Firefighters: Professional or volunteer members of a fire department who are trained to suppress fire and respond to related emergency.FiresRescue Work: Activities devoted to freeing persons or animals from danger to life or well-being in accidents, fires, bombings, floods, earthquakes, other disasters and life-threatening conditions. While usually performed by team efforts, rescue work is not restricted to organized services.Emergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Diabetes, Gestational: Diabetes mellitus induced by PREGNANCY but resolved at the end of pregnancy. It does not include previously diagnosed diabetics who become pregnant (PREGNANCY IN DIABETICS). Gestational diabetes usually develops in late pregnancy when insulin antagonistic hormones peaks leading to INSULIN RESISTANCE; GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; and HYPERGLYCEMIA.September 11 Terrorist Attacks: Terrorism on September 11, 2001 against targets in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia, and an aborted attack that ended in Pennsylvania.Fire Extinguishing Systems: Automatic or hand operated equipment used to control and extinguish fires.Journalism: The collection, preparation, and distribution of news and related commentary and feature materials through such media as pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, and books. While originally applied to the reportage of current events in printed form, specifically newspapers, with the advent of radio and television the use of the term has broadened to include all printed and electronic communication dealing with current affairs.Employee Discipline: Regulations or conditions imposed on employees by management in order to correct or prevent behaviors which are counterproductive to the organization.Journalism, Dental: Content, management, editing, policies, and printing of dental periodicals such as journals, newsletters, tabloids, and bulletins.ChicagoInvestments: Use for articles on the investing of funds for income or profit.Employee Grievances: Formal procedures whereby the employee expresses any dissatisfaction or feeling of injustice regarding the work situation.IllinoisPharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.Strikes, Employee: Work-related situations in which the employees as a group refuse to work until certain conditions of employment are granted by the employer.Community Pharmacy Services: Total pharmaceutical services provided to the public through community pharmacies.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.CaliforniaSchools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Pharmacies: Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.Metronidazole: A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).Digoxin: A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone DIGOXIGENIN. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in ATRIAL FIBRILLATION and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)Phenytoin: An anticonvulsant that is used to treat a wide variety of seizures. It is also an anti-arrhythmic and a muscle relaxant. The mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear, although several cellular actions have been described including effects on ion channels, active transport, and general membrane stabilization. The mechanism of its muscle relaxant effect appears to involve a reduction in the sensitivity of muscle spindles to stretch. Phenytoin has been proposed for several other therapeutic uses, but its use has been limited by its many adverse effects and interactions with other drugs.
  • More analytical test methods may be available for Ammonia, Free Unionized. (settek.com)
  • You often will read a consistent ammonia level in your fish tank if you are consistently feeding your fish and at times this can be as high as 2 mg/L. The amount of unionized ammonia (UIA) in the water is dependent on the water temperature and pH. (earthanedge.com)
  • Clearly that is why so many nurses are opting for unionized environments. (allnurses.com)
  • Unionized members of PNA became increasingly dissatisfied with the poor representation and low militancy of the nurses association. (wikipedia.org)
  • At a national meeting of unionized nurses sponsored by the California Nurses Association (CNA) in March 2000, CNA staff approached PSEA HealthCare leaders and suggested forming an independent nurses association associated (but not affiliated) with CNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a barrage of accusations that Stanford's recently-acquired ValleyCare Medical Center is a poor work environment - including allegations of worker intimidation, bribery and patient endangerment - the hospital's nurses have taken matters into their own hands and unionized. (stanforddaily.com)
  • Columbia University graduate students are ready to vote to unionize as early as this fall, after the NLRB regional director in New York determines who is eligible to participate in the election, Kushner said. (foxbusiness.com)
  • It is the second time the NLRB has said graduate students can unionize. (foxbusiness.com)
  • GET-UP's decision is the latest in a string of similar moves at other colleges, where unionizing efforts have stalled due to fear that a GOP majority will soon take over the NLRB board and dismantle the Columbia precedent. (thedp.com)
  • Many non-unionized employers might be surprised to learn that they, too, are governed by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). (jdsupra.com)
  • There have been many efforts to organize the tech sector, to organize software engineers that have been largely unsuccessful, but here you have a really young workforce voting to unionize and in a nascent and thriving industry and especially as the unionization rates have declined over the last few decades. (pbs.org)
  • But the information & examples given at http://www.nursingworld.org/uan/organize explains about the reasons why RNs unionize & how RNs go about doing that. (allnurses.com)
  • There's some refocusing within groups working on organizing [journalists] … to adapt to the shifting landscape-to organize freelancers, think about the roles that interns are playing, and bring all those people into the movement," said Burns, who led her newsroom's unionizing effort. (cjr.org)
  • Lombard Fire Department lieutenants are seeking to unionize, becoming the fourth employee group in the village to join or form a union within about a year, officials say. (dailyherald.com)
  • Deborah Jones, a 14-year employee at the Cottondale Johnson Controls plant, voted to unionize. (tuscaloosanews.com)
  • An advocacy group for immigrant workers, Somos Un Pueblo Unido, advised Squeaky Clean's workers to set up such a committee because the National Labor Relations Act - enacted under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1935 - prohibits employers from retaliating against workers for engaging in "concerted" activity to improve their wages and conditions, even when they are not trying to unionize. (nytimes.com)
  • As such, non-members receive the same higher wages (one study found that workers in unionized shops enjoy a wage premium of nearly 12 percent ) and benefits enjoyed by their coworkers who belong to the union. (workplacefairness.org)
  • The effects of union decline on the wages of nonunion women are not as substantial because women were not as unionized as men were in 1979. (epi.org)
  • Last year, the labor board dismissed a petition by football players at Northwestern University who had argued that they were employees and sought to unionize. (nytimes.com)
  • Satisfied employees don't unionize because satisfied employees are treated fairly and well and are also fairly reimbursed for their talent, skill and knowledge levels. (allnurses.com)
  • By contrast, the Chicago Public Media employees, who voted to unionize two months earlier, are still negotiating on the terms of their contract. (cjr.org)
  • Hartford - The union representing workers at Lawrence + Memorial Hospital proposed a lower union wage scale for employees of hospital-affiliated physician practices compared to unionized hospital workers, but L+M administrators countered that "doctors who run the offices didn't want their offices to be unionized. (theday.com)
  • The union representing thousands of Maryland health care workers is renewing a push to apply state labor protections and collective bargaining laws to employees at the University of Maryland Medical Center , a move that hospital officials say is not needed to allow unionizing there. (dailypress.com)
  • A November opinion from the state attorney general's office spurred 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East to argue that state officials should oversee the hospital's labor relations, which includes not just unionizing but responding to any grievances from nonunion employees. (dailypress.com)
  • Many medical interns and residents have unionized in recent years, while a group of doctors at a medical center in Oregon formed a union of hospitalists in 2014. (nytimes.com)
  • Unions are required by law to bargain on behalf of every worker in a unionized shop, even if those workers opt not to join the union. (workplacefairness.org)
  • Absent something else, this arrangement would create a free-rider problem, because individual workers have little incentive to join the union if they know they will get all the benefits of unionizing regardless of whether they reimburse the union for its costs. (workplacefairness.org)
  • The Reader 's move follows similar efforts at Chicago Public Media , which voted to unionize in December 2013, and the Chicago-based In These Times magazine, which joined the Communications Workers of America in February 2014 and signed off on a union contract in October. (cjr.org)
  • So said Harry Rodriguez, president of the bargaining unit that represents 756 health care workers, during testimony Friday at a National Labor Relations Board hearing over whether the hospital violated federal labor law when it moved two outpatient clinics out of the hospital to affiliated doctors' offices, and eliminated seven unionized positions in the process. (theday.com)
  • The National Labor Relations Board's decision to allow Northwestern University's football team to unionize has upended an understanding of college athletics, Oklahoma legal experts said. (journalrecord.com)
  • A unionized cooperative is a cooperative, usually a worker cooperative[citation needed], which is beholden to active legal involvement by trade unions in the representation of the worker-owners' interests. (wikipedia.org)
  • Former staffers of the shuttered local-news publications say that, in both coded and explicit ways, management under Joe Ricketts warned them that if they unionized, the sites would cease to exist. (newyorker.com)
  • Ross Reynolds speaks with Amy Hagopian, an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Washington, about why she's joined an effort to unionize faculty at the University of Washington. (kuow.org)
  • David Hyde speaks with Norm Arkans, associate vice president of media relations and communications at the University of Washington, about why the UW administration has "grave reservations" about an attempt by some of the UW faculty to unionize. (kuow.org)
  • At many other media outlets that have successfully unionized in recent years-among them Vice and Gizmodo, which is owned by Univision-"the guy in charge has a liberal-media-owner reputation to maintain," as Whitford put it. (newyorker.com)
  • In recent days, multiple former staffers told me that, in both coded and explicit ways, management had warned them repeatedly in the months before they unionized that doing so would mean that the sites would cease to exist. (newyorker.com)