Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.National Health Insurance, United StatesHealth Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.United StatesInsurance Pools: An organization of insurers or reinsurers through which particular types of risk are shared or pooled. The risk of high loss by a particular insurance company is transferred to the group as a whole (the insurance pool) with premiums, losses, and expenses shared in agreed amounts.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Insurance: Coverage by contract whereby one part indemnifies or guarantees another against loss by a specified contingency.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Insurance, Long-Term Care: Health insurance to provide full or partial coverage for long-term home care services or for long-term nursing care provided in a residential facility such as a nursing home.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Insurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Insurance, Major Medical: Insurance providing a broad range of medical services and supplies, when prescribed by a physician, whether or not the patient is hospitalized. It frequently is an extension of a basic policy and benefits will not begin until the basic policy is exhausted.Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Medical Assistance: Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.TaiwanFederal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Health Insurance Exchanges: State-provided health insurance marketplaces established under the PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Aid to Families with Dependent Children: Financial assistance provided by the government to indigent families with dependent children who meet certain requirements as defined by the Social Security Act, Title IV, in the U.S.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Tax Exemption: Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Insurance, Psychiatric: Insurance providing benefits to cover part or all of the psychiatric care.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Employer Health Costs: That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Budgets: Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Income Tax: Tax on the net income of an individual, organization, or business.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Managed Competition: A strategy for purchasing health care in a manner which will obtain maximum value for the price for the purchasers of the health care and the recipients. The concept was developed primarily by Alain Enthoven of Stanford University and promulgated by the Jackson Hole Group. The strategy depends on sponsors for groups of the population to be insured. The sponsor, in some cases a health alliance, acts as an intermediary between the group and competing provider groups (accountable health plans). The competition is price-based among annual premiums for a defined, standardized benefit package. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Ghana: A republic in western Africa, south of BURKINA FASO and west of TOGO. Its capital is Accra.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Medical Indigency: The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.Insurance, Accident: Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Medical Savings Accounts: Tax-exempt trusts or custodial accounts established by individuals with financial institutions for saving money for future medical expenses.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Consumer Advocacy: The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Great BritainHospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.CaliforniaHealthcare Financing: Methods of generating, allocating, and using financial resources in healthcare systems.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Health Transition: Demographic and epidemiologic changes that have occurred in the last five decades in many developing countries and that are characterized by major growth in the number and proportion of middle-aged and elderly persons and in the frequency of the diseases that occur in these age groups. The health transition is the result of efforts to improve maternal and child health via primary care and outreach services and such efforts have been responsible for a decrease in the birth rate; reduced maternal mortality; improved preventive services; reduced infant mortality, and the increased life expectancy that defines the transition. (From Ann Intern Med 1992 Mar 15;116(6):499-504)Government: The complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the function of governing is carried out in a specific political unit.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.GermanyDrug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Fee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Deductibles and Coinsurance: Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.
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... "extremely concerned that the policies of some private healthcare insurance companies are preventing or restricting patients ... The United States health care system relies heavily on private health insurance, which is the primary source of coverage for ... Health Insurance German Social Insurance Code: Articles on Public Health Insurance National Association of Statutory Health ... Healthcare in Switzerland is universal and is regulated by the Swiss Federal Law on Health Insurance. Health insurance is ...
Life insurance Total permanent disability insurance Health insurance Health insurance in the United States Woodfield, KR (2012 ... Trauma Insurance policies in Australia are most commonly linked to Life Insurance policies, however can be taken as a stand- ... Don't Buy That Health Insurance: Become an Educated Healthcare Consumer. Dog Ear Publishing, LLC. ISBN 1457515326. "Heart to ... alone policy and where a Trauma Insurance policy is linked, it will normally deduct the balance of the insured Life Insurance ...
ration) health care resources. Healthcare rationing in the United States is largely accomplished through market forces, though ... The government also regulates insurance policies, requiring coverage for some items and controlling the rules for who is ... Most Americans have private health insurance, and non-emergency health care rationing decisions are made based on what the ... In the United Kingdom, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) sets coverage requirements for the National ...
Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 Mercer Mercer survey finds $1,000 health plan deductible was ... Health Care Cost Increases for 2009 National Center for Policy Analysis The Market for Medical Care Healthcare Bluebook ... Healthcare Bluebook was founded in 2007 and is headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. Healthcare Bluebook is ... The Healthcare Bluebook Media Info The Healthcare Bluebook About The Healthcare Bluebook FAQ Lifting the Veil on Pricing for ...
Those not able to afford a health insurance policy are unable to acquire one, and sometimes insurance companies pre-screen ... United States Healthcare reform debate in the United States Public opinion on health care reform in the United States Health ... Healthcare rationing in the United States exists in various forms. Access to private health insurance is rationed based on ... Peter Singer wrote for the New York Times Magazine in July 2009 that healthcare is rationed in the United States: "Health care ...
Abu Dhabi which is responsible for regulating the healthcare industry and developing Abu Dhabi's health policy. Abu Dhabi ... Effective January 2006, all residents of Abu Dhabi are covered by a new comprehensive health insurance program ; costs will be ... for private healthcare facilities with Dubai Healthcare City. Ministry of Health (United Arab Emirates) (MOH): for public and ... Dubai Health Authority (DHA): for public and private healthcare facilities in the Emirate of Dubai Dubai Healthcare City (DHCC ...
... insurance companies that were members of the Health Insurance Association of America that helped defeat the Clinton Health Plan ... 1990s portal Health Security Express History of health care reform in the United States Clymer, Adam (September 27, 1994). " ... The Clinton health care plan, was a 1993 healthcare reform package proposed by the administration of President Bill Clinton and ... Pantel, Kant and Rushefsky, Mark.Politics, Power, and Policy Making: The Case of Health Care Reform in the 1990s (1997). "The ...
Social medicine Health policy Health insurance / Insurance /Social health insurance Community health service / Direct primary ... Health care in the United States Health care reform in the United States Healthcare-NOW! Health-care reform in China History of ... Health care / Healthcare system / Health care provider Health center / Clinic / Hospital Health care politics Medical education ... "An Analysis of Health Insurance Premiums Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act" (PDF). "Health Insurance ...
... healthcare)-an emerging movement in health insurance in Britain and the United States, in which providers are rewarded for ... In the United States, policy makers are divided on whether merit pay should be offered to public school teachers, and other ... and Alleged Patient Deaths at the Phoenix Health Care System, VA Office of Inspector General, Veterans Health Administration, ... In 2006, the United States Congress created a $600 million federal grant program called the Teacher Incentive Plan (TIF). In ...
CBO-Private Health Insurance Premiums and Federal Policy-February 2016 Kaiser-2016 Employer Health Benefits Survey-September 14 ... United States Healthcare reform debate in the United States American Health Care Act of 2017 Healthcare rationing in the United ... Census Bureau-Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2015 - Published September, 2016 Bureau, US Census. "Health ... Health insurance coverage is provided by several public and private sources in the United States. During 2016, the U.S. ...
... offering coverage through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act policies on the government's health insurance exchange ... "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES - 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United ... In August 2017, CareSources announced plans to sell healthcare through the exchange. National Register of Historic Places ... "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing ...
... thereby lowering health care expenditures. Finally, policies making insurance more affordable for workers could potentially ... "Healthcare Communication Barriers and Self-Rated Health in Older Chinese American Immigrants". Journal of Community Health. 1: ... The lack of health insurance is a major reason behind immigrants' low usage of the United States health care services. The ... Immigrant health care in the United States is distinct from citizen health care given the context of various social and ...
In public debates, particularly among Western nations like the United States, this has raised questions over insurance public/ ... The nation is the better for policies and funding arrangements that encourage public and private providers of healthcare, ... Catholicism portal Health and fitness portal Catholic Health Association of the United States Catholic Medical Association ... The Catholic Church is the largest private provider of health care in the United States of America. During the 1990s, the ...
... where there is no national healthcare plan and where health insurance policies may not cover abortions. Abortion funds rarely ... The National Network of Abortion Funds is an umbrella group for local abortion funds in the United States. Abortion National ... Women's Reproductive Rights Assistance Project - A United States national abortion fund in Los Angeles Hersey Abortion ... Abortion funds are widespread in countries like the United States of America[citation needed] ...
In the United States, undocumented immigrants have lower rates of health insurance coverage and medical service usage than ... They also argue healthcare policies which make insurance, coverage, and treatment more accessible to all populations will ... found that undocumented immigrants in the United States have lower rates of health insurance coverage and usage of healthcare ... Wallace, Steven P. (August 31, 2012). "Undocumented Immigrants and Healthcare Reform" (PDF). UCLA Center for Health Policy ...
Health insurance exchange Health insurance in the United States Health policy analysis Health care politics List of healthcare ... America's Health Insurance Plans, the umbrella organization of the private health insurance providers in the United States has ... Medicare is a social insurance program administered by the United States government, providing health insurance coverage to ... His health care plan called for the creation of a National Health Insurance Exchange that would include both private insurance ...
"Applied Health Economics and Health Policy. 7 (4): 255-264. doi:10.1007/bf03256159. PMID 19905039. Retrieved 10 November 2011. ... Studies have linked obtaining prescription insurance plans to fewer hospitalizations and lower healthcare costs.[32][33] For ... even though the United States has drug coverage policies for those with low incomes.[31] Those whose healthcare spending is ... whether they actually have health insurance or not.[30]. One way to examine the potential impact of high drug prices on health ...
"Universal Mandatory Health Insurance In The Netherlands: A Model For The United States?," Health Affairs, Volume 27, Number 3, ... The New Dutch Health Insurance System". Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. 33 (6): 1031-1055. doi:10.1215/03616878- ... Changes health insurance Netherlands Health insurance 2017 Health insurance 2018. ... Health insurance in the Netherlands is mandatory. Healthcare in the Netherlands is covered by two statutory forms of insurance ...
Historically, the insurance industry in the United States was regulated almost exclusively by the individual state governments. The first state commissioner of insurance was appointed in New Hampshire in 1851 and the state-based insurance regulatory system grew as quickly as the insurance industry itself.[9] Prior to this period, insurance was primarily regulated by corporate charter, state statutory law and de facto regulation by the courts in judicial decisions.[10][11] Under the state-based insurance regulation system, each state operates independently to regulate their own insurance markets, typically through a state department of insurance or division of insurance. Stretching back as far as the Paul v. Virginia case in 1869, challenges to the state-based insurance regulatory system have risen from various groups, both ...
... (or GAP Insurance) is an insurance coverage offered as a supplement to automobile insurance policies or auto loans. A GAP policy covers the difference between the value of a car (i.e., what the insurance company will typically pay) and what the borrower owes on the loan if the car is totaled or stolen. Because most cars lose value as soon as they're driven off the dealer's lot, and most car loans cover more than the purchase price of the vehicle, the "gap" between the two can be thousands of dollars. Legally, GAP insurance is not the same as GAP waiver.[1] A GAP insurance policy is typically regarded by state regulators as an insurance product, and regulated as such. By contrast, GAP waiver is not considered insurance in most U.S. states, provided that the auto lender agrees to waive the difference between the outstanding loan amount ...
On December 31, 1989, Grange Mutual purchased all the issued and outstanding shares of NWNL General Insurance Company, a Minnesota property and casualty insurance company. The name was changed to Trustgard Insurance Company effective February 28, 1990. Trustgard began the direct marketing of personal lines automobile and homeowners insurance in Missouri and Kansas in the early to mid 1990's. In 1996, Grange decided to convert Trustgard to an independent agency company. Currently, Trustgard writes primarily new and renewal non-standard automobile policies. In March 1995, a new stock subsidiary of Grange Mutual named Grange Indemnity Insurance Company was formed in Ohio and currently writes primarily renewal non-standard automobile policies. In 2002, Grange Mutual Casualty Company partnered with Integrity Insurance, a small-sized company. Through this affiliation, Grange serves Wisconsin, Iowa, and ...
... (known as Comité Européen des Assurances until March 2012[1][2]) is the European insurance and reinsurance federation.[3] Through its 35 member bodies - the national insurance associations - it represents all types of insurance and reinsurance undertakings, e.g. pan-European companies, monoliners, mutuals and SMEs. Insurance Europe, which is based in Brussels, Belgium, represents undertakings that account for around 95% of total European premium income.[4] Insurance makes a major contribution to Europe's economic growth and development. European insurers generate premium income of more than €1,200bn, employ almost one million people and invest almost €9,800bn in the economy.[5] The federation is the voice of the European insurance industry at European and international levels. It is a fair and reliable partner and a contact point for Institutions of the European Union, ...
Redlining is the practice of denying insurance coverage in specific geographic areas, supposedly because of a high likelihood of loss, while the alleged motivation is unlawful discrimination. Racial profiling or redlining has a long history in the property insurance industry in the United States. From a review of industry underwriting and marketing materials, court documents, and research by government agencies, industry and community groups, and academics, it is clear that race has long affected and continues to affect the policies and practices of the insurance industry.[52] In July 2007, The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released a report presenting the results of a study concerning credit-based insurance scores in automobile insurance. The study found that these scores are effective predictors of risk. It also showed that African-Americans and Hispanics are substantially overrepresented in the lowest ...
Health care in Israel is universal and participation in a medical insurance plan is compulsory. All Israeli residents are entitled to basic health care as a fundamental right. The Israeli healthcare system is based on the National Health Insurance Law of 1995, which mandates all citizens resident in the country to join one of four official health insurance organizations, known as Kupot Holim (קופת חולים - "Sick Funds") which are run as not-for-profit organizations and are prohibited by law from denying any Israeli resident membership. Israelis can increase their medical coverage and improve their options by purchasing private health insurance. In a survey of 48 countries in 2013, Israel's ...
Vehicle insurance (also called auto insurance or car insurance) is a kind of insurance that protects people if they have a car accident. Somebody with vehicle insurance would not have to pay the entire cost of damage a car accident causes. In many places, it is against the law to drive without vehicle insurance. ...
... Auto & Home is the brand name for MetLife's nine affiliate personal lines insurance companies.[124] Collectively these companies offer personal lines property and casualty insurance policies in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.[125] The flagship company in the MetLife Auto & Home group, Metropolitan Property and Casualty Insurance Company, was founded in 1972.[124] MetLife Auto & Home companies presently have over 2.7 million active policies and service 58 of the Fortune 100 companies.[126][127] MetLife's home insurance solutions include homeowners insurance, condo insurance, renters insurance, insurance for landlords, and mobile home insurance.[128][129] The available policies for MetLife's home insurance provide coverage for possessions, property damage from natural disaster or theft, and various legal expenses incurred ...
Health exchanges first emerged in the private sector in the early 1980s, and they used computer networking to integrate claims management, eligibility verification, and inter-carrier payments. These became popular in some regions as a way for small and medium-sized businesses to pool their purchasing power into larger groups, reducing cost. An additional advantage was the ability of small businesses to offer a range of plans to employees, allowing them to compete with larger corporations. The largest such exchange prior to the ACA is CaliforniaChoice, established in 1996. By 2000, CaliforniaChoice's membership included 140,000 individuals from 9000 business groups. Obamacare maintained the concept of health insurance exchanges as a key component of health care. President Obama stated that it should be "a market where Americans can one-stop shop for a health ...
The insured must prove that an insurable interest existed in order to prove loss. The test is whether the insured will incur financial loss, or will fail to derive an anticipated financial benefit, if the event insured against occurs. In principle, the object of insurance must be in existence at the time of the occurrence of the peril insured against. If the insured has no interest at the time of the occurrence of the event insured against, he cannot suffer any loss or damage. Since the function of insurable interest is to determine whether the insured has suffered a loss, the insured's interest, by virtue of the terms of the contract, must exist at the time of the materialisation of the peril insured against. If the insured does not possess an interest at that crucial time, there is no object secured by the insurance. Consequently, the insured can bring no claim under the contract for loss suffered. If the insured does not have an insurable interest in the object, the ...
The most complicated aspect of the insurance business is the actuarial science of ratemaking (price-setting) of policies, which uses statistics and probability to approximate the rate of future claims based on a given risk. After producing rates, the insurer will use discretion to reject or accept risks through the underwriting process. At the most basic level, initial ratemaking involves looking at the frequency and severity of insured perils and the expected average payout resulting from these perils. Thereafter an insurance company will collect historical loss data, bring the loss data to present value, and compare these prior losses to the premium collected in order to assess rate adequacy.[24] Loss ratios and expense loads are also used. Rating for different risk characteristics involves at the most basic level comparing the losses with "loss relativities"-a policy with twice as many losses would therefore be charged twice as much. More complex ...
The most complicated aspect of the insurance business is the actuarial science of ratemaking (price-setting) of policies, which uses statistics and probability to approximate the rate of future claims based on a given risk. After producing rates, the insurer will use discretion to reject or accept risks through the underwriting process. At the most basic level, initial ratemaking involves looking at the frequency and severity of insured perils and the expected average payout resulting from these perils. Thereafter an insurance company will collect historical loss data, bring the loss data to present value, and compare these prior losses to the premium collected in order to assess rate adequacy.[24] Loss ratios and expense loads are also used. Rating for different risk characteristics involves at the most basic level comparing the losses with "loss relativities"-a policy with twice as many losses would therefore be charged twice as much. More complex ...
The most complicated aspect of the insurance business is the actuarial science of ratemaking (price-setting) of policies, which uses statistics and probability to approximate the rate of future claims based on a given risk. After producing rates, the insurer will use discretion to reject or accept risks through the underwriting process. At the most basic level, initial ratemaking involves looking at the frequency and severity of insured perils and the expected average payout resulting from these perils. Thereafter an insurance company will collect historical loss data, bring the loss data to present value, and compare these prior losses to the premium collected in order to assess rate adequacy.[24] Loss ratios and expense loads are also used. Rating for different risk characteristics involves at the most basic level comparing the losses with "loss relativities"-a policy with twice as many losses would therefore be charged twice as much. More complex ...
Healthcare Reform: Nurses Impact Policy. *Emerging Global Health Concerns: How Nurses Respond ... Congress of the United States. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. ... 2004). Policy position. HHS-26. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Policy. Retrieved July ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of the Secretary. (2004). Health insurance reform: security standards. ...
TIAA to Offer Health Savings Accounts to Institutional Clients * ADP Recognized for "Worlds Most Admired Companies" List for ... Cox Survey Says Patients Warm to Providing Data to Physicians for Healthcare Monitoring. Featured Partners January 14, 2020. / ... Mastercard today announced the launch of the Priceless Planet Coalition, a platform to unite corporate sustainability efforts ... policy administration, claims and payout. It is available as an on-premise solution and over the cloud as an integrated suite ...
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Health Insurance Company, Medical Mutual of Ohio Pulls Out of South Carolina, United Healthcare Picks Up the Insured Policy ... Health Insurance Company, Medical Mutual of Ohio Pulls Out of South Carolina, United Healthcare Picks Up the Insured Policy ... United Healthcare Files Lawsuit Against the City of Birmingham Disputing Contract Award To Blue Cross. After 6 years in the ... Data Scientists/Quants in the Health Insurance Business-Modeling Beyond the Speed and Capabilities of Humans To Keep Up ...
... according to United HealthCare. According to Uniteds insurance policy this safety issue in part justifies not treating several ... United Health Care. June 2015- Approximately 2.5 million people were treated for Lyme disease in the past 10 years (in the USA ... United HealthCare Lyme Disease Policy- Updated November 2014. https://www.unitedhealthcareonline.com/ccmcontent/ProviderII/UHC/ ... en-US/Assets/ProviderStaticFiles/ProviderStaticFilesPdf/Tools%20and%20Resources/Policies%20and%20Protocols/Medical%20Policies/ ...
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Explore health plans for you and your family, including short-term gap coverage and more. Get an online quote today. ... Find Minnesota health insurance options at many price points. ... UnitedHealthcare of New York, Inc.. This policy is subject to ... Administrative services are provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. ... Health Plan of Nevada, Inc., Oxford Health Insurance, Inc., UnitedHealthcare Life Insurance Company, UnitedHealthcare of the ...
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United Healthcare *9.5.1. State Exceptions 10. Reimbursement Policy-Public Health Insurance Providers. *10.1. Medicare *10.2. ... 8. Merger & Acquisition (M&A)-United States Anesthesia. 9. Reimbursement Policy-Private Health Insurance Providers. *9.1. Aetna ... Coventry Health Care *Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield *Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas *UnitedHealthcare 10 č ɂ 閃 ?̏ Ґ F ... Table 8-1: United States-Anesthesia Market Merger & Acquisitions (M&A), Jan 2016-March 2017 *Table 9-1: Coventry Health Care- ...
JB Fox, PhD, CL Richards, MD, Office of Prevention Through Healthcare, Office of the Associate Director for Policy, CDC. ... Vital Signs: Health Insurance Coverage and Health Care Utilization --- United States, 2006--2009 and January--March 2010. ... Millions of persons in the United States have no health insurance. In addition to paying for their health care out of pocket, ... by selected health insurance status --- National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2009 ...
The National Health Service (NHS) is the universal healthcare system for the Un... ... Read this full essay on Challenges for the United Kingdom Health care system. ... It is a free health care market system. Insurance companies can set health care policy premium and drop coverage on patients. ... The National Health Service (NHS) is the universal healthcare system for the United Kingdom and provides more than 80 percent ...
Take advantage of the 2018-2019 STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY!!. To enroll in the United HealthCare Plan, administered by ... International Student Health Insurance Compliance Form. For Students with United Healthcare Insurance, Services Are Now ... If you decide to purchase an alternate insurance policy, please download and complete the International Student Health ... Immunizations & Insurance. SPECIAL NOTE. The University of North Florida Student Health Services will be CLOSED in observance ...
All full time students must have health insurance. The 2018-2019 Student Health Insurance is provided by United Healthcare. The ... The United Healthcare site will not open until July 1, 2018. If a student "waives/opts out" of health insurance by entering ... To waive or enroll in student health insurance through United Healthcare, please go to www.firststudent.com. You must be a ... Health Insurance Requirement. PLEASE NOTE: All full-time students are automatically charged for health insurance on their ...
Forecast United States Anesthesia Drugs Market & Forecast United States Anesthesia Market is expected - Market research report ... United States Anesthesia Reimbursement Policy - Private Health Insurance Providers*Aetna International. *Coventry Health Care* ... However all major drugs manufactures such as AstraZeneca, AbbVie , Endo Healthcare etc. anesthesia products sales are turning ... United States Anesthesia Reimbursement Policy - Public Health Insurance Providers*Medicare*Table Medicare - Reimbursement ...
To underscore how different the health insurance marketplace is now, and will be into the future, UnitedHealthcare executive ... Along with changes in policies themselves, Scott pointed to health care industry shifts that are taking place, including the ... and a new management agreement between Greensboro-based Cone Health and Charlottes Carolinas HealthCare System. ... To underscore how different the health insurance marketplace is now, and will be into the future, UnitedHealthcare executive ...
... when insurance plans quit the market or modify their terms. ... who studies insurance for Georgetown Universitys Health Policy ... head of the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation at the University of Michigan. "And Im guessing this year that ... UnitedHealthcare has sharply pulled back.. Hundreds of counties have only one marketplace insurer next year, although ... Insurance churn "is a longstanding problem in the U.S. health care system," said Benjamin Sommers, a physician and health ...
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... private healthcare plans, COBRA, Medicaid. Buy affordable individual health insurance in OH. ... Healthcare.com has info on Ohios qualified health insurance options via the Obamacare exchange, ... Ohio ranked 40th in United Health Foundations 2014 Americas Health Rankings.1 The states strengths included a high rate of ... 3923.38 Continuing policy upon termination of employment. More Information. 800-686-1578 ,insurance.ohio.gov/consumer/pages/ ...
United States Food, Drugs, Healthcare, Life Sciences Reed Smith 29 Feb 2016 ... United States: Congressional Health Policy Hearings - 25 February 2016. Last Updated: February 29 2016 ... Several Congressional committees have held hearings recently on health policy issues, including:. *A House Energy and Commerce ... Employment, IP, Healthcare, Commercial, Finance, Litigation, Tax, Media & IT, Immigration, Technology, Energy, Privacy, More ...
United States Food, Drugs, Healthcare, Life Sciences Reed Smith 28 Jan 2016 ... United States: Congressional Health Policy Hearings - 27 January 2016. Last Updated: January 28 2016 ... Congressional Hearings Focus On 340B Program, Health Workforce, Other Health Policy Issues (71% match) ... Congressional Hearings Focus On 340B Program, Health Workforce, Other Health Policy Issues (71% match) ...
The Louisiana Department of Health protects and promotes health and ensures access to medical, preventive and rehabilitative ... As a barber and musician, I didnt have health insurance. I couldnt afford an individual policy or make enough to qualify for ... Medicaid expansion and United Healthcare have been a godsend for me.. UHC ... I have not had a doctor visit yet, but I am grateful to have the peace of mind that I now has health insurance. ...
... is the answer to the United States healthcare challenge. ... There are better ways for policymakers to make health insurance ... Policy Brief #19: Hawaiis Lesson in the Perils of Universal Health Insurance. Carrie L. Lukas ... health insurance coverage. He included $634 billion over ten years in his budget for healthcare reform, which his staff has ... health insurance programs will crowd out private insurance by encouraging many who are currently covered by private insurance ...
The government is responsible for a lot of things-your health included. What is it doing to ensure that you have the best ... Most discussions surrounding health care revolve around health insurance and healthcare costs. However, one other major health ... focus health care issues and not social policies. Reforming health care would control costs and help improve access to health ... The United States spends more on health care than any other nation. Analysts expect that by 2017, each person will spend $ ...
Travel insurance to USA - insurance for parents visiting usa, travel insurance online quotes for all travel health insurance ... needs for USA visitors from all countries and insurance for visitors from India ... United Healthcare National PPO network. *Policy Maximums: $25,000 to $5,00,000 age up to age 69 & $100,000 for age 70-79 ... Shopping for good health insurance can be confusing. Its tough trying to decide what type of policy offers the best coverage ...
  • By applying extensive industry knowledge to continuously enhance its software, Accenture helps insurers reduce operating costs, manage risk and drive growth through improved product development and distribution, enhanced policy administration and distribution, and technology platform consolidation and modernization. (diversityinc.com)
  • Used by leading insurers worldwide, ALIP is a robust, configurable and scalable solution that provides life insurance carriers and annuity providers with advanced capabilities for product development, new-business development, underwriting, policy administration, claims and payout. (diversityinc.com)
  • While the life insurance industry embarks on new ways to engage consumers and simplify processes, we focus on helping insurers automate underwriting and provide their customers with a comprehensive digital experience. (diversityinc.com)
  • In the report - " The Forrester Wave™: Automated Life Insurance Underwriting Systems, Q4 2019 " - Accenture was named a leader based on the current offering and strategy of its product, Accenture Life Insurance & Annuity Platform (ALIP). (diversityinc.com)
  • Rates 50% Less than ACA, Obamacare Plans, or Maryland Health Connection. (quotefinder.org)
  • It may not die a bloody demise this month, but it is certain to be reformed itself, let's hope for the benefit of the 300 million, not just the millions of lucky shareholders who may have understood the ramification of ObamaCare, which was to multiply the profits of five giant insurance companies, just as the major bank oligopoly was rewarded by the federal bailouts and Fed monetary policy. (forbes.com)
  • June 27th, 2018 United States healthcare policy is currently in the spotlight as the Trump administration seeks to weaken Obamacare with actions such as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which removes the individual mandate that required individuals to carry health insurance. (medgadget.com)
  • The bill prohibits health insurance providers from charging a copay over $50 for a one-month supply, or from allowing or requiring a pharmacy to charge any more. (rvamag.com)
  • Copay fees vary between policies, but are typically $25 or less. (kent.edu)
  • Comprehensive health insurance pays a percentage of the cost of hospital and physician charges after a deductible (usually applies to hospital charges) or a co-pay (usually applies to physician charges. (visitorsinsurance.com)
  • The company's web site shows policies that range from one with a $12,500 annual deductible for less than $80 a month to one with a $1,000 deductible for about $250 a month. (npr.org)
  • The policies don't cover prescription drugs and only pay about 60 percent of the cost of hospital visits after the deductible and co-payment. (npr.org)
  • Further information on policy details is available on the web at www.uhcsr.com/barry and www.unitedhealthcareonline.com . (barry.edu)
  • Expansive third-party insurance has displaced the role of the consumer, weakening incentives for the supply side-that is, physicians and the clinics and hospitals they work in-to find new and innovative ways to give patients the high-quality, low-cost, and consumer-friendly care they want and deserve. (eppc.org)
  • Centura Health Emergency & Urgent Care locations are staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week by Centura Health-affiliated board-certified emergency physicians, emergency-trained nurses, radiologic technologists and other clinical specialists. (centura.org)
  • They are staffed by Centura Health-affiliated board-certified emergency physicians, emergency-trained nurses, radiologic technologists and other clinical specialists. (centura.org)
  • One policy, offered by Stamford, Conn.-based IHC Group on the web site eHealthInsurance.com , doesn't cover prescription drugs unless you're inpatient in a hospital, and it doesn't cover prenatal care, mental health care or annual physicals. (npr.org)
  • For example, an insurance policy may have cover mental health, but only $50 a day. (kent.edu)
  • Co-counsel Meiram Bendat said United "applies disparate medical necessity definitions" and "reserves unfettered discretion for itself to reject mental health claims. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Bendat, an attorney and psychotherapist in Los Angeles, said he helps patients fight insurer denials of mental health treatment. (medpagetoday.com)
  • United has "developed its own standards of care for mental health treatment that are inconsistent with prevailing, national standards and those adopted by specialty groups within the mental health community," he said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • We are committed to helping people with mental health issues reach long-term recovery," said United spokesperson Brad Lotterman, in Minneapolis, Minn. "We recently received the complaint and are currently reviewing [it]. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Individuals who go without health insurance may face a tax penalty known as the shared responsibility payment. (healthcare.com)
  • Quotebroker offers affordable health insurance quotes to individuals, families, the self employed and business owners online. (pr.com)
  • We are a team of licensed insurance brokers that work with individuals and families, like yours, across the United States. (angieslist.com)
  • My view may be somewhat limited because as a healthcare provider most of my time involves the care of acutely ill individuals, but I'm still perplexed as usual the solution involves those that are in the trenches and sacrifice but no or very little attention is again given to the businessmen making enormous amounts of money. (cnn.com)
  • Universal Healthcare has benefited industrialized countries like Sweden, France, and Canada because they recognize the fact that healthcare should be a human right, and not a privilege. (brightkite.com)
  • According to Rosenau's evidence-based assessment, U.S. policymakers seeking to establish universal health care should be aware that, according to the Dutch model, it may not control costs. (bio-medicine.org)