chest region. The cervical vertebrae have unique structures to allow for a wide range of motion in the neck while also protecting the spinal cord and providing attachment points for muscles and ligaments.

Electric stimulation therapy, also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or electromyostimulation, is a therapeutic treatment that uses electrical impulses to stimulate muscles and nerves. The electrical signals are delivered through electrodes placed on the skin near the target muscle group or nerve.

The therapy can be used for various purposes, including:

1. Pain management: Electric stimulation can help reduce pain by stimulating the release of endorphins, which are natural painkillers produced by the body. It can also help block the transmission of pain signals to the brain.
2. Muscle rehabilitation: NMES can be used to prevent muscle atrophy and maintain muscle tone in individuals who are unable to move their muscles due to injury or illness, such as spinal cord injuries or stroke.
3. Improving circulation: Electric stimulation can help improve blood flow and reduce swelling by contracting the muscles and promoting the movement of fluids in the body.
4. Wound healing: NMES can be used to promote wound healing by increasing blood flow, reducing swelling, and improving muscle function around the wound site.
5. Muscle strengthening: Electric stimulation can be used to strengthen muscles by causing them to contract and relax repeatedly, which can help improve muscle strength and endurance.

It is important to note that electric stimulation therapy should only be administered under the guidance of a trained healthcare professional, as improper use can cause harm or discomfort.

In the context of human anatomy, the thigh is the part of the lower limb that extends from the hip to the knee. It is the upper and largest portion of the leg and is primarily composed of the femur bone, which is the longest and strongest bone in the human body, as well as several muscles including the quadriceps femoris (front thigh), hamstrings (back thigh), and adductors (inner thigh). The major blood vessels and nerves that supply the lower limb also pass through the thigh.

Wrist injuries refer to damages or traumas affecting the structures of the wrist, including bones, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and cartilage. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as falls, accidents, sports-related impacts, or repetitive stress. Common types of wrist injuries include fractures (such as scaphoid fracture), sprains (like ligament tears), strains (involving muscles or tendons), dislocations, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, tenderness, bruising, limited mobility, and in severe cases, deformity or numbness. Immediate medical attention is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment to ensure optimal recovery and prevent long-term complications.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Vascular patency is a term used in medicine to describe the state of a blood vessel (such as an artery or vein) being open, unobstructed, and allowing for the normal flow of blood. It is an important concept in the treatment and management of various cardiovascular conditions, such as peripheral artery disease, coronary artery disease, and deep vein thrombosis.

Maintaining vascular patency can help prevent serious complications like tissue damage, organ dysfunction, or even death. This may involve medical interventions such as administering blood-thinning medications to prevent clots, performing procedures to remove blockages, or using devices like stents to keep vessels open. Regular monitoring of vascular patency is also crucial for evaluating the effectiveness of treatments and adjusting care plans accordingly.

Venous thrombosis is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the deep veins, often in the legs (deep vein thrombosis or DVT), but it can also occur in other parts of the body such as the arms, pelvis, or lungs (pulmonary embolism).

The formation of a venous thrombus can be caused by various factors, including injury to the blood vessel wall, changes in blood flow, and alterations in the composition of the blood. These factors can lead to the activation of clotting factors and platelets, which can result in the formation of a clot that blocks the vein.

Symptoms of venous thrombosis may include swelling, pain, warmth, and redness in the affected area. In some cases, the clot can dislodge and travel to other parts of the body, causing potentially life-threatening complications such as pulmonary embolism.

Risk factors for venous thrombosis include advanced age, obesity, smoking, pregnancy, use of hormonal contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy, cancer, recent surgery or trauma, prolonged immobility, and a history of previous venous thromboembolism. Treatment typically involves the use of anticoagulant medications to prevent further clotting and dissolve existing clots.

Crutches are medical devices that provide support and assistance for mobility, typically used by individuals who have difficulty walking or standing due to injury, illness, or disability. They help to reduce weight-bearing stress on the affected limb, improve balance, and increase stability during ambulation. Crutches can be either manually operated or designed with special features such as springs or shock absorbers to enhance comfort and functionality. Proper fit, adjustment, and usage of crutches are crucial for ensuring safety, preventing further injury, and promoting rehabilitation.

Gangrene is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when there is a loss of blood flow to a specific area of the body, resulting in tissue death. It can be caused by various factors such as bacterial infections, trauma, diabetes, vascular diseases, and smoking. The affected tissues may become discolored, swollen, and emit a foul odor due to the accumulation of bacteria and toxins.

Gangrene can be classified into two main types: dry gangrene and wet (or moist) gangrene. Dry gangrene develops slowly and is often associated with peripheral arterial disease, which reduces blood flow to the extremities. The affected area turns black and shriveled as it dries out. Wet gangrene, on the other hand, progresses rapidly due to bacterial infections that cause tissue breakdown and pus formation. This type of gangrene can spread quickly throughout the body, leading to severe complications such as sepsis and organ failure if left untreated.

Treatment for gangrene typically involves surgical removal of the dead tissue (debridement), antibiotics to control infections, and sometimes revascularization procedures to restore blood flow to the affected area. In severe cases where the infection has spread or the damage is irreversible, amputation of the affected limb may be necessary to prevent further complications and save the patient's life.

In medical terms, fingers are not specifically defined as they are common anatomical structures. However, I can provide you with a general anatomy definition:

Fingers are the terminal parts of the upper limb in primates, including humans, consisting of four digits (thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers) and one opposable thumb. They contain bones called phalanges, connected by joints that allow for movement and flexibility. Each finger has a nail, nerve endings for sensation, and blood vessels to supply nutrients and oxygen. Fingers are crucial for various activities such as grasping, manipulating objects, and tactile exploration of the environment.

Disability Evaluation is the process of determining the nature and extent of a person's functional limitations or impairments, and assessing their ability to perform various tasks and activities in order to determine eligibility for disability benefits or accommodations. This process typically involves a medical examination and assessment by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician or psychologist, who evaluates the individual's symptoms, medical history, laboratory test results, and functional abilities. The evaluation may also involve input from other professionals, such as vocational experts, occupational therapists, or speech-language pathologists, who can provide additional information about the person's ability to perform specific tasks and activities in a work or daily living context. Based on this information, a determination is made about whether the individual meets the criteria for disability as defined by the relevant governing authority, such as the Social Security Administration or the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Limb salvage is a medical term used to describe the surgical procedures and treatments aimed at preserving and restoring the functionality of a severely injured or diseased limb, rather than amputating it. The goal of limb salvage is to improve the patient's quality of life by maintaining their mobility, independence, and overall well-being.

Limb salvage may involve various surgical techniques such as vascular reconstruction, bone realignment, muscle flap coverage, and external fixation. These procedures aim to restore blood flow, stabilize bones, cover exposed tissues, and prevent infection. Additionally, adjuvant therapies like hyperbaric oxygen treatment, physical therapy, and pain management may be employed to support the healing process and improve functional outcomes.

Limb salvage is typically considered when a limb is threatened by conditions such as severe trauma, tumors, infections, or peripheral arterial disease. The decision to pursue limb salvage over amputation depends on factors like the patient's overall health, age, and personal preferences, as well as the extent of the injury or disease, potential for recovery, and likelihood of successful rehabilitation.

Shoulder pain is a condition characterized by discomfort or hurt in the shoulder joint, muscles, tendons, ligaments, or surrounding structures. The shoulder is one of the most mobile joints in the body, and this mobility makes it prone to injury and pain. Shoulder pain can result from various causes, including overuse, trauma, degenerative conditions, or referred pain from other areas of the body.

The shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket joint made up of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collarbone). The rotator cuff, a group of four muscles that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint, can also be a source of pain if it becomes inflamed or torn.

Shoulder pain can range from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by stiffness, swelling, bruising, weakness, numbness, tingling, or reduced mobility in the affected arm. The pain may worsen with movement, lifting objects, or performing certain activities, such as reaching overhead or behind the back.

Medical evaluation is necessary to determine the underlying cause of shoulder pain and develop an appropriate treatment plan. Treatment options may include rest, physical therapy, medication, injections, or surgery, depending on the severity and nature of the condition.

Peripheral catheterization is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a thin, flexible tube (catheter) into a peripheral vein, which is a blood vessel located outside of the chest and abdomen. This type of catheterization is typically performed to administer medications, fluids, or nutritional support, or to monitor various physiological parameters such as central venous pressure.

Peripheral catheters are usually inserted into veins in the hands or arms, although they can also be placed in other peripheral veins. The procedure is typically performed using aseptic technique to minimize the risk of infection. Once the catheter is in place, it may be secured with a dressing or suture to prevent movement and dislodgement.

Peripheral catheterization is a relatively safe and common procedure that is routinely performed in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. However, like any medical procedure, it carries a small risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or damage to the vein or surrounding tissues.

Artificial limbs, also known as prosthetics, are artificial substitutes that replace a part or all of an absent extremity or limb. They are designed to restore the function, mobility, and appearance of the lost limb as much as possible. Artificial limbs can be made from various materials such as wood, plastic, metal, or carbon fiber, and they can be custom-made to fit the individual's specific needs and measurements.

Prosthetic limbs can be categorized into two main types: cosmetic and functional. Cosmetic prosthetics are designed to look like natural limbs and are primarily used to improve the appearance of the person. Functional prosthetics, on the other hand, are designed to help the individual perform specific tasks and activities. They may include features such as hooks, hands, or specialized feet that can be used for different purposes.

Advances in technology have led to the development of more sophisticated artificial limbs, including those that can be controlled by the user's nervous system, known as bionic prosthetics. These advanced prosthetic devices can provide a greater degree of mobility and control for the user, allowing them to perform complex movements and tasks with ease.

Brachial plexus neuropathies refer to a group of conditions that affect the brachial plexus, which is a network of nerves that originates from the spinal cord in the neck and travels down the arm. These nerves are responsible for providing motor and sensory function to the shoulder, arm, and hand.

Brachial plexus neuropathies can occur due to various reasons, including trauma, compression, inflammation, or tumors. The condition can cause symptoms such as pain, numbness, weakness, or paralysis in the affected arm and hand.

The specific medical definition of brachial plexus neuropathies is:

"A group of conditions that affect the brachial plexus, characterized by damage to the nerves that results in motor and/or sensory impairment of the upper limb. The condition can be congenital or acquired, with causes including trauma, compression, inflammation, or tumors."

Soft tissue injuries refer to damages that occur in the body's connective tissues, such as ligaments, tendons, and muscles. These injuries can be caused by various events, including accidents, falls, or sports-related impacts. Common soft tissue injuries include sprains, strains, and contusions (bruises).

Sprains occur when the ligaments, which connect bones to each other, are stretched or torn. This usually happens in the joints like ankles, knees, or wrists. Strains, on the other hand, involve injuries to the muscles or tendons, often resulting from overuse or sudden excessive force. Contusions occur when blood vessels within the soft tissues get damaged due to a direct blow or impact, causing bleeding and subsequent bruising in the affected area.

Soft tissue injuries can cause pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited mobility. In some cases, these injuries may require medical treatment, including physical therapy, medication, or even surgery, depending on their severity and location. It is essential to seek proper medical attention for soft tissue injuries to ensure appropriate healing and prevent long-term complications or chronic pain.

Exercise therapy is a type of medical treatment that uses physical movement and exercise to improve a patient's physical functioning, mobility, and overall health. It is often used as a component of rehabilitation programs for individuals who have experienced injuries, illnesses, or surgeries that have impaired their ability to move and function normally.

Exercise therapy may involve a range of activities, including stretching, strengthening, balance training, aerobic exercise, and functional training. The specific exercises used will depend on the individual's needs, goals, and medical condition.

The benefits of exercise therapy include:

* Improved strength and flexibility
* Increased endurance and stamina
* Enhanced balance and coordination
* Reduced pain and inflammation
* Improved cardiovascular health
* Increased range of motion and joint mobility
* Better overall physical functioning and quality of life.

Exercise therapy is typically prescribed and supervised by a healthcare professional, such as a physical therapist or exercise physiologist, who has experience working with individuals with similar medical conditions. The healthcare professional will create an individualized exercise program based on the patient's needs and goals, and will provide guidance and support to ensure that the exercises are performed safely and effectively.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Vascular surgical procedures are operations that are performed to treat conditions and diseases related to the vascular system, which includes the arteries, veins, and capillaries. These procedures can be invasive or minimally invasive and are often used to treat conditions such as peripheral artery disease, carotid artery stenosis, aortic aneurysms, and venous insufficiency.

Some examples of vascular surgical procedures include:

* Endarterectomy: a procedure to remove plaque buildup from the inside of an artery
* Bypass surgery: creating a new path for blood to flow around a blocked or narrowed artery
* Angioplasty and stenting: using a balloon to open a narrowed artery and placing a stent to keep it open
* Aneurysm repair: surgically repairing an aneurysm, a weakened area in the wall of an artery that has bulged out and filled with blood
* Embolectomy: removing a blood clot from a blood vessel
* Thrombectomy: removing a blood clot from a vein

These procedures are typically performed by vascular surgeons, who are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular diseases.

The Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract refers to the segment of the digestive system that includes the mouth, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This region is responsible for the initial stages of digestion, such as mechanical breakdown of food by chewing and churning, and chemical breakdown through enzymes and acids. It's also where the majority of nutrient absorption occurs. Various medical conditions, including infections, inflammation, and cancers, can affect the upper GI tract.

Muscle weakness is a condition in which muscles cannot develop the expected level of physical force or power. This results in reduced muscle function and can be caused by various factors, including nerve damage, muscle diseases, or hormonal imbalances. Muscle weakness may manifest as difficulty lifting objects, maintaining posture, or performing daily activities. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment of muscle weakness.

Quadriplegia, also known as tetraplegia, is a medical condition characterized by paralysis affecting all four limbs and the trunk of the body. It results from damage to the cervical spinal cord, typically at levels C1-C8, which controls signals to the muscles in the arms, hands, trunk, legs, and pelvic organs. The extent of quadriplegia can vary widely, ranging from weakness to complete loss of movement and sensation below the level of injury. Other symptoms may include difficulty breathing, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction. The severity and prognosis depend on the location and extent of the spinal cord injury.

Paraplegia is a medical condition characterized by partial or complete loss of motor function and sensation in the lower extremities, typically affecting both legs. This results from damage to the spinal cord, often due to trauma such as accidents, falls, or gunshot wounds, or from diseases like spina bifida, polio, or tumors. The specific area and extent of the injury on the spinal cord determine the severity and location of paralysis. Individuals with paraplegia may require assistive devices for mobility, such as wheelchairs, and may face various health challenges, including pressure sores, urinary tract infections, and chronic pain.

Muscle spasticity is a motor disorder characterized by an involuntary increase in muscle tone, leading to stiffness and difficulty in moving muscles. It is often seen in people with damage to the brain or spinal cord, such as those with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, or spinal cord injuries.

In muscle spasticity, the muscles may contract excessively, causing rigid limbs, awkward movements, and abnormal postures. The severity of muscle spasticity can vary from mild stiffness to severe contractures that limit mobility and function.

Muscle spasticity is caused by an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory signals in the central nervous system, leading to overactivity of the alpha motor neurons that control muscle contraction. This can result in hyperreflexia (overactive reflexes), clonus (rapid, rhythmic muscle contractions), and flexor or extensor spasms.

Effective management of muscle spasticity may involve a combination of physical therapy, medication, surgery, or other interventions to improve function, reduce pain, and prevent complications such as contractures and pressure sores.

Brachial plexus neuritis, also known as Parsonage-Turner syndrome or neuralgic amyotrophy, is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and damage to the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originates from the spinal cord in the neck and travels down the arm, controlling movement and sensation in the shoulder, arm, and hand.

In Brachial plexus neuritis, the insulating covering of the nerves (myelin sheath) is damaged or destroyed, leading to impaired nerve function. The exact cause of this condition is not fully understood, but it can be associated with viral infections, trauma, surgery, or immunological disorders.

Symptoms of Brachial plexus neuritis may include sudden onset of severe pain in the shoulder and arm, followed by weakness or paralysis of the affected muscles. There may also be numbness, tingling, or loss of sensation in the affected areas. In some cases, recovery can occur spontaneously within a few months, while others may experience persistent weakness or disability. Treatment typically involves pain management, physical therapy, and in some cases, corticosteroids or other medications to reduce inflammation.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

The lower extremity, also known as the lower limb, consists of the bones that make up the leg and foot. In humans, these bones include:

1. Femur: This is the thigh bone, and it is the longest and strongest bone in the human body.
2. Patella: Also known as the kneecap, this is a small triangular bone located at the front of the knee joint.
3. Tibia: This is the larger of the two bones in the lower leg, also known as the shin bone.
4. Fibula: This is the smaller of the two bones in the lower leg, located on the lateral side of the tibia.
5. Tarsal bones: These are seven small bones located in the foot, which articulate with the tibia and fibula to form the ankle joint.
6. Metatarsal bones: These are five long bones located in the midfoot, which connect to the phalanges (toes) at one end and the tarsal bones at the other.
7. Phalanges: These are fourteen small bones located in the toes, similar in structure to the phalanges in the fingers of the hand.

Together, these bones provide support, stability, and mobility to the lower extremity, allowing for activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and maintain balance and posture. According to the Mayo Clinic, CP is caused by abnormal brain development or damage to the developing brain that affects a child's ability to control movement.

The symptoms of cerebral palsy can vary in severity and may include:

* Spasticity (stiff or tight muscles)
* Rigidity (resistance to passive movement)
* Poor coordination and balance
* Weakness or paralysis
* Tremors or involuntary movements
* Abnormal gait or difficulty walking
* Difficulty with fine motor skills, such as writing or using utensils
* Speech and language difficulties
* Vision, hearing, or swallowing problems

It's important to note that cerebral palsy is not a progressive condition, meaning that it does not worsen over time. However, the symptoms may change over time, and some individuals with CP may experience additional medical conditions as they age.

Cerebral palsy is usually caused by brain damage that occurs before or during birth, but it can also be caused by brain injuries that occur in the first few years of life. Some possible causes of cerebral palsy include:

* Infections during pregnancy
* Lack of oxygen to the brain during delivery
* Traumatic head injury during birth
* Brain bleeding or stroke in the newborn period
* Genetic disorders
* Maternal illness or infection during pregnancy

There is no cure for cerebral palsy, but early intervention and treatment can help improve outcomes and quality of life. Treatment may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, medications to manage symptoms, surgery, and assistive devices such as braces or wheelchairs.

Muscle strength, in a medical context, refers to the amount of force a muscle or group of muscles can produce during contraction. It is the maximum amount of force that a muscle can generate through its full range of motion and is often measured in units of force such as pounds or newtons. Muscle strength is an important component of physical function and mobility, and it can be assessed through various tests, including manual muscle testing, dynamometry, and isokinetic testing. Factors that can affect muscle strength include age, sex, body composition, injury, disease, and physical activity level.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Golf" is not a medical term. It is a sport that involves hitting a small ball with various clubs into a series of holes on a course, typically in as few strokes as possible. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

The forearm is the region of the upper limb between the elbow and the wrist. It consists of two bones, the radius and ulna, which are located side by side and run parallel to each other. The forearm is responsible for movements such as flexion, extension, supination, and pronation of the hand and wrist.

Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is a complex phenomenon that can result from various stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical, or chemical irritation, and it can be acute or chronic. The perception of pain involves the activation of specialized nerve cells called nociceptors, which transmit signals to the brain via the spinal cord. These signals are then processed in different regions of the brain, leading to the conscious experience of pain. It's important to note that pain is a highly individual and subjective experience, and its perception can vary widely among individuals.

The musculocutaneous nerve is a peripheral nerve that originates from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus, composed of contributions from the ventral rami of spinal nerves C5-C7. It provides motor innervation to the muscles in the anterior compartment of the upper arm: the coracobrachialis, biceps brachii, and brachialis. Additionally, it gives rise to the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, which supplies sensory innervation to the skin on the lateral aspect of the forearm.

The brachial artery is a major blood vessel in the upper arm. It supplies oxygenated blood to the muscles and tissues of the arm, forearm, and hand. The brachial artery originates from the axillary artery at the level of the shoulder joint and runs down the medial (inner) aspect of the arm, passing through the cubital fossa (the depression on the anterior side of the elbow) where it can be palpated during a routine blood pressure measurement. At the lower end of the forearm, the brachial artery bifurcates into the radial and ulnar arteries, which further divide into smaller vessels to supply the hand and fingers.

Hyperesthesia is a medical term that refers to an increased sensitivity to sensory stimuli, including touch, pain, or temperature. It can affect various parts of the body and can be caused by different conditions, such as nerve damage, multiple sclerosis, or complex regional pain syndrome. Hyperesthesia can manifest as a heightened awareness of sensations, which can be painful or uncomfortable, and may interfere with daily activities. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment if experiencing symptoms of hyperesthesia.

Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) of childhood are a group of inherited neuromuscular disorders characterized by degeneration and loss of lower motor neurons in the spinal cord, leading to progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The severity and age of onset can vary significantly, with some forms presenting in infancy and others in later childhood or even adulthood.

The most common form of SMA is 5q autosomal recessive SMA, also known as survival motor neuron (SMN) disease, which results from mutations in the SMN1 gene. The severity of this form can range from severe (type I or Werdnig-Hoffmann disease), intermediate (type II or chronic infantile neurodegenerative disorder), to mild (type III or Kugelberg-Welander disease).

Type I SMA is the most severe form, with onset before 6 months of age and rapid progression leading to death within the first two years of life if left untreated. Type II SMA has an onset between 6 and 18 months of age, with affected children never achieving the ability to walk independently. Type III SMA has a later onset, typically after 18 months of age, and is characterized by a slower progression, allowing for the ability to walk unaided, although mobility may be lost over time.

Other forms of childhood-onset SMA include autosomal dominant distal SMA, X-linked SMA, and spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease). These forms have distinct genetic causes and clinical presentations.

In general, SMAs are characterized by muscle weakness, hypotonia, fasciculations, tongue atrophy, and depressed or absent deep tendon reflexes. Respiratory and nutritional support is often required in more severe cases. Recent advances in gene therapy have led to the development of disease-modifying treatments for some forms of SMA.

Biofeedback is a psychological and physiological intervention that involves the use of electronic devices to measure and provide real-time feedback to individuals about their bodily functions, such as heart rate, muscle tension, skin conductance, and brain activity. The goal of biofeedback is to help individuals gain awareness and control over these functions, with the aim of improving physical and mental health outcomes.

In psychology, biofeedback is often used as a treatment for a variety of conditions, including anxiety, stress, headaches, chronic pain, and mood disorders. By learning to regulate their physiological responses through biofeedback training, individuals can reduce symptoms and improve their overall well-being. The process typically involves working with a trained healthcare provider who guides the individual in practicing various relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing or progressive muscle relaxation, while monitoring their physiological responses using biofeedback equipment. Over time, the individual learns to associate these techniques with positive changes in their body and can use them to manage symptoms on their own.

Proprioception is the unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself. It is sometimes described as the "sixth sense" and it's all about knowing where your body parts are, how they are moving, and the effort being used to move them. This information is crucial for motor control, balance, and coordination.

The proprioceptive system includes sensory receptors called proprioreceptors located in muscles, tendons, and joints that send messages to the brain through nerves regarding body position and movement. These messages are then integrated with information from other senses, such as vision and vestibular sense (related to balance), to create a complete understanding of the body's position and motion in space.

Deficits in proprioception can lead to problems with coordination, balance, and fine motor skills.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tennis" is generally not a term that has a medical definition. It is most commonly known as a sport or game played with rackets and a ball on a court with a net dividing the space in half. If you have any questions about a specific medical condition or term, I'd be happy to help if I can!

The subclavian artery is a major blood vessel that supplies the upper limb and important structures in the neck and head. It arises from the brachiocephalic trunk (in the case of the right subclavian artery) or directly from the aortic arch (in the case of the left subclavian artery).

The subclavian artery has several branches, including:

1. The vertebral artery, which supplies blood to the brainstem and cerebellum.
2. The internal thoracic artery (also known as the mammary artery), which supplies blood to the chest wall, breast, and anterior mediastinum.
3. The thyrocervical trunk, which gives rise to several branches that supply the neck, including the inferior thyroid artery, the suprascapular artery, and the transverse cervical artery.
4. The costocervical trunk, which supplies blood to the neck and upper back, including the posterior chest wall and the lower neck muscles.

The subclavian artery is a critical vessel in maintaining adequate blood flow to the upper limb, and any blockage or damage to this vessel can lead to significant morbidity, including arm pain, numbness, weakness, or even loss of function.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Congenital hand deformities refer to physical abnormalities or malformations of the hand, wrist, and/or digits (fingers) that are present at birth. These deformities can result from genetic factors, environmental influences during pregnancy, or a combination of both. They may affect the bones, muscles, tendons, joints, and other structures in the hand, leading to varying degrees of impairment in function and appearance.

There are numerous types of congenital hand deformities, some of which include:

1. Polydactyly: The presence of extra digits on the hand, which can be fully formed or rudimentary.
2. Syndactyly: Webbing or fusion of two or more fingers, which may involve soft tissue only or bone as well.
3. Clinodactyly: A curved finger due to a sideways deviation of the fingertip, often affecting the little finger.
4. Camptodactyly: Permanent flexion or bending of one or more fingers, typically involving the proximal interphalangeal joint.
5. Trigger Finger/Thumb: A condition where a finger or thumb becomes locked in a bent position due to thickening and narrowing of the tendon sheath.
6. Radial Club Hand (Radial Ray Deficiency): Underdevelopment or absence of the radius bone, resulting in a short, curved forearm and hand deformity.
7. Ulnar Club Hand (Ulnar Ray Deficiency): Underdevelopment or absence of the ulna bone, leading to a short, curved forearm and hand deformity.
8. Cleidocranial Dysplasia: A genetic disorder affecting bone growth, resulting in underdeveloped or absent collarbones, dental abnormalities, and occasionally hand deformities.
9. Apert Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the fusion of fingers and toes (syndactyly) and other skeletal abnormalities.
10. Holt-Oram Syndrome: A genetic disorder involving heart defects and upper limb deformities, such as radial ray deficiency or thumb anomalies.

Treatment for hand deformities varies depending on the specific condition and severity. Options may include physical therapy, bracing, splinting, medications, or surgical intervention.

Central venous catheterization is a medical procedure in which a flexible tube called a catheter is inserted into a large vein in the body, usually in the neck (internal jugular vein), chest (subclavian vein), or groin (femoral vein). The catheter is threaded through the vein until it reaches a central location, such as the superior vena cava or the right atrium of the heart.

Central venous catheterization may be performed for several reasons, including:

1. To administer medications, fluids, or nutritional support directly into the bloodstream.
2. To monitor central venous pressure (CVP), which can help assess a patient's volume status and cardiac function.
3. To draw blood samples for laboratory tests.
4. To deliver chemotherapy drugs or other medications that may be harmful to peripheral veins.
5. To provide access for hemodialysis or other long-term therapies.

The procedure requires careful attention to sterile technique to minimize the risk of infection, and it is usually performed under local anesthesia with sedation or general anesthesia. Complications of central venous catheterization may include bleeding, infection, pneumothorax (collapsed lung), arterial puncture, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI).

'Leg bones' is a general term that refers to the bones in the leg portion of the lower extremity. In humans, this would specifically include:

1. Femur: This is the thigh bone, the longest and strongest bone in the human body. It connects the hip bone to the knee.

2. Patella: This is the kneecap, a small triangular bone located at the front of the knee joint.

3. Tibia and Fibula: These are the bones of the lower leg. The tibia, or shin bone, is the larger of the two and bears most of the body's weight. It connects the knee to the ankle. The fibula, a slender bone, runs parallel to the tibia on its outside.

Please note that in medical terminology, 'leg bones' doesn't include the bones of the foot (tarsal bones, metatarsal bones, and phalanges), which are often collectively referred to as the 'foot bones'.

Penetrating wounds are a type of traumatic injury that occurs when an object pierces through the skin and underlying tissues, creating a hole or cavity in the body. These wounds can vary in severity, depending on the size and shape of the object, as well as the location and depth of the wound.

Penetrating wounds are typically caused by sharp objects such as knives, bullets, or glass. They can damage internal organs, blood vessels, nerves, and bones, leading to serious complications such as bleeding, infection, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly and properly.

The management of penetrating wounds involves a thorough assessment of the wound and surrounding tissues, as well as the identification and treatment of any associated injuries or complications. This may include wound cleaning and closure, antibiotics to prevent infection, pain management, and surgery to repair damaged structures. In some cases, hospitalization and close monitoring may be necessary to ensure proper healing and recovery.

Activities of Daily Living (ADL) are routine self-care activities that individuals usually do every day without assistance. These activities are widely used as a measure to determine the functional status and independence of a person, particularly in the elderly or those with disabilities or chronic illnesses. The basic ADLs include:

1. Personal hygiene: Bathing, washing hands and face, brushing teeth, grooming, and using the toilet.
2. Dressing: Selecting appropriate clothes and dressing oneself.
3. Eating: Preparing and consuming food, either independently or with assistive devices.
4. Mobility: Moving in and out of bed, chairs, or wheelchairs, walking independently or using mobility aids.
5. Transferring: Moving from one place to another, such as getting in and out of a car, bath, or bed.

There are also more complex Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) that assess an individual's ability to manage their own life and live independently. These include managing finances, shopping for groceries, using the telephone, taking medications as prescribed, preparing meals, and housekeeping tasks.

A nerve block is a medical procedure in which an anesthetic or neurolytic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block the transmission of pain signals from that area to the brain. This technique can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, such as identifying the source of pain, providing temporary or prolonged relief, or facilitating surgical procedures in the affected region.

The injection typically contains a local anesthetic like lidocaine or bupivacaine, which numbs the nerve, preventing it from transmitting pain signals. In some cases, steroids may also be added to reduce inflammation and provide longer-lasting relief. Depending on the type of nerve block and its intended use, the injection might be administered close to the spine (neuraxial blocks), at peripheral nerves (peripheral nerve blocks), or around the sympathetic nervous system (sympathetic nerve blocks).

While nerve blocks are generally safe, they can have side effects such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, or in rare cases, systemic toxicity from the anesthetic agent. It is essential to consult with a qualified medical professional before undergoing this procedure to ensure proper evaluation, technique, and post-procedure care.

A computer terminal is a device that enables a user to interact with a computer system. It typically includes an input device, such as a keyboard or a mouse, and an output device, such as a monitor or a printer. A terminal may also include additional features, such as storage devices or network connections. In modern usage, the term "computer terminal" is often used to refer specifically to a device that provides text-based access to a computer system, as opposed to a graphical user interface (GUI). These text-based terminals are sometimes called "dumb terminals," because they rely on the computer system to perform most of the processing and only provide a simple interface for input and output. However, this term can be misleading, as many modern terminals are quite sophisticated and can include features such as advanced graphics capabilities or support for multimedia content.

The Radial nerve is a major peripheral nerve in the human body that originates from the brachial plexus, which is a network of nerves formed by the union of the ventral rami (anterior divisions) of spinal nerves C5-T1. The radial nerve provides motor function to extensor muscles of the upper limb and sensation to parts of the skin on the back of the arm, forearm, and hand.

More specifically, the radial nerve supplies motor innervation to:

* Extensor muscles of the shoulder (e.g., teres minor, infraspinatus)
* Rotator cuff muscles
* Elbow joint stabilizers (e.g., lateral head of the triceps)
* Extensors of the wrist, fingers, and thumb

The radial nerve also provides sensory innervation to:

* Posterior aspect of the upper arm (from the lower third of the humerus to the elbow)
* Lateral forearm (from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus to the wrist)
* Dorsum of the hand (skin over the radial side of the dorsum, including the first web space)

Damage or injury to the radial nerve may result in various symptoms, such as weakness or paralysis of the extensor muscles, numbness or tingling sensations in the affected areas, and difficulty with extension movements of the wrist, fingers, and thumb. Common causes of radial nerve injuries include fractures of the humerus bone, compression during sleep or prolonged pressure on the nerve (e.g., from crutches), and entrapment syndromes like radial tunnel syndrome.

A bone fracture is a medical condition in which there is a partial or complete break in the continuity of a bone due to external or internal forces. Fractures can occur in any bone in the body and can vary in severity from a small crack to a shattered bone. The symptoms of a bone fracture typically include pain, swelling, bruising, deformity, and difficulty moving the affected limb. Treatment for a bone fracture may involve immobilization with a cast or splint, surgery to realign and stabilize the bone, or medication to manage pain and prevent infection. The specific treatment approach will depend on the location, type, and severity of the fracture.

The brachiocephalic veins, also known as the innominate veins, are large veins in the human body. They are formed by the union of the subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein on each side of the body. The resulting vein then carries blood from the upper limbs, head, and neck to the superior vena cava, which is the large vein that returns blood to the heart.

Here's a more detailed medical definition:

The brachiocephalic veins are paired venous structures that result from the union of the subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein on each side of the body. These veins are located in the superior mediastinum, near the base of the neck, and are typically about 2 to 3 centimeters in length. The brachiocephalic veins receive blood from several sources, including the upper extremities, head, neck, and thoracic wall. They then transport this blood to the superior vena cava, which is a large vein that returns blood to the right atrium of the heart.

It's worth noting that the brachiocephalic veins are subject to various pathological conditions, including thrombosis (blood clots), stenosis (narrowing), and compression by nearby structures such as the first rib or the scalene muscles. These conditions can lead to a variety of symptoms, including swelling, pain, and difficulty breathing.

Ulnar nerve compression syndromes refer to a group of conditions characterized by the entrapment or compression of the ulnar nerve, leading to various symptoms. The ulnar nerve provides motor function to the hand muscles and sensation to the little finger and half of the ring finger.

There are several sites along the course of the ulnar nerve where it can become compressed, resulting in different types of ulnar nerve compression syndromes:

1. Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: This occurs when the ulnar nerve is compressed at the elbow, within the cubital tunnel - a narrow passage located on the inner side of the elbow. Symptoms may include numbness and tingling in the little finger and half of the ring finger, weakness in gripping or pinching, and pain or discomfort in the elbow.

2. Guyon's Canal Syndrome: This type of ulnar nerve compression syndrome happens when the nerve is compressed at the wrist, within the Guyon's canal. Causes can include ganglion cysts, bone fractures, or repetitive motion injuries. Symptoms may include numbness and tingling in the little finger and half of the ring finger, weakness or paralysis in the hand muscles, and muscle wasting in severe cases.

Treatment for ulnar nerve compression syndromes depends on the severity and location of the compression. Conservative treatments such as physical therapy, bracing, or anti-inflammatory medications may be recommended for milder cases. Severe or persistent symptoms may require surgical intervention to relieve the pressure on the ulnar nerve.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Gymnastics" is not a medical term. It is an athletic discipline consisting of physical exercises requiring balance, strength, flexibility, agility, coordination, and endurance. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Arterial occlusive diseases are medical conditions characterized by the blockage or narrowing of the arteries, which can lead to a reduction in blood flow to various parts of the body. This reduction in blood flow can cause tissue damage and may result in serious complications such as tissue death (gangrene), organ dysfunction, or even death.

The most common cause of arterial occlusive diseases is atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of plaque made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances in the inner lining of the artery walls. Over time, this plaque can harden and narrow the arteries, restricting blood flow. Other causes of arterial occlusive diseases include blood clots, emboli (tiny particles that travel through the bloodstream and lodge in smaller vessels), inflammation, trauma, and certain inherited conditions.

Symptoms of arterial occlusive diseases depend on the location and severity of the blockage. Common symptoms include:

* Pain, cramping, or fatigue in the affected limb, often triggered by exercise and relieved by rest (claudication)
* Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected limb
* Coldness or discoloration of the skin in the affected area
* Slow-healing sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs
* Erectile dysfunction in men

Treatment for arterial occlusive diseases may include lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and eating a healthy diet. Medications to lower cholesterol, control blood pressure, prevent blood clots, or manage pain may also be prescribed. In severe cases, surgical procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, or bypass surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow.

The Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is a standardized system used by healthcare professionals to classify the severity of traumatic injuries. The scale assigns a score from 1 to 6 to each injury, with 1 indicating minor injuries and 6 indicating maximal severity or currently untreatable injuries.

The AIS scores are based on anatomical location, type of injury, and physiological response to the injury. For example, a simple fracture may be assigned an AIS score of 2, while a life-threatening head injury may be assigned a score of 5 or 6.

The AIS is used in conjunction with other scoring systems, such as the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS), to assess the overall severity of injuries sustained in a traumatic event. These scores can help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care, triage, and resource allocation.

Occupational therapy (OT) is a healthcare profession that aims to improve the daily living and functional abilities of individuals who have physical, sensory, or cognitive disabilities. OT focuses on helping people participate in the activities of everyday life, such as self-care tasks (e.g., dressing, grooming), productive tasks (e.g., work, school), and leisure activities (e.g., hobbies, sports).

Occupational therapists use a variety of interventions to achieve these goals, including:

1. Customized treatment plans that focus on the individual's specific needs and goals.
2. Adaptive equipment and assistive technology to help individuals perform activities more independently.
3. Education and training for individuals, families, and caregivers on how to use adaptive equipment and techniques.
4. Environmental modifications to make daily activities safer and more accessible.
5. Skill development and practice in areas such as fine motor coordination, cognitive skills, and sensory processing.

Occupational therapy can be provided in a variety of settings, including hospitals, rehabilitation centers, outpatient clinics, schools, and private homes. OT is often recommended for individuals who have experienced a stroke, brain injury, spinal cord injury, or other conditions that affect their ability to perform daily activities.

Traumatic amputation is the accidental or spontaneous separation of a limb or body part due to trauma or severe injury. This can occur as a result of motor vehicle accidents, industrial incidents, agricultural mishaps, or military combat, among other causes. The severed portion may or may not be recoverable for reattachment depending on various factors such as the extent of damage, ischemia time, and conditions during transportation. Immediate medical attention is required to control bleeding, manage shock, prevent infection, and initiate appropriate wound care and potential reconstructive surgery.

In medical terms, sensation refers to the ability to perceive and interpret various stimuli from our environment through specialized receptor cells located throughout the body. These receptors convert physical stimuli such as light, sound, temperature, pressure, and chemicals into electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain via nerves. The brain then interprets these signals, allowing us to experience sensations like sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell.

There are two main types of sensations: exteroceptive and interoceptive. Exteroceptive sensations involve stimuli from outside the body, such as light, sound, and touch. Interoceptive sensations, on the other hand, refer to the perception of internal bodily sensations, such as hunger, thirst, heartbeat, or emotions.

Disorders in sensation can result from damage to the nervous system, including peripheral nerves, spinal cord, or brain. Examples include numbness, tingling, pain, or loss of sensation in specific body parts, which can significantly impact a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities.

Subclavian Steal Syndrome is a medical condition that occurs when there is a narrowing or blockage (stenosis) in the subclavian artery, usually at or near its origin from the aorta. This stenosis causes reduced blood flow to the ipsilateral upper extremity. The decreased blood supply to the arm leads to reversal of flow in the vertebral artery, which normally supplies blood to the brain and neck structures. As a result, the brain may receive insufficient blood flow, causing symptoms such as dizziness, lightheadedness, syncope (fainting), or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs or "mini-strokes").

The syndrome is called 'subclavian steal' because the vertebral artery essentially "steals" blood from the circle of Willis (the network of arteries at the base of the brain) to compensate for the reduced flow in the subclavian artery. The condition most commonly affects the left subclavian artery, but it can also occur on the right side or both sides.

Subclavian Steal Syndrome is typically diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and imaging tests such as Doppler ultrasound, CT angiography (CTA), or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Treatment options include surgical bypass, endovascular stenting, or medication to manage symptoms and reduce the risk of stroke.

Spinal cord diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the spinal cord, which is a part of the central nervous system responsible for transmitting messages between the brain and the rest of the body. These diseases can cause damage to the spinal cord, leading to various symptoms such as muscle weakness, numbness, pain, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and difficulty with movement and coordination.

Spinal cord diseases can be congenital or acquired, and they can result from a variety of causes, including infections, injuries, tumors, degenerative conditions, autoimmune disorders, and genetic factors. Some examples of spinal cord diseases include multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, spinal cord injury, herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

The treatment for spinal cord diseases varies depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. Treatment options may include medication, physical therapy, surgery, and rehabilitation. In some cases, the damage to the spinal cord may be irreversible, leading to permanent disability or paralysis.

An amputee is a person who has had a limb or extremity removed by trauma, medical illness, or surgical intervention. Amputation may affect any part of the body, including fingers, toes, hands, feet, arms, and legs. The level of amputation can vary from partial loss to complete removal of the affected limb.

There are several reasons why a person might become an amputee:
- Trauma: Accidents, injuries, or violence can result in amputations due to severe tissue damage or irreparable vascular injury.
- Medical illness: Certain medical conditions such as diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, and cancer may require amputation if the affected limb cannot be saved through other treatments.
- Infection: Severe infections that do not respond to antibiotics or other treatments may necessitate amputation to prevent the spread of infection.
- Congenital defects: Some individuals are born with missing or malformed limbs, making them congenital amputees.

Amputees face various challenges, including physical limitations, emotional distress, and social adjustment. However, advancements in prosthetics and rehabilitation have significantly improved the quality of life for many amputees, enabling them to lead active and fulfilling lives.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

"Walker" is not a medical term per se, but it is often used in the medical field to refer to a mobility aid that helps individuals who have difficulty walking independently. Walkers are typically made of lightweight metal and have four legs that provide stability and support. Some walkers come with wheels or glides on the front legs to make it easier for users to move around. They may also include brakes, seats, and baskets for added functionality.

Walkers can be beneficial for people who have mobility limitations due to various medical conditions such as arthritis, stroke, fractures, neurological disorders, or aging-related issues. Using a walker can help reduce the risk of falls, improve balance, increase independence, and enhance overall quality of life.

It is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using a walker to ensure proper fit, adjustment, and usage techniques for maximum safety and effectiveness.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral nerve disorder that affects the median nerve, which runs from the forearm into the hand through a narrow tunnel-like structure in the wrist called the carpal tunnel. The condition is caused by compression or pinching of the median nerve as it passes through this tunnel, leading to various symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand and fingers.

The median nerve provides sensation to the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. It also controls some small muscles in the hand that allow for fine motor movements. When the median nerve is compressed or damaged due to CTS, it can result in a range of symptoms including:

1. Numbness, tingling, or burning sensations in the fingers (especially the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger)
2. Pain or discomfort in the hand, wrist, or forearm
3. Weakness in the hand, leading to difficulty gripping objects or making a fist
4. A sensation of swelling or inflammation in the fingers, even if there is no visible swelling present
5. Nighttime symptoms that may disrupt sleep patterns

The exact cause of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can vary from person to person, but some common risk factors include:

1. Repetitive hand and wrist motions (such as typing, writing, or using tools)
2. Prolonged exposure to vibrations (from machinery or power tools)
3. Wrist trauma or fractures
4. Pregnancy and hormonal changes
5. Certain medical conditions like diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and thyroid disorders
6. Obesity
7. Smoking

Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome typically involves a physical examination, medical history review, and sometimes specialized tests like nerve conduction studies or electromyography to confirm the diagnosis and assess the severity of the condition. Treatment options may include splinting, medication, corticosteroid injections, and in severe cases, surgery to relieve pressure on the median nerve.

Renal dialysis is a medical procedure that is used to artificially remove waste products, toxins, and excess fluids from the blood when the kidneys are no longer able to perform these functions effectively. This process is also known as hemodialysis.

During renal dialysis, the patient's blood is circulated through a special machine called a dialyzer or an artificial kidney, which contains a semi-permeable membrane that filters out waste products and excess fluids from the blood. The cleaned blood is then returned to the patient's body.

Renal dialysis is typically recommended for patients with advanced kidney disease or kidney failure, such as those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is a life-sustaining treatment that helps to maintain the balance of fluids and electrolytes in the body, prevent the buildup of waste products and toxins, and control blood pressure.

There are two main types of renal dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis is the most common type and involves using a dialyzer to filter the blood outside the body. Peritoneal dialysis, on the other hand, involves placing a catheter in the abdomen and using the lining of the abdomen (peritoneum) as a natural filter to remove waste products and excess fluids from the body.

Overall, renal dialysis is an essential treatment option for patients with kidney failure, helping them to maintain their quality of life and prolong their survival.

Psychomotor performance refers to the integration and coordination of mental processes (cognitive functions) with physical movements. It involves the ability to perform complex tasks that require both cognitive skills, such as thinking, remembering, and perceiving, and motor skills, such as gross and fine motor movements. Examples of psychomotor performances include driving a car, playing a musical instrument, or performing surgical procedures.

In a medical context, psychomotor performance is often used to assess an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), such as bathing, dressing, cooking, cleaning, and managing medications. Deficits in psychomotor performance can be a sign of neurological or psychiatric disorders, such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, or depression.

Assessment of psychomotor performance may involve tests that measure reaction time, coordination, speed, precision, and accuracy of movements, as well as cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. These assessments can help healthcare professionals develop appropriate treatment plans and monitor the progression of diseases or the effectiveness of interventions.

Peripheral Vascular Diseases (PVD) refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels outside of the heart and brain. These diseases are characterized by a narrowing or blockage of the peripheral arteries, which can lead to reduced blood flow to the limbs, particularly the legs.

The primary cause of PVD is atherosclerosis, a buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in and on the walls of the arteries, forming plaques that restrict blood flow. Other risk factors include smoking, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of vascular disease.

Symptoms of PVD can vary depending on the severity of the condition but may include leg pain or cramping during exercise (claudication), numbness or tingling in the legs, coldness or discoloration of the feet, sores or wounds that heal slowly or not at all, and in severe cases, gangrene.

PVD can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, so it is essential to diagnose and treat the condition as early as possible. Treatment options include lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy diet, medications to control symptoms and reduce the risk of complications, and surgical procedures such as angioplasty or bypass surgery to restore blood flow.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Video Games" is not a term that has a medical definition. Video games are interactive software programs that run on electronic devices, such as computers, gaming consoles, and mobile phones. They typically involve some form of user input, such as keyboard or controller movements, to control an avatar or environment within the game.

However, there is a growing field of research examining the potential health impacts of video games, both positive and negative. Some studies have suggested that certain types of video games can improve cognitive abilities, such as problem-solving, memory, and reaction time. However, excessive gaming has also been linked to issues such as addiction, social isolation, and decreased physical activity.

If you have any concerns about the impact of video games on your health or the health of someone you know, it may be helpful to speak with a healthcare professional for guidance.

A single-blind method in medical research is a study design where the participants are unaware of the group or intervention they have been assigned to, but the researchers conducting the study know which participant belongs to which group. This is done to prevent bias from the participants' expectations or knowledge of their assignment, while still allowing the researchers to control the study conditions and collect data.

In a single-blind trial, the participants do not know whether they are receiving the active treatment or a placebo (a sham treatment that looks like the real thing but has no therapeutic effect), whereas the researcher knows which participant is receiving which intervention. This design helps to ensure that the participants' responses and outcomes are not influenced by their knowledge of the treatment assignment, while still allowing the researchers to assess the effectiveness or safety of the intervention being studied.

Single-blind methods are commonly used in clinical trials and other medical research studies where it is important to minimize bias and control for confounding variables that could affect the study results.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question as "automobiles" is a general term used to describe wheeled motor vehicles for transportation, and it's not typically a medical term with its own specific definition. However, I can provide you with some automobile-related terms that have medical implications:

1. **Driving fitness**: This refers to the physical and mental abilities required to operate a vehicle safely. Various medical conditions or treatments can impact driving fitness, such as seizure disorders, sleep apnea, certain medications, or alcohol/substance use disorders.
2. **Driving simulator**: A device used in research and rehabilitation settings that presents a realistic driving environment for assessing and training individuals with various medical conditions or disabilities affecting their ability to drive.
3. **Adaptive automobile equipment**: Devices designed to assist people with disabilities in operating vehicles, such as hand controls, wheelchair lifts, or pedal extensions.
4. **Transportation disadvantage**: A situation where an individual's medical condition, disability, or lack of access to suitable transportation limits their ability to obtain necessary healthcare services.
5. **Motor vehicle crash (MVC) outcomes**: Medical consequences resulting from motor vehicle crashes, including injuries and fatalities. These outcomes are often studied in public health and injury prevention research.

If you have a specific medical term or concept related to automobiles that you would like me to define or explain, please provide more details, and I will be happy to help.

The torso refers to the central part of the human body, which is composed of the spine, ribcage, and the abdomen. It does not include the head, neck, arms, or legs. In anatomical terms, it is often used to describe the area between the neck and the pelvis.

'Task Performance and Analysis' is not a commonly used medical term, but it can be found in the field of rehabilitation medicine and ergonomics. It refers to the process of evaluating and understanding how a specific task is performed, in order to identify any physical or cognitive demands placed on an individual during the performance of that task. This information can then be used to inform the design of interventions, such as workplace modifications or rehabilitation programs, aimed at improving task performance or reducing the risk of injury.

In a medical context, task performance and analysis may be used in the assessment and treatment of individuals with disabilities or injuries, to help them return to work or other activities of daily living. The analysis involves breaking down the task into its component parts, observing and measuring the physical and cognitive demands of each part, and evaluating the individual's ability to perform those demands. Based on this analysis, recommendations may be made for modifications to the task or the environment, training or education, or assistive devices that can help the individual perform the task more safely and efficiently.

Overall, task performance and analysis is a valuable tool in promoting safe and effective task performance, reducing the risk of injury, and improving functional outcomes for individuals with disabilities or injuries.

A stab wound is a type of penetrating trauma to the body caused by a sharp object such as a knife or screwdriver. The injury may be classified as either a stabbing or a puncture wound, depending on the nature of the object and the manner in which it was inflicted. Stab wounds typically involve a forceful thrusting motion, which can result in damage to internal organs, blood vessels, and other structures.

The depth and severity of a stab wound depend on several factors, including the type and length of the weapon used, the angle and force of the strike, and the location of the wound on the body. Stab wounds to vital areas such as the chest or abdomen can be particularly dangerous due to the risk of internal bleeding and infection.

Immediate medical attention is required for stab wounds, even if they appear minor at first glance. Treatment may involve wound cleaning, suturing, antibiotics, and in some cases, surgery to repair damaged tissues or organs. In severe cases, stab wounds can lead to shock, organ failure, and even death if left untreated.

Computer peripherals are external devices that can be connected to a computer system to expand its functionality or capabilities. They are called "peripherals" because they are typically located on the periphery of the computer, as opposed to being built into the main computer case or chassis.

There are several types of computer peripherals, including:

1. Input devices: These are used to provide data and instructions to the computer. Examples include keyboards, mice, scanners, webcams, and microphones.
2. Output devices: These are used to communicate information from the computer to the user or to other external devices. Examples include monitors, printers, speakers, and projectors.
3. Storage devices: These are used to store data and programs on removable media. Examples include USB drives, external hard drives, CDs, and DVDs.
4. Communication devices: These are used to connect the computer to other networks or systems. Examples include modems, routers, network adapters, and wireless access points.
5. Input/output (I/O) devices: These are multifunctional devices that can serve as both input and output peripherals. Examples include touchscreens, digital tablets, and joysticks.

Overall, computer peripherals play a crucial role in enhancing the functionality and usability of computer systems for various applications.

Gunshot wounds are defined as traumatic injuries caused by the penetration of bullets or other projectiles fired from firearms into the body. The severity and extent of damage depend on various factors such as the type of firearm used, the distance between the muzzle and the victim, the size and shape of the bullet, and its velocity.

Gunshot wounds can be classified into two main categories:

1. Penetrating gunshot wounds: These occur when a bullet enters the body but does not exit, causing damage to the organs, tissues, and blood vessels along its path.

2. Perforating gunshot wounds: These happen when a bullet enters and exits the body, creating an entry and exit wound, causing damage to the structures it traverses.

Based on the mechanism of injury, gunshot wounds can also be categorized into low-velocity (less than 1000 feet per second) and high-velocity (greater than 1000 feet per second) injuries. High-velocity gunshot wounds are more likely to cause extensive tissue damage due to the transfer of kinetic energy from the bullet to the surrounding tissues.

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals with gunshot wounds, as they may experience significant blood loss, infection, and potential long-term complications such as organ dysfunction or disability. Treatment typically involves surgical intervention to control bleeding, remove foreign material, repair damaged structures, and manage infections if present.

Reconstructive surgical procedures are a type of surgery aimed at restoring the form and function of body parts that are defective or damaged due to various reasons such as congenital abnormalities, trauma, infection, tumors, or disease. These procedures can involve the transfer of tissue from one part of the body to another, manipulation of bones, muscles, and tendons, or use of prosthetic materials to reconstruct the affected area. The goal is to improve both the physical appearance and functionality of the body part, thereby enhancing the patient's quality of life. Examples include breast reconstruction after mastectomy, cleft lip and palate repair, and treatment of severe burns.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

An ulna fracture is a break in the ulna bone, which is one of the two long bones in the forearm. The ulna is located on the pinky finger side of the forearm and functions to support the elbow joint and assist in rotation and movement of the forearm. Ulna fractures can occur at various points along the bone, including the shaft, near the wrist, or at the elbow end of the bone. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, bruising, tenderness, deformity, limited mobility, and in some cases, numbness or tingling in the fingers. Treatment typically involves immobilization with a cast or splint, followed by rehabilitation exercises to restore strength and range of motion. In severe cases, surgery may be required to realign and stabilize the fractured bone.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is a disorder that affects the nerves, blood vessels, muscles, and joints of the hands and arms. It's primarily caused by prolonged exposure to high levels of hand-transmitted vibration, such as from operating power tools or machinery that vibrate.

The symptoms of HAVS can include:

1. Numbness, tingling, or loss of sensation in the fingers.
2. Fingertip color changes (blanching) when exposed to cold.
3. Impaired blood flow, leading to finger blotchiness and skin color changes.
4. Reduced hand grip strength and coordination.
5. Pain and stiffness in the hands and arms.

The symptoms can develop gradually over time and may not be immediately noticeable. Early recognition and limiting exposure to vibration sources are crucial for preventing further progression of HAVS.

Compression bandages are medical devices used to apply pressure on a part of the body, typically on limbs such as arms or legs. They are often used in the treatment of venous disorders, lymphatic disorders, and wounds, including venous ulcers, leg edema, and chronic swelling. The compression helps to promote better blood flow, reduce swelling, and aid in the healing process by helping to prevent fluid buildup in the tissues. They are usually made from elastic materials that allow for adjustable levels of compression and can be wrapped around the affected area in a specific manner to ensure proper fit and effectiveness. It is important to receive proper instruction on the application and removal of compression bandages to ensure they are used safely and effectively.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

Pain measurement, in a medical context, refers to the quantification or evaluation of the intensity and/or unpleasantness of a patient's subjective pain experience. This is typically accomplished through the use of standardized self-report measures such as numerical rating scales (NRS), visual analog scales (VAS), or categorical scales (mild, moderate, severe). In some cases, physiological measures like heart rate, blood pressure, and facial expressions may also be used to supplement self-reported pain ratings. The goal of pain measurement is to help healthcare providers better understand the nature and severity of a patient's pain in order to develop an effective treatment plan.

Orthotic devices are custom-made or prefabricated appliances designed to align, support, prevent deformity, or improve the function of movable body parts. They are frequently used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders, such as foot and ankle conditions, knee problems, spinal alignment issues, and hand or wrist ailments. These devices can be adjustable or non-adjustable and are typically made from materials like plastic, metal, leather, or fabric. They work by redistributing forces across joints, correcting alignment, preventing unwanted movements, or accommodating existing deformities. Examples of orthotic devices include ankle-foot orthoses, knee braces, back braces, wrist splints, and custom-made foot insoles.

The ulna is one of the two long bones in the forearm, the other being the radius. It runs from the elbow to the wrist and is located on the medial side of the forearm, next to the bone called the humerus in the upper arm. The ulna plays a crucial role in the movement of the forearm and also serves as an attachment site for various muscles.

Sensation disorders are conditions that affect the nervous system's ability to receive and interpret sensory information from the environment. These disorders can affect any of the five senses, including sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. They can result in symptoms such as numbness, tingling, pain, or loss of sensation in various parts of the body.

Some common types of sensation disorders include:

1. Neuropathy: A disorder that affects the nerves, often causing numbness, tingling, or pain in the hands and feet.
2. Central pain syndrome: A condition that results from damage to the brain or spinal cord, leading to chronic pain.
3. Tinnitus: A ringing or buzzing sound in the ears that can be a symptom of an underlying hearing disorder.
4. Ageusia: The loss of taste sensation, often caused by damage to the tongue or nerves that transmit taste information to the brain.
5. Anosmia: The loss of smell sensation, which can result from a variety of causes including injury, infection, or neurological disorders.

Sensation disorders can have significant impacts on a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities. Treatment may involve medication, physical therapy, or other interventions aimed at addressing the underlying cause of the disorder.

A splint is a device used to support, protect, and immobilize injured body parts, such as bones, joints, or muscles. It can be made from various materials like plastic, metal, or fiberglass. Splints are often used to keep the injured area in a stable position, reducing pain, swelling, and further damage while the injury heals. They come in different shapes and sizes, tailored to fit specific body parts and injuries. A splint can be adjustable or custom-made, depending on the patient's needs. It is essential to follow healthcare professionals' instructions for using and caring for a splint to ensure proper healing and prevent complications.

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) refer to damage to the spinal cord that results in a loss of function, such as mobility or feeling. This injury can be caused by direct trauma to the spine or by indirect damage resulting from disease or degeneration of surrounding bones, tissues, or blood vessels. The location and severity of the injury on the spinal cord will determine which parts of the body are affected and to what extent.

The effects of SCI can range from mild sensory changes to severe paralysis, including loss of motor function, autonomic dysfunction, and possible changes in sensation, strength, and reflexes below the level of injury. These injuries are typically classified as complete or incomplete, depending on whether there is any remaining function below the level of injury.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for spinal cord injuries to prevent further damage and improve the chances of recovery. Treatment usually involves immobilization of the spine, medications to reduce swelling and pressure, surgery to stabilize the spine, and rehabilitation to help regain lost function. Despite advances in treatment, SCI can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, and Duplex are diagnostic medical techniques that use sound waves to create images of internal body structures and assess their function. Here are the definitions for each:

1. Ultrasonography: Also known as ultrasound, this is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of internal organs and tissues. A small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the skin surface, which emits and receives sound waves. The returning echoes are then processed to create real-time visual images of the internal structures.
2. Doppler: This is a type of ultrasound that measures the velocity and direction of blood flow in the body by analyzing the frequency shift of the reflected sound waves. It can be used to assess blood flow in various parts of the body, such as the heart, arteries, and veins.
3. Duplex: Duplex ultrasonography is a combination of both gray-scale ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound. It provides detailed images of internal structures, as well as information about blood flow velocity and direction. This technique is often used to evaluate conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, and peripheral arterial disease.

In summary, ultrasonography is a diagnostic imaging technique that uses sound waves to create images of internal structures, Doppler is a type of ultrasound that measures blood flow velocity and direction, and duplex is a combination of both techniques that provides detailed images and information about blood flow.

Paralysis is a loss of muscle function in part or all of your body. It can be localized, affecting only one specific area, or generalized, impacting multiple areas or even the entire body. Paralysis often occurs when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. In most cases, paralysis is caused by damage to the nervous system, especially the spinal cord. Other causes include stroke, trauma, infections, and various neurological disorders.

It's important to note that paralysis doesn't always mean a total loss of movement or feeling. Sometimes, it may just cause weakness or numbness in the affected area. The severity and extent of paralysis depend on the underlying cause and the location of the damage in the nervous system.

Neck muscles, also known as cervical muscles, are a group of muscles that provide movement, support, and stability to the neck region. They are responsible for various functions such as flexion, extension, rotation, and lateral bending of the head and neck. The main neck muscles include:

1. Sternocleidomastoid: This muscle is located on either side of the neck and is responsible for rotating and flexing the head. It also helps in tilting the head to the same side.

2. Trapezius: This large, flat muscle covers the back of the neck, shoulders, and upper back. It is involved in movements like shrugging the shoulders, rotating and extending the head, and stabilizing the scapula (shoulder blade).

3. Scalenes: These three pairs of muscles are located on the side of the neck and assist in flexing, rotating, and laterally bending the neck. They also help with breathing by elevating the first two ribs during inspiration.

4. Suboccipitals: These four small muscles are located at the base of the skull and are responsible for fine movements of the head, such as tilting and rotating.

5. Longus Colli and Longus Capitis: These muscles are deep neck flexors that help with flexing the head and neck forward.

6. Splenius Capitis and Splenius Cervicis: These muscles are located at the back of the neck and assist in extending, rotating, and laterally bending the head and neck.

7. Levator Scapulae: This muscle is located at the side and back of the neck, connecting the cervical vertebrae to the scapula. It helps with rotation, extension, and elevation of the head and scapula.

Pathologic bone demineralization is a condition characterized by the loss of minerals, such as calcium and phosphate, from the bones. This process makes the bones more porous, weaker, and more susceptible to fractures. It can occur due to various medical conditions, including osteoporosis, hyperparathyroidism, Paget's disease of bone, and cancer that has spread to the bones (metastatic cancer).

In a healthy individual, the body constantly remodels the bones by removing old bone tissue (resorption) and replacing it with new tissue. This process is regulated by two types of cells: osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone resorption, and osteoblasts, which produce new bone tissue. In pathologic bone demineralization, there is an imbalance between the activity of these two cell types, with excessive resorption and inadequate formation of new bone tissue.

Pathologic bone demineralization can lead to a range of symptoms, including bone pain, fractures, loss of height, and a decreased ability to perform daily activities. Treatment for this condition depends on the underlying cause but may include medications that slow down bone resorption or promote bone formation, as well as lifestyle changes such as exercise and dietary modifications.

The median nerve is one of the major nerves in the human body, providing sensation and motor function to parts of the arm and hand. It originates from the brachial plexus, a network of nerves that arise from the spinal cord in the neck. The median nerve travels down the arm, passing through the cubital tunnel at the elbow, and continues into the forearm and hand.

In the hand, the median nerve supplies sensation to the palm side of the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. It also provides motor function to some of the muscles that control finger movements, allowing for flexion of the fingers and opposition of the thumb.

Damage to the median nerve can result in a condition called carpal tunnel syndrome, which is characterized by numbness, tingling, and weakness in the hand and fingers.

An aneurysm is a localized, balloon-like bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. It occurs when the pressure inside the vessel causes a weakened area to swell and become enlarged. Aneurysms can develop in any blood vessel, but they are most common in arteries at the base of the brain (cerebral aneurysm) and the main artery carrying blood from the heart to the rest of the body (aortic aneurysm).

Aneurysms can be classified as saccular or fusiform, depending on their shape. A saccular aneurysm is a round or oval bulge that projects from the side of a blood vessel, while a fusiform aneurysm is a dilated segment of a blood vessel that is uniform in width and involves all three layers of the arterial wall.

The size and location of an aneurysm can affect its risk of rupture. Generally, larger aneurysms are more likely to rupture than smaller ones. Aneurysms located in areas with high blood pressure or where the vessel branches are also at higher risk of rupture.

Ruptured aneurysms can cause life-threatening bleeding and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of a ruptured aneurysm may include sudden severe headache, neck stiffness, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, or loss of consciousness. Unruptured aneurysms may not cause any symptoms and are often discovered during routine imaging tests for other conditions.

Treatment options for aneurysms depend on their size, location, and risk of rupture. Small, unruptured aneurysms may be monitored with regular imaging tests to check for growth or changes. Larger or symptomatic aneurysms may require surgical intervention, such as clipping or coiling, to prevent rupture and reduce the risk of complications.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

The pectoralis muscles are a group of chest muscles that are primarily involved in the movement and stabilization of the shoulder joint. They consist of two individual muscles: the pectoralis major and the pectoralis minor.

1. Pectoralis Major: This is the larger and more superficial of the two muscles, lying just under the skin and fat of the chest wall. It has two heads of origin - the clavicular head arises from the medial half of the clavicle (collarbone), while the sternocostal head arises from the anterior surface of the sternum (breastbone) and the upper six costal cartilages. Both heads insert onto the lateral lip of the bicipital groove of the humerus (upper arm bone). The primary actions of the pectoralis major include flexion, adduction, and internal rotation of the shoulder joint.

2. Pectoralis Minor: This is a smaller, triangular muscle that lies deep to the pectoralis major. It originates from the third, fourth, and fifth ribs near their costal cartilages and inserts onto the coracoid process of the scapula (shoulder blade). The main function of the pectoralis minor is to pull the scapula forward and downward, helping to stabilize the shoulder joint and aiding in deep inspiration during breathing.

Together, these muscles play essential roles in various movements such as pushing, pulling, and hugging, making them crucial for daily activities and athletic performance.

Angiography is a medical procedure in which an x-ray image is taken to visualize the internal structure of blood vessels, arteries, or veins. This is done by injecting a radiopaque contrast agent (dye) into the blood vessel using a thin, flexible catheter. The dye makes the blood vessels visible on an x-ray image, allowing doctors to diagnose and treat various medical conditions such as blockages, narrowing, or malformations of the blood vessels.

There are several types of angiography, including:

* Cardiac angiography (also called coronary angiography) - used to examine the blood vessels of the heart
* Cerebral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels of the brain
* Peripheral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels in the limbs or other parts of the body.

Angiography is typically performed by a radiologist, cardiologist, or vascular surgeon in a hospital setting. It can help diagnose conditions such as coronary artery disease, aneurysms, and peripheral arterial disease, among others.

A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a medical condition that occurs when a blood clot, often formed in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis), breaks off and travels to the lungs, blocking one or more pulmonary arteries. This blockage can lead to various symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, rapid heart rate, and coughing up blood. In severe cases, it can cause life-threatening complications like low oxygen levels, hypotension, and even death if not promptly diagnosed and treated with anticoagulant medications or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve the clot.

A neuroma is not a specific type of tumor, but rather refers to a benign (non-cancerous) growth or swelling of nerve tissue. The most common type of neuroma is called a Morton's neuroma, which typically occurs between the third and fourth toes in the foot. It develops as a result of chronic irritation, compression, or trauma to the nerves leading to the toes, causing them to thicken and enlarge.

Morton's neuroma can cause symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, or burning sensations in the affected area. Treatment options for Morton's neuroma may include rest, ice, orthotics, physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, surgery. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional if you suspect you have a neuroma or are experiencing related symptoms.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) is a type of psychotherapy that uses virtual reality technology to simulate realistic situations, environments, or experiences that an individual may be afraid of or avoid due to anxiety, trauma, or phobias. The person is exposed to these stimuli in a controlled and safe setting, allowing them to learn new ways to cope with their fears and anxieties.

During VRET sessions, the individual wears a virtual reality headset that displays 3D images and sounds, creating an immersive experience. They can interact with the virtual environment using controllers or sensors, which allows for realistic movements and actions. The therapist guides the person through various scenarios, gradually increasing the intensity of the exposure as they become more comfortable.

VRET has been found to be effective in treating conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), specific phobias (e.g., fear of heights, flying, public speaking), panic disorders, and social anxiety disorder. By repeatedly facing their fears in a controlled environment, individuals can reduce avoidance behaviors, improve emotional regulation, and enhance overall quality of life.

Conduction anesthesia is a type of local anesthesia in which an anesthetic agent is administered near a peripheral nerve to block the transmission of painful stimuli. It is called "conduction" anesthesia because it works by blocking the conduction of nerve impulses along the nerve fibers.

There are several types of conduction anesthesia, including:

1. Infiltration anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected directly into the tissue where the surgical procedure will be performed. This type of anesthesia can be used for minor surgeries such as wound closure or repair of simple lacerations.
2. Nerve block anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected near a specific nerve or bundle of nerves to block sensation in a larger area of the body. For example, a brachial plexus block can be used to numb the arm and hand for procedures such as shoulder surgery or fracture reduction.
3. Field block anesthesia: In this technique, the anesthetic agent is injected around the periphery of the surgical site to create a "field" of anesthesia that blocks sensation in the area. This type of anesthesia is often used for procedures such as hernia repair or circumcision.

Conduction anesthesia has several advantages over general anesthesia, including reduced risk of complications, faster recovery time, and lower cost. However, it may not be appropriate for all types of surgical procedures or patients, and its effectiveness can vary depending on the skill of the practitioner and the individual patient's response to the anesthetic agent.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

A reoperation is a surgical procedure that is performed again on a patient who has already undergone a previous operation for the same or related condition. Reoperations may be required due to various reasons, such as inadequate initial treatment, disease recurrence, infection, or complications from the first surgery. The nature and complexity of a reoperation can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances, but it often carries higher risks and potential complications compared to the original operation.

Kinesthesia, also known as proprioception, refers to the perception or awareness of the position and movement of the body parts in space. It is a type of sensory information that comes from receptors located in muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints, which detect changes in tension, length, and pressure of these tissues during movement. This information is then sent to the brain, where it is integrated with visual and vestibular (inner ear) inputs to create a sense of body position and movement.

Kinesthesia allows us to perform complex movements and maintain balance without having to consciously think about each movement. It helps us to coordinate our movements, adjust our posture, and navigate through our environment with ease. Deficits in kinesthetic perception can lead to difficulties with motor coordination, balance, and mobility.

Facial injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the face, which may include the bones of the skull that form the face, teeth, salivary glands, muscles, nerves, and skin. Facial injuries can range from minor cuts and bruises to severe fractures and disfigurement. They can be caused by a variety of factors such as accidents, falls, sports-related injuries, physical assaults, or animal attacks.

Facial injuries can affect one or more areas of the face, including the forehead, eyes, nose, cheeks, ears, mouth, and jaw. Common types of facial injuries include lacerations (cuts), contusions (bruises), abrasions (scrapes), fractures (broken bones), and burns.

Facial injuries can have significant psychological and emotional impacts on individuals, in addition to physical effects. Treatment for facial injuries may involve simple first aid, suturing of wounds, splinting or wiring of broken bones, reconstructive surgery, or other medical interventions. It is essential to seek prompt medical attention for any facial injury to ensure proper healing and minimize the risk of complications.

Workers' compensation is a form of insurance that provides medical benefits, wage replacement, and rehabilitation expenses to employees who are injured or become ill as a direct result of their job. It is designed to compensate the employee for lost wages and cover medical expenses due to work-related injuries or illnesses, while also protecting employers from potential lawsuits. Workers' compensation laws vary by state but generally require employers to carry this insurance and provide coverage for eligible employees. The program is typically funded through employer premiums and is administered by individual states.

Local anesthetics are a type of medication that is used to block the sensation of pain in a specific area of the body. They work by temporarily numbing the nerves in that area, preventing them from transmitting pain signals to the brain. Local anesthetics can be administered through various routes, including topical application (such as creams or gels), injection (such as into the skin or tissues), or regional nerve blocks (such as epidural or spinal anesthesia).

Some common examples of local anesthetics include lidocaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine. These medications can be used for a variety of medical procedures, ranging from minor surgeries (such as dental work or skin biopsies) to more major surgeries (such as joint replacements or hernia repairs).

Local anesthetics are generally considered safe when used appropriately, but they can have side effects and potential complications. These may include allergic reactions, toxicity (if too much is administered), and nerve damage (if the medication is injected into a nerve). It's important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using local anesthetics, and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

"Trauma severity indices" refer to various scoring systems used by healthcare professionals to evaluate the severity of injuries in trauma patients. These tools help standardize the assessment and communication of injury severity among different members of the healthcare team, allowing for more effective and consistent treatment planning, resource allocation, and prognosis estimation.

There are several commonly used trauma severity indices, including:

1. Injury Severity Score (ISS): ISS is an anatomical scoring system that evaluates the severity of injuries based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS). The body is divided into six regions, and the square of the highest AIS score in each region is summed to calculate the ISS. Scores range from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating more severe injuries.
2. New Injury Severity Score (NISS): NISS is a modification of the ISS that focuses on the three most severely injured body regions, regardless of their anatomical location. The three highest AIS scores are squared and summed to calculate the NISS. This scoring system tends to correlate better with mortality than the ISS in some studies.
3. Revised Trauma Score (RTS): RTS is a physiological scoring system that evaluates the patient's respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurological status upon arrival at the hospital. It uses variables such as Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), systolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate to calculate a score between 0 and 7.84, with lower scores indicating more severe injuries.
4. Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS): TRISS is a combined anatomical and physiological scoring system that estimates the probability of survival based on ISS or NISS, RTS, age, and mechanism of injury (blunt or penetrating). It uses logistic regression equations to calculate the predicted probability of survival.
5. Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS): PTS is a physiological scoring system specifically designed for children under 14 years old. It evaluates six variables, including respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, systolic blood pressure, capillary refill time, GCS, and temperature to calculate a score between -6 and +12, with lower scores indicating more severe injuries.

These scoring systems help healthcare professionals assess the severity of trauma, predict outcomes, allocate resources, and compare patient populations in research settings. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized care for each patient.

Paresthesia is a medical term that describes an abnormal sensation such as tingling, numbness, prickling, or burning, usually in the hands, feet, arms, or legs. These sensations can occur without any obvious cause, often described as "pins and needles" or falling asleep in a limb. However, persistent paresthesia can be a sign of an underlying medical condition, such as nerve damage, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or a vitamin deficiency. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional if experiencing persistent paresthesia to determine the cause and appropriate treatment.

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is not inherently a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with significant uses in the medical field. Medically, PTFE is often referred to by its brand name, Teflon. It is a synthetic fluoropolymer used in various medical applications due to its unique properties such as high resistance to heat, electrical and chemical interaction, and exceptional non-reactivity with body tissues.

PTFE can be found in medical devices like catheters, where it reduces friction, making insertion easier and minimizing trauma. It is also used in orthopedic and dental implants, drug delivery systems, and sutures due to its biocompatibility and non-adhesive nature.

The scapula, also known as the shoulder blade, is a flat, triangular bone located in the upper back region of the human body. It serves as the site of attachment for various muscles that are involved in movements of the shoulder joint and arm. The scapula has several important features:

1. Three borders (anterior, lateral, and medial)
2. Three angles (superior, inferior, and lateral)
3. Spine of the scapula - a long, horizontal ridge that divides the scapula into two parts: supraspinous fossa (above the spine) and infraspinous fossa (below the spine)
4. Glenoid cavity - a shallow, concave surface on the lateral border that articulates with the humerus to form the shoulder joint
5. Acromion process - a bony projection at the top of the scapula that forms part of the shoulder joint and serves as an attachment point for muscles and ligaments
6. Coracoid process - a hook-like bony projection extending from the anterior border, which provides attachment for muscles and ligaments

Understanding the anatomy and function of the scapula is essential in diagnosing and treating various shoulder and upper back conditions.

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), also known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), is a chronic pain condition that most often affects a limb after an injury or trauma. It is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and sensitivity, along with changes in skin color, temperature, and swelling.

The symptoms of RSD/CRPS are thought to be caused by an overactive sympathetic nervous system, which controls involuntary bodily functions such as heart rate, blood pressure, and sweating. In RSD/CRPS, the sympathetic nerves are believed to send incorrect signals to the brain, causing it to perceive intense pain even in the absence of any actual tissue damage.

RSD/CRPS can be classified into two types: Type 1, which occurs after an injury or trauma that did not directly damage the nerves, and Type 2, which occurs after a distinct nerve injury. The symptoms of both types are similar, but Type 2 is typically more severe and may involve more widespread nerve damage.

Treatment for RSD/CRPS usually involves a combination of medications, physical therapy, and other therapies such as spinal cord stimulation or sympathetic nerve blocks. Early diagnosis and treatment can help improve outcomes and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Tenosynovitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the lining (synovium) surrounding a tendon, which is a cord-like structure that attaches muscle to bone. This inflammation can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected joint. Tenosynovitis often affects the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles, and it can result from various causes, including infection, injury, overuse, or autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of tenosynovitis are essential to prevent complications such as tendon rupture or chronic pain.

"Weight-bearing" is a term used in the medical field to describe the ability of a body part or limb to support the weight or pressure exerted upon it, typically while standing, walking, or performing other physical activities. In a clinical setting, healthcare professionals often use the term "weight-bearing exercise" to refer to physical activities that involve supporting one's own body weight, such as walking, jogging, or climbing stairs. These exercises can help improve bone density, muscle strength, and overall physical function, particularly in individuals with conditions affecting the bones, joints, or muscles.

In addition, "weight-bearing" is also used to describe the positioning of a body part during medical imaging studies, such as X-rays or MRIs. For example, a weight-bearing X-ray of the foot or ankle involves taking an image while the patient stands on the affected limb, allowing healthcare providers to assess any alignment or stability issues that may not be apparent in a non-weight-bearing position.

Medical science often defines and describes "walking" as a form of locomotion or mobility where an individual repeatedly lifts and sets down each foot to move forward, usually bearing weight on both legs. It is a complex motor activity that requires the integration and coordination of various systems in the human body, including the musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiovascular systems.

Walking involves several components such as balance, coordination, strength, and endurance. The ability to walk independently is often used as a measure of functional mobility and overall health status. However, it's important to note that the specific definition of walking may vary depending on the context and the medical or scientific field in question.

The Ulnar nerve is one of the major nerves in the forearm and hand, which provides motor function to the majority of the intrinsic muscles of the hand (except for those innervated by the median nerve) and sensory innervation to the little finger and half of the ring finger. It originates from the brachial plexus, passes through the cubital tunnel at the elbow, and continues down the forearm, where it runs close to the ulna bone. The ulnar nerve then passes through the Guyon's canal in the wrist before branching out to innervate the hand muscles and provide sensation to the skin on the little finger and half of the ring finger.

A computer is a programmable electronic device that can store, retrieve, and process data. It is composed of several components including:

1. Hardware: The physical components of a computer such as the central processing unit (CPU), memory (RAM), storage devices (hard drive or solid-state drive), and input/output devices (monitor, keyboard, and mouse).
2. Software: The programs and instructions that are used to perform specific tasks on a computer. This includes operating systems, applications, and utilities.
3. Input: Devices or methods used to enter data into a computer, such as a keyboard, mouse, scanner, or digital camera.
4. Processing: The function of the CPU in executing instructions and performing calculations on data.
5. Output: The results of processing, which can be displayed on a monitor, printed on paper, or saved to a storage device.

Computers come in various forms and sizes, including desktop computers, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. They are used in a wide range of applications, from personal use for communication, entertainment, and productivity, to professional use in fields such as medicine, engineering, finance, and education.

Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Nonketotic Coma (HHNC) is a serious complication of diabetes, specifically type 2, that occurs when blood glucose levels rise to extremely high levels, typically above 600 mg/dL. This condition is often accompanied by severe dehydration due to excessive urination and an inability to consume adequate fluids.

The term "hyperosmolar" refers to the high concentration of glucose in the blood, which increases the osmolality (or osmotic pressure) of the blood. This can lead to water moving out of cells and into the bloodstream to try to balance out the concentration, causing severe dehydration.

The term "nonketotic" means that there is no significant production of ketone bodies, which are produced when the body breaks down fat for energy in the absence of sufficient insulin. This differentiates HHNC from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), another serious complication of diabetes.

The "coma" part of the term refers to the fact that HHNC can cause altered mental status, ranging from confusion and disorientation to coma, due to the effects of dehydration and high blood glucose levels on the brain.

HHNC is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment in a hospital setting. Treatment typically involves administering fluids to rehydrate the body, insulin to lower blood glucose levels, and addressing any other underlying conditions or complications. If left untreated, HHNC can be life-threatening.

Pilomatrixoma is a benign skin tumor that originates from the hair follicle's matrix. It is also known as calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe. This slow-growing tumor typically appears as a hard, mobile, small nodule, often on the head or neck region. Pilomatrixomas are usually painless but can become inflamed or infected. They are more common in children and young adults and are slightly more prevalent in females than males. Histologically, pilomatrixoma is characterized by the presence of shadow cells, basaloid cells, and calcifications. Surgical excision is the standard treatment for this condition.

Functional laterality, in a medical context, refers to the preferential use or performance of one side of the body over the other for specific functions. This is often demonstrated in hand dominance, where an individual may be right-handed or left-handed, meaning they primarily use their right or left hand for tasks such as writing, eating, or throwing.

However, functional laterality can also apply to other bodily functions and structures, including the eyes (ocular dominance), ears (auditory dominance), or legs. It's important to note that functional laterality is not a strict binary concept; some individuals may exhibit mixed dominance or no strong preference for one side over the other.

In clinical settings, assessing functional laterality can be useful in diagnosing and treating various neurological conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, where understanding any resulting lateralized impairments can inform rehabilitation strategies.

A spasm is a sudden, involuntary contraction or tightening of a muscle, group of muscles, or a hollow organ such as the ureter or bronchi. Spasms can occur as a result of various factors including muscle fatigue, injury, irritation, or abnormal nerve activity. They can cause pain and discomfort, and in some cases, interfere with normal bodily functions. For example, a spasm in the bronchi can cause difficulty breathing, while a spasm in the ureter can cause severe pain and may lead to a kidney stone blockage. The treatment for spasms depends on the underlying cause and may include medication, physical therapy, or lifestyle changes.

Epidural injection is a medical procedure where a medication is injected into the epidural space of the spine. The epidural space is the area between the outer covering of the spinal cord (dura mater) and the vertebral column. This procedure is typically used to provide analgesia (pain relief) or anesthesia for surgical procedures, labor and delivery, or chronic pain management.

The injection usually contains a local anesthetic and/or a steroid medication, which can help reduce inflammation and swelling in the affected area. The medication is delivered through a thin needle that is inserted into the epidural space using the guidance of fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) scans.

Epidural injections are commonly used to treat various types of pain, including lower back pain, leg pain (sciatica), and neck pain. They can also be used to diagnose the source of pain by injecting a local anesthetic to numb the area and determine if it is the cause of the pain.

While epidural injections are generally safe, they do carry some risks, such as infection, bleeding, nerve damage, or allergic reactions to the medication. It's important to discuss these risks with your healthcare provider before undergoing the procedure.

A forelimb is a term used in animal anatomy to refer to the upper limbs located in the front of the body, primarily involved in movement and manipulation of the environment. In humans, this would be equivalent to the arms, while in quadrupedal animals (those that move on four legs), it includes the structures that are comparable to both the arms and legs of humans, such as the front legs of dogs or the forepaws of cats. The bones that make up a typical forelimb include the humerus, radius, ulna, carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges.

Physical restraint, in a medical context, refers to the use of physical force or equipment to limit a person's movements or access to their own body. This is typically done to prevent harm to the individual themselves or to others. It can include various devices such as wrist restraints, vest restraints, or bed rails. The use of physical restraints should be a last resort and must be in accordance with established guidelines and regulations to ensure the safety and rights of the patient are respected.

Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neoplasms refer to tumors that originate in the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These tumors can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors, such as schwannomas and neurofibromas, grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant tumors, such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), can invade nearby tissues and may metastasize (spread) to other organs.

PNS neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size. Common symptoms include pain, weakness, numbness, or tingling in the affected area. In some cases, PNS neoplasms may not cause any symptoms until they become quite large. Treatment options for PNS neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

In the context of medicine and physiology, vibration refers to the mechanical oscillation of a physical body or substance with a periodic back-and-forth motion around an equilibrium point. This motion can be produced by external forces or internal processes within the body.

Vibration is often measured in terms of frequency (the number of cycles per second) and amplitude (the maximum displacement from the equilibrium position). In clinical settings, vibration perception tests are used to assess peripheral nerve function and diagnose conditions such as neuropathy.

Prolonged exposure to whole-body vibration or hand-transmitted vibration in certain occupational settings can also have adverse health effects, including hearing loss, musculoskeletal disorders, and vascular damage.

I believe there might be some confusion in your question. Algeria is a country located in North Africa, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you had intended to ask about a different term, please provide clarification, and I would be happy to help you with that.

In the field of dentistry, braces are devices used to align and straighten teeth and improve jaw position. They are typically made of metal or ceramic brackets that are bonded to the teeth, along with wires and rubber bands that apply pressure and move the teeth into proper alignment over time. The length of treatment with braces can vary but typically lasts from 1-3 years. Regular adjustments are necessary to ensure effective movement of the teeth.

The purpose of wearing braces is to correct malocclusions, such as overbites, underbites, crossbites, and open bites, as well as crowded or crooked teeth. This can lead to improved dental health, better oral function, and a more aesthetically pleasing smile. It's important to maintain good oral hygiene while wearing braces to prevent issues like tooth decay and gum disease. After the braces are removed, retainers may be used to maintain the new alignment of the teeth.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

The Injury Severity Score (ISS) is a medical scoring system used to assess the severity of trauma in patients with multiple injuries. It's based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), which classifies each injury by body region on a scale from 1 (minor) to 6 (maximum severity).

The ISS is calculated by summing the squares of the highest AIS score in each of the three most severely injured body regions. The possible ISS ranges from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating more severe injuries. An ISS over 15 is generally considered a significant injury, and an ISS over 25 is associated with a high risk of mortality. It's important to note that the ISS has limitations, as it doesn't consider the number or type of injuries within each body region, only the most severe one.

Amputation stumps, also known as residual limbs, refer to the remaining part of a limb after it has been amputated. The stump includes the soft tissue and bone that were once part of the amputated limb. Proper care and management of the amputation stump are essential for optimal healing, reducing the risk of complications such as infection or delayed wound healing, and promoting successful prosthetic fitting and use. This may involve various treatments such as wound care, pain management, physical therapy, and the use of specialized medical devices.

Anterior horn cells, also known as motor neurons, are a type of nerve cell located in the anterior (ventral) horn of the spinal cord's gray matter. These cells play a crucial role in initiating and regulating voluntary muscle movement by transmitting signals from the brain to the muscles via the peripheral nervous system.

Damage or degeneration of the anterior horn cells can result in various neuromuscular disorders, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These conditions can lead to muscle weakness, atrophy, and paralysis.

A User-Computer Interface (also known as Human-Computer Interaction) refers to the point at which a person (user) interacts with a computer system. This can include both hardware and software components, such as keyboards, mice, touchscreens, and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The design of the user-computer interface is crucial in determining the usability and accessibility of a computer system for the user. A well-designed interface should be intuitive, efficient, and easy to use, minimizing the cognitive load on the user and allowing them to effectively accomplish their tasks.

Butorphanol is a synthetic opioid analgesic (pain reliever) used to treat moderate to severe pain. It works by binding to the opiate receptors in the brain, which reduces the perception of pain. Butorphanol is available as an injectable solution and a nasal spray.

The medical definition of 'Butorphanol' is:

A synthetic opioid analgesic with agonist-antagonist properties. It is used in the management of moderate to severe pain, as a veterinary analgesic, and for obstetrical analgesia. Butorphanol has a high affinity for the kappa-opioid receptor, a lower affinity for the mu-opioid receptor, and little or no affinity for the delta-opioid receptor. Its actions at the mu-opioid receptor are antagonistic to those of morphine and other mu-opioid agonists, while its actions at the kappa-opioid receptor are similar to those of other opioids.

Butorphanol has a rapid onset of action and a relatively short duration of effect. It may cause respiratory depression, sedation, nausea, vomiting, and other side effects common to opioid analgesics. Butorphanol is classified as a Schedule IV controlled substance in the United States due to its potential for abuse and dependence.

The saphenous vein is a term used in anatomical description to refer to the great or small saphenous veins, which are superficial veins located in the lower extremities of the human body.

The great saphenous vein (GSV) is the longest vein in the body and originates from the medial aspect of the foot, ascending along the medial side of the leg and thigh, and drains into the femoral vein at the saphenofemoral junction, located in the upper third of the thigh.

The small saphenous vein (SSV) is a shorter vein that originates from the lateral aspect of the foot, ascends along the posterior calf, and drains into the popliteal vein at the saphenopopliteal junction, located in the popliteal fossa.

These veins are often used as conduits for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery due to their consistent anatomy and length.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "engineering." However, in general, engineering refers to the application of scientific and mathematical principles to design, build, and maintain structures, machines, devices, systems, and solutions. This can include various disciplines such as biomedical engineering, which involves applying engineering principles to medicine and healthcare.

Biomedical engineering combines knowledge from fields like mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, chemistry, and materials science with medical and biological sciences to develop solutions for healthcare challenges. Biomedical engineers design and develop medical devices, artificial organs, imaging systems, biocompatible materials, and other technologies used in medical treatments and diagnostics.

In summary, while there is no specific medical definition for "engineering," the term can refer to various disciplines that apply scientific and mathematical principles to solve problems related to healthcare and medicine.

Neural conduction is the process by which electrical signals, known as action potentials, are transmitted along the axon of a neuron (nerve cell) to transmit information between different parts of the nervous system. This electrical impulse is generated by the movement of ions across the neuronal membrane, and it propagates down the length of the axon until it reaches the synapse, where it can then stimulate the release of neurotransmitters to communicate with other neurons or target cells. The speed of neural conduction can vary depending on factors such as the diameter of the axon, the presence of myelin sheaths (which act as insulation and allow for faster conduction), and the temperature of the environment.

The epidural space is the potential space located outside the dura mater, which is the outermost of the three membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (the meninges). This space runs the entire length of the spinal canal and contains fatty tissue, blood vessels, and nerve roots. It is often used as a route for administering anesthesia during childbirth or surgery, as well as for pain management in certain medical conditions. The injection of medications into this space is called an epidural block.

A thrombectomy is a medical procedure that involves the removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel. This is typically performed to restore blood flow in cases where the clot is causing significant blockage, which can lead to serious complications such as tissue damage or organ dysfunction.

During a thrombectomy, a surgeon makes an incision and accesses the affected blood vessel, often with the help of imaging guidance. Specialized tools are then used to extract the clot, after which the blood vessel is usually repaired. Thrombectomies can be performed on various blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the brain, heart, lungs, and limbs.

This procedure may be recommended for patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), or certain types of stroke, depending on the specific circumstances and the patient's overall health. It is generally considered when anticoagulation therapy or clot-dissolving medications are not sufficient or appropriate to treat the blood clot.

Debridement is a medical procedure that involves the removal of dead, damaged, or infected tissue to improve the healing process or prevent further infection. This can be done through various methods such as surgical debridement (removal of tissue using scalpel or scissors), mechanical debridement (use of wound irrigation or high-pressure water jet), autolytic debridement (using the body's own enzymes to break down and reabsorb dead tissue), and enzymatic debridement (application of topical enzymes to dissolve necrotic tissue). The goal of debridement is to promote healthy tissue growth, reduce the risk of infection, and improve overall wound healing.

Blood vessel prosthesis implantation is a surgical procedure in which an artificial blood vessel, also known as a vascular graft or prosthetic graft, is inserted into the body to replace a damaged or diseased native blood vessel. The prosthetic graft can be made from various materials such as Dacron (polyester), PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), or bovine/human tissue.

The implantation of a blood vessel prosthesis is typically performed to treat conditions that cause narrowing or blockage of the blood vessels, such as atherosclerosis, aneurysms, or traumatic injuries. The procedure may be used to bypass blocked arteries in the legs (peripheral artery disease), heart (coronary artery bypass surgery), or neck (carotid endarterectomy). It can also be used to replace damaged veins for hemodialysis access in patients with kidney failure.

The success of blood vessel prosthesis implantation depends on various factors, including the patient's overall health, the location and extent of the vascular disease, and the type of graft material used. Possible complications include infection, bleeding, graft thrombosis (clotting), and graft failure, which may require further surgical intervention or endovascular treatments.

Indwelling catheters, also known as Foley catheters, are medical devices that are inserted into the bladder to drain urine. They have a small balloon at the tip that is inflated with water once the catheter is in the correct position in the bladder, allowing it to remain in place and continuously drain urine. Indwelling catheters are typically used for patients who are unable to empty their bladders on their own, such as those who are bedridden or have nerve damage that affects bladder function. They are also used during and after certain surgical procedures. Prolonged use of indwelling catheters can increase the risk of urinary tract infections and other complications.

"Motor activity" is a general term used in the field of medicine and neuroscience to refer to any kind of physical movement or action that is generated by the body's motor system. The motor system includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles that work together to produce movements such as walking, talking, reaching for an object, or even subtle actions like moving your eyes.

Motor activity can be voluntary, meaning it is initiated intentionally by the individual, or involuntary, meaning it is triggered automatically by the nervous system without conscious control. Examples of voluntary motor activity include deliberately lifting your arm or kicking a ball, while examples of involuntary motor activity include heartbeat, digestion, and reflex actions like jerking your hand away from a hot stove.

Abnormalities in motor activity can be a sign of neurological or muscular disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis. Assessment of motor activity is often used in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

Immobilization is a medical term that refers to the restriction of normal mobility or motion of a body part, usually to promote healing and prevent further injury. This is often achieved through the use of devices such as casts, splints, braces, slings, or traction. The goal of immobilization is to keep the injured area in a fixed position so that it can heal properly without additional damage. It may be used for various medical conditions, including fractures, dislocations, sprains, strains, and soft tissue injuries. Immobilization helps reduce pain, minimize swelling, and protect the injured site from movement that could worsen the injury or impair healing.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

In a medical or occupational health context, "work" is often used to refer to physical or mental activities that require energy expenditure and are performed as part of a job, daily routine, or exercise. However, there is also a specific medical concept called "work" that is used in the field of ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders.

In this context, work is defined as the product of force and distance, measured in joules (J) or newton-meters (Nm). It can be used to describe the amount of physical effort required to perform a specific task or activity, such as lifting an object or operating a machine.

For example, if a worker lifts a box that weighs 10 kilograms (kg) and raises it to a height of 0.5 meters (m), the work done can be calculated as follows:

Work = Force x Distance
Force = weight of the object (mass x gravity)
Distance = height raised

Force = 10 kg x 9.8 m/s^2 (acceleration due to gravity) = 98 N (newtons)
Work = 98 N x 0.5 m = 49 J or 49 Nm

This measurement of work can help assess the physical demands of a job and identify potential risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries, such as overexertion or repetitive strain.

Graft occlusion in the context of vascular surgery refers to the complete or partial blockage of a blood vessel that has been surgically replaced or repaired with a graft. The graft can be made from either synthetic materials or autologous tissue (taken from another part of the patient's body).

Graft occlusion can occur due to various reasons, including:

1. Thrombosis: Formation of a blood clot within the graft, which can obstruct blood flow.
2. Intimal hyperplasia: Overgrowth of the inner lining (intima) of the graft or the adjacent native vessel, causing narrowing of the lumen and reducing blood flow.
3. Atherosclerosis: Deposition of cholesterol and other substances in the walls of the graft, leading to hardening and narrowing of the vessel.
4. Infection: Bacterial or fungal infection of the graft can cause inflammation, weakening, and ultimately occlusion of the graft.
5. Mechanical factors: Kinking, twisting, or compression of the graft can lead to obstruction of blood flow.

Graft occlusion is a significant complication following vascular surgery, as it can result in reduced perfusion to downstream tissues and organs, leading to ischemia (lack of oxygen supply) and potential tissue damage or loss.

In a medical context, "lifting" generally refers to the act or process of physically moving or supporting an object or person with the use of one's muscles, particularly those in the back, legs, and arms. However, I am a large language model, not a doctor, and this definition is based on general usage rather than specific medical terminology.

Improper lifting techniques can lead to injuries, especially musculoskeletal ones. For this reason, healthcare professionals often provide guidelines for safe lifting, emphasizing the importance of maintaining a wide base of support, keeping the object close to the body, using leg muscles instead of the back, and avoiding twisting or bending at the waist.

In some cases, "lifting" may also refer to medical procedures where a surgeon raises a part of the body during surgery, but this is more commonly referred to as "elevation."

The radial artery is a key blood vessel in the human body, specifically a part of the peripheral arterial system. Originating from the brachial artery in the upper arm, the radial artery travels down the arm and crosses over the wrist, where it can be palpated easily. It then continues into the hand, dividing into several branches to supply blood to the hand's tissues and digits.

The radial artery is often used for taking pulse readings due to its easy accessibility at the wrist. Additionally, in medical procedures such as coronary angiography or bypass surgery, the radial artery can be utilized as a site for catheter insertion. This allows healthcare professionals to examine the heart's blood vessels and assess cardiovascular health.

An air bag is a type of vehicle safety device that uses a inflatable cushion to protect occupants from collision forces in the event of a car accident. When a crash occurs, a sensor triggers the inflation of the air bag, which then rapidly deploys and fills the space between the driver or passenger and the steering wheel or dashboard. This helps to absorb the impact and reduce the risk of injury. Air bags are typically installed in the steering wheel, dashboard, and sides of the vehicle, and they can significantly improve safety in the event of a crash. However, air bags can also pose a risk of injury if they deploy improperly or in certain types of crashes, so it is important for drivers to understand how they work and when they are most effective.

The jugular veins are a pair of large, superficial veins that carry blood from the head and neck to the heart. They are located in the neck and are easily visible when looking at the side of a person's neck. The external jugular vein runs along the surface of the muscles in the neck, while the internal jugular vein runs within the carotid sheath along with the carotid artery and the vagus nerve.

The jugular veins are important in clinical examinations because they can provide information about a person's cardiovascular function and intracranial pressure. For example, distention of the jugular veins may indicate heart failure or increased intracranial pressure, while decreased venous pulsations may suggest a low blood pressure or shock.

It is important to note that medical conditions such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can also affect the jugular veins and can lead to serious complications if not treated promptly.

Nerve compression syndromes refer to a group of conditions characterized by the pressure or irritation of a peripheral nerve, causing various symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the affected area. This compression can occur due to several reasons, including injury, repetitive motion, bone spurs, tumors, or swelling. Common examples of nerve compression syndromes include carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, radial nerve compression, and ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist or elbow. Treatment options may include physical therapy, splinting, medications, injections, or surgery, depending on the severity and underlying cause of the condition.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Industry" is a general term that refers to a specific branch of economic activity, or a particular way of producing goods or services. It is not a medical term with a defined meaning within the field of medicine.

However, if you are referring to the term "industrious," which can be used to describe someone who is diligent and hard-working, it could be applied in a medical context to describe a patient's level of engagement and effort in their own care. For example, a patient who is conscientious about taking their medications as prescribed, following through with recommended treatments, and making necessary lifestyle changes to manage their condition might be described as "industrious" by their healthcare provider.

Back injuries refer to damages or traumas that affect the structures of the back, including the muscles, nerves, ligaments, bones, and other tissues. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as sudden trauma (e.g., falls, accidents), repetitive stress, or degenerative conditions. Common types of back injuries include strains, sprains, herniated discs, fractured vertebrae, and spinal cord injuries. Symptoms may vary from mild discomfort to severe pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness, depending on the severity and location of the injury. Treatment options range from conservative measures like physical therapy and medication to surgical intervention in severe cases.

Muscular atrophy is a condition characterized by a decrease in the size and mass of muscles due to lack of use, disease, or injury. This occurs when there is a disruption in the balance between muscle protein synthesis and degradation, leading to a net loss of muscle proteins. There are two main types of muscular atrophy:

1. Disuse atrophy: This type of atrophy occurs when muscles are not used or are immobilized for an extended period, such as after an injury, surgery, or prolonged bed rest. In this case, the nerves that control the muscles may still be functioning properly, but the muscles themselves waste away due to lack of use.
2. Neurogenic atrophy: This type of atrophy is caused by damage to the nerves that supply the muscles, leading to muscle weakness and wasting. Conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), spinal cord injuries, and peripheral neuropathies can cause neurogenic atrophy.

In both cases, the affected muscles may become weak, shrink in size, and lose their tone and mass. Treatment for muscular atrophy depends on the underlying cause and may include physical therapy, exercise, and medication to manage symptoms and improve muscle strength and function.

An embolism is a medical condition that occurs when a substance, such as a blood clot or an air bubble, blocks a blood vessel. This can happen in any part of the body, but it is particularly dangerous when it affects the brain (causing a stroke) or the lungs (causing a pulmonary embolism). Embolisms can cause serious harm by preventing oxygen and nutrients from reaching the tissues and organs that need them. They are often the result of underlying medical conditions, such as heart disease or deep vein thrombosis, and may require immediate medical attention to prevent further complications.

The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm that extends from the shoulder joint (glenohumeral joint) to the elbow joint. It articulates with the glenoid cavity of the scapula to form the shoulder joint and with the radius and ulna bones at the elbow joint. The proximal end of the humerus has a rounded head that provides for movement in multiple planes, making it one of the most mobile joints in the body. The greater and lesser tubercles are bony prominences on the humeral head that serve as attachment sites for muscles that move the shoulder and arm. The narrow shaft of the humerus provides stability and strength for weight-bearing activities, while the distal end forms two articulations: one with the ulna (trochlea) and one with the radius (capitulum). Together, these structures allow for a wide range of motion in the shoulder and elbow joints.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

A feasibility study is a preliminary investigation or analysis conducted to determine the viability of a proposed project, program, or product. In the medical field, feasibility studies are often conducted before implementing new treatments, procedures, equipment, or facilities. These studies help to assess the practicality and effectiveness of the proposed intervention, as well as its potential benefits and risks.

Feasibility studies in healthcare typically involve several steps:

1. Problem identification: Clearly define the problem that the proposed project, program, or product aims to address.
2. Objectives setting: Establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives for the study.
3. Literature review: Conduct a thorough review of existing research and best practices related to the proposed intervention.
4. Methodology development: Design a methodology for data collection and analysis that will help answer the research questions and achieve the study's objectives.
5. Resource assessment: Evaluate the availability and adequacy of resources, including personnel, time, and finances, required to carry out the proposed intervention.
6. Risk assessment: Identify potential risks and challenges associated with the implementation of the proposed intervention and develop strategies to mitigate them.
7. Cost-benefit analysis: Estimate the costs and benefits of the proposed intervention, including direct and indirect costs, as well as short-term and long-term benefits.
8. Stakeholder engagement: Engage relevant stakeholders, such as patients, healthcare providers, administrators, and policymakers, to gather their input and support for the proposed intervention.
9. Decision-making: Based on the findings of the feasibility study, make an informed decision about whether or not to proceed with the proposed project, program, or product.

Feasibility studies are essential in healthcare as they help ensure that resources are allocated efficiently and effectively, and that interventions are evidence-based, safe, and beneficial for patients.

A blood vessel prosthesis is a medical device that is used as a substitute for a damaged or diseased natural blood vessel. It is typically made of synthetic materials such as polyester, Dacron, or ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) and is designed to mimic the function of a native blood vessel by allowing the flow of blood through it.

Blood vessel prostheses are used in various surgical procedures, including coronary artery bypass grafting, peripheral arterial reconstruction, and the creation of arteriovenous fistulas for dialysis access. The choice of material and size of the prosthesis depends on several factors, such as the location and diameter of the vessel being replaced, the patient's age and overall health status, and the surgeon's preference.

It is important to note that while blood vessel prostheses can be effective in restoring blood flow, they may also carry risks such as infection, thrombosis (blood clot formation), and graft failure over time. Therefore, careful patient selection, surgical technique, and postoperative management are crucial for the success of these procedures.

Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. They have thick, muscular walls that can withstand the high pressure of blood being pumped out of the heart. Arteries branch off into smaller vessels called arterioles, which further divide into a vast network of tiny capillaries where the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste occurs between the blood and the body's cells. After passing through the capillary network, deoxygenated blood collects in venules, then merges into veins, which return the blood back to the heart.

Regional perfusion chemotherapy for cancer is a medical treatment in which a specific area or region of the body is infused with high concentrations of cancer-killing (cytotoxic) drugs via a temporary isolation and perfusion of that region. This technique is typically used to treat isolated areas of cancer that are locally advanced, recurrent, or cannot be removed surgically.

The procedure involves isolating the regional blood circulation by cannulating the artery and vein that supply blood to the target area, often the limbs (such as in melanoma or sarcoma) or the liver (for liver tumors). The chemotherapeutic drugs are then introduced into the isolated arterial circulation, allowing for a high concentration of the drug to be delivered directly to the cancerous tissue while minimizing systemic exposure and toxicity.

After the infusion, the region is rinsed with a blood-substitute solution to remove any residual chemotherapeutic agents before reconnecting the circulation. This procedure can be repeated multiple times if necessary.

Regional perfusion chemotherapy has been shown to improve local control and potentially increase survival rates in certain types of cancer, while reducing systemic side effects compared to traditional intravenous chemotherapy. However, it is a complex and invasive procedure that requires specialized medical expertise and facilities.

A radius fracture is a break in the bone that runs from the wrist to the elbow, located on the thumb side of the forearm. Radius fractures can occur as a result of a fall, direct blow to the forearm, or a high-energy collision such as a car accident. There are various types of radius fractures, including:

1. Distal radius fracture: A break at the end of the radius bone, near the wrist joint, which is the most common type of radius fracture.
2. Radial shaft fracture: A break in the middle portion of the radius bone.
3. Radial head and neck fractures: Breaks in the upper part of the radius bone, near the elbow joint.
4. Comminuted fracture: A complex radius fracture where the bone is broken into multiple pieces.
5. Open (compound) fracture: A radius fracture with a wound or laceration in the skin, allowing for communication between the outside environment and the fractured bone.
6. Intra-articular fracture: A radius fracture that extends into the wrist joint or elbow joint.
7. Torus (buckle) fracture: A stable fracture where one side of the bone is compressed, causing it to buckle or bend, but not break completely through.

Symptoms of a radius fracture may include pain, swelling, tenderness, bruising, deformity, limited mobility, and in some cases, numbness or tingling in the fingers. Treatment options depend on the type and severity of the fracture but can range from casting to surgical intervention with implant fixation.

The femoral vein is the large vein that runs through the thigh and carries oxygen-depleted blood from the lower limbs back to the heart. It is located in the femoral triangle, along with the femoral artery and nerve. The femoral vein begins at the knee as the popliteal vein, which then joins with the deep vein of the thigh to form the femoral vein. As it moves up the leg, it is joined by several other veins, including the great saphenous vein, before it becomes the external iliac vein at the inguinal ligament in the groin.

Phantom limb is a condition where an individual experiences sensations in a limb or appendage that has been amputated. These sensations can include feelings of pain, warmth, cold, itching, or tingling in the area where the limb used to be. The exact cause of phamtom limb is not fully understood, but it's believed to be related to mixed signals from the brain and nervous system.

Phantom limb sensations are relatively common among amputees, with some studies suggesting that up to 80% of individuals who have undergone an amputation may experience these sensations to some degree. While phantom limb can be a challenging condition to live with, there are various treatments available that can help manage the symptoms and improve quality of life. These may include medications, physical therapy, and alternative therapies such as acupuncture or mirror box therapy.

"Torque" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a physical concept used in the fields of physics and engineering, referring to a twisting force that causes rotation around an axis. However, in certain medical contexts, such as in discussions of spinal or joint biomechanics, the term "torque" may be used to describe a rotational force applied to a body part. But generally speaking, "torque" is not a term commonly used in medical terminology.

Peripheral nerves are nerve fibers that transmit signals between the central nervous system (CNS, consisting of the brain and spinal cord) and the rest of the body. These nerves convey motor, sensory, and autonomic information, enabling us to move, feel, and respond to changes in our environment. They form a complex network that extends from the CNS to muscles, glands, skin, and internal organs, allowing for coordinated responses and functions throughout the body. Damage or injury to peripheral nerves can result in various neurological symptoms, such as numbness, weakness, or pain, depending on the type and severity of the damage.

In medical terms, toes are the digits located at the end of the foot. Humans typically have five toes on each foot, consisting of the big toe (hallux), second toe, third toe, fourth toe, and little toe (fifth toe). The bones of the toes are called phalanges, with the exception of the big toe, which has a different bone structure and is composed of a proximal phalanx, distal phalanx, and sometimes a sesamoid bone.

Toes play an essential role in maintaining balance and assisting in locomotion by helping to push off the ground during walking or running. They also contribute to the overall stability and posture of the body. Various medical conditions can affect toes, such as ingrown toenails, bunions, hammertoes, and neuromas, which may require specific treatments or interventions to alleviate pain, restore function, or improve appearance.

The brachiocephalic trunk, also known as the brachiocephalic artery or innominate artery, is a large vessel that branches off the aorta and divides into the right common carotid artery and the right subclavian artery. It supplies blood to the head, neck, and arms on the right side of the body.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Ultrasonography, Doppler refers to a non-invasive diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create real-time images of the movement of blood flow through vessels, tissues, or heart valves. The Doppler effect is used to measure the frequency shift of the ultrasound waves as they bounce off moving red blood cells, which allows for the calculation of the speed and direction of blood flow. This technique is commonly used to diagnose and monitor various conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, heart valve abnormalities, and fetal heart development during pregnancy. It does not use radiation or contrast agents and is considered safe with minimal risks.

Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) diseases, also known as Peripheral Neuropathies, refer to conditions that affect the functioning of the peripheral nervous system, which includes all the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These nerves transmit signals between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body, controlling sensations, movements, and automatic functions such as heart rate and digestion.

PNS diseases can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, toxins, metabolic disorders, trauma, or autoimmune conditions. The symptoms of PNS diseases depend on the type and extent of nerve damage but often include:

1. Numbness, tingling, or pain in the hands and feet
2. Muscle weakness or cramps
3. Loss of reflexes
4. Decreased sensation to touch, temperature, or vibration
5. Coordination problems and difficulty with balance
6. Sexual dysfunction
7. Digestive issues, such as constipation or diarrhea
8. Dizziness or fainting due to changes in blood pressure

Examples of PNS diseases include Guillain-Barre syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, diabetic neuropathy, and peripheral nerve injuries. Treatment for these conditions varies depending on the underlying cause but may involve medications, physical therapy, lifestyle changes, or surgery.

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a medical condition characterized by the narrowing or blockage of arteries that supply blood to the extremities, most commonly the legs. This results in reduced blood flow, leading to symptoms such as leg pain, cramping, numbness, or weakness during physical activity, and in severe cases, tissue damage or gangrene. PAD is often indicative of widespread atherosclerosis, which is the hardening and narrowing of arteries due to the buildup of fatty deposits called plaques. It's important to note that early detection and management can help prevent serious complications.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "videotape recording" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Videotape recording is a general technology term that refers to the process of capturing and storing visual and/or audio content on magnetic tape in the form of a videocassette.

In a medical context, videotape recordings might be used for various purposes, such as documenting medical procedures or patient consultations, creating educational materials, or conducting research. However, the use of videotape recording in these situations would not change the fundamental meaning of the term.

Radiculopathy is a medical term that refers to the condition where there is damage or disturbance in the nerve roots as they exit the spinal column. These nerve roots, also known as radicles, can become damaged due to various reasons such as compression, inflammation, or injury, leading to a range of symptoms.

Radiculopathy may occur in any part of the spine, but it is most commonly found in the cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back) regions. When the nerve roots in the cervical region are affected, it can result in symptoms such as neck pain, shoulder pain, arm pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the arms or fingers. On the other hand, when the nerve roots in the lumbar region are affected, it can cause lower back pain, leg pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the legs or feet.

The symptoms of radiculopathy can vary depending on the severity and location of the damage to the nerve roots. In some cases, the condition may resolve on its own with rest and conservative treatment. However, in more severe cases, medical intervention such as physical therapy, medication, or surgery may be necessary to alleviate the symptoms and prevent further damage.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

A neurological examination is a series of tests used to evaluate the functioning of the nervous system, including both the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and peripheral nervous system (the nerves that extend from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body). It is typically performed by a healthcare professional such as a neurologist or a primary care physician with specialized training in neurology.

During a neurological examination, the healthcare provider will assess various aspects of neurological function, including:

1. Mental status: This involves evaluating a person's level of consciousness, orientation, memory, and cognitive abilities.
2. Cranial nerves: There are 12 cranial nerves that control functions such as vision, hearing, smell, taste, and movement of the face and neck. The healthcare provider will test each of these nerves to ensure they are functioning properly.
3. Motor function: This involves assessing muscle strength, tone, coordination, and reflexes. The healthcare provider may ask the person to perform certain movements or tasks to evaluate these functions.
4. Sensory function: The healthcare provider will test a person's ability to feel different types of sensations, such as touch, pain, temperature, vibration, and proprioception (the sense of where your body is in space).
5. Coordination and balance: The healthcare provider may assess a person's ability to perform coordinated movements, such as touching their finger to their nose or walking heel-to-toe.
6. Reflexes: The healthcare provider will test various reflexes throughout the body using a reflex hammer.

The results of a neurological examination can help healthcare providers diagnose and monitor conditions that affect the nervous system, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, or peripheral neuropathy.

A tendon transfer is a surgical procedure where a healthy tendon is moved to rebalance or reinforce a muscle that has become weak or paralyzed due to injury, disease, or nerve damage. The transferred tendon attaches to the bone in a new position, allowing it to power a different movement or stabilize a joint. This procedure helps restore function and improve mobility in the affected area.

Spinal cord compression is a medical condition that refers to the narrowing of the spinal canal, which puts pressure on the spinal cord and the nerves that branch out from it. This can occur due to various reasons such as degenerative changes in the spine, herniated discs, bone spurs, tumors, or fractures. The compression can lead to a range of symptoms including pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, or loss of bladder and bowel control. In severe cases, it can cause paralysis. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and may include physical therapy, medication, surgery, or radiation therapy.

Muscle fatigue is a condition characterized by a reduction in the ability of a muscle to generate force or power, typically after prolonged or strenuous exercise. It is often accompanied by sensations of tiredness, weakness, and discomfort in the affected muscle(s). The underlying mechanisms of muscle fatigue are complex and involve both peripheral factors (such as changes in muscle metabolism, ion handling, and neuromuscular transmission) and central factors (such as changes in the nervous system's ability to activate muscles). Muscle fatigue can also occur as a result of various medical conditions or medications that impair muscle function.

An explosion is a rapid release of energy that causes a blast wave or pressure surge, and may also produce rapidly expanding gases, heat, light, and sound. In medical terms, explosions can cause a variety of injuries, including blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, burns, and primary and secondary blast injuries.

Blunt trauma is caused by the force of the explosion propelling objects or people through the air, or by the collapse of structures. Penetrating trauma is caused by flying debris or fragments that pierce the skin and other tissues. Burns can result from the heat generated by the explosion, as well as from contact with hot gases, flames, or chemicals.

Primary blast injuries are caused by the direct effect of the blast wave on the body, and can damage internal organs such as the lungs, ears, and brain. Secondary blast injuries are caused by debris or fragments that become projectiles due to the force of the explosion. Tertiary blast injuries occur when people or objects are thrown by the blast wind or become trapped in collapsed structures.

Medical personnel who treat victims of explosions must be trained to recognize and manage these various types of injuries, as well as to provide appropriate psychological support for those affected by the traumatic event.

Mepivacaine is a local anesthetic drug, which is used to cause numbness or loss of feeling before and during surgical procedures. It works by blocking the nerve signals in your body. Mepivacaine has a faster onset of action compared to bupivacaine but has a shorter duration of action. It can be used for infiltration, peripheral nerve block, and epidural anesthesia.

The medical definition of Mepivacaine is:

A amide-type local anesthetic with fast onset and moderate duration of action. Its molar potency is similar to that of procaine, but its duration of action is approximately 50% longer. It has been used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is metabolized in the liver by hydrolysis.

It's important to note that mepivacaine, like any other medication, can have side effects and should be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Foot injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the various structures of the foot, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves. These injuries can result from various causes such as accidents, sports activities, falls, or repetitive stress. Common types of foot injuries include fractures, sprains, strains, contusions, dislocations, and overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Symptoms may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury but often include pain, swelling, bruising, difficulty walking, and reduced range of motion. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal healing and prevent long-term complications.

An autonomic nerve block is a medical procedure that involves injecting a local anesthetic or other medication into or near the nerves that make up the autonomic nervous system. This type of nerve block is used to diagnose and treat certain medical conditions that affect the autonomic nervous system, such as neuropathy or complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).

The autonomic nervous system is responsible for controlling many involuntary bodily functions, such as heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, and body temperature. It is made up of two parts: the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for preparing the body for "fight or flight" responses, while the parasympathetic nervous system helps the body relax and rest.

An autonomic nerve block can be used to diagnose a problem with the autonomic nervous system by temporarily blocking the nerves' signals and observing how this affects the body's functions. It can also be used to treat pain or other symptoms caused by damage to the autonomic nerves. The injection is usually given in the area near the spine, and the specific location will depend on the nerves being targeted.

It is important to note that an autonomic nerve block is a medical procedure that should only be performed by a qualified healthcare professional. As with any medical procedure, there are risks and benefits associated with an autonomic nerve block, and it is important for patients to discuss these with their doctor before deciding whether this treatment is right for them.

In the context of healthcare, workload refers to the amount and complexity of tasks or responsibilities that a healthcare professional is expected to perform within a given period. This can include direct patient care activities such as physical assessments, treatments, and procedures, as well as indirect care activities like documentation, communication with other healthcare team members, and quality improvement initiatives.

Workload can be measured in various ways, including the number of patients assigned to a provider, the amount of time spent on direct patient care, or the complexity of the medical conditions being managed. High workloads can impact the quality of care provided, as well as healthcare professional burnout and job satisfaction. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and manage workload effectively to ensure safe and high-quality patient care.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

A dislocation is a condition in which a bone slips out of its normal position in a joint. This can happen as a result of trauma or injury, such as a fall or direct blow to the body. Dislocations can cause pain, swelling, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, a dislocation may also damage surrounding tissues, such as ligaments, tendons, and nerves.

Dislocations are typically treated by reducing the dislocation, which means putting the bone back into its normal position. This is usually done with the help of medication to relieve pain and relaxation techniques to help the person stay still during the reduction. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair damaged tissues or if the dislocation cannot be reduced through other methods. After the dislocation has been reduced, the joint may be immobilized with a splint or sling to allow it to heal properly.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect that you have a dislocation. If left untreated, a dislocation can lead to further complications, such as joint instability and chronic pain.

The Stellate Ganglion is a part of the sympathetic nervous system. It's a collection of nerve cells (a ganglion) located in the neck, more specifically at the level of the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae. The stellate ganglion is formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical ganglion and the first thoracic ganglion.

This ganglion plays a crucial role in the body's "fight or flight" response, providing sympathetic innervation to the head, neck, upper extremities, and heart. It's responsible for various functions including regulation of blood flow, sweat gland activity, and contributing to the sensory innervation of the head and neck.

Stellate ganglion block is a medical procedure used to diagnose or treat certain conditions like pain disorders, by injecting local anesthetic near the stellate ganglion to numb the area and interrupt nerve signals.

Pathological constriction refers to an abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage or organ, which can interfere with the normal flow of blood, air, or other substances through the area. This constriction can occur due to various reasons such as inflammation, scarring, or abnormal growths, and can affect different parts of the body, including blood vessels, airways, intestines, and ureters. Pathological constriction can lead to a range of symptoms and complications depending on its location and severity, and may require medical intervention to correct.

Craniocerebral trauma, also known as traumatic brain injury (TBI), is a type of injury that occurs to the head and brain. It can result from a variety of causes, including motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports injuries, violence, or other types of trauma. Craniocerebral trauma can range in severity from mild concussions to severe injuries that cause permanent disability or death.

The injury typically occurs when there is a sudden impact to the head, causing the brain to move within the skull and collide with the inside of the skull. This can result in bruising, bleeding, swelling, or tearing of brain tissue, as well as damage to blood vessels and nerves. In severe cases, the skull may be fractured or penetrated, leading to direct injury to the brain.

Symptoms of craniocerebral trauma can vary widely depending on the severity and location of the injury. They may include headache, dizziness, confusion, memory loss, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, changes in vision or hearing, weakness or numbness in the limbs, balance problems, and behavioral or emotional changes. In severe cases, the person may lose consciousness or fall into a coma.

Treatment for craniocerebral trauma depends on the severity of the injury. Mild injuries may be treated with rest, pain medication, and close monitoring, while more severe injuries may require surgery, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Prevention is key to reducing the incidence of craniocerebral trauma, including measures such as wearing seat belts and helmets, preventing falls, and avoiding violent situations.

An accidental fall is an unplanned, unexpected event in which a person suddenly and involuntarily comes to rest on the ground or other lower level, excluding intentional changes in position (e.g., jumping to catch a ball) and landings that are part of a planned activity (e.g., diving into a pool). Accidental falls can occur for various reasons, such as environmental hazards, muscle weakness, balance problems, visual impairment, or certain medical conditions. They are a significant health concern, particularly among older adults, as they can lead to serious injuries, loss of independence, reduced quality of life, and increased mortality.

Vascular diseases are medical conditions that affect the circulatory system, specifically the blood vessels (arteries, veins, and capillaries). These diseases can include conditions such as:

1. Atherosclerosis: The buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in and on the walls of the arteries, which can restrict blood flow.
2. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD): A condition caused by atherosclerosis where there is narrowing or blockage of the peripheral arteries, most commonly in the legs. This can lead to pain, numbness, and cramping.
3. Coronary Artery Disease (CAD): Atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. This can lead to chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.
4. Carotid Artery Disease: Atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries in the neck that supply blood to the brain. This can increase the risk of stroke.
5. Cerebrovascular Disease: Conditions that affect blood flow to the brain, including stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA or "mini-stroke").
6. Aneurysm: A weakened area in the wall of a blood vessel that causes it to bulge outward and potentially rupture.
7. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): A blood clot that forms in the deep veins, usually in the legs, which can cause pain, swelling, and increased risk of pulmonary embolism if the clot travels to the lungs.
8. Varicose Veins: Swollen, twisted, and often painful veins that have filled with an abnormal collection of blood, usually appearing in the legs.
9. Vasculitis: Inflammation of the blood vessels, which can cause damage and narrowing, leading to reduced blood flow.
10. Raynaud's Phenomenon: A condition where the small arteries that supply blood to the skin become narrowed, causing decreased blood flow, typically in response to cold temperatures or stress.

These are just a few examples of vascular conditions that fall under the umbrella term "cerebrovascular disease." Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve outcomes for many of these conditions.

In medical terms, the knee is referred to as the largest and one of the most complex joints in the human body. It is a hinge joint that connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bones (tibia and fibula), enabling movements like flexion, extension, and a small amount of rotation. The knee also contains several other components such as menisci, ligaments, tendons, and bursae, which provide stability, cushioning, and protection during movement.

Occupational health is a branch of medicine that focuses on the physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all types of jobs. The goal of occupational health is to prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and disabilities, while also promoting the overall health and safety of employees. This may involve identifying and assessing potential hazards in the workplace, implementing controls to reduce or eliminate those hazards, providing education and training to workers on safe practices, and conducting medical surveillance and screenings to detect early signs of work-related health problems.

Occupational health also involves working closely with employers, employees, and other stakeholders to develop policies and programs that support the health and well-being of workers. This may include promoting healthy lifestyles, providing access to mental health resources, and supporting return-to-work programs for injured or ill workers. Ultimately, the goal of occupational health is to create a safe and healthy work environment that enables employees to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, while also protecting their long-term health and well-being.

The popliteal vein is the continuation of the tibial and fibular (or anterior and posterior tibial) veins, forming in the lower leg's back portion or popliteal fossa. It carries blood from the leg towards the heart. The popliteal vein is located deep within the body and is accompanied by the popliteal artery, which supplies oxygenated blood to the lower leg. This venous structure is a crucial part of the venous system in the lower extremities and is often assessed during physical examinations for signs of venous insufficiency or deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

Anticoagulants are a class of medications that work to prevent the formation of blood clots in the body. They do this by inhibiting the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot. Anticoagulants can be given orally, intravenously, or subcutaneously, depending on the specific drug and the individual patient's needs.

There are several different types of anticoagulants, including:

1. Heparin: This is a naturally occurring anticoagulant that is often used in hospitalized patients who require immediate anticoagulation. It works by activating an enzyme called antithrombin III, which inhibits the formation of clots.
2. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH): LMWH is a form of heparin that has been broken down into smaller molecules. It has a longer half-life than standard heparin and can be given once or twice daily by subcutaneous injection.
3. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs): These are newer oral anticoagulants that work by directly inhibiting specific clotting factors in the coagulation cascade. Examples include apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran.
4. Vitamin K antagonists: These are older oral anticoagulants that work by inhibiting the action of vitamin K, which is necessary for the formation of clotting factors. Warfarin is an example of a vitamin K antagonist.

Anticoagulants are used to prevent and treat a variety of conditions, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), atrial fibrillation, and prosthetic heart valve thrombosis. It is important to note that anticoagulants can increase the risk of bleeding, so they must be used with caution and regular monitoring of blood clotting times may be required.

In a medical context, efficiency generally refers to the ability to achieve a desired outcome with minimal waste of time, effort, or resources. It can be applied to various aspects of healthcare, including the delivery of clinical services, the use of medical treatments and interventions, and the operation of health systems and organizations. High levels of efficiency can help to improve patient outcomes, increase access to care, and reduce costs.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

A tendon is the strong, flexible band of tissue that connects muscle to bone. It helps transfer the force produced by the muscle to allow various movements of our body parts. Tendons are made up of collagen fibers arranged in parallel bundles and have a poor blood supply, making them prone to injuries and slow to heal. Examples include the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the heel bone, and the patellar tendon, which connects the kneecap to the shinbone.

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome (SVCS) is a medical condition characterized by the obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC), which is the large vein that carries blood from the upper body to the heart. This obstruction can be caused by cancerous tumors, thrombosis (blood clots), or other compressive factors.

The obstruction results in the impaired flow of blood from the head, neck, arms, and upper chest, leading to a variety of symptoms such as swelling of the face, neck, and upper extremities; shortness of breath; cough; chest pain; and distended veins visible on the skin surface. In severe cases, SVCS can cause life-threatening complications like cerebral edema (swelling of the brain) or pulmonary edema (fluid accumulation in the lungs).

Immediate medical attention is required for individuals with suspected SVCS to prevent further complications and to manage the underlying cause. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, anticoagulation therapy, or surgery, depending on the etiology of the obstruction.

The motor cortex is a region in the frontal lobe of the brain that is responsible for controlling voluntary movements. It is involved in planning, initiating, and executing movements of the limbs, body, and face. The motor cortex contains neurons called Betz cells, which have large cell bodies and are responsible for transmitting signals to the spinal cord to activate muscles. Damage to the motor cortex can result in various movement disorders such as hemiplegia or paralysis on one side of the body.

Computer-assisted therapy, also known as computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), refers to the use of computer programs or digital platforms to deliver therapeutic interventions that are typically guided by a trained professional. This approach often involves interactive activities and exercises designed to help individuals develop skills and strategies for managing various psychological, emotional, or behavioral issues.

The goal of computer-assisted therapy is to increase accessibility, affordability, and convenience of mental health services while maintaining the effectiveness of traditional face-to-face therapy. It can be used as a standalone treatment or as an adjunct to traditional therapy, depending on the individual's needs and preferences. Common applications of computer-assisted therapy include treating anxiety disorders, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), insomnia, and substance use disorders.

Vascular system injuries refer to damages or disruptions to the body's vascular system, which is made up of the heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries. These injuries can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, disease, or surgical complications. They may result in bleeding, blockage of blood flow, or formation of blood clots, leading to serious consequences like tissue damage, organ failure, or even death if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Traumatic injuries to the vascular system can include cuts, tears, or bruises to the blood vessels, which can lead to internal or external bleeding. Blunt trauma can also cause damage to the blood vessels, leading to blockages or aneurysms.

Diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions can weaken the blood vessels and make them more prone to injury. Surgical complications, such as accidental cuts to blood vessels during operations, can also lead to vascular system injuries.

Treatment for vascular system injuries may include surgery, medication, or lifestyle changes, depending on the severity and location of the injury.

The Chi-square distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is often used in statistical hypothesis testing. It is the distribution of a sum of squares of k independent standard normal random variables. The resulting quantity follows a chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom, denoted as χ²(k).

The probability density function (pdf) of the Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom is given by:

f(x; k) = (1/ (2^(k/2) * Γ(k/2))) \* x^((k/2)-1) \* e^(-x/2), for x > 0 and 0, otherwise.

Where Γ(k/2) is the gamma function evaluated at k/2. The mean and variance of a Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom are k and 2k, respectively.

The Chi-square distribution has various applications in statistical inference, including testing goodness-of-fit, homogeneity of variances, and independence in contingency tables.

Gait is a medical term used to describe the pattern of movement of the limbs during walking or running. It includes the manner or style of walking, including factors such as rhythm, speed, and step length. A person's gait can provide important clues about their physical health and neurological function, and abnormalities in gait may indicate the presence of underlying medical conditions, such as neuromuscular disorders, orthopedic problems, or injuries.

A typical human gait cycle involves two main phases: the stance phase, during which the foot is in contact with the ground, and the swing phase, during which the foot is lifted and moved forward in preparation for the next step. The gait cycle can be further broken down into several sub-phases, including heel strike, foot flat, midstance, heel off, and toe off.

Gait analysis is a specialized field of study that involves observing and measuring a person's gait pattern using various techniques, such as video recordings, force plates, and motion capture systems. This information can be used to diagnose and treat gait abnormalities, improve mobility and function, and prevent injuries.

Neurosurgical procedures are operations that are performed on the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. These procedures are typically carried out by neurosurgeons, who are medical doctors with specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the nervous system. Neurosurgical procedures can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, including traumatic injuries, tumors, aneurysms, vascular malformations, infections, degenerative diseases, and congenital abnormalities.

Some common types of neurosurgical procedures include:

* Craniotomy: A procedure in which a bone flap is temporarily removed from the skull to gain access to the brain. This type of procedure may be performed to remove a tumor, repair a blood vessel, or relieve pressure on the brain.
* Spinal fusion: A procedure in which two or more vertebrae in the spine are fused together using bone grafts and metal hardware. This is often done to stabilize the spine and alleviate pain caused by degenerative conditions or spinal deformities.
* Microvascular decompression: A procedure in which a blood vessel that is causing pressure on a nerve is repositioned or removed. This type of procedure is often used to treat trigeminal neuralgia, a condition that causes severe facial pain.
* Deep brain stimulation: A procedure in which electrodes are implanted in specific areas of the brain and connected to a battery-operated device called a neurostimulator. The neurostimulator sends electrical impulses to the brain to help alleviate symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease or dystonia.
* Stereotactic radiosurgery: A non-invasive procedure that uses focused beams of radiation to treat tumors, vascular malformations, and other abnormalities in the brain or spine. This type of procedure is often used for patients who are not good candidates for traditional surgery due to age, health status, or location of the lesion.

Neurosurgical procedures can be complex and require a high degree of skill and expertise. Patients considering neurosurgical treatment should consult with a qualified neurosurgeon to discuss their options and determine the best course of action for their individual situation.

In medical terms, ribs are the long, curved bones that make up the ribcage in the human body. They articulate with the thoracic vertebrae posteriorly and connect to the sternum anteriorly via costal cartilages. There are 12 pairs of ribs in total, and they play a crucial role in protecting the lungs and heart, allowing room for expansion and contraction during breathing. Ribs also provide attachment points for various muscles involved in respiration and posture.

Psychometrics is a branch of psychology that deals with the theory and technique of psychological measurement, such as the development and standardization of tests used to measure intelligence, aptitude, personality, attitudes, and other mental abilities or traits. It involves the construction and validation of measurement instruments, including the determination of their reliability and validity, and the application of statistical methods to analyze test data and interpret results. The ultimate goal of psychometrics is to provide accurate, objective, and meaningful measurements that can be used to understand individual differences and make informed decisions in educational, clinical, and organizational settings.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, color is a type of diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses the Doppler effect to produce visual images of blood flow in vessels and the heart. The Doppler effect is the change in frequency or wavelength of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to the source of the wave. In this context, it refers to the change in frequency of the ultrasound waves as they reflect off moving red blood cells.

In color Doppler ultrasonography, different colors are used to represent the direction and speed of blood flow. Red typically represents blood flowing toward the transducer (the device that sends and receives sound waves), while blue represents blood flowing away from the transducer. The intensity or brightness of the color is proportional to the velocity of blood flow.

Color Doppler ultrasonography is often used in conjunction with grayscale ultrasound imaging, which provides information about the structure and composition of tissues. Together, these techniques can help diagnose a wide range of conditions, including heart disease, blood clots, and abnormalities in blood flow.

Arthralgia is a medical term that refers to pain in the joints. It does not involve inflammation, which would be referred to as arthritis. The pain can range from mild to severe and may occur in one or multiple joints. Arthralgia can have various causes, including injuries, infections, degenerative conditions, or systemic diseases. In some cases, the underlying cause of arthralgia remains unknown. Treatment typically focuses on managing the pain and addressing the underlying condition if it can be identified.

The tibial arteries are three major arteries that supply blood to the lower leg and foot. They are branches of the popliteal artery, which is a continuation of the femoral artery. The three tibial arteries are:

1. Anterior tibial artery: This artery runs down the front of the leg and supplies blood to the muscles in the anterior compartment of the leg, as well as to the foot. It becomes the dorsalis pedis artery as it approaches the ankle.
2. Posterior tibial artery: This artery runs down the back of the leg and supplies blood to the muscles in the posterior compartment of the leg. It then branches into the fibular (peroneal) artery and the medial and lateral plantar arteries, which supply blood to the foot.
3. Fibular (peroneal) artery: This artery runs down the outside of the leg and supplies blood to the muscles in the lateral compartment of the leg. It also provides branches that anastomose with the anterior and posterior tibial arteries, forming a network of vessels that helps ensure adequate blood flow to the foot.

Together, these arteries play a critical role in providing oxygenated blood and nutrients to the lower leg and foot, helping to maintain their health and function.

Peripheral nerve injuries refer to damage or trauma to the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These nerves transmit information between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body, including sensory, motor, and autonomic functions. Peripheral nerve injuries can result in various symptoms, depending on the type and severity of the injury, such as numbness, tingling, weakness, or paralysis in the affected area.

Peripheral nerve injuries are classified into three main categories based on the degree of damage:

1. Neuropraxia: This is the mildest form of nerve injury, where the nerve remains intact but its function is disrupted due to a local conduction block. The nerve fiber is damaged, but the supporting structures remain intact. Recovery usually occurs within 6-12 weeks without any residual deficits.
2. Axonotmesis: In this type of injury, there is damage to both the axons and the supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium). The nerve fibers are disrupted, but the connective tissue sheaths remain intact. Recovery can take several months or even up to a year, and it may be incomplete, with some residual deficits possible.
3. Neurotmesis: This is the most severe form of nerve injury, where there is complete disruption of the nerve fibers and supporting structures (endoneurium, perineurium, epineurium). Recovery is unlikely without surgical intervention, which may involve nerve grafting or repair.

Peripheral nerve injuries can be caused by various factors, including trauma, compression, stretching, lacerations, or chemical exposure. Treatment options depend on the type and severity of the injury and may include conservative management, such as physical therapy and pain management, or surgical intervention for more severe cases.

Intermittent claudication is a medical condition characterized by pain or cramping in the legs, usually in the calf muscles, that occurs during exercise or walking and is relieved by rest. This symptom is caused by insufficient blood flow to the working muscles due to peripheral artery disease (PAD), a narrowing or blockage of the arteries in the limbs. As the individual walks, the muscle demands for oxygen and nutrients increase, but the restricted blood supply cannot meet these demands, leading to ischemia (lack of oxygen) and pain. The pain typically subsides after a few minutes of rest, as the muscle's demand for oxygen decreases, allowing the limited blood flow to compensate. Regular exercise and medications may help improve symptoms and reduce the risk of complications associated with PAD.

A tremor is an involuntary, rhythmic muscle contraction and relaxation that causes a shaking movement. It's a type of motion disorder that can affect any part of your body, but it most often occurs in your hands. Tremors can be harmless, but they can also be a symptom of a more serious neurological disorder. The cause of tremors isn't always known, but they can be the result of damage to the brain from a stroke, multiple sclerosis, or trauma. Certain medications, alcohol abuse, and drug withdrawal can also cause tremors. In some cases, tremors may be inherited and run in families.

Tremors can be classified based on their cause, appearance, and the situation in which they occur. The two most common types of tremors are:

* Resting tremors, which occur when your muscles are relaxed, such as when your hands are resting on your lap. Parkinson's disease is a common cause of this type of tremor.
* Action tremors, which occur with purposeful movement, such as when you're trying to hold something or when you're using a utensil. Essential tremor, the most common type of tremor, is an action tremor.

Tremors can also be classified based on their frequency (how often they occur) and amplitude (the size of the movement). High-frequency tremors are faster and smaller in amplitude, while low-frequency tremors are slower and larger in amplitude.

In general, tremors are not a life-threatening condition, but they can be embarrassing or make it difficult to perform daily activities. In some cases, tremors may indicate a more serious underlying condition that requires treatment. If you're concerned about tremors or have any questions about your symptoms, it's important to speak with a healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sports" is not a medical term. It refers to physical activities that are governed by a set of rules and often engaged in competitively. However, there are fields such as Sports Medicine and Exercise Science that deal with various aspects of physical activity, fitness, and sports-related injuries or conditions. If you have any questions related to these areas, I'd be happy to try to help!

Electric injuries refer to damage to the body caused by exposure to electrical energy. This can occur when a person comes into contact with an electrical source, such as a power line or outlet, and the electrical current passes through the body. The severity of the injury depends on various factors, including the voltage and amperage of the electrical current, the duration of exposure, and the path the current takes through the body.

Electric injuries can cause a range of symptoms and complications, including burns, cardiac arrest, muscle damage, nerve damage, and fractures or dislocations (if the victim is thrown by the electrical shock). In some cases, electric injuries can be fatal. Treatment typically involves supportive care to stabilize the patient's vital signs, as well as specific interventions to address any complications that may have arisen as a result of the injury. Prevention measures include following safety guidelines when working with electricity and being aware of potential electrical hazards in one's environment.

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. When a clot forms in an artery, it can cut off the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues served by that artery, leading to damage or tissue death. If a thrombus forms in the heart, it can cause a heart attack. If a thrombus breaks off and travels through the bloodstream, it can lodge in a smaller vessel, causing blockage and potentially leading to damage in the organ that the vessel supplies. This is known as an embolism.

Thrombosis can occur due to various factors such as injury to the blood vessel wall, abnormalities in blood flow, or changes in the composition of the blood. Certain medical conditions, medications, and lifestyle factors can increase the risk of thrombosis. Treatment typically involves anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve or prevent further growth of the clot, as well as addressing any underlying causes.

Raynaud's disease, also known as Raynaud's phenomenon or syndrome, is a condition that affects the blood vessels, particularly in the fingers and toes. It is characterized by episodes of vasospasm (constriction) of the small digital arteries and arterioles, which can be triggered by cold temperatures or emotional stress. This results in reduced blood flow to the affected areas, causing them to become pale or white and then cyanotic (blue) due to the accumulation of deoxygenated blood. As the episode resolves, the affected areas may turn red as blood flow returns, sometimes accompanied by pain, numbness, or tingling sensations.

Raynaud's disease can be primary, meaning it occurs without an underlying medical condition, or secondary, which is associated with connective tissue disorders, autoimmune diseases, or other health issues such as carpal tunnel syndrome, vibration tool usage, or smoking. Primary Raynaud's is more common and tends to be less severe than secondary Raynaud's.

Treatment for Raynaud's disease typically involves avoiding triggers, keeping the body warm, and using medications to help dilate blood vessels and improve circulation. In some cases, lifestyle modifications and smoking cessation may also be recommended to manage symptoms and prevent progression of the condition.

Muscle contraction is the physiological process in which muscle fibers shorten and generate force, leading to movement or stability of a body part. This process involves the sliding filament theory where thick and thin filaments within the sarcomeres (the functional units of muscles) slide past each other, facilitated by the interaction between myosin heads and actin filaments. The energy required for this action is provided by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Muscle contractions can be voluntary or involuntary, and they play a crucial role in various bodily functions such as locomotion, circulation, respiration, and posture maintenance.

The femoral artery is the major blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the lower extremity of the human body. It is a continuation of the external iliac artery and becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through the adductor hiatus in the adductor magnus muscle of the thigh.

The femoral artery is located in the femoral triangle, which is bound by the sartorius muscle anteriorly, the adductor longus muscle medially, and the biceps femoris muscle posteriorly. It can be easily palpated in the groin region, making it a common site for taking blood samples, measuring blood pressure, and performing surgical procedures such as femoral artery catheterization and bypass grafting.

The femoral artery gives off several branches that supply blood to the lower limb, including the deep femoral artery, the superficial femoral artery, and the profunda femoris artery. These branches provide blood to the muscles, bones, skin, and other tissues of the leg, ankle, and foot.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

The radius is one of the two bones in the forearm in humans and other vertebrates. In humans, it runs from the lateral side of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist. It is responsible for rotation of the forearm and articulates with the humerus at the elbow and the carpals at the wrist. Any medical condition or injury that affects the radius can impact the movement and function of the forearm and hand.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

The popliteal artery is the continuation of the femoral artery that passes through the popliteal fossa, which is the area behind the knee. It is the major blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the lower leg and foot. The popliteal artery divides into the anterior tibial artery and the tibioperoneal trunk at the lower border of the popliteus muscle. Any damage or blockage to this artery can result in serious health complications, including reduced blood flow to the leg and foot, which may lead to pain, cramping, numbness, or even tissue death (gangrene) if left untreated.

In the context of medical terminology, "occupations" generally refers to the activities or tasks that a person performs as part of their daily life and routines. This can include both paid work or employment, as well as unpaid activities such as household chores, hobbies, and self-care. The term is often used in the field of occupational therapy, which focuses on helping individuals develop, recover, and maintain the skills needed for participation in their daily occupations and improving their overall quality of life. Additionally, Occupational Medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the prevention and management of job-related injuries and illnesses, as well as promoting health and productivity in the workplace.

A leg ulcer is a chronic wound that occurs on the lower extremities, typically on the inner or outer ankle. It's often caused by poor circulation, venous insufficiency, or diabetes. Leg ulcers can also result from injury, infection, or inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus. These ulcers can be painful, and they may take a long time to heal, making them prone to infection. Proper diagnosis, treatment, and wound care are essential for healing leg ulcers and preventing complications.

The upper extremity, proximal extremity or superior epiphysis of the femur is the part of the femur closest to the pelvic bone ... Upper extremity of right femur viewed from behind and above, showing head, neck, and the greater and lesser trochanter Left hip ... along the back part of the body: it is called the linea quadrata (or quadrate line). About the junction of the upper one-third ...
... (1998) B.L.U.E. Nights (Live) (2000) (Use dmy dates from June 2016, Use British English from ... Bruford Levin Upper Extremities (B.L.U.E.) was a musical group consisting of drummer Bill Bruford, bassist Tony Levin, ...
Bruford Levin Upper Extremities is a self-titled album by the band Bruford Levin Upper Extremities. It is their only studio ... Bruford Levin Upper Extremities (1998, Digipak, CD)". discogs.com. Retrieved 28 March 2021. Deupree, Caleb. Bruford Levin Upper ... Joyce, Mike (10 April 1998). "Bill Bruford and Ton Levin: Bruford Levin Upper Extremities". The Washington Post. Retrieved 19 ... Aaron, S. Victor (28 September 2007). "One Track Mind: Bruford Levin Upper Extremities, "Cracking The Midnight Glass" (1999)". ...
"Upper Extremity Nerve Blocks" (PDF). NYSORA. Retrieved 4 August 2017. "Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block". Upper ... "Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade of the upper extremity". Current Opinion in Anesthesiology. 25 (2): 253-259. doi: ... of nerves innervating the shoulder and arm and can be blocked at different levels depending on the type of upper extremity ... The addition of dexamethasone to a nerve block or if given intravenously for surgery can prolong the duration of an upper limb ...
"Upper extremity bursitis". Am Fam Physician. 56 (7): 1797-806, 1811-2. PMID 9371010. Arcuni SE (2000). "Rotator cuff pathology ... Butcher JD, Salzman KL, Lillegard WA (1996). "Lower extremity bursitis". Am Fam Physician. 53 (7): 2317-24. PMID 8638508. ...
Deshaies LD (2008). "Upper extremity orthoses". In Radomski MW, Trombly Latham C (eds.). Occupational therapy for physical ... The presence of positive Tinel's sign, Phalen sign, Flick sign, or Upper limb neural tension test independently have weak ...
Carson, Sarah; Woolridge, Dale P.; Colletti, Jim; Kilgore, Kevin (2006). "Pediatric Upper Extremity Injuries". Pediatric ... The olecranon is the proximal extremity of the ulna which is articulated with the humerus bone and constitutes a part of the ... Then a complete neurological exam of the upper limb should be documented. Frontal and lateral X-ray views of the elbow are ... This is because in early life, olecranon is thick, short and much stronger than the lower extremity of the humerus. However, ...
Wolf, Megan R.; Avery, Daniel; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis (February 2017). "Upper Extremity Injuries in Gymnasts". Hand Clinics. ... This extremity may end in a strap, or have an eyelet (a small hole, edged with buttonhole stitch or a metal circle), to permit ... These injuries commonly occur at the lower extremities such as cartilage lesions, ligament tears, and bone bruises/fractures. ... and energy dissipation at lower extremity joints. Journal of Biomechanics, 1967-1973. Gittoes, M. J., & Irin, G. (2012). ...
Front of right upper extremity. (Coracobrachialis labeled at right, fourth from the bottom.) Coracobrachialis muscle (shown in ... The coracobrachialis muscle is a muscle in the upper medial part of the arm. It is located within the anterior compartment of ... which arises from the anterior division of the upper trunk (C5, C6) and middle trunk (C7) of the brachial plexus. The ...
Superficial veins of the upper limb. Front of right upper extremity. Front of right upper extremity, showing surface markings ... The cubital fossa, chelidon, grivet or elbow pit, is the triangular area on the anterior side of the upper limb between the arm ...
The American Society for Surgery of the Hand (2021). "Dupuytren's Contracture". HandCare: The Upper Extremity Expert. Retrieved ... The skin on the inner side of the upper arm is thin and has enough skin to supply a full-thickness graft. The donor site can be ... or the inner side of the upper arm. This place is chosen because the skin color best matches the palm's skin color. ...
It is larger than the upper extremity of femur, is somewhat cuboid in form, but its transverse diameter is greater than its ... The lower extremity of femur (or distal extremity) is the lower end of the femur (thigh bone) in human and other animals, ... At its upper part is the adductor tubercle, and behind it is a rough impression which gives origin to the medial head of the ... to the lower and front part of the medial wall of the fossa and the anterior cruciate ligament to an impression on the upper ...
Nerves of the left upper extremity. Brachioradialis Johnson, G. R. (2014-01-01), Revell, P. A. (ed.), "1 - Developments in ... 2007 Illustration: upper-body/brachialis from The Department of Radiology at the University of Washington Anatomy figure: 07:01 ...
Nerves of the left upper extremity. Brachialis muscle (labeled in green text) This article incorporates text in the public ... The brachialis (brachialis anticus), also known as the Teichmann muscle, is a muscle in the upper arm that flexes the elbow. It ... Horizontal section through the middle of upper arm. (Brachialis labeled at center left.) Muscles of forearm, including ...
Stein, JS; Strauss, E (January 1995). "Gunshot wounds to the upper extremity. Evaluation and management of vascular injuries". ... The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) is used to classify the severity of injury and evaluates for severity of skeletal ... "Management of Complex Extremity Trauma". American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. Archived from the original on 29 ... For stable people without hard signs of vascular injury, an injured extremity index (IEI) should be calculated by comparing the ...
Upper Extremity Surgery. 8 (4): 247-256. doi:10.1097/00130911-200412000-00008. ISSN 1089-3393. PMID 16518099. Atwood, E. S., ...
Cutaneous nerves of right upper extremity. Diagram of segmental distribution of the cutaneous nerves of the right upper ... Peripheral Nerve Injury of the Upper Extremity", Nerves and Nerve Injuries, San Diego: Academic Press, pp. 505-524, doi:10.1016 ... The anterior branch (upper branch) winds around the surgical neck of the humerus, beneath the deltoid muscle, with the ... The axillary nerve or the circumflex nerve is a nerve of the human body, that originates from the brachial plexus (upper trunk ...
Upper Extremity Surgery. 14 (4): 204-208. doi:10.1097/BTH.0b013e3181df0a93. PMID 21107214. S2CID 7819090. Sachar, K. (2012). " ...
Upper Extremity Surgery. 14 (1): 38-40. doi:10.1097/BTH.0b013e3181d44583. PMID 20216051. Matar HE, Beirne P, Garg N (February ... For example, the Wilmington Robotic Exoskeleton is a potential assistive device built on a back brace, shadowing the upper arm ...
Hughes, E. S. R. (1949-02-01). "Venous obstruction in the upper extremity; Paget-Schroetter's syndrome; a review of 320 cases ... Paget-Schroetter disease or upper extremity DVT (UEDVT) is the obstruction of an arm vein (such as the axillary vein or ... Staphyloccoal or Streptococcal infections of the face, for example nasal or upper lip pustules may thus spread directly into ...
"Catheter-related upper extremity venous thrombosis". uptodate.com. Retrieved 11 February 2016. (Orphaned articles from March ... The use of central venous catheters is a risk factor for the formation of blood clots in the upper extremity. The etiology is ... Central catheters are bigger and longer and are inserted into the large veins of the extremities, neck, or chest. Central ...
Malformations of the upper extremities can occur in the third to seventh embryonic week. In some cases the TPT is hereditary. ... Hovius, SE; Zuidam, JM; de Wit, T (December 2004). "Treatment of the triphalangeal thumb". Techniques in Hand & Upper Extremity ... hand and upper limb, 1987 Zuidam JM, de Kraker M, Selles RW, Hovius SE, Evaluation of function and appearance of adults with ...
ISBN 0-7216-7752-5. Walzer J, Pappas AM (1995). Upper Extremity Injuries in the Athlete. Edinburgh, UK: Churchill Livingstone. ... Pettrone FA (1986). American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Symposium on Upper Extremity Injuries in Athletes. St. Louis, ... As a result, the alignment and rotation of all major joints in the affected extremity is common, as are extrinsic and intrinsic ... ISBN 0-7817-5074-1. Simon RR, Sherman SC, Koenigsknecht SJ (2006). Emergency Orthopedics: The Extremities. McGraw-Hill ...
Cutaneous nerves of right upper extremity. Diagram of segmental distribution of the cutaneous nerves of the right upper ... extremity. Proper palmar digital nerves of median nerve This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 938 of ...
... (which evolved from a venous thoracic outlet syndrome) is a form of upper extremity deep vein ... James Paget first proposed the idea of venous thrombosis causing upper extremity pain and swelling, and Leopold von Schrötter ... Hughes, E. S. R. (1949-02-01). "Venous obstruction in the upper extremity; Paget-Schroetter's syndrome; a review of 320 cases ... Mai, Cuc; Hunt, Daniel (2011-05-01). "Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis: a review". The American Journal of Medicine. 124 ...
Cutaneous nerves of right upper extremity. Diagram of segmental distribution of the cutaneous nerves of the right upper ... Nerves of the upper limb, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy stubs). ... extremity. Common palmar digital nerves Common palmar digital branches of median nerve Common palmar digital branches of median ...
Cutaneous nerves of right upper extremity. This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 944 of the 20th ... The upper and smaller branch of the nerve passes to the front of the elbow, lying close to the cephalic vein, and supplies the ... Nerves of the upper limb, All stub articles, Neuroanatomy stubs). ... nerve of forearm Lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm Posterior cutaneous nerve of arm Cross-section through the middle of upper ...
Nerves of the left upper extremity. The SA is seen to the left of the red line. Serratus anterior muscle. Anterior thoracic ... It originates at the side of the chest from the upper 8 or 9 ribs; it inserts along the entire length of the anterior aspect of ... The serratus anterior acts in concert with the upper and lower fibers of the trapezius muscle to sustain upward rotation of the ...
Nerves of the left upper extremity. Flexor pollicis longus muscle Flexor pollicis longus muscle Flexor pollicis longus muscle ...
The handles of the tourniquet should be positioned medial-lateral on the upper extremity or posterior-anterior on the lower ... Upper Extremity Surgery. 13 (4): 173-5. doi:10.1097/BTH.0b013e3181b56187. PMID 19956041. S2CID 116895. Ahmed I, Chawla A, ... A tourniquet is a device that is used to apply pressure to a limb or extremity in order to stop the flow of blood. It may be ... "The silicone ring tourniquet in orthopaedic operations of the extremities". Surgical Technology International. 23: 251-7. PMID ...
The upper extremity, proximal extremity or superior epiphysis of the femur is the part of the femur closest to the pelvic bone ... Upper extremity of right femur viewed from behind and above, showing head, neck, and the greater and lesser trochanter Left hip ... along the back part of the body: it is called the linea quadrata (or quadrate line). About the junction of the upper one-third ...
Operative surgery-2-Upper-extremity - Download as a PDF or view online for free ... Operative surgery-2-Upper-extremity. Nov. 26, 2015•0. likes•1,471. views ...
Patients who present with upper extremity ischemia range from young adults with nonatherosclerotic causes to elderly patients ... disease is uncommon because of the abundant collateral network and the infrequency of atherosclerosis in the upper extremity. ... encoded search term (Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease) and Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease What to Read ... Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusive Disease. Updated: Sep 20, 2022 * Author: Mark K Eskandari, MD; Chief Editor: Vincent Lopez ...
Disorders that affect the upper body are known as Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders (UEMSD) and include carpal tunnel, ... Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders (UEMSD). Disorders to the wrist, elbow and shoulder are disabling injuries that ... 2007). Two posture analysis approaches and their application in a modified Rapid Upper Limb Assessment evaluation. Ergonomics. ...
AUTHOR ABSTRACT No Abstract. SOURCE AND NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE ID# SOURCE: Dosman, James A.; Cockcroft, Donald W., eds. Principles of health and safety in agriculture. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, Inc.; 1989: 352-354. ISBN: 0-8493-0160-2. NLOM ID#: No ID#.
Hand and Upper Extremity Service. Daniel A. Osei, MD, MSc, Fellowship Director, Hand and Upper Extremity Service ... The Hand and Upper Extremity Fellowship program offers an abundantly diverse educational and operative experience. The primary ... During each rotation fellows are exposed to a variety of upper extremity conditions in a one-on-one mentorship environment ... Fellows assume an integral role in teaching residents and medical students, and direct a cadaveric upper extremity teaching ...
BayCare Health Systems Hand and Upper Extremity Orthopedic Teams provide specialized care for the hand, wrist and elbow. How ... Hand and Upper Extremity. Your hands, wrists, elbows and shoulders are essential tools that allow you to work, play and perform ... Problems in any of these can affect upper extremity function - from the fingertips to the shoulder blades - causing major ... BayCare Health Systems Hand and Upper Extremity Orthopedic Teams provide specialized care for the hand, wrist and elbow. Our ...
This expanded fourth edition presents the latest research in hand and upper extremity rehabilitation and provides the purpose ... Hand and Upper Extremity Rehabilitation: A Practical Guide, 4th Edition walks students through the treatment of common ... medical conditions affecting the upper extremities and highlights non-surgical and surgical procedures for these conditions. ... Hand and Upper Extremity Rehabilitation, 4th Edition. by Rebecca Saunders, PT, CHT, Romina Astifidis, MS, PT, CHT, Susan L. ...
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Eight different patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures have been reported in the peer-review literature for women ... Patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review Arch Phys Med Rehabil. ... Upper extremity; confidence interval; effect size; upper limb disability questionnaire. ... Objectives: (1) To identify English-language published patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer ...
... of this two-part series discusses the features and evaluation of some commonly missed fractures and dislocations of the upper ... This is Part I of a two-part article on pitfalls in the radiologic evaluation of extremity trauma. Part II, "The Lower ... This two-part series, divided into separate discussions of the upper limb and the lower limb, reviews key diagnostic features ... of this two-part series discusses the features and evaluation of some commonly missed fractures and dislocations of the upper ...
... improve your mobility and range of motion through effective treatment of conditions that affect your hands or upper extremities ... Hand and Upper Extremity Therapy Services. We pride ourselves on delivering exceptional service to help you get back to living ... Our hand/upper extremity therapy services improve your overall health and well-being. Our wide range of personalized ... Program is a great way for therapists to continue their education and develop skills in the field of hand and upper extremity ...
RIC Hosts Feb 22 Neurological Upper Extremity Workshop. Feb 6, 2013 , Continuing Education, Stroke , 0 , ... According to RIC, recommended attendees for the workshop, "Neurologic Upper Extremity: Function and Management," include ... and to describe a range of intervention techniques intended to improve functional use of the upper extremity. Course objectives ... aims to equip participants with the ability to identify both neurologic and orthopedic aspects of the involved upper extremity ...
Prior to the upper extremity motorsports study, little was known about similar trends in NASCAR despite the fact that the sport ... Epidemiological Study Tracks Upper Extremity Injury Trends in NASCAR Drivers and Pit Crew. ... The descriptive epidemiological study followed 226 total NASCAR patients with upper extremity injuries between July 2003 and ... specifically upper extremities (shoulders, arms and forearms, wrists and hands). By studying how each position on a team can be ...
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ICD-10 code M99.47 for Connective tissue stenosis of neural canal of upper extremity is a medical classification as listed by ... ICD-10-CM Code for Connective tissue stenosis of neural canal of upper extremity M99.47 ICD-10 code M99.47 for Connective ... tissue stenosis of neural canal of upper extremity is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range - Diseases of ...
For more information regarding work-related hand or upper extremity injuries and workers compensation, please contact us today ... reduce the risk of re-injury and restore the patients hand and upper extremity to a healthy and functional state as quickly as ... is specifically designed for surgery of the hand and upper extremity and includes state of the art techniques such as ... compensation injuries to the hand and upper extremity. Our AAAHC accredited on-site surgical facility, the Rexford Surgical ...
Introduction of Upper Extremity, Mechanism of Thoracic Outlet Syndromes, and Cervicobrachial Syndromes. ... CCEP 6 Advanced Principles of Extremity Rehabilitation. 13-15 Parkwood Road,, Bournemouth ... https://www.aecc.ac.uk/study/our-courses/short-courses-and-cpd/cpd-seminars/ccep-2-advanced-principles-of-extremity-adjusting- ...
Monitoring Upper Extremity Activity to Track Rehabilitation Progress following Spinal Cord Injury. Add to your list(s) Send you ... University of Cambridge , Talks.cam , Monitoring Upper Extremity Activity to Track Rehabilitation Progress following Spinal ...
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... upper back; upper extremity; upper-extremity joint; work-related musculoskeletal disorder; work-related upper-extremity ... Criteria document for evaluating the work-relatedness of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders ... nonspecific upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorder; osteoarthrosis; peripheral neuropathy; radial nerve compression; radial ...
This study states that Upper extremity and neck access is commonly used for complex endovascular aortic repairs. We sought to ... Upper extremity and neck access for complex aortic repairs have a higher risk of stroke compared with femoral and iliac access ... Association of Upper Extremity And Neck Access With Stroke In Endovascular Aortic Repair. Nov 22, 2021 ... This study states that Upper extremity and neck access is commonly used for complex endovascular aortic repairs. We sought to ...
Craig Knowles - KM Technique- Upper Extremities. CLASS CLOSED. Description. This course will be held at the Lilburn campus.. ... Craig Knowles - KM Technique- Upper Extremities. August 4, 2018 @ 9:00 am - August 5, 2018 @ 1:00 pm. $189 ...
... exp UPPER EXTREMITY/) OR (upper AND extremity.ti,ab) OR (upper AND extremity.ti,mp) OR (arm.ti,ab) OR (exp ARM INJURIES/) OR ( ... UPPER EXTREMITY DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS/co) OR (*UPPER EXTREMITY DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS/di)] Search Outcome. 104 papers were ... were diagnosed with upper extremity DVT.. Retrospective observational cohort study (Level of evidence 2b). upper extremity DVT ... Blom JW, Doggen CJ, Osanto S, Rosendaal FR. Old and new risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. J Thromb ...
... and Innervation of the Muscles of the Upper Extremity ... and Innervation of the Muscles of the Upper Extremity. Updated ... Pectoralis Major, Upper *Origin: Anterior surface of sternal 1/2 of clavicle*Insertion: Crest of greater tubercle of humerus* ... Trapezius, Upper Anterior *Origin: Occiput and cervical vertebrae*Insertion: Lateral 1/3 of clavicle*Action: Elevation of ... Origin: Upper eight or nine ribs*Insertion: Medial border, costal surface of scapula*Action: Scapular abduction and rotation ( ...
An Evaluation of Two "New" Approaches of the Brachial: Plexus for Anaesthesia of the Upper Extremity. Publication. Publication ... Rettig, H.C. (2007, May 31). An Evaluation of Two "New" Approaches of the Brachial: Plexus for Anaesthesia of the Upper ...
Upper Extremity DVT. Your doctor has requested an ultrasound of the veins in your arms to determine if you have a blood clot. ... Cedars-Sinai Programs & Services Imaging Center Exams Vascular Ultrasound Upper Extremity DVT ... Cedars-Sinai Programs & Services Imaging Center Exams Vascular Ultrasound Upper Extremity DVT ... An image from an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis vascular ultrasound study showing blood flow in the veins of the arm. ...
  • 483 adult patients with validated acute Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), 14% of whom (69 patients) were diagnosed with upper extremity DVT. (bestbets.org)
  • An image from an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis vascular ultrasound study showing blood flow in the veins of the arm. (cedars-sinai.org)
  • Disorders that affect the upper body are known as Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders (UEMSD) and include carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, rotator cuff syndrome, and others. (wa.gov)
  • Incidence and prevalence of upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders of occupational origin. (bvsalud.org)
  • Physicians who practice at facilities at which electronic health record systems are used have a high prevalence of computer-associated upper extremity musculoskeletal symptoms, according to research recently published in Archives of Internal Medicine. (medicaleconomics.com)
  • Background: The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and morbidity of neck pain with or without cervical rhizopathy, upper extremity motor deficit and/or thoracolumbar pain in elderly men. (lu.se)
  • Prevalence of upper extremity symptoms and disorders among dental and dental hygiene students. (bvsalud.org)
  • Upper extremity rehabilitation and splinting. (just.edu.jo)
  • The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) reports that it will be hosting an interactive workshop February 22 centered on comprehensively evaluating and developing an evidence-based intervention plan for neurologic upper-extremity management and function. (rehabpub.com)
  • A graduate of Baylor University and Baylor College of Medicine, she completed her residency training in plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Washington in Seattle and a hand and upper extremity fellowship with the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Washington University in St. Louis followed by a second fellowship in pediatric hand and microvascular surgery fellowship at The Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. (vumc.org)
  • Our fellowship is unique in its in-depth representation of subspecialty interests among the 10 faculty members in hand surgery, including sports and traumatic injuries of the entire upper extremity, cerebral palsy, elbow reconstruction, brachial plexus surgery, limb-sparing tumor procedures, microsurgery and arthroscopy. (hss.edu)
  • The descriptive epidemiological study followed 226 total NASCAR patients with upper extremity injuries between July 2003 and October 2014, tracking diagnoses, mechanisms of injury and positions of each individual. (orthocarolina.com)
  • As pit stop times have become more important, teams have continued to recruit stronger, more athletic team members, and with increased demand comes higher incidence of task-specific upper body injuries. (orthocarolina.com)
  • With two locations in Los Angeles, one in Beverly Hills and another in West Hills, Avosant Surgical Associates specialize in treatment of workers' compensation injuries to the hand and upper extremity. (lahandsurgeon.com)
  • Our AAAHC accredited on-site surgical facility, the Rexford Surgical Institute (RSI), is specifically designed for surgery of the hand and upper extremity and includes state of the art techniques such as microvascular and arthroscopic surgery commonly required to treat work-related hand and wrist injuries. (lahandsurgeon.com)
  • For more information regarding work-related hand or upper extremity injuries and workers' compensation, please contact us today. (lahandsurgeon.com)
  • Injuries of the upper limb commonly present to the Emergency Department and are often treated by immobilisation. (bestbets.org)
  • The upper extremity is a common site to encounter osteoporosis-related fragility fractures and surgeons treating these injuries would benefit from an understanding of the symptoms, evaluation, and medical treatment options. (musculoskeletalkey.com)
  • Distal radius, distal ulnar fractures, and pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures have a higher incidence of acute upper extremity compartment syndrome.4 Penetrating injuries to the upper extremity with concomitant vascular injury may cause enough bleeding and swelling to result in compartment syndrome as well. (facs.org)
  • Head injuries were implicated in about half of fatal injuries (49%), whereas most nonfatal injuries involved the upper and lower extremities for employer-reported and ED-treated nonfatal injuries. (cdc.gov)
  • Workers with lower extremity (22 days) and multiple body part (28 days) injuries had higher median DAFW compared with other injuries. (cdc.gov)
  • When upper extremity exoskeletons are used along with a proactive ergonomics program, such devices may reduce risk factors associated with work‐related shoulder injuries. (cdc.gov)
  • Arterial occlusive disease of the upper extremity may represent either local or systemic disease. (medscape.com)
  • Symptomatic upper-extremity arterial occlusive disease is uncommon because of the abundant collateral network and the infrequency of atherosclerosis in the upper extremity. (medscape.com)
  • One third of peripheral emboli lodge in the upper extremity, producing acute arterial occlusion. (medscape.com)
  • Many patients with upper extremity arterial disease have associated Raynaud syndrome or significant cold sensitivity. (medscape.com)
  • Ultrasonography (US) is a valuable tool for preoperative evaluation of the arterial and venous vasculature in the upper extremity [ 1 ]. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • Just as in the lower extremity, the classic signs of acute compartment syndrome include the six "Ps": pain, paresthesia, poikilothermia (differing temperatures between limbs with affected side being cooler), pallor, paralysis, and pulselessness. (facs.org)
  • Task-oriented Game Therapy Using Free Internet-videogame Enhances Upper Extremity Functions for Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Sham-controlled Study. (who.int)
  • 4 0 obj It was developed both to help describe the disability experienced by people with upper-limb disorders and to monitor changes in symptoms and function over time. (ketleronline.com)
  • The upper extremity, proximal extremity or superior epiphysis of the femur is the part of the femur closest to the pelvic bone and the trunk. (wikipedia.org)
  • and proximal left upper extremity weakness. (cdc.gov)
  • The first of this two-part series discusses the features and evaluation of some commonly missed fractures and dislocations of the upper limb, excluding the hand. (aafp.org)
  • This two-part series, divided into separate discussions of the upper limb and the lower limb, reviews key diagnostic features of some commonly missed fractures and dislocations. (aafp.org)
  • Upper extremity of right femur viewed from behind and above, showing head, neck, and the greater and lesser trochanter Left hip-joint, opened by removing the floor of the acetabulum from within the pelvis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study states that Upper extremity and neck access is commonly used for complex endovascular aortic repairs. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Upper extremity and neck access for complex aortic repairs have a higher risk of stroke compared with femoral and iliac access alone. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 3,000 community-dwelling older men with a mean age of 75.4 ± 3.2 years (range 69-81) to determine if they had experienced neck pain with or without cervical rhizopathy/upper extremity motor deficit/thoracolumbar pain (yes/no) during the preceding 12 months, and if so, morbidity with the condition (no/minor/moderate/severe). (lu.se)
  • Patients who present with upper-extremity ischemia range from young adults with nonatherosclerotic causes to elderly patients with atherosclerosis. (medscape.com)
  • BestBets: In patients with isolated upper extremity injury, does the use of temporary immobilisation increase the short term risk of venous thromboembolic events? (bestbets.org)
  • 179 Patients presenting between March 1999 and September 2003 with a first upper limb DVT. (bestbets.org)
  • 115 Patients presenting for thrombophilia screening after an episode of upper-extremity DVT. (bestbets.org)
  • Brinkley Sandvall, MD, bonds quickly with her young patients - children who have acquired or congenital hand and upper extremity differences. (vumc.org)
  • Toby Williams, 6, is one of the patients helped by the Hand and Upper Extremity program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. (vumc.org)
  • This paper presents our preliminary results to develop sustainable prostheses for five upper-extremity amputee patients in Colombia, South America. (uri.edu)
  • Long-term hemodialysis typically necessitates vascular access in the upper extremity, either through an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or an arteriovenous graft (AVG). Central venous catheters can also provide vascular access for patients undergoing hemodialysis, but these devices are associated with a substantial risk of infection, which increases morbidity and mortality. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • A systematic literature review was performed to assess whether in patients undergoing elective upper extremity surgery (P), regional anesthesia (I), compared to general anesthesia (C), would result in lower long-term (>3 months) postoperative pain intensity (O). We included randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials (RCTs). (bvsalud.org)
  • Glenn Gaston , MD, Chief Hand Surgeon of the OrthoCarolina Hand Center, and William Heisel , PA, Director of OrthoCarolina Motorsports, performed an investigation to examine the musculoskeletal forces on the bodies of motorsports athletes, specifically upper extremities (shoulders, arms and forearms, wrists and hands). (orthocarolina.com)
  • Their purpose is to augment, amplify, or reinforce the performance of a worker's existing body components-primarily the lower back and the upper extremity (arms and shoulders). (cdc.gov)
  • Electrogoniometers and inclinometers measured wrist and upper arm postures, surface electromyography measured muscle activity of four forearm muscles and three shoulder muscles and a force platform under the keyboard and force-sensing computer mouse measured applied forces. (cdc.gov)
  • Studies have shown that upper extremity exoskeletons may have a role in reducing shoulder WMSDs. (cdc.gov)
  • As upper extremity prosthetic devices continue to advance, it is unclear if traditional outcome measures accurately assess their impact on function and quality of life. (armdynamics.com)
  • 2010) Upper limb prosthetic outcome measures: Review and content comparison based on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. (ketleronline.com)
  • This is Part I of a two-part article on pitfalls in the radiologic evaluation of extremity trauma. (aafp.org)
  • It is reasonable to assume that this local risk is present also in the case of upper limb trauma and immobilisation. (bestbets.org)
  • Once compartment syndrome of the upper extremity is diagnosed, trauma surgeons should perform a fasciotomy. (facs.org)
  • To examine the occurrence of upper extremity compartment syndrome in the National Trauma Data Bank ® (NTDB ® ), medical records for admission year 2016 were searched using the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision Clinical Modification codes. (facs.org)
  • Hemodialysis is commonly performed by placing two large-bore needles into a vascular access point in the upper extremity. (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • This is typically done on the non-dominant wrist or upper arm, provided the vascular anatomy on that side is suitable ( Fig. 1 ). (e-ultrasonography.org)
  • BayCare Health System's Hand and Upper Extremity Orthopedic Teams provide specialized care for the hand, wrist and elbow. (baycare.org)
  • During each rotation fellows are exposed to a variety of upper extremity conditions in a one-on-one mentorship environment where the fellow is exposed to a range of methods, techniques, approaches and management of multiple issues. (hss.edu)
  • Fellows assume an integral role in teaching residents and medical students, and direct a cadaveric upper extremity teaching session weekly. (hss.edu)
  • The Hand and Upper Extremity Fellowship program offers an abundantly diverse educational and operative experience. (hss.edu)
  • The fellowship is divided into four 3-month rotations, designed to broaden a fellow's base of knowledge across all elements of hand and upper extremity. (hss.edu)
  • Our Hand Therapy Mentorship Program is a great way for therapists to continue their education and develop skills in the field of hand and upper extremity therapy. (athletico.com)
  • Our goal at Avosant Surgical Associates is to treat, rehabilitate, reduce the risk of re-injury and restore the patient's hand and upper extremity to a healthy and functional state as quickly as possible. (lahandsurgeon.com)
  • After extensive training as a reconstructive hand surgeon, she runs the Hand and Upper Extremity program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. (vumc.org)
  • I feel like this is the greatest job - it's the intersection of what I can do, what I want to do and what I feel compelled to do," said Sandvall, who is fellowship-trained in pediatric hand and upper surgery and reconstructive microsurgery. (vumc.org)
  • Brinkley Sandvall, MD, directs the Hand and Upper Extremity program at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. (vumc.org)
  • Sandvall sees children in the hand and upper extremity clinic on the main campus as well as in Murfreesboro. (vumc.org)
  • General anesthesia techniques can be applied for hand and upper extremity procedures the same as for procedures on the rest of the body. (medscape.com)
  • Several local anesthetic agents are available for use in hand and upper extremity surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Problems in any of these can affect upper extremity function - from the fingertips to the shoulder blades - causing major disruptions at home and at work and negatively impacting quality of life. (baycare.org)
  • The upper extremity contains 15 compartments from the shoulder to the tips of the fingers. (facs.org)
  • Tasks containing a mixture of mouse and keyboard use (form completion and text editing) were associated with higher shoulder muscle activity, larger range of motion and larger velocities and accelerations of the upper arm. (cdc.gov)
  • [6] Shoulder assist and supernumerary (nonanthropomorphic) arm tool holding support exoskeletons are used to support the upper extremities during sustained overhead work or to assist in holding heavy tools. (cdc.gov)
  • The course aims to equip participants with the ability to identify both neurologic and orthopedic aspects of the involved upper extremity using standardized and non-standardized assessments, and to describe a range of intervention techniques intended to improve functional use of the upper extremity. (rehabpub.com)
  • 0000001043 00000 n The 'FACT-B+4-UL' questionnaire, a specic variant of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B) is available among others to measure the upper limb function. (ketleronline.com)
  • Upper Extremity Functional Scale Patient name: Date: We are interested in knowing whether you are having any difficulty at all with the activities listed below because of your upper limb problem for which you are currently seeking attention. (ketleronline.com)
  • Title: Microsoft Word - Upper Extremity Functional Scale - Spanish version.doc Author: Cheryl Beloro Created Date: 11/20/2010 4:03:37 PM Physiotherapy Canada 47(4): 258-263. (ketleronline.com)
  • Despite being well recognized, brachial plexus birth palsies continue to be relatively common, potentially resulting in permanent deficits in upper extremity function. (musculoskeletalkey.com)
  • In the upper arm, the flexor and extensor compartments are encircled with the brachial fascia and separated by the medial and lateral intermuscular septa. (facs.org)
  • The volar compartment of the forearm is the most commonly affected compartment in acute upper extremity compartment syndrome. (facs.org)
  • Sensors and other inputs detect muscle movement of the residual limb or upper body and control powered actuators that provide greater grasp force than body-powered prostheses. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Hybrid prostheses are typically prescribed for higher level upper-limb amputations. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Introduction of Upper Extremity, Mechanism of Thoracic Outlet Syndromes, and Cervicobrachial Syndromes. (chiropractic-ecu.org)
  • 1) To identify English-language published patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer research and (2) to examine construct validity and responsiveness in patient-reported upper extremity outcome measures used in breast cancer research. (nih.gov)
  • You wonder if upper limb immobilisation carries similar risks to lower regarding venous thromboembolic disease. (bestbets.org)
  • Upper extremity DVT (UEDVT) is independently associated mainly with Central Venous Catheter presence and cancer [1]. (bestbets.org)
  • Diagnosis of upper extremity compartment syndrome requires a high index of suspicion based on a detailed history and physical exam. (facs.org)
  • Specifically searched were records with a diagnosis code of T79.A1 (traumatic compartment syndrome of upper extremity). (facs.org)
  • Based on the current evidence, we recommend administering the DASH to assess patient-reported upper extremity function in breast cancer survivors because the DASH has the most consistently large effects sizes for construct validity and responsiveness. (nih.gov)
  • According to RIC, recommended attendees for the workshop, "Neurologic Upper Extremity: Function and Management," include occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants, physical therapists, and physical therapist assistants. (rehabpub.com)
  • upper extremity function were added, allowing creation of a 46-item bank and a 7-item short form. (ketleronline.com)
  • When performing procedures on the hands and upper extremities, many options are available for anesthesia. (medscape.com)
  • When used in the proper setting and patient population, regional anesthesia can be applied safely for procedures involving the upper extremities and the hands. (medscape.com)
  • Chronic pain is a recognized complication of surgery , and it has been hypothesized that regional anesthesia might reduce the risk of development of chronic pain after upper extremity surgery . (bvsalud.org)
  • The Embase, Medline ALL, Web of Science Core Collections, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar databases were searched for all reports assessing pain at >3 months after upper extremity surgery under general versus regional anesthesia . (bvsalud.org)
  • upper limb disability questionnaire. (nih.gov)
  • Nous avons utilisé un autoquestionnaire validé comprenant le questionnaire « nordique » sur les TMS et le questionnaire GHQ12 (questionnaire général de santé en 12 questions). (who.int)
  • What Is the Effect of Upper Extremity Regional Anesthesia? (bvsalud.org)
  • Our highly trained hand therapists aim to improve your mobility and range of motion through effective treatment of conditions that affect your hands or upper extremities. (athletico.com)