Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Penile Prosthesis: Rigid, semi-rigid, or inflatable cylindric hydraulic devices, with either combined or separate reservoir and pumping systems, implanted for the surgical treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Visual Prosthesis: Artificial device such as an externally-worn camera attached to a stimulator on the RETINA, OPTIC NERVE, or VISUAL CORTEX, intended to restore or amplify vision.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Neural Prostheses: Medical devices which substitute for a nervous system function by electrically stimulating the nerves directly and monitoring the response to the electrical stimulation.Ossicular Prosthesis: An implant used to replace one or more of the ear ossicles. They are usually made of plastic, Gelfoam, ceramic, or stainless steel.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Lymphatic Vessels: Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.AmputeesMaxillofacial Prosthesis: A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face, missing as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery. When the prosthesis replaces portions of the mandible only, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS.Larynx, Artificial: A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Eye, Artificial: A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Penile Implantation: Surgical insertion of cylindric hydraulic devices for the treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Prosthesis Coloring: Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.Neovascularization, Physiologic: The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Silicone Elastomers: Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Prosthesis Retention: Holding a PROSTHESIS in place.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Amputation Stumps: The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Maxillofacial Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of an appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face. When only portions of the mandible are replaced, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Palatal Obturators: Appliances that close a cleft or fissure of the palate.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A: The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Capillaries: The minute vessels that connect the arterioles and venules.Amputation: The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Pericytes: Unique slender cells with multiple processes extending along the capillary vessel axis and encircling the vascular wall, also called mural cells. Pericytes are imbedded in the BASEMENT MEMBRANE shared with the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessel. Pericytes are important in maintaining vessel integrity, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling.Polyethylenes: Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Femoral NeoplasmsAortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Stapes Surgery: Surgery performed in which part of the STAPES, a bone in the middle ear, is removed and a prosthesis is placed to help transmit sound between the middle ear and inner ear.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Antigens, CD31: Cell adhesion molecules present on virtually all monocytes, platelets, and granulocytes. CD31 is highly expressed on endothelial cells and concentrated at the junctions between them.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Denture Retention: The retention of a denture in place by design, device, or adhesion.Total Disc Replacement: The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Denture, Overlay: Removable prosthesis constructed over natural teeth or implanted studs.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Mandibular Prosthesis: A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the mandible missing or defective as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Orbital Implants: Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Angiogenesis Inhibitors: Agents and endogenous substances that antagonize or inhibit the development of new blood vessels.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Allantois: An extra-embryonic membranous sac derived from the YOLK SAC of REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. It lies between two other extra-embryonic membranes, the AMNION and the CHORION. The allantois serves to store urinary wastes and mediate exchange of gas and nutrients for the developing embryo.Laryngectomy: Total or partial excision of the larynx.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Lymphangiogenesis: The formation of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Angiopoietin-1: The first to be discovered member of the angiopoietin family. It may play a role in increasing the sprouting and branching of BLOOD VESSELS. Angiopoietin-1 specifically binds to and stimulates the TIE-2 RECEPTOR. Several isoforms of angiopoietin-1 occur due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of its mRNA.Receptor, TIE-2: A TIE receptor tyrosine kinase that is found almost exclusively on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. It is required for both normal embryonic vascular development (NEOVASCULARIZATION, PHYSIOLOGIC) and tumor angiogenesis (NEOVASCULARIZATION, PATHOLOGIC).Arterioles: The smallest divisions of the arteries located between the muscular arteries and the capillaries.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Endothelial Growth Factors: These growth factors are soluble mitogens secreted by a variety of organs. The factors are a mixture of two single chain polypeptides which have affinity to heparin. Their molecular weight are organ and species dependent. They have mitogenic and chemotactic effects and can stimulate endothelial cells to grow and synthesize DNA. The factors are related to both the basic and acidic FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTORS but have different amino acid sequences.Speech, Esophageal: A method of speech used after laryngectomy, with sound produced by vibration of the column of air in the esophagus against the contracting cricopharyngeal sphincter. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mice, Inbred C57BLJaw, Edentulous: The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2: A 200-230-kDa tyrosine kinase receptor for vascular endothelial growth factors found primarily in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and their precursors. VEGFR-2 is important for vascular and hematopoietic development, and mediates almost all endothelial cell responses to VEGF.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Amputation, Traumatic: Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors: A family of angiogenic proteins that are closely-related to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR A. They play an important role in the growth and differentiation of vascular as well as lymphatic endothelial cells.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Venules: The minute vessels that collect blood from the capillary plexuses and join together to form veins.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Humeral Head: The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Foreign-Body Reaction: Chronic inflammation and granuloma formation around irritating foreign bodies.Disarticulation: Amputation or separation at a joint. (Dorland, 28th ed)Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Corrosion Casting: A tissue preparation technique that involves the injecting of plastic (acrylates) into blood vessels or other hollow viscera and treating the tissue with a caustic substance. This results in a negative copy or a solid replica of the enclosed space of the tissue that is ready for viewing under a scanning electron microscope.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Intervertebral Disc: Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Denture, Complete, Lower: A complete denture replacing all the natural mandibular teeth and associated structures. It is completely supported by the oral tissue and underlying mandibular bone.Denture, Complete, Upper: A complete denture replacing all the natural maxillary teeth and associated maxillary structures. It is completely supported by the oral tissue and underlying maxillary bone.Lymphokines: Soluble protein factors generated by activated lymphocytes that affect other cells, primarily those involved in cellular immunity.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Denture Repair: The process of reuniting or replacing broken or worn parts of a denture.Angiopoietin-2: An angiopoietin that is closely related to ANGIOPOIETIN-1. It binds to the TIE-2 RECEPTOR without receptor stimulation and antagonizes the effect of ANGIOPOIETIN-1. However its antagonistic effect may be limited to cell receptors that occur within the vasculature. Angiopoietin-2 may therefore play a role in down-regulation of BLOOD VESSEL branching and sprouting.Retinal Artery: Central retinal artery and its branches. It arises from the ophthalmic artery, pierces the optic nerve and runs through its center, enters the eye through the porus opticus and branches to supply the retina.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Retinal Vein: Central retinal vein and its tributaries. It runs a short course within the optic nerve and then leaves and empties into the superior ophthalmic vein or cavernous sinus.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Esthetics: The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3: A vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor whose expression is restricted primarily to adult lymphatic endothelium. VEGFR-3 preferentially binds the vascular endothelial growth factor C and vascular endothelial growth factor D and may be involved in the control of lymphangiogenesis.Denture, Complete: A denture replacing all natural teeth and associated structures in both the maxilla and mandible.Biomedical Engineering: Application of principles and practices of engineering science to biomedical research and health care.Ossicular Replacement: Surgical insertion of an implant to replace one or more of the ear ossicles.Tooth, Artificial: A fabricated tooth substituting for a natural tooth in a prosthesis. It is usually made of porcelain or plastic.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Voice Quality: That component of SPEECH which gives the primary distinction to a given speaker's VOICE when pitch and loudness are excluded. It involves both phonatory and resonatory characteristics. Some of the descriptions of voice quality are harshness, breathiness and nasality.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Neurofeedback: A technique to self-regulate brain activities provided as a feedback in order to better control or enhance one's own performance, control or function. This is done by trying to bring brain activities into a range associated with a desired brain function or status.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Methylmethacrylates: The methyl esters of methacrylic acid that polymerize easily and are used as tissue cements, dental materials, and absorbent for biological substances.Phosphenes: A subjective visual sensation with the eyes closed and in the absence of light. Phosphenes can be spontaneous, or induced by chemical, electrical, or mechanical (pressure) stimuli which cause the visual field to light up without optical inputs.Penis: The external reproductive organ of males. It is composed of a mass of erectile tissue enclosed in three cylindrical fibrous compartments. Two of the three compartments, the corpus cavernosa, are placed side-by-side along the upper part of the organ. The third compartment below, the corpus spongiosum, houses the urethra.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Dental Impression Technique: Procedure of producing an imprint or negative likeness of the teeth and/or edentulous areas. Impressions are made in plastic material which becomes hardened or set while in contact with the tissue. They are later filled with plaster of Paris or artificial stone to produce a facsimile of the oral structures present. Impressions may be made of a full complement of teeth, of areas where some teeth have been removed, or in a mouth from which all teeth have been extracted. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Chorion: The outermost extra-embryonic membrane surrounding the developing embryo. In REPTILES and BIRDS, it adheres to the shell and allows exchange of gases between the egg and its environment. In MAMMALS, the chorion evolves into the fetal contribution of the PLACENTA.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Patella: The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Otosclerosis: Formation of spongy bone in the labyrinth capsule which can progress toward the STAPES (stapedial fixation) or anteriorly toward the COCHLEA leading to conductive, sensorineural, or mixed HEARING LOSS. Several genes are associated with familial otosclerosis with varied clinical signs.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
... and blood vessels of the eyelid has occurred. More severe injuries require reconstruction, however, this usually results in ... Unlike other types of avulsion, when a nail is lost, it is not typically reattached. Following the loss of the nail, the nail ... The ear can also be reconstructed with cartilage and skin grafts or an external ear prosthesis can be made by an ... Until this layer has formed, the exposed nail bed is highly sensitive, and is typically covered with a non-adherent dressing, ...
Blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and nerves (all supplying the mucosa) will run through here. Tiny parasympathetic ganglia are ... SIS is harvested (typically from pigs) for transplanted structural material in several clinical applications, typically ... October 2006). "Biologic prosthesis reduces recurrence after laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: a multicenter, ...
Clots formed by red blood cell (RBC) and platelet damage can block up blood vessels and lead to very serious consequences. ... The replaceable models of implantable heart valve prostheses are typically supplied with a sewing or suturing ring surrounding ... Their main purpose is to maintain unimpeded forward flow through the heart and from the heart into the major blood vessels ... Only a small amount of blood thinner is needed to be taken by the patient each day in order to prevent clotting of the blood ...
... the vessels are tunnelled beneath the skin surface to the new site) or it may be cut off and new blood supply may be connected. ... Ideally, a prosthesis is made around the time of the mastectomy and it can be used just weeks after the surgery.[citation ... Typically done in the same procedure of a mastectomy, a tissue expander is placed in the sub-pectoral pocket more colloquially ... A nipple prosthesis can be used to restore the appearance of the reconstructed breast. Impressions can be made and photographs ...
For these types of grafts, extraction of the part of the periosteum and accompanying blood vessels along with donor bone is ... Autologous bone is typically harvested from intra-oral sources as the chin or extra-oral sources as the iliac crest, the fibula ... as a necessary part of the process of inserting the artificial hip prosthesis. The femoral head is a roughly spherical area of ... All bone requires a blood supply in the transplanted site. Depending on where the transplant site is and the size of the graft ...
... the abnormal buildup of blood vessels, will possibly develop around the facial area at birth and the eyes may be set widely ... Prosthesis is a synthetic alternative for missing limbs, teeth, and various other body parts. Advances in prosthetic limbs have ... Patients that receive a loss of limbs due to phocomelia are typically treated with prosthetics. Infants at the age of 6 months ... Inability to clot blood efficiently due to a low amount of platelets running through the blood Malformations in the kidney and ...
Potential surgical problems include maintaining the blood supply. If vessels cannot be stretched into the scrotum, or are ... Testicular prostheses are saline-filled plastic ovoids implanted in the scrotum. They have no function except to provide the ... In the last 50 years, the following procedures were most commonly performed to make the genitalia more typically female: ... with blood vessels, from an abdominal or inguinal position to the scrotum. If the inguinal canal is open it must be closed to ...
... however it also houses blood vessels and nerves within loose connective tissue.[6] Mechanical loads that are placed on the ... Tooth and Prosthesis Related Factors. Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions:. Peri-Implant Health. Peri-Implant Mucositis. Peri- ... Gingivitis is typically painless and is most commonly a result of plaque biofilm accumulation, in association with reduced or ... Smoking decreases the healing abilities of the oral tissues by destroying blood vessels and supply and preventing essential ...
This is from both a higher rate of blood flow and an expansion of blood vessels. The blood-flow change is localized to within 2 ... blood around 2 seconds later. This rises to a peak over 4-6 seconds, before falling back to the original level (and typically ... bite bars may also discomfort those with dental prostheses.[51] ... in that brain area's blood vessels. This changes the magnetic ... This, in turn, releases nitric oxide at the contact point of astrocytes and intermediate-sized blood vessels, the arterioles. ...
This is from both a higher rate of blood flow and an expansion of blood vessels. The blood-flow change is localized to within 2 ... blood around 2 seconds later. This rises to a peak over 4-6 seconds, before falling back to the original level (and typically ... bite bars may also discomfort those with dental prostheses. Despite these difficulties, fMRI has been used clinically to map ... in that brain area's blood vessels. This changes the magnetic property of the blood, making it interfere less with the ...
... and coughing up blood or chyle. As the deranged lymphatic vessels invade the organs and tissues in the chest they put stress on ... It typically presents by age 20 and, although it is technically benign, these deranged lymphatics tend to invade surrounding ... prosthesis, surgical stabilization. Lymphangiomatosis can occur at any age, but the incidence is highest in children and ... Additionally, these lymphatic vessels may leak, allowing fluid to accumulate in the chest, which puts further pressure on the ...
... from the globe Rotate and elevate the globe Open Tenon's capsule to visualize optic nerve Cauterize necessary blood vessels ... typically revolves around maintaining moisture of the prosthesis and cleanliness Removing the ocular prosthesis for cleaning ... An ocular prosthesis does not provide vision; this would be a visual prosthesis. Someone with an ocular prosthesis is totally ... A few ocular prostheses today are made of cryolite glass. A variant of the ocular prosthesis is a very thin hard shell known as ...
... induced coagulation is similar to the coagulation process done within the body to prevent blood loss from damaged blood vessels ... Many implants typically fall under Class II and Class III devices.[16][17] ... ocular prosthesis, and injectable filler.[1][2][3] Other organs and systems[edit]. Other types of organ dysfunction can occur ... The inflow of blood causes the tissue to become swollen and may cause cell death. The excess blood, or edema, can activate pain ...
... induced coagulation is similar to the coagulation process done within the body to prevent blood loss from damaged blood vessels ... nose prosthesis, ocular prosthesis, and injectable filler. Other types of organ dysfunction can occur in the systems of the ... Many implants typically fall under Class II and Class III devices. Under ideal conditions, implants should initiate the desired ... The inflow of blood causes the tissue to become swollen and may cause cell death. The excess blood, or edema, can activate pain ...
This occurs when there is damage to the blood vessel and a clot begins to form. The formation of the fibrin strands in the ... The force from the blood flow over the high pressure gradient from the prosthesis leads to fragmentation of red cells, and ... is a fragmented part of a red blood cell. Schistocytes are typically irregularly shaped, jagged, and have two pointed ends. ... The red blood cells get trapped in the fibrin strands and the sheer force of the blood flow causes the red blood cell to break ...
The first pathological change in the small blood vessels is narrowing of the blood vessels. As the disease progresses, neuronal ... Once the nutrient rich blood is able to reach the affected areas (typically the feet, lower legs and hands) it promotes the ... and now wear a prosthesis. Exercise programs, along with manual therapy, will help to prevent muscle contractures, spasms and ... Blood vessel opening agents (e.g., ACE inhibitors, α1-antagonists) can lead to substantial improvements in neuronal blood flow ...
These cement-less techniques may involve osseointegration, including porous metal prostheses. The operation typically involves ... Damage to blood vessels. Infection, either Superficial or Deep Dislocation Dislocation Persistent pain; Loss of range of motion ... Cross match of blood is routine also, as a high percentage of patients receive a blood transfusion. Pre-operative planning ... The prosthesis may need to be replaced due to complications such as infection or prosthetic fracture. Replacement may be done ...
Marsupials and eutherian mammals typically have an even number of nipples arranged bilaterally, from as few as two to as many ... Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood.. *Any change in the size or the shape of the breast or nipple. ... The venous vessels parallel the arteries.[2]. Stimulation. Main article: Nipple stimulation ... Nipple prosthesis for breast cancer survivors. *Nipple piercing. *Supernumerary (third) nipple. *Udder ...
A blood test including platelets and a clotting screen should be performed prior to administration of anticoagulant regimens in ... Venous stasis may occur at the end of the first trimester, due to enhanced compliance of the vessel walls by a hormonal effect ... While unfractionated heparin is otherwise typically given in an intravenous formulation, this is inconvenient for the prolonged ... doses of subcutaneous heparin to prevent thromboembolic phenomena in pregnant patients with mechanical cardiac valve prostheses ...
... blood pressure, and white blood cell count. Bacteremia is typically transient and is quickly removed from the blood by the ... an infected blood clot (suppurative thrombophlebitis), or an infected blood vessel graft. Persistent bacteremia can also occur ... no implanted prostheses, negative blood cultures after 2-4 days of treatment, and signs of clinical improvement after 72 hrs. ... The patient's skin is typically cleaned with an alcohol-based product prior to drawing blood to prevent contamination. Blood ...
... the attentuation of blood vessels in the retina. Non-syndromic RP usually presents a variety of the following symptoms: Night ... A visual prosthesis may be an option in certain people with severe disease. It is estimated to affect 1 in 4,000 people. Onset ... Early onset RP occurs within the first few years of life and is typically associated with syndromic disease forms, while late ... The Argus retinal prosthesis became the first approved treatment for the disease in February 2011, and is currently available ...
... or the visceral vessels can be separately revascularized. Because of collateral blood flow from the SMA via the marginal artery ... Open surgery typically involves exposure of the dilated portion of the aorta and insertion of a synthetic (Dacron or Gore-Tex) ... June 1999). "Descending aorta substitution with expandable ends prosthesis. Case report". J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino). 40 (3): ... If visceral vessels are involved in the diseased aortic segment, a branched graft can be used with branches sewn directly to ...
... effectively pinching and isolating one side of the great vessel. Blood continues to flow to the body's lower half through the ... Surgeons typically assemble their own tools to core and remove a plug of muscle from the left ventricular wall. In 2011, Correx ... In 1962-63, Templeton implanted prostheses similar to those originally described by Sarnoff in five patients with severe aortic ... When an apicoaortic conduit is implanted, blood continues to flow from the heart through the aortic valve. In addition, blood ...
Nearby anatomic structures, such as the inferior alveolar nerve, the maxillary sinus and blood vessels, can also be injured ... Bridges typically connect to more than one implant and may also connect to teeth as anchor points. Typically the number of ... The dental prosthesis can be disconnected from the implant abutments with finger pressure by the wearer. To enable this, the ... a finger of tissue based on a blood vessel in the palate (called a vascularized interpositional periosteal-connective tissue ( ...
Diagnosis is typically suspected based on symptoms. This is then supported by blood tests, medical imaging, or bone biopsy. ... Pus spreads into the bone's blood vessels, impairing their flow, and areas of devitalized infected bone, known as sequestra, ... Gallium scans are 100% sensitive for osteomyelitis but not specific, and may be helpful in patients with metallic prostheses. ... In those with poor blood flow, amputation may be required. With treatment outcomes are often generally good when the condition ...
The venous vessels parallel the arteries.[2] The lymphatic ducts that drain the nipple are the same for the breast.[2] The ... Marsupials and eutherian mammals typically have an even number of nipples arranged bilaterally, from as few as two to as many ... Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood. *Any change in the size or the shape of the breast or nipple ... Nipple prosthesis for breast cancer survivors. *Nipple piercing. *Supernumerary (third) nipple. *Udder ...
The present invention provides modular bifurcated intraluminal tubular prostheses, particularly stents and stent-grafts, for ... is typically attached to the frame to prevent blood flow through a ruptured vessel wall. Such liners are often formed from ... Proper matching of the prosthesis to the branching blood vessel is critical to the treatment of an aneurysm. The prosthesis ... Resilient prosthesis for widening a channel, particularly a blood vessel, and method for making same. ...
... a laterally protruding member atraumatically engages the ostium of a side or branch vessel. The protruding member may be fixed ... A primary endoluminal prosthesis is then fixed to the modular fixation device to bypass a diseased portion of the anatomy. ... An endoluminal prosthesis is provided with an improved fixation system for coupling the endoluminal prosthesis to an inner wall ... on a modular fixation device for initial fixation within the body lumen with the finger member within the side or branch vessel ...
A process of preparing such a prosthesis is also disclosed. ... An implantable prosthesis includes a porous polymeric member ... porous tubes are made by stretching and sintering and have been used as tubular prostheses for artificial blood vessels for a ... Typically, only a very thin inner capsule is formed on the intraluminal surface of a PTFE graft as compared with a conventional ... For example, ePTFE grafts can be used in both large diameter, i.e. 6 mm or greater artificial blood vessels, as well as in ...
A stent-graft prosthesis includes a generally tubular outer PTFE layer, a generally tubular helical stent, a generally tubular ... A stent-graft prosthesis is typically used to repair, replace, or otherwise correct a damaged blood vessel. An artery or vein ... A stent-graft prosthesis is particularly useful to isolate aneurysms or other blood vessel abnormalities from normal blood ... Embodiments hereof also relate to a stent-graft prosthesis for implantation within a blood vessel. The stent-graft prosthesis ...
The tubular prosthesis includes a substantially continuous ePTFE tubular first body and perimetrically non-continuous second ... The prosthesis provides for both axial and radial compliance. ... A tubular implantable prosthesis is formed of porous expanded ... An intraluminal prosthesis is typically used to repair, replace, or otherwise correct a diseased or damaged blood vessel. An ... An intraluminal prosthesis is a medical device used in the treatment of diseased blood vessels. ...
An intraluminal prosthesis comprising polymeric material is immersed in a mixture of carrier fluid and pharmacological agent(s ... Intraluminal prostheses and methods of impregnating same with pharmacological agents for delivery within a body of a subject ... and pharmacological agent is pressurized for a time sufficient to cause the polymeric material of the intraluminal prosthesis ... in the treatment of occluded or partially occluded arteries and other blood vessels. As an example of a balloon angioplasty ...
The prosthesis comprises a self expandable wire support structure surrounded by a flexible tubular membrane. A delivery ... Disclosed is a tubular endoluminal vascular prosthesis, useful in treating, for example, an abdominal aortic aneurysm. ... in essence involves replacing the diseased and aneurysmal segment of blood vessel with a prosthetic device which typically is a ... minimizing blood flow through the prosthesis wall becomes a primary objective. Thus, in a central zone 57 of the prosthesis 42 ...
... such as the interior of a blood vessel. ... The present invention is directed to a prosthesis for ... The prosthesis includes a biocompatible elongate intraluminal liner in the form of a graft, with a biocompatible adhesive being ... such as the interior of a blood vessel. Typically, implantable prostheses such as vascular grafts are held in place within a ... a needle is inserted intraluminally into a blood vessel. A guidewire is then inserted through the blood vessel and advanced to ...
A61F2/00-Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body ... Stents are endovascular prostheses which may be used for treatment of stenoses (vascular occlusions). Stents typically have a ... A61F2/00-Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body ... A61F2/00-Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body ...
The porous polymers have utility as medical prostheses, the porosity permitting ingrowth of neighboring tissue. The present ... The major need for vascular grafts is for adequate supply of blood to organs and tissues whose blood vessels are inadequate ... then be cross-linked or in some other way stabilized so that it typically must be degraded to be removed from the prosthesis. ... The prosthesis may be used to repair, replace or augment a diseased or defective vein or artery of the body. The prosthesis may ...
A patterned coating on a prosthesis, for example a stent, and a method for forming the coating are disclosed. Additionally, an ... Stents may be placed in a wide array of blood vessels, both arteries and veins. Representative examples of sites include the ... Typically, the polymer can include from about 0.1% to about 25% by weight of the total weight of composition 10. Typically, the ... A Method for Coating a Prosthesis To form a coating onto a surface of prosthesis 12, the surface of prosthesis 12 should be ...
Typically, a prosthesis is implanted in a blood vessel at the site of a stenosis or aneurysm endoluminally, i.e. by so-called " ... Method of restoring blood flow through an obstructed blood vessel of the brain. ... Active blood vessel sleeve methods and systems. US20080262528 *. 17 Apr 2007. 23 Oct 2008. Lazarus Effect, Inc.. Complex wire ... Active blood vessel sleeve methods and systems. US8197493. 29 Dec 2010. 12 Jun 2012. Mindframe, Inc.. Method for providing ...
... incision and then tuck the reservoir into the retropubic space while carefully avoiding the juxtaposed nerves and blood vessels ... Typically the IPP is placed using either an infrapubic or penoscrotal approach. The penoscrotal approach allows surgeons to ... Radial dilatation in the insertion of the multi-component inflatable penile prosthesis. Br J Urol. 1995;75(6):792. [CrossRef] [ ... Reservoir herniation as a complication of three-piece penile prosthesis insertion. Urology. 2001;57(1):142-145. [CrossRef] [ ...
... assembly is provided for use in repairing or replacing damaged or diseased portions of a blood vessel or other like vessel. The ... As such, the implantable prosthesis is provided with internal support for the graft when in a compressed state during ... prosthesis includes an expandable stent/graft combination, with a pair of stents at either end of the graft, and further ... Typically, these devices may include a tubular graft which is designed to span the damaged site of the vessel to permit blood ...
... a method for delivering into the vasculature a straight or bifurcated stent or prosthesis; a method of treating and ... An introducer for delivering into the vasculature a straight or bifurcated stent or prosthesis; ... Typically, a stent or endoluminal prosthesis is implanted in a blood vessel at the site of a stenosis or aneurysm by so-called ... b) directing blood flow from said blood vessel into said first branched vessel through a first distal portion of said ...
... and blood vessels of the eyelid has occurred. More severe injuries require reconstruction, however, this usually results in ... Unlike other types of avulsion, when a nail is lost, it is not typically reattached. Following the loss of the nail, the nail ... The ear can also be reconstructed with cartilage and skin grafts or an external ear prosthesis can be made by an ... Until this layer has formed, the exposed nail bed is highly sensitive, and is typically covered with a non-adherent dressing, ...
... as the servo actuator to bend the catheter for biomedical applications such as active catheters in bifurcated blood vessels [39 ... proposed the application of IPMC-based artificial muscle to the myoelectric hand prosthesis [37]. Yoon et al. reported the ... A traditional strip-type IPMC consists of an ion exchange membrane, typically Nafion (DuPont) membranes with thickness of less ... "Control of IPMC-based artificial muscle for myoelectric hand prosthesis," in The First IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference ...
This is typically a last resort, as it requires complex surgery. If the penile prosthesis is removed, other treatments will no ... ED is complex; many different areas of the body play a role- the brain, hormones, emotions, nerves, muscles and blood vessels. ... Typically, treating erectile dysfunction includes the use of conservative methods (e.g. Viagra and Cialis) and penile ... When these treatments dont work, a penile prosthesis (implant) is considered. ...
Risks of surgery are very rare but can include: Infection, bleeding, damage to nerves or blood vessels, soft tissue trauma, ... loosening or wear of prosthesis, need for further surgery. Risks of anesthesia include heart attack, blood clot, stroke, ... Typically weight bearing and ambulation is started immediately.. *Discharge to home can occur as soon as the day or day after ... To prevent blood clots that can occur in 5% of the patients, we encourage early activity and blood thinning medication for one ...
... the location of the cancer can mean that you are only millimeters away from major blood vessels or nerves that serve other ... Treatment for primary bone cancers typically involve a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. These are the rarest and most ... These truly "robotic" internal prostheses can restore leg length, gait, and can even grow with a growing child. ... As such, treatment of metastatic cancer to bone typically involves improving the quality of life by decreasing pain and ...
Prosthesis. An artificial replacement. Pulp. The nerves, blood vessels, lymphatic and other cells inside a tooth. ... Class I procedures are typically diagnostic and preventive, and are usually covered at the highest level to encourage patients ... The date a crown, veneer, inlay, only or bridge is actually cemented into place or the date a removable prosthesis is delivered ... A removable dental prosthesis constructed for placement immediately after removal of the remaining natural teeth. ...
The tissue is preferably obtained from the patient who is to receive the vascular prosthesis, with the tissue being mounted ... A vascular prosthesis comprises pericardial, fascial, or other tissue formed over a tubular support frame. A first exemplary ... Justia Patents Blood Vessel Or Graft PreparationUS Patent for Method and apparatus for forming vascular prostheses Patent ( ... The amount of tissue harvested will depend on the size of the vascular prosthesis to be prepared. Typically, the sheet of ...
A tubular prosthesis in which high elasticity fibers are oriented in the longitudinal direction is highly suitable for use as a ... An elongated ligament prosthesis exhibiting the desired properties of high strength and high elasticity may be prepared by ... A prosthesis of the invention may also be manufactured in the form of a prosthetic heart valve leaflet. ... orienting said first set of fibers in the longitudinal direction of the prosthesis and selecting fibers having high yield ...
... the treatment is more difficult because use of adjuvants is limited due to the location of blood vessels and nerves. ... Giant Cell Bone Tumors: Diagnosis Typically After Long Period of Pain. Giant cell tumor of the bone usually presents after a ... recurrences occur it is problematic because it generally means destroying the joint and fitting the patient with a prosthesis ...
BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION). It is associated with pressurization, expansion, and eventual rupture of the aneurysm. ... Solitary lesions of bone that typically cause a bulging of the overlying cortex bearing some resemblance to the saccular ... In the late stage of syphilis, sometimes 20-30 years after the initial infection, damages are often seen in the blood vessels ... Blood Blood is a specialized bodily fluid that delivers necessary substances to the bodys cells (in animals) - such as ...
  • As a result of their insufficient elasticity, this type of prosthesis must be forced into the region of plastic deformation to achieve the longitudinal elongation desired for normal anatomical function, e.g. flexion of a joint, which of course permanently impairs the mechanical function of the prosthesis. (justia.com)
  • The use of these prostheses alleviates the disadvantages described above for the monocomponent type of prosthesis. (justia.com)
  • Because blood vessel dilation appears to follow, not precede, the pain, some action originating in the brain is likely to be part of the process.Abnormalities in the Sympathetic Nervous SystemSome evidence suggests that abnormalities in the sympathetic (also called autonomic) nervous system may contribute to cluster headaches. (amazonaws.com)
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm with occlusion of three primary mesenteric vessels treated by surgery with perfusion of the left iliac artery. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The BIOMArCS-AAA study aims to investigate the associations of (temporal patterns of) blood biomarkers with aneurysm growth in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with particula. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A surgical component (device) that is placed within the bone of the jaw or skull to support a dental prosthesis such as a crown, bridge, or denture to act as an orthodontic anchor, as a means of providing for dental replacement. (biolase.com)
  • bridge is a stationary dental prosthesis (appliance) fixed to teeth adjacent to a space. (oriondental.ca)
  • Your surgeon will make a small cut on the side of your hip and they will carefully remove some or all of the parts of the original prosthesis and, if cement was previously used in your total hip replacement, this will be removed too. (ramsayhealth.co.uk)
  • It is expected that the plastic acetabular liner will wear out eventually (20+ years) and when that happens the old liner and femoral head can be replaced - while leaving the rest of the original prosthesis in place. (drajoyjana.com)
  • The porous polymers have utility as medical prostheses, the porosity permitting ingrowth of neighboring tissue. (google.nl)
  • A vascular prosthesis comprises pericardial, fascial, or other tissue formed over a tubular support frame. (justia.com)
  • The tissue is preferably obtained from the patient who is to receive the vascular prosthesis, with the tissue being mounted over the frame immediately prior to use. (justia.com)
  • The present invention relates generally to medical methods and devices, and more particularly to a method and apparatus for forming vascular prostheses from host tissue sources. (justia.com)
  • A novel prosthesis for use in repairing or replacing soft tissue is disclosed, which comprises a triaxially-braided fabric element having interwoven first, second and third sets of fibers, with the fibers of the second and third sets being oriented at substantially the same acute braiding angle with respect to the fibers of the first set. (justia.com)
  • The desired characteristics for a ligament prosthesis include appropriate size and shape, biological compatibility, capability of being readily attached by the surgeon to the body of the patient, high fatigue resistance and mechanical behavior approximating that of the ligamentous tissue sought to be repaired or replaced. (justia.com)
  • Bio-ink is composed of living cells in a process developed by Gabor Forgacs, a biological physicist at the University of Missouri, to grow blood vessels and cardiac tissue. (americasquarterly.org)
  • While cells from animals have been used to make blood vessels, using the patient's own stem cells helps reduce the possibility that the body will reject the tissue. (americasquarterly.org)
  • The surgeon's goal for a successful procedure is to remove damaged or diseased bone and tissue while preserving as much of the area's blood vessels, skin, tissue, and nerves as possible. (rosenfeldinjurylawyers.com)
  • This results in the relaxation of smooth muscle in the arteries and arterioles that supply the erectile tissue, producing a dramatic increase in penile blood flow. (menshealthworld.net)
  • Usually, voiding troubles related to stretching of the doctor to measure intravesical pressure as additional tissue lls in the blood. (iahf.com)
  • Typically done in the same procedure of a mastectomy , a tissue expander is placed in the sub-pectoral pocket more colloquially considered to be under the chest tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This procedure may be performed by leaving the donor tissue connected to the original site to retain its blood supply (the vessels are tunnelled beneath the skin surface to the new site) or it may be cut off and new blood supply may be connected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood and lymph vessel and adjacent structures fig. The overstrained tissue has been gained in subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff can cause increased joint translation and rotation. (goodsamatlanta.org)
  • Free tissue transfer for skin cancer involves transferring muscle and blood vessels from one part of the body to another to reconstruct damaged or missing tissue. (scienceblog.com)
  • Andersen, an associate professor of otolaryngology/head and neck surgery in the OHSU School of Medicine, removed Fahland's eye and surrounding tissue in 2001, and Wax replaced them with muscle and blood vessels from her abdomen. (scienceblog.com)
  • It is the nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue inside a tooth. (oriondental.ca)
  • We may face a future where we can sidestep the need for human donors, by being able to instantly 3D print fully functioning organs, tissue and even blood. (dcslsoftware.com)
  • The gelatin pellets are deposited into the biopsy site, typically a cylindrical opening in the tissue created by the recent use of a vacuum assisted large core. (google.de)
  • The gelatin pellets are deposited into the biopsy site, typically a cylindrical opening in the tissue created by the recent use of a vacuum assisted large core biopsy device, by an applicator device that includes an elongated cylindrical body that forms a flexible tube and a piston slidable in the tube. (google.de)
  • Treatment for primary bone cancers typically involve a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. (kentucky.com)
  • As such, treatment of metastatic cancer to bone typically involves improving the quality of life by decreasing pain and improving patient function. (kentucky.com)
  • Solitary lesions of bone that typically cause a bulging of the overlying cortex bearing some resemblance to the saccular protrusion of the aortic wall in aortic aneurysm, hence the name. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The pores are designed to preserve the natural nutrition of femoral bone and facilitate rehabilitation by allowing for unrestricted blood flow. (openpr.com)
  • Next, the surgeon will reconstruct the remaining muscle and bone at the surgical site to build a platform that is shaped to accept a comfortable prosthesis. (rosenfeldinjurylawyers.com)
  • In 2016, we plan to have completed the studies assessing the survival and function of bone and blood vessel-forming cells on the scaffold. (raft.ac.uk)
  • Osteosarcoma typically appears as a mass of abnormal bone in an arm or leg, usually near the knee or shoulder. (drugs.com)
  • Gaps created when the cancer is removed are filled with a bone graft or a synthetic prosthesis. (drugs.com)
  • This is because good bone quality is needed so that bone can grow into the prosthesis to secure it. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Special rasps bore holes in the hand bones and in the forearm's radius bone to accommodate the metal stems of the prosthesis. (meddiagnosticrehab.co)
  • This deformity is typically used to define the end - stage rheumatoid arthritis cellulitis p this leads to lack of understanding of this muscle, in contrast, describes the change in length from about to come into contact with the imposed forces on the biceps tendon and bone lesions. (goodsamatlanta.org)
  • Avascular necrosis (AVN), also known as osteonecrosis , occurs when insufficient blood flow to the head of the femur causes areas of the bone to die and collapse. (drajoyjana.com)
  • We've seen huge advancements in the scientific and medical use of 3D printing in areas such as dental implants, prostheses, drug composition, bone and cartilage printing, and even the creation of synthetic skin, organ cells and blood vessels. (dcslsoftware.com)
  • In this condition, a disruption of the blood supply to a portion of bone leads to cell death. (aaos.org)
  • Another embodiment of the invention comprises a small vessel anastomotic stent for use on a target vessel which has a small diameter such as a coronary artery. (google.ca)
  • 2. The system of claim 1 , further comprising an outer clement configured to engage said inner element to hold a portion of the graft vessel and a portion of the target vessel therebetween. (google.ca)
  • an outer element connectable to said inner element to compress a portion of the graft vessel and a portion of the target vessel therebetween. (google.ca)
  • The device can be a one piece anastomosis device for connecting a graft vessel to a target vessel without the use of conventional sutures. (google.de)
  • The inner and outer flanges capture the edges of an opening in a target vessel and secure the graft vessel to the opening in the target vessel. (google.de)
  • The purpose is to stimulate neovascularisation to the corporal bodies with improvement in penile blood flow and endothelial function. (menshealthnet.org)
  • Penile erection can be achieved with the privilege to collect a midstream specimen of urine from the dsm nosology, prds, like pas (american psychiatric association, 1998) requires the fulfillment of three side effects may be developed that produce penile vasodilation, penile blood flow of blood vessels. (healmyptsd.com)
  • Modular sections of the prostheses, or "prosthetic modules," may be selectively assembled to form a prosthesis having characteristics which are tailored to the specific requirements of the patient, including branch angle and branch lumen sizes which match the patients vascular geometry. (google.com)
  • Testicular cancer that has spread through the blood or lymph system may cause symptoms in other areas, often manifesting as back pain, abdominal pain, coughing, or shortness of breath. (menstuff.org)
  • The pathologist will determine what type of cancer you have, and whether there is evidence the cancer may have spread through the blood vessels or lymph system. (menstuff.org)
  • Cardiovascular disease is the collective term used to describe diseases of the heart and blood vessels. (finder.com.au)
  • This system regulates non-voluntary muscle actions in the body, such as in the heart and blood vessels.PrognosisThe pain of cluster headaches can be intolerable. (amazonaws.com)
  • This new technique combines the benefit of 1-mm typically sutureless incision with the ability to retrieve iris tumor biopsy specimens for pathology analysis. (eyecancer.com)
  • There, you may have a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the area to determine how far the tumor has invaded nearby nerves, blood vessels, and joints. (drugs.com)
  • If the tumor has invaded critical blood vessels or part of a nearby joint, the limb may need to be amputated. (drugs.com)
  • If this painless test reveals the presence of a mass, your doctor will take a blood sample to be examined for tumor markers. (menstuff.org)
  • With pathology results in hand, the urologist will repeat the blood test for tumor markers to ensure levels are falling into the normal range. (menstuff.org)
  • There are four components that comprise the hip replacement: acetabular component (cup), liner (plastic, metal or ceramic), femoral head (metal or ceramic ball) and femoral component (typically titanium stem). (umich.edu)
  • Healing of intracapsular fractures is complicated by the tenuous blood supply to the femoral head-the retinacular vessels that pass up the femoral capsule may be damaged, especially if the fracture is displaced. (bmj.com)
  • However, the prostheses disclosed in the '660 and '551 Patents are complex in construction and their methods of attachment to the body of the patient involve rather complicated surgical procedures. (justia.com)
  • In some cases, the surgeon will order wide-ranging tests that might include a psychological assessment, blood pressure test, CT scan, MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and an angiography. (rosenfeldinjurylawyers.com)
  • Other tests may be helpful in excluding unrecognized systemic disease and include a complete blood count, urinalysis, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, and thyroid function studies. (kingsizemaleenhancement.com)
  • Medicines that can cause erectile dysfunction include many used to treat high blood pressure, antihistamines, antidepressants, tranquilizers, and appetite suppressants. (testosteronemuscleboost.org)
  • Potaba (potassium para aminobenzoate)potaba is a surgical access tract is typically performed to detect tiny, 1% changes in bladder dysfunction can either have it done professionally, or they may search fruitlessly inside themselves for passion, but it varies depending on where theyre stored in various parts of the male hormones testosterone and risk of bacterial prostatitis include urinary frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence 2. (iahf.com)
  • Other cardiovascular applications include vessel connectors, ducts for special blood handling devices and percutaneous access ports. (cryolife.com)
  • This may include antibiotics or blood thinners. (restonhospital.com)
  • These surgeries are difficult due to the complex anatomy of the skeletal system - the location of the cancer can mean that you are only millimeters away from major blood vessels or nerves that serve other areas of the body. (kentucky.com)
  • Care is taken to preserve major blood vessels and other important structures. (wakehealth.edu)
  • A traditional strip-type IPMC consists of an ion exchange membrane, typically Nafion (DuPont) membranes with thickness of less than 300 μ m, and two thin noble metallic electrodes chemically and physically deposited on the surfaces of the membrane. (hindawi.com)
  • This is critical for anyone considering having an impacted third molar removed that is currently under an existing or planned removable prosthesis (denture). (deardoctor.com)
  • Takayasu's arteritis (TA), also known as pulseless disease/aortoarteritis/"young female arteritis," is a rare chronic inflammatory progressive large vessel vasculitis (LVV) of unknown etiology afflicting women of childbearing age [ 1 - 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Robohand-a South Africa-based charitable organization that creates 3D limb models and offers free downloads of their instructions and designs-uses 3D printers to generate featherweight custom arms, hands and fingers at lower costs than traditional prostheses: $500 to $2,000 instead of $10,000. (americasquarterly.org)
  • In 2016 we will be working on the electrodes that will be implanted in the upper limb and control the prosthesis and testing them in the laboratory. (raft.ac.uk)
  • These less invasive procedures permit delivery and implementation of an endoprosthesis without the need for replacement of a portion of the vessel, and thus eliminate major surgical intervention and the risks associated therewith. (google.es)
  • Patients with blood cell diseases such as sickle cell anemia, leukemia, and multiple myeloma have higher than normal risks of developing priapism. (kingsizemaleenhancement.com)
  • And this decision should only then be made after clinical examination and review of factors such as your age, position of the tooth, anticipated difficulty of removal, type of overlying prosthesis, and risks associated with the removal. (deardoctor.com)
  • Thus, such patients warrant special attention during the peripartum period owing to the likelihood of development of complications such as hypertension, multiple organ dysfunction, and stenosis hindering regional blood flow leading to restricted intrauterine fetal growth and low birth weight in babies [ 8 - 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • It is typically made of woven or knitted polyethylene terephthalate (Dacron) or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fabrics and is best suited for large (more than 10 mm) diameter, high-flow vessel replacement (e.g., aortic or aorto-iliac artery reconstruction) and also for haemodialysis access and extra-anatomic bypass grafting. (nih.gov)