The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.
"Medicine in Art" refers to the depiction or use of medical themes, practices, or symbolism in various art forms, such as paintings, sculptures, literature, and performing arts, often serving educational, historical, or aesthetic purposes.
"Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses the creative process of making art to improve a person's physical, mental, and emotional well-being."
The narrow tube connecting the YOLK SAC with the midgut of the EMBRYO; persistence of all or part of it in post-fetal life produces abnormalities, of which the commonest is MECKEL DIVERTICULUM.
ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.
An embryonic structure originating from the ALLANTOIS. It is a canal connecting the fetal URINARY BLADDER and the UMBILICUS. It is normally converted into a fibrous cord postnatally. When the canal fails to be filled and remains open (patent urachus), urine leaks through the umbilicus.
The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.
A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)
Metastatic lesion of the UMBILICUS associated with intra-abdominal neoplasms especially of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or OVARY.
Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)
That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.
A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.
The period of history before 500 of the common era.

Body piercing in the accident and emergency department. (1/151)

Recently an increasing number of patients with complications related to pierced body jewellery have been seen. Often removal of the jewellery is indicated. Removal of these items may also be required for radiological purposes. If the doctor is familiar with the opening mechanism of the item, removal is not usually difficult. Uninformed attempts at removal may cause unnecessary trauma and distress. In a survey of 28 accident and emergency doctors, only six were able accurately to describe the opening mechanisms of all three commonly used types of jewellery. Descriptions of the types of jewellery currently used are not available in the medical literature. The aim of this article is to familiarize doctors with the types of jewellery used, describe their opening mechanisms, and suggest techniques for their removal. The complications of body piercing and the indications for the removal of body jewellery are also outlined.  (+info)

Diphenhydramine disposition in the sheep maternal-placental-fetal unit: gestational age, plasma drug protein binding, and umbilical blood flow effects on clearance. (2/151)

The objective of this study was to examine the interrelationships between maternal and fetal plasma drug protein binding, umbilical blood flow (Q(um)), gestational age (GA), and maternal-fetal diphenhydramine (DPHM) clearances in chronically instrumented pregnant sheep. Maternal and fetal DPHM placental (CL(mf) and CL(fm), respectively) and nonplacental (CL(mo) and CL(fo), respectively) clearances and steady-state plasma protein binding were determined in 18 pregnant sheep at 124 to 140 days' gestation (term, approximately 145 days). The data demonstrated a highly significant fall of approximately 66% in CL(fm) and a decreasing trend in CL(fo) ( approximately 47%) over the GA range studied. However, no such relationships existed between GA and CL(mf) or CL(mo). Concomitant with this was a decrease in fetal DPHM plasma unbound fraction with GA, with no such change being evident in the mother. Both CL(mo) and CL(fo) were related to the respective DPHM plasma unbound fraction. A strong relationship also existed between fetal plasma unbound fraction and CL(fm). Thus, the decrease in fetal unbound fraction of DPHM during gestation could contribute to the fall in CL(fm), and possibly CL(fo). However, over the GA range studied, fetal DPHM free fraction decreased by approximately 47%, whereas CL(fm) fell by approximately 66%. Because fetal unbound fraction and CL(fm) are linearly related, the GA-associated fall in unbound fraction appears to be insufficient to account for the entire decline in CL(fm). In separate studies in pregnant sheep, we observed a approximately 40% fall in weight-normalized Q(um) between 125 and 137 days' gestation. Because CL(fm) for DPHM is similar to that of flow-limited compounds (e.g., ethanol, antipyrine), this decrease in Q(um) may also contribute to the GA-related fall in CL(fm).  (+info)

The Pitx2 protein in mouse development. (3/151)

The Rieger syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder involving ocular, dental, and umbilical defects is caused by mutations in PITX2, a Bicoid-type homeobox protein. Mouse Pitx2 mRNA is expressed in eye, tooth and umbilicus consistent with the human Riegers phenotype. Moreover, Pitx2 is involved in the Nodal/Sonic hedgehog pathway that determines left/right polarity. In this report we demonstrate a 32-kDa polypeptide on Western blots of nuclear extracts from a rat pituitary cell line, using a Pitx2 specific antibody (designated P2R10). We describe also for the first time expression of the Pitx2 protein in mouse. Pitx2 protein immunostaining was detectable during the development of the eye, tooth, umbilicus, and also in the pituitary, heart, gut, and limb. We demonstrate for the first time directly that Pitx2 is asymmetrically expressed in early heart, gut, and lung development.  (+info)

Elimination of biliary stones through the urinary tract: a complication of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (4/151)

The introduction and popularization of laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been accompanied with a considerable increase in perforation of gallbladder during this procedure (10% - 32%), with the occurrence of intraperitoneal bile spillage and the consequent increase in the incidence of lost gallstones (0.2% - 20%). Recently the complications associated with these stones have been documented in the literature. We report a rare complication occurring in an 81-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and developed cutaneous fistula to the umbilicus and elimination of biliary stones through the urinary tract. During the cholecystectomy, the gall bladder was perforated, and bile and gallstones were spilled into the peritoneal cavity. Two months after the initial procedure there was exteriorization of fistula through the umbilicus, with intermittent elimination of biliary stones. After eleven months, acute urinary retention occurred due to biliary stones in the bladder, which were removed by cystoscopy. We conclude that efforts should be concentrated on avoiding the spillage of stones during the surgery, and that no rules exist for indicating a laparotomy simply to retrieve these lost gallstones.  (+info)

A prospective, randomised trial of prophylactic antibiotics versus bag extraction in the prophylaxis of wound infection in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (5/151)

Septic complications are rare following laparoscopic cholecystectomy if prophylactic antibiotics are given, as demonstrated in previous studies. Antibiotic treatment may be unnecessary and, therefore, undesirable, so we compared two forms of prophylaxis: a cephalosporin antibiotic and bag extraction of the dissected gallbladder. A total of 76 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to either receive an antibiotic or to have their gallbladder removed from the abdomen in a plastic bag. Complicated cases were excluded. There was a total of 6 wound infections (7.9%), 3 in each of the study groups. All these were associated with skin commensals. There were no other septic complications. Bacteriological studies grouped the organisms isolated from the bile and the wound as potential pathogens and likely commensals. A total of 10 potential pathogens were isolated, 9 of which were found in the group receiving antibiotics. We conclude that septic sequelae of uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy are uncommon, but clearly not entirely prevented by antibiotic or mechanical prophylaxis. Prophylactic antibiotics may not be required in uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Further study is warranted.  (+info)

Implantable insulin pumps: infections most likely due to seeding from skin flora determine severe outcomes of pump-pocket seromas. (6/151)

Complications at implantation site of implantable insulin pumps may lead to premature removal. To elucidate the origins and the outcomes of these local adverse events. We investigated seromas of the 'pump-pocket' that have been detected for an eight month-period during the follow-up of such-treated forty type 1 diabetic patients. At the start of study period, skin bacterial flora was sampled at umbilicus and groin, and isolated strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis were preserved in specific vials at -20 degrees C. Each time a seroma was detected at transcutaneous 45 days-refill of pump reservoir, it was sampled for bacterial cultures. Isolated strains of S. epidermidis from seroma were genetically compared to preserved strains of corresponding patients using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) after genomic restriction by SmaI. Among the ten seromas that occurred after a mean time of 9.9 months since implantation, S. epidermidis were isolated in five cases. Genetic comparison of isolated strains could be performed in three cases. Compared strains showed identical (in 2 cases) or closely related (in one case) PFGE profiles. While the five aseptic seromas resolved with rest, four infected cases required explantations after one to nineteen months in spite of antibiotic therapy and the fifth one persisted without impairment under long-term antibiotics. Our results suggest that seeding from the skin flora is a key-factor determining the severity of pump-pocket complications. We recommend that bacterial investigations of pump-pocket seromas should be systematically performed, while prophylactic measures might include antibiotic cover for each puncture of the pump-pocket.  (+info)

Recovery of anaerobic bacteria from 3 patients with infection at a pierced body site. (7/151)

We describe 3 adolescents who developed infections due to anaerobes at pierced body sites: the nipple, the umbilicus, and the nasal septum. Anaerobes (Prevotella intermedia and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius) were recovered from pure culture of specimens obtained from 1 patient with nipple infection and were mixed with aerobic bacteria in cultures of specimens obtained from 2 patients (Streptococcus aureus, Peptostreptococcus micros, and Prevotella melaninogenica were recovered from a patient with nasal septum infection, and Bacteroides fragilis and Enterococcus faecalis were recovered from a patient with umbilical infection). The infection resolved in all patients after removal of the ornaments and use of antimicrobial drug treatment.  (+info)

Significant abdominal wall hematoma from an umbilical port insertion. (8/151)

Laparoscopists consider the umbilical and ventral midline area to be "vascular safe." On occasion, however, the insertion of the first trocar at the umbilical port may result in severe abdominal wall hematoma.  (+info)

The umbilicus, also known as the navel, is the scar left on the abdominal wall after the removal of the umbilical cord in a newborn. The umbilical cord connects the developing fetus to the placenta in the uterus during pregnancy, providing essential nutrients and oxygen while removing waste products. After birth, the cord is clamped and cut, leaving behind a small stump that eventually dries up and falls off, leaving the umbilicus. In adults, it typically appears as a slight depression or dimple on the abdomen.

"Medicine in Art" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used to describe the intersection and representation of medical themes, practices, or symbols in various art forms. It can include but is not limited to:

1. The depiction of medical scenes, practitioners, or patients in paintings, sculptures, or photographs.
2. The use of medical imagery such as X-rays, MRIs, or anatomical drawings in mixed media works.
3. The exploration of medical issues, diseases, or treatments in conceptual art.
4. The creation of art by artists with medical conditions, which can provide insight into their experiences.
5. The use of art therapy as a healing modality in medical settings.

This term is often used in the context of art history, visual culture, and medical humanities to analyze and understand the complex relationships between art, medicine, and society.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "art." In general, art refers to creative works that express or evoke emotions through meaning, symbolism, form, and/or color. This can include various forms such as visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography), performing arts (theater, music, dance), literary arts (poetry, novels), and more.

However, there is a field of study called medical humanities that explores the intersection between medicine and the humanities, including art. In this context, art can be used as a tool for healing, communication, reflection, and understanding in healthcare settings. For example, art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses creative activities like drawing, painting, or sculpting to help patients explore their emotions, improve their mental health, and enhance their well-being.

Therefore, while there may not be a specific medical definition for "art," it can have significant implications for healthcare and the human experience.

The Vitelline Duct, also known as the Yolk Stalk or the Omphalomesenteric Duct, is a vestigial structure in human embryonic development. It is a canal that connects the midgut of the developing fetus to the yolk sac, which provides nutrients during early stages of embryonic growth.

In normal development, this duct usually obliterates or closes off completely by the end of the 8th week of gestation. If it fails to do so, it can result in various congenital abnormalities. These may include Meckel's diverticulum (a pouch protruding from the wall of the intestine), omphalocele (a defect where the intestines and other organs protrude through the belly button), or persistent vitellointestinal duct, which can lead to infections and bowel obstructions.

A laparoscope is a type of medical instrument called an endoscope, which is used to examine the interior of a body cavity or organ. Specifically, a laparoscope is a long, thin tube with a high-intensity light and a high-resolution camera attached to it. This device allows surgeons to view the abdominal cavity through small incisions, without having to make large, invasive cuts.

During a laparoscopic procedure, the surgeon will insert the laparoscope through a small incision in the abdomen, typically near the navel. The camera sends images back to a monitor, giving the surgeon a clear view of the organs and tissues inside the body. This allows for more precise and less invasive surgical procedures, often resulting in faster recovery times and fewer complications compared to traditional open surgery.

Laparoscopes are commonly used in a variety of surgical procedures, including:

1. Gynecological surgeries (e.g., hysterectomies, ovarian cyst removals)
2. Gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy)
3. Gastrointestinal surgeries (e.g., removing benign or malignant tumors)
4. Hernia repairs
5. Bariatric surgeries for weight loss (e.g., gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy)

While laparoscopes provide numerous benefits over open surgery, they still require specialized training and expertise to use effectively and safely.

The urachus is a vestigial structure in humans, which is a fibrous cord that connects the umbilicus (navel or belly button) to the dome-shaped top of the bladder. In fetal development, the urachus is the passageway for urine to move from the developing bladder to the allantois, an outpouching of the hindgut that ultimately becomes part of the placenta.

After birth, the urachus usually obliterates and turns into a fibrous cord called the median umbilical ligament. However, in some cases, the urachus may not completely obliterate, leading to various congenital abnormalities such as urachal cysts, urachal sinuses, or urachal fistulas. These conditions can cause symptoms like lower abdominal pain, infection, and sometimes even sepsis if left untreated.

It's worth noting that the urachus is not a commonly discussed structure in routine medical practice, but it does have clinical significance in certain pediatric surgical cases and congenital anomalies.

The abdominal wall refers to the group of muscles, fascia (sheaths of connective tissue), and skin that make up the front and sides of the abdomen, extending from the thorax (chest) to the pelvis. It provides protection to the abdominal organs, supports the trunk, and allows for movement of the torso.

The main muscles of the anterior abdominal wall include:

1. Rectus sheaths (Rectus Abdominis): paired vertical muscles running from the pubic symphysis to the xiphoid process and costal cartilages of ribs 5-7.
2. External obliques: thin, irregular muscles that lie over the lower part of the abdomen and run diagonally downward and forward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest (pelvic bone) and pubic tubercle.
3. Internal obliques: thicker muscles that lie under the external obliques, running diagonally upward and forward from the iliac crest to the lower ribs.
4. Transverse abdominis: deepest of the abdominal muscles, lying horizontally across the abdomen, attaching from the lower ribs to the pelvis.

These muscles are interconnected by various layers of fascia and aponeuroses (flat, broad tendons), forming a complex structure that allows for both stability and mobility. The linea alba, a fibrous band, runs down the midline of the anterior abdominal wall, connecting the rectus sheaths.

Damage to the abdominal wall can occur due to trauma, surgery, or various medical conditions, which may require surgical intervention for repair.

The rectus abdominis is a paired, flat, and long muscle in the anterior (front) wall of the abdomen. It runs from the pubic symphysis (the joint where the two pubic bones meet in the front of the pelvis) to the xiphoid process (the lower end of the sternum or breastbone) and costal cartilages of the fifth, sixth, and seventh ribs.

The rectus abdominis is responsible for flexing the lumbar spine (lower back), which helps in bending forward or sitting up from a lying down position. It also contributes to maintaining proper posture and stabilizing the pelvis and spine. The muscle's visibility, especially in its lower portion, is often associated with a "six-pack" appearance in well-trained individuals.

"Sister Mary Joseph's nodule" is a term used in medicine to describe a palpable (able to be felt) or visible nodule or lump that is located at the umbilicus (belly button). It is usually indicative of an underlying malignancy, most commonly originating from the stomach or ovaries. The presence of this nodule suggests a poor prognosis as it often indicates advanced stage cancer. The term was coined by Dr. Hamilton Bailey in honor of Sister Mary Joseph, who first recognized the association between umbilical nodules and internal malignancies during her work as a surgical nurse with Dr. William Mayo in the early 20th century.

The abdominal muscles, also known as the abdominals or abs, are a group of muscles in the anterior (front) wall of the abdominopelvic cavity. They play a crucial role in maintaining posture, supporting the trunk, and facilitating movement of the torso. The main abdominal muscles include:

1. Rectus Abdominis: These are the pair of long, flat muscles that run vertically along the middle of the anterior abdominal wall. They are often referred to as the "six-pack" muscles due to their visible, segmented appearance in well-trained individuals. The primary function of the rectus abdominis is to flex the spine, allowing for actions such as sitting up from a lying down position or performing a crunch exercise.

2. External Obliques: These are the largest and most superficial of the oblique muscles, located on the lateral (side) aspects of the abdominal wall. They run diagonally downward and forward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest (the upper part of the pelvis) and the pubic tubercle (a bony prominence at the front of the pelvis). The external obliques help rotate and flex the trunk, as well as assist in side-bending and exhalation.

3. Internal Obliques: These muscles lie deep to the external obliques and run diagonally downward and backward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest, pubic tubercle, and linea alba (the strong band of connective tissue that runs vertically along the midline of the abdomen). The internal obliques help rotate and flex the trunk, as well as assist in forced exhalation and increasing intra-abdominal pressure during actions such as coughing or lifting heavy objects.

4. Transversus Abdominis: This is the deepest of the abdominal muscles, located inner to both the internal obliques and the rectus sheath (a strong, fibrous covering that surrounds the rectus abdominis). The transversus abdominis runs horizontally around the abdomen, attaching to the lower six ribs, the thoracolumbar fascia (a broad sheet of connective tissue spanning from the lower back to the pelvis), and the pubic crest (the front part of the pelvic bone). The transversus abdominis helps maintain core stability by compressing the abdominal contents and increasing intra-abdominal pressure.

Together, these muscles form the muscular "corset" of the abdomen, providing support, stability, and flexibility to the trunk. They also play a crucial role in respiration, posture, and various movements such as bending, twisting, and lifting.

The abdomen refers to the portion of the body that lies between the thorax (chest) and the pelvis. It is a musculo-fascial cavity containing the digestive, urinary, and reproductive organs. The abdominal cavity is divided into several regions and quadrants for medical description and examination purposes. These include the upper and lower abdomen, as well as nine quadrants formed by the intersection of the midline and a horizontal line drawn at the level of the umbilicus (navel).

The major organs located within the abdominal cavity include:

1. Stomach - muscular organ responsible for initial digestion of food
2. Small intestine - long, coiled tube where most nutrient absorption occurs
3. Large intestine - consists of the colon and rectum; absorbs water and stores waste products
4. Liver - largest internal organ, involved in protein synthesis, detoxification, and metabolism
5. Pancreas - secretes digestive enzymes and hormones such as insulin
6. Spleen - filters blood and removes old red blood cells
7. Kidneys - pair of organs responsible for filtering waste products from the blood and producing urine
8. Adrenal glands - sit atop each kidney, produce hormones that regulate metabolism, immune response, and stress response

The abdomen is an essential part of the human body, playing a crucial role in digestion, absorption, and elimination of food and waste materials, as well as various metabolic processes.

An umbilical hernia is a type of hernia that occurs at the umbilicus, or belly button. It results from a protrusion of abdominal contents through a weakened area in the abdominal wall surrounding the navel. This condition is common in newborns and infants, especially premature babies, due to incomplete closure of the abdominal muscles during development.

In most cases, umbilical hernias in children close on their own by age 3-4 or by the time they reach school age. However, if the hernia is still present after this age, surgical intervention may be required to prevent potential complications such as incarceration (where the herniated tissue becomes trapped and cannot be pushed back in) or strangulation (where the blood supply to the herniated tissue is cut off, leading to tissue death).

Adults can also develop umbilical hernias, often as a result of increased pressure in the abdomen due to obesity, pregnancy, heavy lifting, or persistent coughing. Umbilical hernias in adults are generally more likely to require surgical repair due to the higher risk of complications.

Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that involves the insertion of a laparoscope, which is a thin tube with a light and camera attached to it, through small incisions in the abdomen. This allows the surgeon to view the internal organs without making large incisions. It's commonly used to diagnose and treat various conditions such as endometriosis, ovarian cysts, infertility, and appendicitis. The advantages of laparoscopy over traditional open surgery include smaller incisions, less pain, shorter hospital stays, and quicker recovery times.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the gallbladder using a laparoscope, a thin tube with a camera, which allows the surgeon to view the internal structures on a video monitor. The surgery is performed through several small incisions in the abdomen, rather than a single large incision used in open cholecystectomy. This approach results in less postoperative pain, fewer complications, and shorter recovery time compared to open cholecystectomy.

The procedure is typically indicated for symptomatic gallstones or chronic inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis), which can cause severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard of care for gallbladder removal due to its minimally invasive nature and excellent outcomes.

I'm not a medical professional, but the term "History, Ancient" is not a medical term per se. However, in a broader context, it could refer to the study of ancient medical practices, theories, and beliefs that existed in civilizations prior to the Middle Ages or Classical Antiquity. This might include the examination of ancient texts, artifacts, and archaeological evidence to understand how illnesses were treated and viewed in these historical periods. It forms an essential part of the evolution of medical knowledge and practices over time.

Look up umbilicus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Umbilicus may refer to: The navel or belly button Umbilicus (mollusc), a ... Umbilicus mundi, or "the world's navel", a Greek artifact Umbilicus, an American rock band that includes members of death metal ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Umbilicus. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to ... a genus of over ninety species of perennial flowering plants Umbilicus urbis Romae, the designated center of the city of Rome ...
Umbilicus patens (Pomel) Umbilicus patulus (Candargy) Umbilicus pendulinus (Wolley-Dod) Umbilicus persicus (Boiss.) Umbilicus ... Umbilicus leucanthus (G.Don) Umbilicus libanoticus (Labill.) - possibly Umbilicus glaber Umbilicus lievenii (Ledeb.) Umbilicus ... Umbilicus praealtus (Brotero) Umbilicus pubescens (G.Don) Umbilicus pulvinatus (Rupr.) Umbilicus pulvinatus (Rupr.) Umbilicus ... Umbilicus lineolatus (Boiss.) Umbilicus linifolius (Rupr.) Umbilicus luteus (Huds.) Umbilicus malacophyllus (Pall.) Umbilicus ...
"Umbilicus intermedius Boiss". Plants of the World Online. The Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. n.d. Retrieved ... Umbilicus intermedius, the intermediate navelwort or common pennywort, is a succulent, perennial flowering plant in the ... Umbilicus (plant), Flora of Lebanon, Taxa named by Pierre Edmond Boissier, All stub articles, Crassulaceae stubs). ...
... , the horizontal navelwort, is a fleshy perennial flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae (in the ... Umbilicus (plant), Flora of Lebanon, Flora of Malta, All stub articles, Crassulaceae stubs). ... genus Umbilicus) native to the Mediterranean Basin and Middle East, from the Azores in the west to Oman in the east in rocky ... http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/search?q=Umbilicus+horizontalis v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is ...
... , common names lamb's-tail and gold drop, is a succulent, perennial flowering plant, a species in the ... "RHS Plant Selector - Umbilicus oppositifolius". RHS. Retrieved 5 March 2021. "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal ... genus Umbilicus of the family Crassulaceae. It is endemic to shady mountain areas in the Caucasus. It is widely listed under ... Umbilicus (plant), All stub articles, Crassulaceae stubs). ...
... is infrequent even in suitable habitats and it is generally considered to be rare. Umbilicus comprises 18 ... Umbilicus schmidtii is a flowering plant in the family Crassulaceae. The species is endemic to Cape Verde. It is listed as ... Umbilicus scmidtii is a western hygrophyte occurring on Santo Antão, São Nicolau, Santiago and Fogo of the Cape Verde Islands. ... Umbilicus schmidtii is an unbranched erect perennial herb up to 25 cm high, glabrous in all parts. Basal leaves orbicular, ...
This opening is known as the umbilicus. Another way of characterizing the umbilicus in gastropods is as the hole around which ... A phaneromphalous shell has an open umbilicus. A cryptomphalous shell has the opening of the umbilicus completely plugged. ... the spiral of the whorls can be clearly viewed by looking into the umbilicus. An umbilicus can vary from very narrow and ... The term umbilicus is often used in descriptions of gastropod shells, i.e. it is a feature present on the ventral (or under) ...
... is used in homeopathic medicine. Navelwort is referred to as Cotyledon umbilicus by Homeopaths, since that ... Umbilicus rupestris is not the same "Pennywort" as the one used in Asian medicine, which is the unrelated Asiatic Pennywort, ... Umbilicus rupestris, the navelwort, penny-pies or wall pennywort, is a fleshy, perennial, edible flowering plant in the ... Both the name "navelwort" and the scientific name Umbilicus come from the round shape of the leaves, which have a navel-like ...
... is known for its wide umbilicus. It is a genus of more than 90 species of plants in the family ... Fahmy, Mohamed (2018), "Umbilicus of Plants", Umbilicus and Umbilical Cord, Cham: Springer International Publishing, pp. 19-21 ... Umbilicus (plant), Flora of the Alps, Flora of Europe, All stub articles, Crassulaceae stubs). ...
... in the genus Umbilicus, found in the Southern Balkans and southern Italy. Umbilicus luteus leaf extract had a highly virucidal ... Umbilicus luteus, the reniform Venus' navel[citation needed], is a succulent, perennial flowering plant in the family ... Umbilicus (plant), Flora of Europe, All stub articles, Crassulaceae stubs). ...
... is a species of flowering plant in the Crassulaceae family. It is referred to by the common names green ... "Umbilicus chloranthus Heldr. & Sart. ex Boiss". Plants of the World Online. The Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. n.d ... "Umbilicus chloranthus Heldr. & Sart. ex Boiss". World Flora Online. The World Flora Online Consortium. n.d. Retrieved September ... "Umbilicus chloranthus Heldr. & Sart. ex Boiss". Global Diversity Information Facility. GBIF Secretariat. n.d. Retrieved ...
In a typical Roman city, an umbilicus (umbilicus urbis, "city navel") represented the reference point used by the city planners ... The term umbilicus agri ("navel of the field") was used if the surveying was done for the agricultural land, frequently the ... The place for an umbilicus was supposedly set by examining the sky. The standard city plan included two major thoroughfares, ... decumanus maximus and cardo maximus, intersecting at the umbilicus thus starting the centuriation (surveying). Umbilicus played ...
The Umbilicus is believed to be a separate structure from the Milliarium Aureum, which was built nearby by Augustus (c. 20 BC) ... The Umbilicus Urbis Romae (Classical Latin: [ʊmbɪˈliːkʊs ˈʊrbɪs ˈroːmae̯])-"Navel of the City of Rome"-was the symbolic centre ... The original masonry Umbilicus was probably constructed in the 2nd century BC. The existing ruins, however, are from the time ... Originally covered in marble, the Umbilicus is now a forlorn-looking brick core some 2 metres high and 4.45 metres in diameter ...
... is a moth of the family Glyphipterigidae. It is found on the Canary Islands and Sardinia and in Portugal ... The larvae feed on Umbilicus rupestris. They mine the leaves of their host plant. The mine starts as a branching corridor with ...
... is a fungal plant pathogen which causes rust on navelwort (Umbilicus rupestris). It was originally found on ... "Puccinia umbilici". Discover Life. Retrieved 14 December 2019. Puccinia umbilici on Aphotofungi v t e v t e (Articles with ... the leaves of Umbilicus pendulinus in France. It is found in Europe, Japan, Russia and the United States. Guépin, in Duby, Bot ...
Deep umbilicus. Diaphana pacifica T. Schiøtte, 1998 Distribution : Southern California Diaphana paessleri H. Strebel, 1905 ...
No umbilicus. The aperture is rounded and lacks siphonal canal. The outer lip is sharp and thin. Inner lip indistinct except ...
The navel (clinically known as the umbilicus; PL: umbilici or umbilicuses; commonly known as the belly button or tummy button) ... The umbilicus is used to visually separate the abdomen into quadrants. The umbilicus is a prominent scar on the abdomen, with ... ISBN 978-3-319-43885-6. Mohamed, Fahmy (2018). "Umbilicus Types and Shapes". Umbilicus and Umbilical Cord. Egypt: Springer. pp ... The skin around the waist at the level of the umbilicus is supplied by the tenth thoracic spinal nerve (T10 dermatome). The ...
Umbilicus narrow. Periumbilical keel weak. Height of shell 2 mm (0.079 in) tall and 1-1.1 mm (0.039-0.043 in) wide. E. ... The aperture is oval and the umbilicus wide, with a strong periumbilical keel. The shells are 2 mm (0.079 in) and 0.9 mm (0.035 ... The aperture is circular, the umbilicus narrow, and the periumbilical keel is absent. The shells are 1.7 mm (0.067 in) and 0.9 ...
"Umbilicus horizontalis". MaltaWildPlants.com. Retrieved 2022-01-04. Mifsud, Stephen. "Umbilicus rupestris". MaltaWildPlants.com ...
Umbilicus none ; whorls flattened above between periphery and suture. The base of the shell is rather rounded. This species ...
Wall Pennywort - Umbilicus rupestris. Wartwort - Euphorbia helioscopia An attractive European weed which has flowers that turn ... Kidneywort - Cotyledon umbilicus. Also called pennywort and navelwort. Knotwort - Any plant of the genus Illecebrum. Laserwort ...
Shell evolute, expanding fairly rapidly; umbilicus open, perforate; whorl section ovoid to subquadrate.[citation needed] ...
Umbilicus completely closed. The species is distributed along the northern Tramuntana Mountains in western Mallorca, cohabiting ...
superior umbilicus Also, distal umbilicus. A very small opening on the ventral side (facing toward the bird's skin) of a ... Compare: superior umbilicus. inner wing Also defined: outer wing. The inner wing of a bird is that portion of the wing ... Compare: inferior umbilicus. supraloral Where a stripe is present only above the lores, and does not continue behind the eye, ... This part is embedded within the skin follicle and has an opening at the base (proximal umbilicus) and a small opening on the ...
Umbilicus is closed. The shell of Semisulcospira libertina is very variable. There are seven or more (up to 12) basal cords ( ...
Umbilicus chrysanthus Boiss. & Heldr.) is an ornamental plant of family Crassulaceae. Pink, A. (2004). Gardening for the ...
There is no umbilicus. The head and foot of the animal has a yellow-orange color with brown spots. The color of the shell is ...
The umbilicus is open. The width of the adult shell is up to 7.5-7.77 mm. The weight of the snail of the shell length 6.13 mm ...
The umbilicus is narrow. The primary aperture is single, umbilical to extraumbilical, and has a bordering lip. The surface is ...
Look up umbilicus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Umbilicus may refer to: The navel or belly button Umbilicus (mollusc), a ... Umbilicus mundi, or "the worlds navel", a Greek artifact Umbilicus, an American rock band that includes members of death metal ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Umbilicus. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to ... a genus of over ninety species of perennial flowering plants Umbilicus urbis Romae, the designated center of the city of Rome ...
During development, the umbilicus functions as a channel that allows blood flow between the placenta and fetus. ... A stark contrast is observed between the physiologic importance of the umbilicus during development and its importance after ... The umbilicus is on the right and the bladder on the left. The attachments or the urachal cyst to the bladder and the umbilicus ... encoded search term (Disorders of the Umbilicus) and Disorders of the Umbilicus What to Read Next on Medscape ...
During development, the umbilicus functions as a channel that allows blood flow between the placenta and fetus. ... A stark contrast is observed between the physiologic importance of the umbilicus during development and its importance after ... The umbilicus is on the right and the bladder on the left. The attachments or the urachal cyst to the bladder and the umbilicus ... encoded search term (Disorders of the Umbilicus) and Disorders of the Umbilicus What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Homeopathic Cotyledon Umbilicus - FEVER AND CHILL indications, uses & symptoms from 12 cross linked materia medicas. Available ... Cotyledon Umbilicus- main page Below are the main rubriks (i.e strongest indications or symptoms) of Cotyledon Umbilicus in ... Have you ever used Cotyledon Umbilicus? Yes No. Filter Cotyledon Umbilicus fever and chill symptoms:. ... Cotyledon Umbilicus. General Modalities Etc Relationships Mind Vertigo, Dizziness Head Eyes Ears Face Mouth Skin Throat Chest ...
Brown, E. S. (1997) The Umbilicus as Sexual Focus. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 78:577 ...
View all photos in CalPhotos of Umbilicus horizontalis *Check Google Images for Umbilicus horizontalis ... Umbilicus horizontalis. Horizontal Navelwort Photographer: Dr. Amadej Trnkoczy. ID: 0000 0000 0615 0646 (2015-06-04). Copyright ... The photographers identification Umbilicus horizontalis has not been reviewed. Click here to review or comment on the ...
Members of Cannibal Corpse, Inhuman Condition, The Absence and more have united in a 70s themed rock band dubbed Umbilicus. ... "Umbilicus was formed in the summer of 2020 and driven by our love of rock and roll from the late 60s, 70s and early 80s. ... Members Form New 70s Inspired Rock Band Umbilicus. Dec 31st, 2021 - 12:06pm. Posted by wookubus 0 ...
Schmidt S M, Clouse R M, Sharma P P, plazi (2020). A new Miopsalis from Mindanao supports a biogeographic umbilicus between ... A new Miopsalis from Mindanao supports a biogeographic umbilicus between Borneo and the southern Philippines (Arachnida: ... A new Miopsalis from Mindanao supports a biogeographic umbilicus between Borneo and the southern Philippines (Arachnida: ... A new Miopsalis from Mindanao supports a biogeographic umbilicus between Borneo and the southern Philippines (Arachnida: ...
Umbilicus Oppositifolius. Umbilicus Oppositifolius is generally non-toxic to humans and animals. However, it is important to be ... One way to propagate Umbilicus Oppositifolius is by cutting. Growing Umbilicus Oppositifolius from seeds is an easy and ... Umbilicus Oppositifolius needs full sun to partial sun in order to thrive. Aim for 6 hours of direct sunlight each day, and ... Umbilicus Oppositifolius can be affected common pests and diseases like most of the other succulents such as snails. ...
Umbilical cord cyst with patent urachus presenting as a urine jet from the umbilicus: a case report. ... 01 September 2023 A neonate with cystic umbilical cord and wet umbilicus ... 1 The differential diagnosis of fluid discharge from the umbilicus and umbilical granuloma must include urachal anomalies, ...
5 thoughts on "Umbilicus Segmentata." * Caspian October 26, 2010 at 4:51 pm. That was beautifully written - very poetic and ... Umbilicus Segmentata.. Long fingers of sunlight stretched through the canopy of leaves and gently stroked her face. She felt ...
U psov je umbilicus vláknitá jazva, ktorá sa vytvorí na brušnej stene po odpadnutí pupočnej šnúry. ...
Barlotta K.S., & Stack L.B., & Knoop K.J. Barlotta, Kevin S., et al. "Sister Mary Joseph Node (Nodular Umbilicus)." The Atlas ... Nodular Umbilicus-CT. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen/pelvis reveals an umbilical nodule and large mass, which is a germ ... Barlotta K.S., & Stack L.B., & Knoop K.J. Barlotta, Kevin S., et al.Sister Mary Joseph Node (Nodular Umbilicus). In: Knoop KJ, ... Nodular Umbilicus. Firm umbilical nodule and abdominal distension due to a germ cell tumor. (Photo contributor: Lawrence B. ...
According to Goss32, the umbilicus is the vertebrae L3 and L4. Dubuov33 studied the umbilicus situation in 100 non-obese ... Minilipoabdominoplasty with umbilicus detachment: indications and comparison of surgical tactics for umbilicus reintegration, ... Minilipoabdominoplasty with umbilicus detachment: indications and comparison of surgical tactics for umbilicus reintegration, ... In addition, fair-supraumbilical skin laxity and shape of the umbilicus, as the "sad umbilicus" (horizontal spindle) remain ...
During development, the umbilicus functions as a channel that allows blood flow between the placenta and fetus. ... A stark contrast is observed between the physiologic importance of the umbilicus during development and its importance after ... The umbilicus is on the right and the bladder on the left. The attachments or the urachal cyst to the bladder and the umbilicus ... encoded search term (Disorders of the Umbilicus) and Disorders of the Umbilicus What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Care of the Umbilicus The umbilical cord delivers oxygen and nutrients to the fetus while it is in the womb. After delivery, ... Cleaning the umbilicus gently with a baby wipe or with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. ... Follow your healthcare providers recommendations about how to care for the umbilicus. This care might include:. *Keeping the ... Folding down the top of the diaper to expose the umbilicus to the air. ...
Start Over You searched for: Subjects Umbilicus -- physiopathology ✖Remove constraint Subjects: Umbilicus -- physiopathology ...
When the Umbilicus Is Problematic The umbilicus is a favored entry point not only for its operative access to pelvic structures ... Certainly, the subcutaneous fat layer is thinner at the LUQ than at the umbilicus, and in patients whose umbilicus is pulled ... up to the level of the umbilicus, and a horizontal line at the upper margin of the umbilicus. In a retrospective study of 7,802 ... For umbilical entry, we first use a Kocher clamp to grasp the base of the umbilicus and then evert it. Using two towel clips, ...
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Umbilicus oppositifolius. Add to cart. £5.99. Pot Size: 1Ltr. Add To Wish List ...
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Thickened shelly layer typically covering part of the columella and/or umbilicus. ...
The umbilicus. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ...
Umbilicus Reset. Resetting of the Soul Incarnation Transduction Sequence by observing the current 3D birth. ...
Umbilicus. 7. 80. 8. 320. 03PE3. 48 (M). 40. +. +. Right groin. 5. N. 10. 320. ...
Cord insertion - describe if midline, over umbilicus.. *Covering membranes - yes/no, intact/ruptured. ...
Pilonidal sinus should be considered in a young hirsute patient with wet umbilicus.. How to cite this article:. Gaopande VL, ... Clinical and histopathological profile of lesions of umbilicus. Vandana Laxmidhar Gaopande, Sanjay D Deshmukh, Siddhi Gaurish S ... Background: Although lesions of umbilicus are encountered in clinical practice on a regular basis, surgical intervention is ... Complaints of umbilical discharge/wet umbilicus and umbilical mass were the most common. In four cases, the umbilical lesion ...
ABDOMEN; HERNIA; Umbilical (K552, G471) (Protrusion; Umbilicus). ABDOMEN; PAIN; burning; umbilicus; region of (K573, G487) ...
Umbilicus :- ► Sticking extending to pudendum when coughing and gagging. ► Smarting boring tonight of U. ► Pain in region, agg ... Sticking in pudendum ; extending almost to umbilicus. ► Burning in pudendum before menses. ► Vulva feels enlarged. ... around umbilicus, with trembling of heart, which can be felt outwardly (without palpitation), full pulse, nausea, weakness and ...
  • Umbilicus may refer to: The navel or belly button Umbilicus (mollusc), a feature of gastropod, Nautilus and Ammonite shell anatomy Umbilicus (plant), a genus of over ninety species of perennial flowering plants Umbilicus urbis Romae, the designated center of the city of Rome from which and to which all distances in Rome and the Roman Empire were measured Umbilicus (reference point), a central point used to plan an Ancient Roman city. (wikipedia.org)
  • Umbilicus mundi, or "the world's navel", a Greek artifact Umbilicus, an American rock band that includes members of death metal bands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Umbilicus rupestris , the navelwort , [1] penny-pies or wall pennywort , is a fleshy, perennial, edible flowering plant in the stonecrop family Crassulaceae in the genus Umbilicus so named for its umbilicate ( navel -like) leaves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the name "navelwort" and the scientific name Umbilicus come from the round shape of the leaves, which have a navel-like depression in the center. (wikipedia.org)
  • The original navel is then sutured onto the u-flap, which has been defattened with the sutures being buried, and the umbilicus being secured. (theaestheticguide.com)
  • point to your umbilicus (navel). (educationworld.com)
  • Having an umbilicus, or navel. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Shaped or depressed like an umbilicus, or navel. (yourdictionary.com)
  • [ 2 ] An understanding of the anatomy and embryology of the abdominal wall and umbilicus is important for identifying and properly treating these conditions. (medscape.com)
  • Omphalocele and gastroschisis, which are common abdominal wall defects associated with the umbilicus, are discussed further elsewhere (see Pediatric Omphalocele and Gastroschisis ). (medscape.com)
  • The original umbilicus is tacked to the abdominal fascia to shorten the pedicle. (theaestheticguide.com)
  • Umbilicus rupestris in bloom in Nazaré , Portugal . (wikipedia.org)
  • Umbilicus rupestris is not the same "Pennywort" as the one used in Asian medicine, which is the unrelated Asiatic Pennywort, Centella asiatica . (wikipedia.org)
  • The photographer's identification Umbilicus rupestris has not been reviewed. (berkeley.edu)
  • Umbilicus rupestris The navelwort or penny-pies or wall pennywort (Umbilicus rupestris (Salisb. (antropocene.it)
  • The female Nigerian infant depicted here, was delivered with an abnormality known as a patent urachus, producing a distended, enlarged umbilicus. (cdc.gov)
  • SPOP-DP starts with 1.5cm skin incision on umbilicus. (sages.org)
  • In resource-constrained settings where there is paucity of needed equipment and cost is prohibitive, a method utilizing fewer instruments will be useful.Aim:This study aims to describe a method of primary trocar introduction that utilizes any available port.Methods:A supra- or infra-umbilical incision is made into an everted tubular umbilicus. (bvsalud.org)
  • When I heard about his short, Umbilicus Desidero , I knew I had to see it even if it wasn't something that I would typically cover at PopHorror. (mikeandsophia.com)
  • Review of "Umbilicus Desidero" by The Headless Critic Watching Movies - Without Your Head Umbilicus Desidero - 2019 Production by: Launch Over You should live every day like it's your last because you never know when your life will be forever changed. (mikeandsophia.com)
  • Below are the main rubriks (i.e strongest indications or symptoms) of Cotyledon Umbilicus in traditional homeopathic usage , not approved by the FDA. (abchomeopathy.com)
  • The predominant malformations in both the 100 and 50ppm groups were of the heart with some malformations of the retina, eye, umbilicus, lungs, ribs and vertebrae. (cdc.gov)
  • Scholars@Duke publication: Location of the transverse colon in relationship to the umbilicus: implications for laparoscopic techniques. (duke.edu)
  • Also, the umbilicus is used increasingly as the entry site during laparoscopic surgery. (nih.gov)
  • Spontaneous closure of these hernias and preservation of the appearance of the natural umbilicus were recognized. (medscape.com)
  • Closure is by suture of the flap apex only, creating scaring that resembles a natural umbilicus. (nih.gov)
  • The lifelike patented umbilicus made of soft, realistic material can be attached and detached easily, and offers venous and arterial access to practice blood withdrawal or infusion of fluids. (ambu.com)
  • An inverted u-flap is created as the surgeon conducts defattening of the umbilicus and the u-shaped flap. (theaestheticguide.com)
  • Unusual umbilical anatomy, such as a single umbilical artery or abnormal position of the umbilicus, may be associated with other congenital anomalies or syndromes. (medscape.com)
  • Toronto A new procedure is designed to optimize the umbilicus in combination with other procedures. (theaestheticguide.com)
  • The embryology of the umbilicus and the developmental basis for surgical abnormalities has been well described for more than 100 years. (medscape.com)
  • Primary cutaneous endometriosis of the umbilicus. (bvsalud.org)
  • Masses of the umbilicus may be related to lesions of the skin, embryologic remnants, or an umbilical hernia. (medscape.com)
  • The umbilicus is opened by creating 4 isosceles triangular skin flaps. (nih.gov)
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The relative relationships of the transverse colon and umbilicus were compared with age, height, weight, and body mass index (BMI = kg/m2) using multiple regression analysis. (duke.edu)
  • At some point, she had a bruise around her umbilicus. (medscape.com)
  • A stark contrast is observed between the physiologic importance of the umbilicus during development and its importance after birth. (medscape.com)
  • This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Umbilicus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Look up umbilicus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. (wikipedia.org)
  • An off-center hole, the umbilicus , never grows over, always revealing the under layer. (blep.com)
  • He maintains a 10 cm to 12 cm position from the suprapubic area to the umbilicus. (theaestheticguide.com)
  • The suturing is done within the new umbilical site with the sutures half-buried in the umbilicus. (theaestheticguide.com)
  • During development, the umbilicus functions as a channel that allows blood flow between the placenta and fetus. (medscape.com)