Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Presumed Consent: An institutional policy of granting authority to health personnel to perform procedures on patients or to remove organs from cadavers for transplantation unless an objection is registered by family members or by the patient prior to death. This also includes emergency care of minors without prior parental consent.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Donor Selection: The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.Directed Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Tissue Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing organs or tissue for future use.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).United StatesUnited States Health Resources and Services Administration: A component of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that provides leadership related to the delivery of health services and the requirements for and distribution of health resources, including manpower training.Transplants: Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.Principle-Based Ethics: An approach to ethics that focuses on theories of the importance of general principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.End Stage Liver Disease: Final stage of a liver disease when the liver failure is irreversible and LIVER TRANSPLANTATION is needed.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Value-Based Purchasing: Purchasers are provided information on the quality of health care, including patient outcomes and health status, with data on the dollar outlays going towards health. The focus is on managing the use of the health care system to reduce inappropriate care and to identify and reward the best-performing providers. (from http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/meyerrpt.htm accessed 11/25/2011)Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Gene Regulatory Networks: Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Neural Networks (Computer): A computer architecture, implementable in either hardware or software, modeled after biological neural networks. Like the biological system in which the processing capability is a result of the interconnection strengths between arrays of nonlinear processing nodes, computerized neural networks, often called perceptrons or multilayer connectionist models, consist of neuron-like units. A homogeneous group of units makes up a layer. These networks are good at pattern recognition. They are adaptive, performing tasks by example, and thus are better for decision-making than are linear learning machines or cluster analysis. They do not require explicit programming.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Posthumous Conception: Conception after the death of the male or female biological parent through techniques such as the use of gametes that have been stored during his or her lifetime or that were collected immediately after his or her death.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Purchasing, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the purchasing of supplies and equipment.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Tissue Preservation: The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities: The non-profit, non-governmental organization which collects, processes, and distributes data on hospital use. Two programs of the Commission are the Professional Activity Study and the Medical Audit Program.Financial Management: The obtaining and management of funds for institutional needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Negotiating: The process of bargaining in order to arrive at an agreement or compromise on a matter of importance to the parties involved. It also applies to the hearing and determination of a case by a third party chosen by the parties in controversy, as well as the interposing of a third party to reconcile the parties in controversy.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Insurance, Accident: Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.
  • You are helping humanity by becoming an organ donor," Trevino encourages. (montefiore.org)
  • Becoming an organ donor is simple, but its impact can be so profound,' says Dr. Joseph Cooke, associate professor of clinical medicine and chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. (nyp.org)
  • I see on a daily basis the lifesaving power that organ donations can have for people in dire situations, and I encourage everyone to consider becoming an organ donor. (nyp.org)
  • Founded in 1994, AlloSource is one of the nation's largest non-profit providers of bone and soft tissue allografts for use in a host of medical treatments. (donoralliance.org)
  • This experimental option, not yet approved by the FDA, may lead to better ways to keep lungs (the most fragile of organs) stable during transplant. (nm.org)
  • This operation is usually performed for cystic fibrosis as both lungs need to be replaced and it is a technically easier operation to replace the heart and lungs en bloc. (wikidoc.org)
  • However, if a patient is connected to a ventilator, allowing the heart to continue to beat and the lungs tp continue to pump air throughout the body, the organs remain healthy and viable for transplantation. (cnn.com)
  • In a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine , researchers said the number of donor lungs and successful transplants may be dramatically increased by treating the organs on a perfusion machine for several hours before transplantation. (latimes.com)
  • About 85% of lungs made available for donation are not used due to tissue damage that potentially could be repaired with perfusion or other techniques. (latimes.com)
  • Other organs, like the heart and lungs, come from a recently deceased donor. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The majority of lungs that are transplanted come from deceased organ donors. (nyhq.org)
  • Prior to the study, we had noticed a decline in the number of deceased organ donors in Southern Alberta," said Dr. Andreas Kramer, lead author of the study. (cnn.com)
  • Despite promising organ-donation technologies, deceased organ donors are still in short supply in the United States. (cnn.com)
  • Donor designation in the New York State Donate Life Registry indicates that an individual age 18 or over has made the legally binding decision to direct others to donate their organs, eyes and tissues upon their death. (liveonny.org)
  • 1972: The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act established the Uniform Organ Donor Card as a legal document in all 50 states, making it possible for all persons aged 18 years or older to legally donate their organs. (medscape.com)
  • Often driven by inflammation and excessive cytokines, vasoplegia can result in inadequate perfusion and oxygen delivery to vital organs, resulting in increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI), intestinal and brain ischemia, acute lung injury, and other complications that trigger morbidity and mortality. (prnewswire.com)
  • Strict rules and regulations are put in place to make sure patients have a fair chance at receiving vital organs. (empowher.com)
  • The first successful pediatric heart transplant took place in 1984, in the United States and was performed by Dr. Eric A. Rose (Columbia University). (umn.edu)
  • More than 119,000 Americans are currently waiting for donated organs, including 900 people in Kentucky. (kyforward.com)
  • HHS' Health Resources and Services Administration, which regulates organ donation in the U.S., supports Facebook's initiative, said HRSA spokesman David Bowman. (fcw.com)
  • Mr. Nathan, together with former Center for Organ Recovery & Education Chief Executive Officer Brian Broznick, pioneered the Pennsylvania Driver's License Registry. (donors1.org)
  • According to Pittsburgh's Center for Organ Recovery & Education (CORE) , 22 people die in the U.S. every day while awaiting an organ, and every 10 minutes somebody new is added to a nationwide organ waiting list that is now more than 118,000 people long. (prweb.com)