Nuchal Cord: A complication of pregnancy in which the UMBILICAL CORD wraps around the fetal neck once or multiple times. In some cases, cord entanglement around fetal neck may not affect pregnancy outcome significantly. In others, the nuchal cord may lead to restricted fetal blood flow, oxygen transport, fetal development, fetal movement, and complicated delivery at birth.Umbilical Cord: The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Pregnancy Trimester, Third: The last third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 29th through the 42nd completed week (197 to 294 days) of gestation.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Pregnancy Trimester, First: The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Hernia, Umbilical: A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Endothelial cells that line venous vessels of the UMBILICAL CORD.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Parturition: The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.Breech Presentation: A malpresentation of the FETUS at near term or during OBSTETRIC LABOR with the fetal cephalic pole in the fundus of the UTERUS. There are three types of breech: the complete breech with flexed hips and knees; the incomplete breech with one or both hips partially or fully extended; the frank breech with flexed hips and extended knees.Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Crowdsourcing: Social media model for enabling public involvement and recruitment in participation. Use of social media to collect feedback and recruit volunteer subjects.Intrauterine Device Expulsion: Spontaneous loss of INTRAUTERINE DEVICES from the UTERUS.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Gynecology: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.ManikinsDelivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Patient Simulation: The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.ElastinThrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)Foramen Ovale, Patent: A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Malingering: Simulation of symptoms of illness or injury with intent to deceive in order to obtain a goal, e.g., a claim of physical illness to avoid jury duty.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.United StatesUser-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.
  • Cord blood banking is the name given to the practice of preserving umbilical cord blood, so that it will be available to use in the future (should a medical condition arise that would respond favorably to treatment with cord blood). (surebaby.com)
  • Measurements should be taken with the inner border of the horizontal line of the callipers placed ON the line that defines the nuchal translucency thickness - the crossbar of the calliper should be such that it is hardly visible as it merges with the white line of the border, not in the nuchal fluid. (fetalmedicine.com)
  • Studies by Nicolaides et al and Pandya et al revealed that the prevalence of trisomies increased with increasing maternal age as well as increasing nuchal translucency thickness. (fetalsono.com)
  • citation needed] Peregrine concludes that ultrasound diagnosis of nuchal cords will only be useful if doctors are able to do so reliably and predict which of those fetuses are likely to have a problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • We compared parameters for women who delivered by CS after an ultrasound diagnosis of nuchal cord (48 cases) with those in whom nuchal cord was diagnosed in the course of a vaginal delivery (344 cases). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • As an expectant parent it is important to recognize the following types of umbilical cord problems and what could happen if they are not prevented. (thepaganlawfirm.com)
  • Typically, babies with nuchal cord are born healthy, but it can impact heart rate. (wkw.com)
  • Henry E, Andres RL, Christensen RD. Neonatal outcomes following a tight nuchal cord. (nature.com)
  • Nelson and Grether concluded that potentially asphyxiating conditions, chiefly tight nuchal cord, were associated with an appreciable proportion of unexplained spastic quadriplegia but not with diplegia or hemiplegia. (fetalsono.com)
  • Furthermore, these authors state that, because the frequency of tight nuchal cord in utero is unknown and because it is not known whether a tight nuchal cord may spontaneously loosen, it is not clear that intervention would provide benefit. (fetalsono.com)
  • Umbilical cord blood contains stem cells that can be used to treat some immune disorders and cancers, so it is sometimes collected after the cord has been cut from the newborn baby. (surebaby.com)
  • Ventilation prior to cord clamping in asphyxiated newborn lambs restores cardiac output at a similar rate and fashion as lambs undergoing ICC prior to ventilation. (bmj.com)
  • The newborn will be held by the neonatologist at the level of the introitus, the cord will be clamped at 2 minutes after birth with a plastic clamp placed at 1 cm from its cutaneous insertion. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Fairview Hospital, a Cleveland Clinic hospital, is one of two birthing centers in Ohio to give new parents the opportunity to contribute their newborn baby's cord blood to the Cleveland Cord Blood Center (CCBC) - Ohio's first and only public cord blood bank. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine the safety of first trimester fetal stem cell therapy using unrelated donor partially HLA-matched stem and progenitor cells derived from human umbilical cord blood for the treatment of selected lysosomal storage diseases that are known to cause severe and irreversible neurological disability in early infancy and which are lethal in childhood. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The present study, facilitated by a VR system, is the first to provide an in-vivo longitudinal description of normal first trimester growth of the human umbilical cord and vitelline duct. (biomedsearch.com)