Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.
MYCOBACTERIUM infections of the lung.
A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.
Tuberculosis resistant to chemotherapy with two or more ANTITUBERCULAR AGENTS, including at least ISONIAZID and RIFAMPICIN. The problem of resistance is particularly troublesome in tuberculous OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS associated with HIV INFECTIONS. It requires the use of second line drugs which are more toxic than the first line regimens. TB with isolates that have developed further resistance to at least three of the six classes of second line drugs is defined as EXTENSIVELY DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent or treat TUBERCULOSIS.
An acute form of TUBERCULOSIS in which minute tubercles are formed in a number of organs of the body due to dissemination of the bacilli through the blood stream.
Antibacterial agent used primarily as a tuberculostatic. It remains the treatment of choice for tuberculosis.
The dormant form of TUBERCULOSIS where the person shows no obvious symptoms and no sign of the causative agent (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) in the SPUTUM despite being positive for tuberculosis infection skin test.
Infection of the lymph nodes by tuberculosis. Tuberculous infection of the cervical lymph nodes is scrofula.
Tuberculosis of the bones or joints.
TUBERCULOSIS that involves any region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, mostly in the distal ILEUM and the CECUM. In most cases, MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS is the pathogen. Clinical features include ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and palpable mass in the ileocecal area.
Osteitis or caries of the vertebrae, usually occurring as a complication of tuberculosis of the lungs.
An infection of cattle caused by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. It is transmissible to man and other animals.
Tuberculosis of the skin. It includes scrofuloderma and tuberculid, but not LUPUS VULGARIS.
One of several skin tests to determine past or present tuberculosis infection. A purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacilli, called tuberculin, is introduced into the skin by scratch, puncture, or interdermal injection.
A semisynthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against several forms of Mycobacterium. In susceptible organisms it inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity by forming a stable complex with the enzyme. It thus suppresses the initiation of RNA synthesis. Rifampin is bactericidal, and acts on both intracellular and extracellular organisms. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1160)
Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.
The bovine variety of the tubercle bacillus. It is called also Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.
Tuberculosis of the serous membrane lining the thoracic cavity and surrounding the lungs.
Tuberculosis resistant to ISONIAZID and RIFAMPIN and at least three of the six main classes of second-line drugs (AMINOGLYCOSIDES; polypeptide agents; FLUOROQUINOLONES; THIOAMIDES; CYCLOSERINE; and PARA-AMINOSALICYLIC ACID) as defined by the CDC.
A general term for MYCOBACTERIUM infections of any part of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female.
A pyrazine that is used therapeutically as an antitubercular agent.
Substances obtained from various species of microorganisms that are, alone or in combination with other agents, of use in treating various forms of tuberculosis; most of these agents are merely bacteriostatic, induce resistance in the organisms, and may be toxic.
An active immunizing agent and a viable avirulent attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, var. bovis, which confers immunity to mycobacterial infections. It is used also in immunotherapy of neoplasms due to its stimulation of antibodies and non-specific immunity.
A form of bacterial meningitis caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS or rarely MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. The organism seeds the meninges and forms microtuberculomas which subsequently rupture. The clinical course tends to be subacute, with progressions occurring over a period of several days or longer. Headache and meningeal irritation may be followed by SEIZURES, cranial neuropathies, focal neurologic deficits, somnolence, and eventually COMA. The illness may occur in immunocompetent individuals or as an OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTION in the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other immunodeficiency syndromes. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp717-9)
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Tuberculous infection of the eye, primarily the iris, ciliary body, and choroid.
Infection of the spleen with species of MYCOBACTERIUM.
A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. Most species are free-living in soil and water, but the major habitat for some is the diseased tissue of warm-blooded hosts.
Infection of the LIVER with species of MYCOBACTERIUM, most often MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS. It is characterized by localized small tuberculous miliary lesions or tumor-like mass (TUBERCULOMA), and abnormalities in liver function tests.
Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.
MYCOBACTERIUM infections of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).
An antitubercular agent that inhibits the transfer of mycolic acids into the cell wall of the tubercle bacillus. It may also inhibit the synthesis of spermidine in mycobacteria. The action is usually bactericidal, and the drug can penetrate human cell membranes to exert its lethal effect. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, p863)
A rapid-growing, nonphotochromogenic species of MYCOBACTERIUM originally isolated from human smegma and found also in soil and water. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A treatment method in which patients are under direct observation when they take their medication or receive their treatment. This method is designed to reduce the risk of treatment interruption and to ensure patient compliance.
Infection of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS with species of MYCOBACTERIUM, most often MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS.
Tuberculosis of the brain, spinal cord, or meninges (TUBERCULOSIS, MENINGEAL), most often caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS and rarely by MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS. The infection may be limited to the nervous system or coexist in other organs (e.g., TUBERCULOSIS, PULMONARY). The organism tends to seed the meninges causing a diffuse meningitis and leads to the formation of TUBERCULOMA, which may occur within the brain, spinal cord, or perimeningeal spaces. Tuberculous involvement of the vertebral column (TUBERCULOSIS, SPINAL) may result in nerve root or spinal cord compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp717-20)
Tuberculosis involving the larynx, producing ulceration of the VOCAL CORDS and the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA.
Infection of the KIDNEY with species of MYCOBACTERIUM.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Tuberculosis of the mouth, tongue, and salivary glands.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
Identification of those persons (or animals) who have had such an association with an infected person, animal, or contaminated environment as to have had the opportunity to acquire the infection. Contact tracing is a generally accepted method for the control of sexually transmitted diseases.
Opportunistic infections found in patients who test positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common include PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA, Kaposi's sarcoma, cryptosporidiosis, herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and infections with Mycobacterium avium complex, Microsporidium, and Cytomegalovirus.
The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.
A protein extracted from boiled culture of tubercle bacilli (MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS). It is used in the tuberculin skin test (TUBERCULIN TEST) for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in asymptomatic persons.
A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.
Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Infections with bacteria of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
MYCOBACTERIUM infections of the male reproductive tract (GENITALIA, MALE).
Mycolic acids are complex, long-chain fatty acids that are a major component of the cell wall of Mycobacterium species, including the causative agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, providing them with unique characteristics such as resistance to acid-alkali stability, pigmentation, and protection against host immune responses.
Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A form of PERITONITIS seen in patients with TUBERCULOSIS, characterized by lesion either as a miliary form or as a pelvic mass on the peritoneal surfaces. Most patients have ASCITES, abdominal swelling, ABDOMINAL PAIN, and other systemic symptoms such as FEVER; WEIGHT LOSS; and ANEMIA.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.
Viruses whose host is one or more Mycobacterium species. They include both temperate and virulent types.
A relatively small nodular inflammatory lesion containing grouped mononuclear phagocytes, caused by infectious and noninfectious agents.
The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)
A second-line antitubercular agent that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The assay of INTERFERON-GAMMA released from lymphocytes after their exposure to a specific test antigen, to check for IMMUNOLOGIC MEMORY resulting from a previous exposure to the antigen. The amount of interferon-gamma released is usually assayed by an ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY.
Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.
So-called atypical species of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM that do not cause tuberculosis. They are also called tuberculoid bacilli, i.e.: M. buruli, M. chelonae, M. duvalii, M. flavescens, M. fortuitum, M. gilvum, M. gordonae, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. obuense, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai, M. terrae, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi.
Simultaneous infection of a host organism by two or more pathogens. In virology, coinfection commonly refers to simultaneous infection of a single cell by two or more different viruses.
Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.
Cyclic peptide antibiotic similar to VIOMYCIN. It is produced by Streptomyces capreolus.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is a geographical location, referring to the Republic of India, a country in South Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.
Toxic glycolipids composed of trehalose dimycolate derivatives. They are produced by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS and other species of MYCOBACTERIUM. They induce cellular dysfunction in animals.
X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.
Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.
Measurable quantity of bacteria in an object, organism, or organism compartment.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
An antitubercular agent often administered in association with ISONIAZID. The sodium salt of the drug is better tolerated than the free acid.
A tumor-like mass resulting from the enlargement of a tuberculous lesion.
An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Pathological conditions of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM caused by infection of MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS. Tuberculosis involvement may include the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.
A moderate-growing, photochromogenic species found in aquariums, diseased fish, and swimming pools. It is the cause of cutaneous lesions and granulomas (swimming pool granuloma) in humans. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Peru" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Republic of Peru. If you have any questions about medical topics that I can help clarify, please let me know!
A class of quinoline compounds defined by the presence of two aromatic ring structures which are attached via a side chain to carbon 3 of the qunolinyl structure. The two aromatic moieties are typically NAPTHALENE and BENZENE. Several compounds in this class are used as ANTITUBERCULAR AGENTS.
Infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (atypical mycobacteria): M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. flavescens, M. gordonae, M. obuense, M. gilvum, M. duvali, M. szulgai, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. xenopi (littorale), M. ulcerans, M. buruli, M. terrae, M. fortuitum (minetti, giae), M. chelonae.
A variety of TUBERCULOSIS affecting various birds, including chickens and ducks. It is caused by MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM and characterized by tubercles consisting principally of epithelioid cells.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
A bacterium causing tuberculosis in domestic fowl and other birds. In pigs, it may cause localized and sometimes disseminated disease. The organism occurs occasionally in sheep and cattle. It should be distinguished from the M. avium complex, which infects primarily humans.
Immunologic techniques involved in diagnosis.
A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that causes LEPROSY in man. Its organisms are generally arranged in clumps, rounded masses, or in groups of bacilli side by side.
Presence of fluid in the pleural cavity resulting from excessive transudation or exudation from the pleural surfaces. It is a sign of disease and not a diagnosis in itself.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Russia" is a country and not a medical term. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Membrane-bound cytoplasmic vesicles formed by invagination of phagocytized material. They fuse with lysosomes to form phagolysosomes in which the hydrolytic enzymes of the lysosome digest the phagocytized material.
Enzymes from the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from donor to acceptor, forming either esters or amides. (From Enzyme Nomenclature 1992) EC 2.3.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
Using MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques, such as DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS; PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS; and DNA FINGERPRINTING, to identify, classify, and compare organisms and their subtypes.
Copies of transposable elements interspersed throughout the genome, some of which are still active and often referred to as "jumping genes". There are two classes of interspersed repetitive elements. Class I elements (or RETROELEMENTS - such as retrotransposons, retroviruses, LONG INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS and SHORT INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS) transpose via reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. Class II elements (or DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS - such as transposons, Tn elements, insertion sequence elements and mobile gene cassettes of bacterial integrons) transpose directly from one site in the DNA to another.
The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
A complex that includes several strains of M. avium. M. intracellulare is not easily distinguished from M. avium and therefore is included in the complex. These organisms are most frequently found in pulmonary secretions from persons with a tuberculous-like mycobacteriosis. Strains of this complex have also been associated with childhood lymphadenitis and AIDS; M. avium alone causes tuberculosis in a variety of birds and other animals, including pigs.
'Azā compounds' are a class of organic molecules containing at least one nitrogen atom in a five-membered ring, often found in naturally occurring substances and pharmaceuticals, with the name derived from the Arabic word "azZa" meaning 'strong' referring to the ring's aromatic stability.
The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
A well-circumscribed mass composed of tuberculous granulation tissue that may occur in the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, brain stem, or perimeningeal spaces. Multiple lesions are quite common. Management of intracranial manifestations vary with lesion site. Intracranial tuberculomas may be associated with SEIZURES, focal neurologic deficits, and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. Spinal cord tuberculomas may be associated with localized or radicular pain, weakness, sensory loss, and incontinence. Tuberculomas may arise as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS, but also occur in immunocompetent individuals.
Laboratory techniques that involve the in-vitro synthesis of many copies of DNA or RNA from one original template.
A group of ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS characterized by a chromophoric naphthohydroquinone group spanned by an aliphatic bridge not previously found in other known ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS. They have been isolated from fermentation broths of Streptomyces mediterranei.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
Immune status consisting of non-production of HIV antibodies, as determined by various serological tests.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.
Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.
Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.
Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.
Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
A thiosemicarbazone that is used in association with other antimycobacterial agents in the initial and continuation phases of antituberculosis regimens. Thiacetazone containing regimens are less effective than the short-course regimen recommended by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and are used in some developing countries to reduce drug costs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p217)
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
INFLAMMATION of the sac surrounding the heart (PERICARDIUM) due to MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS infection. Pericarditis can lead to swelling (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION), compression of the heart (CARDIAC TAMPONADE), and preventing normal beating of the heart.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
A slow-growing, photochromogenic species that is the etiologic agent of a tuberculosis-like disease in humans and is frequently isolated from human pulmonary secretions or tubercles. The incidence of infection is sharply increased among immunocompromised individuals. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A phenothiazine antipsychotic used in the management of PHYCOSES, including SCHIZOPHRENIA.
A bacterial DNA topoisomerase II that catalyzes ATP-dependent breakage of both strands of DNA, passage of the unbroken strands through the breaks, and rejoining of the broken strands. Gyrase binds to DNA as a heterotetramer consisting of two A and two B subunits. In the presence of ATP, gyrase is able to convert the relaxed circular DNA duplex into a superhelix. In the absence of ATP, supercoiled DNA is relaxed by DNA gyrase.
Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.
Granulomatous disorders affecting one or more sites in the respiratory tract.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the respiratory tract or its organs. It includes RESPIRATORY FUNCTION TESTS.
A fat-soluble riminophenazine dye used for the treatment of leprosy. It has been used investigationally in combination with other antimycobacterial drugs to treat Mycobacterium avium infections in AIDS patients. Clofazimine also has a marked anti-inflammatory effect and is given to control the leprosy reaction, erythema nodosum leprosum. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1993, p1619)
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Vietnam" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context; it is a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions related to medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those topics for you.
An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.
A republic in western Africa, constituting an enclave within SENEGAL extending on both sides of the Gambia River. Its capital is Banjul, formerly Bathurst.
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
The number of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. Determination requires the use of a fluorescence-activated flow cytometer.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
Medical procedure involving the emptying of contents in the stomach through the use of a tube inserted through the nose or mouth. It is performed to remove poisons or relieve pressure due to intestinal blockages or during surgery.
Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.
Hospitals which provide care to patients with long-term illnesses.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Penal institutions, or places of confinement for war prisoners.
Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.
A synthetic fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent that inhibits the supercoiling activity of bacterial DNA GYRASE, halting DNA REPLICATION.
Amidohydrolases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of amides and related compounds, playing a crucial role in various biological processes including the breakdown and synthesis of bioactive molecules.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Polysaccharides composed of repeating galactose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.
Quinolines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds consisting of a two-nitrogened benzene ring fused to a pyridine ring, which have been synthesized and used as building blocks for various medicinal drugs, particularly antibiotics and antimalarials.
A group of QUINOLONES with at least one fluorine atom and a piperazinyl group.
Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.
Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
An aniline dye used as a disinfectant and an antiseptic agent. It is weakly fluorescing and binds specifically to certain proteins.
I'm afraid there seems to be a misunderstanding - "Africa" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. Africa is the world's second-largest and second-most populous continent, consisting of 54 countries with diverse cultures, peoples, languages, and landscapes. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help answer those for you!
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)
Any compound containing one or more monosaccharide residues bound by a glycosidic linkage to a hydrophobic moiety such as an acylglycerol (see GLYCERIDES), a sphingoid, a ceramide (CERAMIDES) (N-acylsphingoid) or a prenyl phosphate. (From IUPAC's webpage)

Cell-mediated immunity: dealing a direct blow to pathogens. (1/6653)

Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are essential for defence against viral infections. Recent data demonstrating direct killing of intracellular bacteria by granulysin, a protein released from the granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, emphasize the contribution of these lymphocytes to the control of tuberculosis.  (+info)

Tuberculosis outbreaks in prison housing units for HIV-infected inmates--California, 1995-1996. (2/6653)

During 1995-1996, staff from the California departments of corrections and health services and local health departments investigated two outbreaks of drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB). The outbreaks occurred in two state correctional institutions with dedicated HIV housing units. In each outbreak, all cases were linked by IS6110-based DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. This report describes the investigations of both outbreaks; the findings indicated that M. tuberculosis can spread rapidly among HIV-infected inmates and be transmitted to their visitors and prison employees, with secondary spread to the community.  (+info)

Issues in the treatment of active tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. (3/6653)

Most HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis can be treated satisfactorily with standard regimens with expectations of good results. Treatment of tuberculosis in these patients has been complicated by the introduction of HAART, which relies on drugs that interfere with the most potent class of antituberculous medications. Rifampin-free regimens or regimens that employ rifabutin may be acceptable strategies for patients who are receiving protease inhibitors, although these regimens have not been rigorously evaluated in patients with AIDS. At present, there is good reason to believe that a 6-month course of a rifabutin-containing regimen or a 9-12-month course of a regimen of streptomycin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide should be adequate therapy for most patients with drug-susceptible disease. As the treatment of HIV infection with antiretroviral agents evolves, the treatment of tuberculosis in patients with AIDS is likely to evolve as well. This will require careful coordination of antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapies.  (+info)

Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency impairs cellular immunity. (4/6653)

Norepinephrine, released from sympathetic neurons, and epinephrine, released from the adrenal medulla, participate in a number of physiological processes including those that facilitate adaptation to stressful conditions. The thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes are richly innervated by the sympathetic nervous system, and catecholamines are thought to modulate the immune response. However, the importance of this modulatory role in vivo remains uncertain. We addressed this question genetically by using mice that lack dopamine beta-hydroxylase (dbh-/- mice). dbh-/- mice cannot produce norepinephrine or epinephrine, but produce dopamine instead. When housed in specific pathogen-free conditions, dbh-/- mice had normal numbers of blood leukocytes, and normal T and B cell development and in vitro function. However, when challenged in vivo by infection with the intracellular pathogens Listeria monocytogenes or Mycobacterium tuberculosis, dbh-/- mice were more susceptible to infection, exhibited extreme thymic involution, and had impaired T cell function, including Th1 cytokine production. When immunized with trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin, dbh-/- mice produced less Th1 cytokine-dependent-IgG2a antitrinitrophenyl antibody. These results indicate that physiological catecholamine production is not required for normal development of the immune system, but plays an important role in the modulation of T cell-mediated immunity to infection and immunization.  (+info)

Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex to lipophilic deazapteridine derivatives, inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase. (5/6653)

Twelve lipophilic 2,4-diamino-5-methyl-5-deazapteridine derivatives and trimethoprim were evaluated for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium in vitro. Six of the compounds had MICs of < or =12.8 mg/L and < or =1.28 mg/L against M. tuberculosis and M. avium, respectively; trimethoprim MICs were >128 mg/L and >12.8 but < or =128 mg/L, respectively. Two compounds, with either a 2-methyl-5-methoxy phenyl or 2-methoxy-5-trifluoromethyl phenyl linked at the 6-position of the deazapteridine moiety by a CH2NH bridge, had MICs of < or =0.13 mg/L against M. avium; the two compounds also had apparent I50 values for dihydrofolate reductase of 2 and 8 nM, respectively, compared with an I50 of 400 nM with trimethoprim. Four of the compounds were selectively toxic to mycobacteria as compared with Vero cells. These results demonstrated that lipophilic antifolates can be synthesized which are more active against mycobacteria than trimethoprim and which possess selective toxicity.  (+info)

The future role of international agencies in control of acute respiratory tract infections. (6/6653)

Achievements in the control of acute respiratory infection (ARI) owe much to international collaboration in research, education, and delivery of services. This article highlights some of the current activities of the many international agencies involved and summarizes thoughts on their future roles. Key recent scientific advances include better surveillance, new and improved vaccines, refinement of standard clinical management plans and behavioral change techniques, and demonstration of the effectiveness of their application. Agencies involved include the World Health Organization, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, national government agencies for overseas aid, many academic departments, and professional lung health associations. However, much remains to be done, especially in collaborative research, in the devising, implementing, and evaluating of health care delivery systems in low-income countries, and in mobilizing political will and resources. These are tasks beyond the capacity of any lone agency. Success will depend on how effectively we collaborate.  (+info)

Observations on animal and human health during the outbreak of Mycobacterium bovis in game farm wapiti in Alberta. (7/6653)

This report describes and discusses the history, clinical, pathologic, epidemiologic, and human health aspects of an outbreak of Mycobacterium bovis infection in domestic wapiti in Alberta between 1990 and 1993, shortly after legislative changes allowing game farming. The extent and seriousness of the outbreak of M. bovis in wapiti in Alberta was not fully known at its onset. The clinical findings in the first recognized infected wapiti are presented and the postmortem records for the herd in which the animal resided are summarized. Epidemiologic findings from the subsequent field investigation are reviewed, the results of recognition and investigation of human exposure are updated, and recommendations for reduction of human exposure are presented.  (+info)

Differential protective efficacy of DNA vaccines expressing secreted proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (8/6653)

The development of more-effective antituberculosis vaccines would assist in the control of the global problem of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. One recently devised vaccination strategy is immunization with DNA plasmids encoding individual microbial genes. Using the genes for the M. tuberculosis secreted proteins MPT64 (23 kDa), Ag85B (30 kDa), and ESAT-6 (6 kDa) as candidate antigens, DNA vaccines were prepared and tested for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of aerosolized tuberculosis (TB). Intramuscular immunization with DNA-64 or DNA-85B resulted in the activation of CD4(+) T cells, which produce gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and high titers of specific immunoglobulin G antibodies. Further, DNA-64 induced major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells. The addition of a eukaryotic leader sequence to mpt64 did not significantly increase the T-cell or antibody response. Each of the three DNA vectors stimulated a significant reduction in the level of M. tuberculosis infection in the lungs of mice challenged 4 weeks after immunization, but not to the levels resulting after immunization with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The vaccines showed a consistent hierarchy of protection, with the most effective being Ag85B, followed by ESAT-6 and then MPT64. Coimmunization with the three vectors resulted in a greater degree of protection than that induced by any single vector. This protective efficacy was associated with the emergence of IFN-gamma-secreting T cells earlier than in infected animals immunized with a control vector. The efficacy of these DNA vaccines suggests that multisubunit vaccination may contribute to future vaccine strategies against TB.  (+info)

Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It primarily affects the lungs but can also involve other organs and tissues in the body. The infection is usually spread through the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

The symptoms of pulmonary TB include persistent cough, chest pain, coughing up blood, fatigue, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, chest X-ray, and microbiological tests such as sputum smear microscopy and culture. In some cases, molecular tests like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may be used for rapid diagnosis.

Treatment usually consists of a standard six-month course of multiple antibiotics, including isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. In some cases, longer treatment durations or different drug regimens might be necessary due to drug resistance or other factors. Preventive measures include vaccination with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and early detection and treatment of infected individuals to prevent transmission.

Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It primarily affects the lungs and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. The infection typically enters the body when a person inhales droplets containing the bacteria, which are released into the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

The symptoms of pulmonary TB can vary but often include:

* Persistent cough that lasts for more than three weeks and may produce phlegm or blood-tinged sputum
* Chest pain or discomfort, particularly when breathing deeply or coughing
* Fatigue and weakness
* Unexplained weight loss
* Fever and night sweats
* Loss of appetite

Pulmonary TB can cause serious complications if left untreated, including damage to the lungs, respiratory failure, and spread of the infection to other parts of the body. Treatment typically involves a course of antibiotics that can last several months, and it is essential for patients to complete the full treatment regimen to ensure that the infection is fully eradicated.

Preventive measures include vaccination with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, which can provide some protection against severe forms of TB in children, and measures to prevent the spread of the disease, such as covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, wearing a mask in public places, and avoiding close contact with people who have active TB.

'Mycobacterium tuberculosis' is a species of slow-growing, aerobic, gram-positive bacteria that demonstrates acid-fastness. It is the primary causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) in humans. This bacterium has a complex cell wall rich in lipids, including mycolic acids, which provides a hydrophobic barrier and makes it resistant to many conventional antibiotics. The ability of M. tuberculosis to survive within host macrophages and resist the immune response contributes to its pathogenicity and the difficulty in treating TB infections.

M. tuberculosis is typically transmitted through inhalation of infectious droplets containing the bacteria, which primarily targets the lungs but can spread to other parts of the body (extrapulmonary TB). The infection may result in a spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from latent TB infection (LTBI) to active disease. LTBI represents a dormant state where individuals are infected with M. tuberculosis but do not show symptoms and cannot transmit the bacteria. However, they remain at risk of developing active TB throughout their lifetime, especially if their immune system becomes compromised.

Effective prevention and control strategies for TB rely on early detection, treatment, and public health interventions to limit transmission. The current first-line treatments for drug-susceptible TB include a combination of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide for at least six months. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis present significant challenges in TB control and require more complex treatment regimens.

Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a form of tuberculosis (TB) infection caused by bacteria that are resistant to at least two of the first-line anti-TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. This makes MDR-TB more difficult and expensive to treat, requiring longer treatment durations and the use of second-line medications, which can have more severe side effects.

MDR-TB can occur when there are errors in prescribing or taking anti-TB drugs, or when people with TB do not complete their full course of treatment. It is a significant global health concern, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where TB is more prevalent and resources for diagnosis and treatment may be limited.

MDR-TB can spread from person to person through the air when someone with the infection coughs, speaks, or sneezes. People at higher risk of contracting MDR-TB include those who have been in close contact with someone with MDR-TB, people with weakened immune systems, and healthcare workers who treat TB patients.

Preventing the spread of MDR-TB involves early detection and prompt treatment, as well as infection control measures such as wearing masks, improving ventilation, and separating infected individuals from others. It is also important to ensure that anti-TB drugs are used correctly and that patients complete their full course of treatment to prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

A tuberculosis vaccine, also known as the BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine, is a type of immunization used to prevent tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The BCG vaccine contains a weakened strain of the bacteria that causes TB in cattle.

The BCG vaccine works by stimulating an immune response in the body, which helps to protect against severe forms of TB, such as TB meningitis and TB in children. However, it is not very effective at preventing pulmonary TB (TB that affects the lungs) in adults.

The BCG vaccine is not routinely recommended for use in the United States due to the low risk of TB infection in the general population. However, it may be given to people who are at high risk of exposure to TB, such as healthcare workers, laboratory personnel, and people traveling to countries with high rates of TB.

It is important to note that the BCG vaccine does not provide complete protection against TB and that other measures, such as testing and treatment for latent TB infection, are also important for controlling the spread of this disease.

Miliary tuberculosis is a disseminated form of tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The term "miliary" refers to the tiny millet-like size (2-5 microns in diameter) of the TB foci observed in the lungs or other organs during autopsy or on imaging studies. In military tuberculosis, these small granules are widespread throughout the body, affecting multiple organs such as the lungs, liver, spleen, bones, and brain. It can occur in people with weakened immune systems, including those with HIV/AIDS, or in individuals who have recently been infected with TB bacteria. Symptoms may include fever, night sweats, weight loss, fatigue, and cough. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent severe complications and improve outcomes.

Isoniazid is an antimicrobial medication used for the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It is a first-line medication, often used in combination with other TB drugs, to kill the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria that cause TB. Isoniazid works by inhibiting the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are essential components of the bacterial cell wall. This leads to bacterial death and helps to control the spread of TB.

Isoniazid is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. It can be taken orally or given by injection. The medication is generally well-tolerated, but it can cause side effects such as peripheral neuropathy, hepatitis, and skin rashes. Regular monitoring of liver function tests and supplementation with pyridoxine (vitamin B6) may be necessary to prevent or manage these side effects.

It is important to note that Isoniazid is not effective against drug-resistant strains of TB, and its use should be guided by the results of drug susceptibility testing. Additionally, it is essential to complete the full course of treatment as prescribed to ensure the successful eradication of the bacteria and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

Latent Tuberculosis (TB) infection is defined as a state of persistent immune response to stimulation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis without evidence of clinically manifest active TB disease. The individuals with latent TB infection do not feel ill and are not infectious. However, they may develop active TB disease later in their lives, typically within the first 2 years after infection. It's estimated that about 5-10% of people with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease during their lifetime. The risk is higher in people who have weakened immune systems due to HIV infection, malnutrition, aging, or use of immunosuppressive medications. Diagnosis of latent TB infection is typically made through a tuberculin skin test or an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Treatment of latent TB infection can reduce the risk of developing active TB disease.

Tuberculosis (TB) of the lymph node, also known as scrofula or tuberculous lymphadenitis, is a specific form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It involves the infection and inflammation of the lymph nodes (lymph glands) by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium. The lymph nodes most commonly affected are the cervical (neck) and supraclavicular (above the collarbone) lymph nodes, but other sites can also be involved.

The infection typically spreads to the lymph nodes through the bloodstream or via nearby infected organs, such as the lungs or intestines. The affected lymph nodes may become enlarged, firm, and tender, forming masses called cold abscesses that can suppurate (form pus) and eventually rupture. In some cases, the lymph nodes may calcify, leaving hard, stone-like deposits.

Diagnosis of tuberculous lymphadenitis often involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as CT or MRI scans), and microbiological or histopathological examination of tissue samples obtained through fine-needle aspiration biopsy or surgical excision. Treatment typically consists of a standard anti-tuberculosis multi-drug regimen, which may include isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide for at least six months. Surgical intervention might be necessary in cases with complications or treatment failure.

Osteoarticular tuberculosis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) that involves the bones and joints. It is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection can spread to the bones and joints through the bloodstream or from nearby infected organs, such as the lungs.

The most commonly affected sites are the spine (Pott's disease), hip, knee, wrist, and small bones of the hands and feet. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, stiffness, and decreased range of motion in the affected joint or bone. In some cases, the infection can lead to deformity, chronic disability, or even death if left untreated.

Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI), and laboratory tests (such as blood tests, sputum cultures, or biopsy). Treatment usually consists of a long course of antibiotics (usually for at least six months) to kill the bacteria. Surgery may also be necessary in some cases to remove infected tissue or stabilize damaged joints.

Gastrointestinal tuberculosis (GTB) is a type of tuberculosis that affects the gastrointestinal tract, including the stomach, intestines, and associated organs such as the liver and spleen. It is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which typically infects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

In GTB, the bacteria invade the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract and cause inflammation, ulceration, and thickening of the intestinal wall. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea (which may be bloody), weight loss, fever, and fatigue. GTB can also cause complications such as bowel obstruction, perforation, or fistula formation.

Diagnosis of GTB can be challenging, as the symptoms are non-specific and can mimic those of other gastrointestinal disorders. Diagnostic tests may include endoscopy, biopsy, culture, and molecular testing for the presence of M. tuberculosis. Treatment typically involves a prolonged course of multiple antibiotics, such as isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide, administered under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

It's worth noting that GTB is relatively rare in developed countries with low rates of tuberculosis, but it is more common in areas where TB is endemic or among populations with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS.

Tuberculosis (TB) of the spine, also known as Pott's disease, is a specific form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves the vertebral column. It is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium, which primarily affects the lungs but can spread through the bloodstream to other parts of the body, including the spine.

In Pott's disease, the infection leads to the destruction of the spongy bone (vertebral body) and the intervertebral disc space, resulting in vertebral collapse, kyphosis (hunchback deformity), and potential neurological complications due to spinal cord compression. Common symptoms include back pain, stiffness, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. Early diagnosis and treatment with a multidrug antibiotic regimen are crucial to prevent long-term disability and further spread of the infection.

Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis. It primarily affects cattle but can also spread to other mammals including humans, causing a similar disease known as zoonotic tuberculosis. The infection in animals typically occurs through inhalation of infectious droplets or ingestion of contaminated feed and water.

In cattle, the disease often affects the respiratory system, leading to symptoms such as chronic coughing, weight loss, and difficulty breathing. However, it can also affect other organs, including the intestines, lymph nodes, and mammary glands. Diagnosis of BTB typically involves a combination of clinical signs, laboratory tests, and epidemiological data.

Control measures for BTB include regular testing and culling of infected animals, movement restrictions, and vaccination of susceptible populations. In many countries, BTB is a notifiable disease, meaning that cases must be reported to the authorities. Proper cooking and pasteurization of dairy products can help prevent transmission to humans.

Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is a rare form of tuberculosis that affects the skin. It is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, including M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and M. africanum. CTB can occur as a primary infection after direct inoculation of the skin with the bacteria, or it can be secondary to a distant focus of infection such as lung or lymph node TB.

The clinical presentation of CTB is varied and can include papules, nodules, pustules, ulcers, plaques, or scaly lesions. The lesions may be painless or painful, and they can be associated with systemic symptoms such as fever, night sweats, and weight loss.

CTB can be diagnosed through a combination of clinical examination, skin biopsy, culture, and PCR testing. Treatment typically involves a prolonged course of multiple antibiotics, often for six to nine months or more. The most commonly used drugs are isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Surgical excision may be necessary in some cases.

Prevention measures include early detection and treatment of pulmonary TB, BCG vaccination, and avoiding contact with people with active TB.

A tuberculin test is a medical procedure used to determine if someone has developed an immune response to the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The test involves injecting a small amount of purified protein derivative (PPD) from the TB bacteria under the skin, usually on the forearm. After 48-72 hours, the area is examined for signs of a reaction, such as swelling, redness, or hardness. A positive result suggests that the person has been infected with TB at some point in the past, although it does not necessarily mean that they have active TB disease. However, individuals who have a positive tuberculin test should be evaluated further to determine if they need treatment for latent TB infection or active TB disease.

Rifampin is an antibiotic medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as rifamycins. It works by inhibiting bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, thereby preventing bacterial growth and multiplication. Rifampin is used to treat a variety of infections caused by bacteria, including tuberculosis, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Legionella pneumophila. It is also used to prevent meningococcal disease in people who have been exposed to the bacteria.

Rifampin is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and injectable solutions. The medication is usually taken two to four times a day, depending on the type and severity of the infection being treated. Rifampin may be given alone or in combination with other antibiotics.

It is important to note that rifampin can interact with several other medications, including oral contraceptives, anticoagulants, and anti-seizure drugs, among others. Therefore, it is essential to inform your healthcare provider about all the medications you are taking before starting treatment with rifampin.

Rifampin may cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, and changes in the color of urine, tears, sweat, and saliva to a reddish-orange color. These side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. However, if they persist or become bothersome, it is important to consult your healthcare provider.

In summary, rifampin is an antibiotic medication used to treat various bacterial infections and prevent meningococcal disease. It works by inhibiting bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, preventing bacterial growth and multiplication. Rifampin may interact with several other medications, and it can cause side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, and changes in the color of body fluids.

Sputum is defined as a mixture of saliva and phlegm that is expelled from the respiratory tract during coughing, sneezing or deep breathing. It can be clear, mucoid, or purulent (containing pus) depending on the underlying cause of the respiratory issue. Examination of sputum can help diagnose various respiratory conditions such as infections, inflammation, or other lung diseases.

"Mycobacterium bovis" is a species of slow-growing, aerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family Mycobacteriaceae. It is the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle and other animals, and can also cause tuberculosis in humans, particularly in those who come into contact with infected animals or consume unpasteurized dairy products from infected cows. The bacteria are resistant to many common disinfectants and survive for long periods in a dormant state, making them difficult to eradicate from the environment. "Mycobacterium bovis" is closely related to "Mycobacterium tuberculosis," the bacterium that causes tuberculosis in humans, and both species share many genetic and biochemical characteristics.

Pleural Tuberculosis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) that involves the infection and inflammation of the pleura, which are the thin membranes that surround the lungs and line the inside of the chest cavity. This condition is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium, which can spread through the air when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

In pleural tuberculosis, the bacteria reach the pleura either through direct extension from a nearby lung infection or via bloodstream dissemination. The infection can cause the pleura to become inflamed and produce excess fluid, leading to pleural effusion. This accumulation of fluid in the pleural space can cause chest pain, coughing, and difficulty breathing.

Diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies such as chest X-rays or CT scans, and laboratory tests such as acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy, culture, and nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) to detect the presence of M. tuberculosis in the pleural fluid or tissue samples.

Treatment of pleural tuberculosis typically involves a standard course of anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT), which includes a combination of multiple antibiotics such as isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. The duration of treatment may vary depending on the severity of the infection and the patient's response to therapy. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to drain the pleural effusion or remove the infected pleura.

Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is a term used to describe a rare, severe form of tuberculosis (TB) that is resistant to the majority of available drugs used to treat TB. This means that the bacteria that cause TB have developed resistance to at least four of the core anti-TB drugs, including isoniazid and rifampin, as well as any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the three injectable second-line drugs (amikacin, capreomycin, or kanamycin).

XDR-TB can be challenging to diagnose and treat due to its resistance to multiple drugs. It is also more likely to cause severe illness, spread from person to person, and result in poor treatment outcomes compared to drug-susceptible TB. XDR-TB is a public health concern, particularly in areas with high rates of TB and limited access to effective treatments.

It's important to note that XDR-TB should not be confused with Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which refers to TB that is resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampin, but not necessarily to the other second-line drugs.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Urogenital tuberculosis (UTB) is a less common form of TB that affects the urinary and genital systems. It occurs when the bacteria spread through the bloodstream from the initial site of infection, usually the lungs, to the kidneys. The infection can then spread to other parts of the urinary system, including the ureters, bladder, and urethra, as well as the genital organs in both men and women.

UTB symptoms may include:
- Persistent dull pain in the lower back or side
- Frequent urination or urgent need to urinate
- Painful urination (dysuria)
- Blood in the urine (hematuria)
- Incontinence
- Sexual dysfunction in men, such as epididymitis or infertility
- Scrotal mass in men
- Amenorrhea or irregular menstruation in women

Diagnosis of UTB typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging tests (such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI), urine analysis and culture, and sometimes biopsy. Treatment usually consists of a prolonged course of multiple antibiotics to eliminate the infection. Surgery may be required in some cases to repair damaged organs or remove scar tissue.

Pyrazinamide is an antituberculosis agent, a type of medication used to treat tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is an antimicrobial drug that works by inhibiting the growth of the bacterium. Pyrazinamide is often used in combination with other TB drugs such as isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol.

The medical definition of Pyrazinamide is: a synthetic antituberculosis agent, C6H5N3O (a pyridine derivative), used in the treatment of tuberculosis, especially in combination with isoniazid and rifampin. It is converted in the body to its active form, pyrazinoic acid, which inhibits the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by interfering with bacterial cell wall synthesis.

It's important to note that Pyrazinamide should be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional and is usually prescribed for several months to ensure complete eradication of the TB bacteria. As with any medication, it can cause side effects, and individuals should report any unusual symptoms to their healthcare provider.

Antitubercular antibiotics are a class of medications specifically used to treat tuberculosis (TB) and other mycobacterial infections. Tuberculosis is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which can affect various organs, primarily the lungs.

There are several antitubercular antibiotics available, with different mechanisms of action that target the unique cell wall structure and metabolism of mycobacteria. Some commonly prescribed antitubercular antibiotics include:

1. Isoniazid (INH): This is a first-line medication for treating TB. It inhibits the synthesis of mycolic acids, a crucial component of the mycobacterial cell wall. Isoniazid can be bactericidal or bacteriostatic depending on the concentration and duration of treatment.
2. Rifampin (RIF): Also known as rifampicin, this antibiotic inhibits bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, preventing the transcription of genetic information into mRNA. It is a potent bactericidal agent against mycobacteria and is often used in combination with other antitubercular drugs.
3. Ethambutol (EMB): This antibiotic inhibits the synthesis of arabinogalactan and mycolic acids, both essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall. Ethambutol is primarily bacteriostatic but can be bactericidal at higher concentrations.
4. Pyrazinamide (PZA): This medication is active against dormant or slow-growing mycobacteria, making it an essential component of TB treatment regimens. Its mechanism of action involves the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis and the disruption of bacterial membrane potential.
5. Streptomycin: An aminoglycoside antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit, inhibiting protein synthesis in mycobacteria. It is primarily used as a second-line treatment for drug-resistant TB.
6. Fluoroquinolones: These are a class of antibiotics that inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, essential enzymes involved in bacterial DNA replication. Examples include ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and levofloxacin, which can be used as second-line treatments for drug-resistant TB.

These antitubercular drugs are often used in combination to prevent the development of drug resistance and improve treatment outcomes. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a standardized regimen consisting of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide for the initial two months, followed by isoniazid and rifampicin for an additional four to seven months. However, treatment regimens may vary depending on the patient's clinical presentation, drug susceptibility patterns, and local guidelines.

BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine is a type of immunization used primarily to prevent tuberculosis (TB). It contains a live but weakened strain of Mycobacterium bovis, which is related to the bacterium that causes TB in humans (Mycobacterium tuberculosis).

The BCG vaccine works by stimulating an immune response in the body, enabling it to better resist infection with TB bacteria if exposed in the future. It is often given to infants and children in countries where TB is common, and its use varies depending on the national immunization policies. The protection offered by the BCG vaccine is moderate and may not last for a very long time.

In addition to its use against TB, the BCG vaccine has also been investigated for its potential therapeutic role in treating bladder cancer and some other types of cancer. The mechanism of action in these cases is thought to be related to the vaccine's ability to stimulate an immune response against abnormal cells.

Meningeal tuberculosis, also known as Tuberculous meningitis, is a severe form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges, which are the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. It is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium, which can spread through the bloodstream from a primary infection site in the lungs or elsewhere in the body.

In meningeal tuberculosis, the bacteria cause inflammation and thickening of the meninges, leading to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral edema, and vasculitis. These conditions can result in various neurological symptoms such as headache, fever, stiff neck, altered mental status, seizures, and focal neurologic deficits. If left untreated, meningeal tuberculosis can lead to severe complications, including brain damage, hydrocephalus, and even death.

Diagnosis of meningeal tuberculosis typically involves a combination of clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, imaging studies, and sometimes molecular or culture-based tests to detect the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the CSF. Treatment usually involves a prolonged course of antibiotics specifically designed to target TB, such as isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide, often administered for six to nine months or longer. In some cases, corticosteroids may also be used to reduce inflammation and prevent complications.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Ocular tuberculosis (OTB) is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), which results from the spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacteria outside the lungs. In ocular tuberculosis, these bacteria primarily affect the eye and its surrounding structures.

The most common form of OTB is tubercular uveitis, which involves inflammation of the uveal tract (iris, ciliary body, and choroid). Other forms of OTB include:

* Tubercular conjunctivitis: Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane that covers the front part of the eye and lines the inside of the eyelids.
* Tubercular keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea, the transparent outer layer at the front of the eye.
* Tubercular scleritis: Inflammation of the sclera, the white protective coating of the eye.
* Tubercular episcleritis: Inflammation of the episclera, a thin layer of tissue between the conjunctiva and sclera.
* Tubercular dacryoadenitis: Inflammation of the lacrimal gland, which produces tears.
* Tubercular optic neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain.

Diagnosis of OTB can be challenging due to its varied clinical presentations and the need for laboratory confirmation. A definitive diagnosis typically requires the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from ocular tissues or fluids, which may involve invasive procedures. In some cases, a presumptive diagnosis might be made based on clinical findings, epidemiological data, and response to anti-tuberculous therapy.

Treatment for OTB usually involves a standard anti-tuberculosis regimen consisting of multiple drugs (isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide) for at least six months. Corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents might be used concomitantly to manage inflammation and prevent tissue damage. Close monitoring is essential to ensure treatment adherence, assess response to therapy, and detect potential side effects.

Splenic tuberculosis is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (ETB), which refers to a manifestation of the disease outside of the lungs. It is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

In splenic tuberculosis, the infection involves the spleen (an organ located in the upper left part of the abdomen that filters blood and helps fight infection). The infection can occur through the hematogenous spread (dissemination via the bloodstream) from a primary focus elsewhere in the body, such as the lungs.

The disease presents with various symptoms, including fever, fatigue, weight loss, abdominal pain, and splenomegaly (enlargement of the spleen). Diagnosis often requires a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies, and microbiological or histopathological confirmation. Treatment typically involves a prolonged course of multidrug antibiotics to eliminate the infection and prevent complications.

"Mycobacterium" is a genus of gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are characterized by their complex cell walls containing large amounts of lipids. This genus includes several species that are significant in human and animal health, most notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium leprae, which causes leprosy. Other species of Mycobacterium can cause various diseases in humans, including skin and soft tissue infections, lung infections, and disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are often resistant to common disinfectants and antibiotics, making them difficult to treat.

Hepatic tuberculosis (HTB) is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) that involves the liver. It can occur as a result of the spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a primary site of infection, usually the lungs, through the bloodstream to the liver.

In hepatic tuberculosis, the liver may become enlarged and tender, and patients may experience symptoms such as fever, night sweats, loss of appetite, weight loss, and abdominal discomfort. Liver function tests may show elevated levels of certain enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT).

Diagnosis of hepatic tuberculosis can be challenging, as the symptoms and laboratory findings are nonspecific. Imaging studies such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI may show evidence of liver involvement, but a definitive diagnosis usually requires histological examination of liver tissue obtained through biopsy.

Treatment of hepatic tuberculosis involves the use of multiple antituberculous drugs, typically including isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. The duration of treatment is usually at least six months, but may be longer in some cases. It is important to monitor liver function tests closely during treatment, as these medications can cause liver damage in some individuals.

Bacterial antigens are substances found on the surface or produced by bacteria that can stimulate an immune response in a host organism. These antigens can be proteins, polysaccharides, teichoic acids, lipopolysaccharides, or other molecules that are recognized as foreign by the host's immune system.

When a bacterial antigen is encountered by the host's immune system, it triggers a series of responses aimed at eliminating the bacteria and preventing infection. The host's immune system recognizes the antigen as foreign through the use of specialized receptors called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are found on various immune cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and neutrophils.

Once a bacterial antigen is recognized by the host's immune system, it can stimulate both the innate and adaptive immune responses. The innate immune response involves the activation of inflammatory pathways, the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection, and the production of antimicrobial peptides.

The adaptive immune response, on the other hand, involves the activation of T cells and B cells, which are specific to the bacterial antigen. These cells can recognize and remember the antigen, allowing for a more rapid and effective response upon subsequent exposures.

Bacterial antigens are important in the development of vaccines, as they can be used to stimulate an immune response without causing disease. By identifying specific bacterial antigens that are associated with virulence or pathogenicity, researchers can develop vaccines that target these antigens and provide protection against infection.

Female genital tuberculosis (FGTB) is a specific form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the female reproductive organs. It is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which primarily affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

In FGTB, the bacteria typically infect the fallopian tubes, uterus, ovaries, and/or the cervix, leading to various gynecological symptoms. The infection can cause scarring, blockage of the fallopian tubes, and damage to the reproductive organs, which may result in infertility, ectopic pregnancy, or chronic pelvic pain.

FGTB is often asymptomatic or has non-specific symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose. Common symptoms include irregular menstrual bleeding, postmenopausal bleeding, vaginal discharge, and pelvic pain. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical examination, imaging studies (such as ultrasound or CT scan), and laboratory tests (such as endometrial biopsy, PCR, or culture).

FGTB is usually treated with a standard anti-tuberculosis drug regimen that includes isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide for at least six months. In some cases, surgery may be required to manage complications such as hydrosalpinx or chronic pelvic pain. Preventing the spread of pulmonary TB through early detection and treatment is crucial in preventing FGTB.

Ethambutol is an antimycobacterial medication used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It works by inhibiting the synthesis of mycobacterial cell walls, which leads to the death of the bacteria. Ethambutol is often used in combination with other TB drugs, such as isoniazid and rifampin, to prevent the development of drug-resistant strains of the bacteria.

The most common side effect of ethambutol is optic neuritis, which can cause visual disturbances such as decreased vision, color blindness, or blurred vision. This side effect is usually reversible if the medication is stopped promptly. Other potential side effects include skin rashes, joint pain, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.

Ethambutol is available in oral tablet and solution forms, and is typically taken once or twice daily. The dosage of ethambutol is based on the patient's weight, and it is important to follow the healthcare provider's instructions carefully to avoid toxicity. Regular monitoring of visual acuity and liver function is recommended during treatment with ethambutol.

"Mycobacterium smegmatis" is a species of fast-growing, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It is commonly found in the environment, including soil and water. This bacterium is known for its ability to form resistant colonies called biofilms. While it does not typically cause disease in humans, it can contaminate medical equipment and samples, potentially leading to misdiagnosis or infection. In rare cases, it has been associated with skin and soft tissue infections. It is often used in research as a model organism for studying mycobacterial biology and drug resistance due to its relatively harmless nature and rapid growth rate.

Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) is a treatment strategy in which a healthcare professional directly observes the patient taking each dose of their medication, typically used in the context of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. The goal of DOT is to ensure adherence to the prescribed treatment regimen and improve treatment outcomes by reducing the likelihood of missed doses or irregular medication-taking behaviors that can contribute to drug resistance and disease relapse.

In a DOT setting, the healthcare provider, which could be a nurse, community health worker, or other designated individual, directly observes the patient swallowing the medication. This can occur in various settings, such as a clinic, hospital, or even the patient's home, depending on the program and resources available. The frequency of observations may vary based on the specific treatment plan and clinical context.

DOT has been shown to improve treatment completion rates and reduce the risk of TB transmission and drug resistance. It is an essential component of the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommended strategy for TB control and care.

Endocrine tuberculosis (TB) is a form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves the endocrine glands, such as the thyroid, pituitary, and adrenal glands. The infection can cause inflammation, granulomatous lesions, and tissue damage in these glands, leading to hormonal imbalances and various clinical manifestations.

Tuberculosis bacilli (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) reach the endocrine glands through hematogenous spread from a primary or secondary focus, usually in the lungs. The most common form of endocrine TB is adrenal TB, which can lead to adrenal insufficiency due to destruction of the adrenal cortex. Thyroid TB is rare and typically presents as a cold abscess or a thyroid mass. Pituitary TB is also uncommon but can cause hypopituitarism and visual impairment due to compression of the optic chiasm.

Diagnosis of endocrine TB often involves imaging studies, such as CT or MRI scans, hormonal assessments, and microbiological or histopathological examination of tissue samples obtained through biopsy. Treatment typically consists of a standard anti-tuberculous chemotherapy regimen, which may need to be adjusted based on the patient's hormonal status and clinical response.

Central Nervous System (CNS) Tuberculosis is a specific form of tuberculosis (TB) that refers to the infection and inflammation caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the brain or spinal cord. The two most common forms of CNS tuberculosis are tuberculous meningitis and tuberculomas.

1. Tuberculous Meningitis (TBM): This is the most frequent form of CNS TB, characterized by the inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meninges). The infection can lead to the formation of caseous lesions (granulomas), which may obstruct cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and result in increased intracranial pressure. Symptoms often include headache, fever, altered mental status, neck stiffness, vomiting, and focal neurological deficits.
2. Tuberculomas: These are localized granulomatous lesions formed by the immune response to M. tuberculosis in the brain parenchyma. They can cause various neurological symptoms depending on their size and location, such as seizures, focal deficits, or increased intracranial pressure.

CNS TB is a severe manifestation of tuberculosis that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term neurological damage or even death. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies (CT or MRI scans) and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained through lumbar puncture. Treatment usually consists of a prolonged course of multiple antituberculous drugs, along with corticosteroids to manage inflammation and prevent complications.

Laryngeal tuberculosis is a specific form of tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, that affects the larynx or voice box. The bacteria typically infect the lungs, leading to pulmonary TB, and can spread through the bloodstream or airways to other parts of the body, including the larynx.

In laryngeal tuberculosis, the infection causes granulomatous inflammation and ulceration in the laryngeal tissues, particularly affecting the vocal cords, epiglottis, and/or false vocal cords. Symptoms may include hoarseness, cough, difficulty swallowing, painful swallowing, stridor (high-pitched whistling sound during breathing), and occasionally respiratory distress or airway obstruction. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as X-rays or CT scans), endoscopic examination, and microbiological or histopathological confirmation of the presence of TB in tissue samples or secretions. Treatment usually consists of a standard multidrug antituberculosis chemotherapy regimen to eliminate the infection and prevent complications or further spread of the disease.

Renal tuberculosis (TB) is a type of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that occurs when the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium infects and affects the kidneys. It can also spread to other parts of the urinary system, such as the ureters, bladder, or urethra.

In renal TB, the infection typically begins in the renal cortex, where it causes caseous necrosis (formation of areas of tissue death) and granulomas (small clusters of immune cells). Over time, these lesions can lead to scarring, calcification, and destruction of renal tissues.

Symptoms of renal TB may include fever, fatigue, weight loss, flank pain, hematuria (blood in the urine), and sterile pyuria (pus in the urine without evidence of bacterial infection). Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies (such as CT scans or intravenous pyelograms), and laboratory tests (such as urinalysis, acid-fast bacilli smears, and culture).

Treatment of renal TB usually involves a prolonged course of antibiotics (typically 6 to 9 months) using multiple drugs, such as isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Surgery may be necessary in some cases to remove damaged or infected tissues, or to relieve obstructions caused by scarring or calcification.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Tuberculosis (TB), when referring to "oral" or "oropharyngeal," is a specific form of this infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In oral TB, the infection primarily affects the tissues in and around the mouth and throat (oropharynx). The most common sites for oral TB are the tongue, palate, tonsils, and buccal mucosa (the lining of the inner cheeks).

Oral TB can present with various symptoms, including:

1. Painless or painful ulcers in the mouth or throat
2. Swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck
3. Difficulty swallowing
4. Persistent cough and hoarseness
5. Fever and fatigue
6. Unintentional weight loss

It is important to note that oral TB is relatively rare compared to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB affecting the lungs). However, it can still be transmitted through respiratory droplets or direct contact with infected sputum or saliva. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical examination, imaging studies, and laboratory tests such as smear microscopy, culture, or molecular techniques like PCR to detect the presence of M. tuberculosis in samples taken from the affected area. Treatment usually consists of a standard anti-TB drug regimen recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for at least six months.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

Bacterial drug resistance is a type of antimicrobial resistance that occurs when bacteria evolve the ability to survive and reproduce in the presence of drugs (such as antibiotics) that would normally kill them or inhibit their growth. This can happen due to various mechanisms, including genetic mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes from other bacteria.

As a result, bacterial infections may become more difficult to treat, requiring higher doses of medication, alternative drugs, or longer treatment courses. In some cases, drug-resistant infections can lead to serious health complications, increased healthcare costs, and higher mortality rates.

Examples of bacterial drug resistance include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Preventing the spread of bacterial drug resistance is crucial for maintaining effective treatments for infectious diseases.

Bacteriological techniques refer to the various methods and procedures used in the laboratory for the cultivation, identification, and study of bacteria. These techniques are essential in fields such as medicine, biotechnology, and research. Here are some common bacteriological techniques:

1. **Sterilization**: This is a process that eliminates or kills all forms of life, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. Common sterilization methods include autoclaving (using steam under pressure), dry heat (in an oven), chemical sterilants, and radiation.

2. **Aseptic Technique**: This refers to practices used to prevent contamination of sterile materials or environments with microorganisms. It includes the use of sterile equipment, gloves, and lab coats, as well as techniques such as flaming, alcohol swabbing, and using aseptic transfer devices.

3. **Media Preparation**: This involves the preparation of nutrient-rich substances that support bacterial growth. There are various types of media, including solid (agar), liquid (broth), and semi-solid (e.g., stab agar). The choice of medium depends on the type of bacteria being cultured and the purpose of the investigation.

4. **Inoculation**: This is the process of introducing a bacterial culture into a medium. It can be done using a loop, swab, or needle. The inoculum should be taken from a pure culture to avoid contamination.

5. **Incubation**: After inoculation, the bacteria are allowed to grow under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric composition. This process is called incubation.

6. **Staining and Microscopy**: Bacteria are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Therefore, they need to be stained and observed under a microscope. Gram staining is a common method used to differentiate between two major groups of bacteria based on their cell wall composition.

7. **Biochemical Tests**: These are tests used to identify specific bacterial species based on their biochemical characteristics, such as their ability to ferment certain sugars, produce particular enzymes, or resist certain antibiotics.

8. **Molecular Techniques**: Advanced techniques like PCR and DNA sequencing can provide more precise identification of bacteria. They can also be used for genetic analysis and epidemiological studies.

Remember, handling microorganisms requires careful attention to biosafety procedures to prevent accidental infection or environmental contamination.

Contact tracing is a key public health strategy used to control the spread of infectious diseases. It involves identifying and monitoring individuals (contacts) who have come into close contact with an infected person (case), to prevent further transmission of the disease. The process typically includes:

1. Case identification: Identifying and confirming cases of infection through diagnostic testing.
2. Contact identification: Finding people who may have been in close contact with the infected case during their infectious period, which is the time when they can transmit the infection to others. Close contacts are usually defined as individuals who have had face-to-face contact with a confirmed case within a certain distance (often 6 feet or closer) and/or shared confined spaces for prolonged periods (usually more than 15 minutes).
3. Contact listing: Recording the identified contacts' information, including their names, addresses, phone numbers, and potentially other demographic data.
4. Risk assessment: Evaluating the level of risk associated with each contact based on factors such as the type of exposure, duration of contact, and the infectiousness of the case.
5. Notification: Informing contacts about their potential exposure to the infection and providing them with necessary health information, education, and guidance. This may include recommendations for self-quarantine, symptom monitoring, testing, and vaccination if available.
6. Follow-up: Monitoring and supporting contacts during their quarantine or isolation period, which typically lasts 14 days from the last exposure to the case. Public health professionals will check in with contacts regularly to assess their symptoms, provide additional guidance, and ensure they are adhering to the recommended infection prevention measures.
7. Data management: Documenting and reporting contact tracing activities for public health surveillance, evaluation, and future planning purposes.

Contact tracing is a critical component of infectious disease control and has been used effectively in managing various outbreaks, including tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, Ebola, and more recently, COVID-19.

AIDS-related opportunistic infections (AROIs) are infections that occur more frequently or are more severe in people with weakened immune systems, such as those with advanced HIV infection or AIDS. These infections take advantage of a weakened immune system and can affect various organs and systems in the body.

Common examples of AROIs include:

1. Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), caused by the fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii
2. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, caused by a type of bacteria called mycobacteria
3. Candidiasis, a fungal infection that can affect various parts of the body, including the mouth, esophagus, and genitals
4. Toxoplasmosis, caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii
5. Cryptococcosis, a fungal infection that affects the lungs and central nervous system
6. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, caused by a type of herpes virus
7. Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis
8. Cryptosporidiosis, a parasitic infection that affects the intestines
9. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a viral infection that affects the brain

Preventing and treating AROIs is an important part of managing HIV/AIDS, as they can cause significant illness and even death in people with weakened immune systems. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to treat HIV infection and prevent the progression of HIV to AIDS, which can help reduce the risk of opportunistic infections. In addition, medications to prevent specific opportunistic infections may be prescribed for people with advanced HIV or AIDS.

Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a soluble cytokine that is primarily produced by the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, especially CD4+ Th1 cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. It plays a crucial role in the regulation of the immune response against viral and intracellular bacterial infections, as well as tumor cells. IFN-γ has several functions, including activating macrophages to enhance their microbicidal activity, increasing the presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of T cells and NK cells, and inducing the production of other cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, IFN-γ has direct antiproliferative effects on certain types of tumor cells and can enhance the cytotoxic activity of immune cells against infected or malignant cells.

DNA fingerprinting, also known as DNA profiling or genetic fingerprinting, is a laboratory technique used to identify and compare the unique genetic makeup of individuals by analyzing specific regions of their DNA. This method is based on the variation in the length of repetitive sequences of DNA called variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs) or short tandem repeats (STRs), which are located at specific locations in the human genome and differ significantly among individuals, except in the case of identical twins.

The process of DNA fingerprinting involves extracting DNA from a sample, amplifying targeted regions using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and then separating and visualizing the resulting DNA fragments through electrophoresis. The fragment patterns are then compared to determine the likelihood of a match between two samples.

DNA fingerprinting has numerous applications in forensic science, paternity testing, identity verification, and genealogical research. It is considered an essential tool for providing strong evidence in criminal investigations and resolving disputes related to parentage and inheritance.

Tuberculin is not a medical condition but a diagnostic tool used in the form of a purified protein derivative (PPD) to detect tuberculosis infection. It is prepared from the culture filtrate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB. The PPD tuberculin is injected intradermally, and the resulting skin reaction is measured after 48-72 hours to determine if a person has developed an immune response to the bacteria, indicating a past or present infection with TB. It's important to note that a positive tuberculin test does not necessarily mean that active disease is present, but it does indicate that further evaluation is needed.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "South Africa" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located at the southernmost tip of the African continent. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) is a term used in molecular biology and genetics. It refers to the presence of variations in DNA sequences among individuals, which can be detected by restriction enzymes. These enzymes cut DNA at specific sites, creating fragments of different lengths.

In RFLP analysis, DNA is isolated from an individual and treated with a specific restriction enzyme that cuts the DNA at particular recognition sites. The resulting fragments are then separated by size using gel electrophoresis, creating a pattern unique to that individual's DNA. If there are variations in the DNA sequence between individuals, the restriction enzyme may cut the DNA at different sites, leading to differences in the length of the fragments and thus, a different pattern on the gel.

These variations can be used for various purposes, such as identifying individuals, diagnosing genetic diseases, or studying evolutionary relationships between species. However, RFLP analysis has largely been replaced by more modern techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods and DNA sequencing, which offer higher resolution and throughput.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Mycobacterium infections are a group of infectious diseases caused by various species of the Mycobacterium genus, including but not limited to M. tuberculosis (which causes tuberculosis), M. avium complex (which causes pulmonary and disseminated disease, particularly in immunocompromised individuals), M. leprae (which causes leprosy), and M. ulcerans (which causes Buruli ulcer). These bacteria are known for their ability to resist destruction by normal immune responses and many disinfectants due to the presence of a waxy mycolic acid layer in their cell walls.

Infection typically occurs through inhalation, ingestion, or direct contact with contaminated materials. The severity and manifestations of the disease can vary widely depending on the specific Mycobacterium species involved, the route of infection, and the host's immune status. Symptoms may include cough, fever, night sweats, weight loss, fatigue, skin lesions, or lymphadenitis. Diagnosis often requires specialized laboratory tests, such as culture or PCR-based methods, to identify the specific Mycobacterium species involved. Treatment typically involves a combination of antibiotics and may require long-term therapy.

Multiple bacterial drug resistance (MDR) is a medical term that refers to the resistance of multiple strains of bacteria to several antibiotics or antimicrobial agents. This means that these bacteria have developed mechanisms that enable them to survive and multiply despite being exposed to drugs that were previously effective in treating infections caused by them.

MDR is a significant public health concern because it limits the treatment options available for bacterial infections, making them more difficult and expensive to treat. In some cases, MDR bacteria may cause severe or life-threatening infections that are resistant to all available antibiotics, leaving doctors with few or no effective therapeutic options.

MDR can arise due to various mechanisms, including the production of enzymes that inactivate antibiotics, changes in bacterial cell membrane permeability that prevent antibiotics from entering the bacteria, and the development of efflux pumps that expel antibiotics out of the bacteria. The misuse or overuse of antibiotics is a significant contributor to the emergence and spread of MDR bacteria.

Preventing and controlling the spread of MDR bacteria requires a multifaceted approach, including the judicious use of antibiotics, infection control measures, surveillance, and research into new antimicrobial agents.

Tuberculosis (TB) of the male genital system, also known as genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB), is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that affects the urinary and genital organs. It is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium, which typically enters the body through inhalation and spreads to other parts of the body via the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

In males, GUTB can affect the epididymis, testes, prostate gland, seminal vesicles, vas deferens, and urethra. The most common site of infection is the epididymis, followed by the prostate gland. Symptoms may include pain or swelling in the affected area, discharge from the urethra, blood in the urine, fever, fatigue, and weight loss.

Diagnosis of GUTB typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies (such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI), and laboratory tests (such as urinalysis, culture, or biopsy). Treatment usually involves a prolonged course of multiple antibiotics that are effective against TB, such as isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Surgery may be necessary in some cases to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue.

GUTB can lead to serious complications if left untreated, including infertility, chronic pain, and spread of the infection to other parts of the body. Therefore, it is important to seek medical attention promptly if you experience any symptoms suggestive of GUTB.

Mycolic acids are complex, long-chain fatty acids that are a major component of the cell wall in mycobacteria, including the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis and leprosy. These acids contribute to the impermeability and resistance to chemical agents of the mycobacterial cell wall, making these organisms difficult to eradicate. Mycolic acids are unique to mycobacteria and some related actinomycetes, and their analysis can be useful in the identification and classification of these bacteria.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is a viral illness that progressively attacks and weakens the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to other infections and diseases. The virus primarily infects CD4+ T cells, a type of white blood cell essential for fighting off infections. Over time, as the number of these immune cells declines, the body becomes increasingly vulnerable to opportunistic infections and cancers.

HIV infection has three stages:

1. Acute HIV infection: This is the initial stage that occurs within 2-4 weeks after exposure to the virus. During this period, individuals may experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, fatigue, rash, swollen glands, and muscle aches. The virus replicates rapidly, and the viral load in the body is very high.
2. Chronic HIV infection (Clinical latency): This stage follows the acute infection and can last several years if left untreated. Although individuals may not show any symptoms during this phase, the virus continues to replicate at low levels, and the immune system gradually weakens. The viral load remains relatively stable, but the number of CD4+ T cells declines over time.
3. AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome): This is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by a severely damaged immune system and numerous opportunistic infections or cancers. At this stage, the CD4+ T cell count drops below 200 cells/mm3 of blood.

It's important to note that with proper antiretroviral therapy (ART), individuals with HIV infection can effectively manage the virus, maintain a healthy immune system, and significantly reduce the risk of transmission to others. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving long-term health outcomes and reducing the spread of HIV.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Tuberculous peritonitis is a specific type of peritonitis (inflammation of the peritoneum, the serous membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs) that is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium. This form of peritonitis is less common than peritonitis caused by other types of bacteria, but it can occur in people with weakened immune systems or those who have been in close contact with individuals with active TB.

The symptoms of tuberculous peritonitis may include abdominal pain and distension, fever, weight loss, decreased appetite, and ascites (accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity). Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies, and laboratory tests, such as cultures or nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) to detect the presence of M. tuberculosis in the peritoneal fluid or tissue. Treatment usually involves a prolonged course of multiple antibiotics that are active against M. tuberculosis, along with supportive care to manage any complications or symptoms.

Bacterial typing techniques are methods used to identify and differentiate bacterial strains or isolates based on their unique characteristics. These techniques are essential in epidemiological studies, infection control, and research to understand the transmission dynamics, virulence, and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens.

There are various bacterial typing techniques available, including:

1. **Bacteriophage Typing:** This method involves using bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to identify specific bacterial strains based on their susceptibility or resistance to particular phages.
2. **Serotyping:** It is a technique that differentiates bacterial strains based on the antigenic properties of their cell surface components, such as capsules, flagella, and somatic (O) and flagellar (H) antigens.
3. **Biochemical Testing:** This method uses biochemical reactions to identify specific metabolic pathways or enzymes present in bacterial strains, which can be used for differentiation. Commonly used tests include the catalase test, oxidase test, and various sugar fermentation tests.
4. **Molecular Typing Techniques:** These methods use genetic markers to identify and differentiate bacterial strains at the DNA level. Examples of molecular typing techniques include:
* **Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE):** This method uses restriction enzymes to digest bacterial DNA, followed by electrophoresis in an agarose gel under pulsed electrical fields. The resulting banding patterns are analyzed and compared to identify related strains.
* **Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST):** It involves sequencing specific housekeeping genes to generate unique sequence types that can be used for strain identification and phylogenetic analysis.
* **Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS):** This method sequences the entire genome of a bacterial strain, providing the most detailed information on genetic variation and relatedness between strains. WGS data can be analyzed using various bioinformatics tools to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene deletions or insertions, and other genetic changes that can be used for strain differentiation.

These molecular typing techniques provide higher resolution than traditional methods, allowing for more accurate identification and comparison of bacterial strains. They are particularly useful in epidemiological investigations to track the spread of pathogens and identify outbreaks.

Streptomycin is an antibiotic drug derived from the actinobacterium Streptomyces griseus. It belongs to the class of aminoglycosides and works by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis and leading to bacterial death.

Streptomycin is primarily used to treat a variety of infections caused by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, including tuberculosis, brucellosis, plague, tularemia, and certain types of bacterial endocarditis. It is also used as part of combination therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB).

Like other aminoglycosides, streptomycin has a narrow therapeutic index and can cause ototoxicity (hearing loss) and nephrotoxicity (kidney damage) with prolonged use or high doses. Therefore, its use is typically limited to cases where other antibiotics are ineffective or contraindicated.

It's important to note that the use of streptomycin requires careful monitoring of drug levels and kidney function, as well as regular audiometric testing to detect any potential hearing loss.

Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect and replicate within mycobacteria, which include species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. These viruses are important tools in the study of mycobacterial biology, genetics, and evolution. They have also been explored for their potential therapeutic use in treating mycobacterial infections, including tuberculosis.

Mycobacteriophages typically have double-stranded DNA genomes that range in size from around 50 to 170 kilobases. They can be classified into different groups or "clusters" based on genetic similarities and differences. Some mycobacteriophages are temperate, meaning they can either replicate lytically (killing the host cell) or establish a persistent relationship with the host by integrating their genome into the host's chromosome as a prophage. Others are strictly lytic and always kill the host cell upon infection.

Understanding the biology of mycobacteriophages can provide insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host interactions, DNA replication, gene regulation, and other fundamental processes. Additionally, studying the diversity of mycobacteriophages can shed light on evolutionary relationships among different mycobacterial species and strains.

A granuloma is a small, nodular inflammatory lesion that occurs in various tissues in response to chronic infection, foreign body reaction, or autoimmune conditions. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of epithelioid macrophages, which are specialized immune cells with enlarged nuclei and abundant cytoplasm, often arranged in a palisading pattern around a central area containing necrotic debris, microorganisms, or foreign material.

Granulomas can be found in various medical conditions such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, fungal infections, and certain autoimmune disorders like Crohn's disease. The formation of granulomas is a complex process involving both innate and adaptive immune responses, which aim to contain and eliminate the offending agent while minimizing tissue damage.

Macrophages are a type of white blood cell that are an essential part of the immune system. They are large, specialized cells that engulf and destroy foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi, as well as damaged or dead cells. Macrophages are found throughout the body, including in the bloodstream, lymph nodes, spleen, liver, lungs, and connective tissues. They play a critical role in inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair and remodeling.

Macrophages originate from monocytes, which are a type of white blood cell produced in the bone marrow. When monocytes enter the tissues, they differentiate into macrophages, which have a larger size and more specialized functions than monocytes. Macrophages can change their shape and move through tissues to reach sites of infection or injury. They also produce cytokines, chemokines, and other signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Macrophages have a variety of surface receptors that allow them to recognize and respond to different types of foreign substances and signals from other cells. They can engulf and digest foreign particles, bacteria, and viruses through a process called phagocytosis. Macrophages also play a role in presenting antigens to T cells, which are another type of immune cell that helps coordinate the immune response.

Overall, macrophages are crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis, defending against infection, and promoting wound healing and tissue repair. Dysregulation of macrophage function has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory conditions.

Ethionamide is an antimicrobial medication used to treat tuberculosis (TB) caused by drug-resistant strains of the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It belongs to a class of drugs called thioamides, which work by inhibiting the bacteria's ability to synthesize its cell wall.

Ethionamide is often used in combination with other TB medications to prevent the development of drug-resistant strains and improve treatment outcomes. Common side effects of ethionamide include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite, as well as neurological symptoms such as dizziness, headache, and peripheral neuropathy.

It is important to note that the use of ethionamide should be under the close supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause serious side effects and its effectiveness may be affected by drug interactions or individual patient factors.

Emigration is the process of leaving one's country of origin or habitual residence to settle in another country. It involves giving up the rights and privileges associated with citizenship in the country of origin and acquiring new rights and responsibilities as a citizen or resident of the destination country. Emigrants are people who choose to leave their native land to live elsewhere, often driven by factors such as economic opportunities, political instability, or conflict.

Immigration, on the other hand, is the process of entering and settling in a new country with the intention of becoming a permanent resident or citizen. Immigrants are individuals who come from another country to live in a new place, often seeking better job opportunities, education, or quality of life. They must comply with the immigration laws and regulations of the host country and may be required to undergo medical examinations, background checks, and other screening processes before being granted permission to enter and reside in the country.

In summary, emigration refers to leaving one's home country, while immigration refers to entering and settling in a new country.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The Interferon-gamma Release Assay (IGRA) is a type of blood test that measures the immune response to the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, it detects the release of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), a signaling molecule produced by T cells when they are stimulated by antigens present in the M. tuberculosis complex.

The IGRA test is used as an aid in diagnosing latent TB infection (LTBI) and active TB disease, particularly in individuals who may have an increased risk of progression to active TB or who cannot provide a reliable sputum sample for conventional acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy or culture.

There are two commercially available IGRA tests: the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test and the T-SPOT.TB test. Both tests involve incubating a patient's whole blood sample with M. tuberculosis-specific antigens, followed by measurement of IFN-γ release from T cells. The QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test measures IFN-γ in the plasma using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the T-SPOT.TB test enumerates antigen-specific T cells using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay.

IGRA tests have several advantages over traditional tuberculin skin tests (TSTs), including higher specificity, less cross-reactivity with BCG vaccination or non-tuberculous mycobacteria, and greater ease of administration and interpretation. However, IGRAs may still have limitations in certain populations, such as immunocompromised individuals, and should be interpreted in conjunction with clinical symptoms, radiographic findings, and other diagnostic tests.

DNA transposable elements, also known as transposons or jumping genes, are mobile genetic elements that can change their position within a genome. They are composed of DNA sequences that include genes encoding the enzymes required for their own movement (transposase) and regulatory elements. When activated, the transposase recognizes specific sequences at the ends of the element and catalyzes the excision and reintegration of the transposable element into a new location in the genome. This process can lead to genetic variation, as the insertion of a transposable element can disrupt the function of nearby genes or create new combinations of gene regulatory elements. Transposable elements are widespread in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and are thought to play a significant role in genome evolution.

Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of environmental mycobacteria that do not cause tuberculosis or leprosy. They can be found in water, soil, and other natural environments. Some people may become infected with NTM, leading to various diseases depending on the site of infection, such as lung disease (most common), skin and soft tissue infections, lymphadenitis, and disseminated disease.

The clinical significance of NTM isolation is not always clear, as colonization without active infection can occur. Diagnosis typically requires a combination of clinical, radiological, microbiological, and sometimes molecular evidence to confirm the presence of active infection. Treatment usually involves multiple antibiotics for an extended period, depending on the species involved and the severity of disease.

Coinfection is a term used in medicine to describe a situation where a person is infected with more than one pathogen (infectious agent) at the same time. This can occur when a person is infected with two or more viruses, bacteria, parasites, or fungi. Coinfections can complicate the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, as the symptoms of each infection can overlap and interact with each other.

Coinfections are common in certain populations, such as people who are immunocompromised, have chronic illnesses, or live in areas with high levels of infectious agents. For example, a person with HIV/AIDS may be more susceptible to coinfections with tuberculosis, hepatitis, or pneumocystis pneumonia. Similarly, a person who has recently undergone an organ transplant may be at risk for coinfections with cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, or other opportunistic pathogens.

Coinfections can also occur in people who are otherwise healthy but are exposed to multiple infectious agents at once, such as through travel to areas with high levels of infectious diseases or through close contact with animals that carry infectious agents. For example, a person who travels to a tropical area may be at risk for coinfections with malaria and dengue fever, while a person who works on a farm may be at risk for coinfections with influenza and Q fever.

Effective treatment of coinfections requires accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy for each pathogen involved. In some cases, treating one infection may help to resolve the other, but in other cases, both infections may need to be treated simultaneously to achieve a cure. Preventing coinfections is an important part of infectious disease control, and can be achieved through measures such as vaccination, use of personal protective equipment, and avoidance of high-risk behaviors.

Communicable disease control is a branch of public health that focuses on preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases within a population. The goal is to reduce the incidence and prevalence of communicable diseases through various strategies, such as:

1. Surveillance: Monitoring and tracking the occurrence of communicable diseases in a population to identify trends, outbreaks, and high-risk areas.
2. Prevention: Implementing measures to prevent the transmission of infectious agents, such as vaccination programs, education campaigns, and environmental interventions (e.g., water treatment, food safety).
3. Case management: Identifying, diagnosing, and treating cases of communicable diseases to reduce their duration and severity, as well as to prevent further spread.
4. Contact tracing: Identifying and monitoring individuals who have been in close contact with infected persons to detect and prevent secondary cases.
5. Outbreak response: Coordinating a rapid and effective response to disease outbreaks, including the implementation of control measures, communication with affected communities, and evaluation of interventions.
6. Collaboration: Working closely with healthcare providers, laboratories, policymakers, and other stakeholders to ensure a coordinated and comprehensive approach to communicable disease control.
7. Research: Conducting research to better understand the epidemiology, transmission dynamics, and prevention strategies for communicable diseases.

Effective communicable disease control requires a multidisciplinary approach that combines expertise in medicine, epidemiology, microbiology, public health, social sciences, and healthcare management.

Capreomycin is an antibiotic drug that is primarily used to treat tuberculosis (TB) that is resistant to other first-line medications. It belongs to a class of drugs called cyclic polypeptides, which work by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. Capreomycin is administered via intramuscular injection and is typically used in combination with other anti-TB drugs as part of a multidrug regimen.

The medical definition of 'Capreomycin' is:

A cyclic polypeptide antibiotic derived from Streptomyces capreolus, used in the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly drug-resistant strains. It inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit and is administered intramuscularly.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

Molecular epidemiology is a branch of epidemiology that uses laboratory techniques to identify and analyze the genetic material (DNA, RNA) of pathogens or host cells to understand their distribution, transmission, and disease associations in populations. It combines molecular biology methods with epidemiological approaches to investigate the role of genetic factors in disease occurrence and outcomes. This field has contributed significantly to the identification of infectious disease outbreaks, tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, understanding the transmission dynamics of viruses, and identifying susceptible populations for targeted interventions.

Cord factors are a group of glycolipids that are found on the surface of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. These cord factors are called "cord factors" because they help to form characteristic "cords" or cable-like structures when mycobacteria grow in clumps.

Cord factors contribute to the virulence of mycobacteria by inhibiting the ability of certain immune cells, such as macrophages, to destroy the bacteria. They do this by preventing the fusion of lysosomes (which contain enzymes that can break down and kill the bacteria) with phagosomes (the compartments in which the bacteria are contained within the macrophage). This allows the mycobacteria to survive and replicate inside the host cells, leading to the development of tuberculosis.

Cord factors have also been shown to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can contribute to tissue damage and the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. Therefore, cord factors are an important target for the development of new therapies and vaccines against tuberculosis.

Thoracic radiography is a type of diagnostic imaging that involves using X-rays to produce images of the chest, including the lungs, heart, bronchi, great vessels, and the bones of the spine and chest wall. It is a commonly used tool in the diagnosis and management of various respiratory, cardiovascular, and thoracic disorders such as pneumonia, lung cancer, heart failure, and rib fractures.

During the procedure, the patient is positioned between an X-ray machine and a cassette containing a film or digital detector. The X-ray beam is directed at the chest, and the resulting image is captured on the film or detector. The images produced can help identify any abnormalities in the structure or function of the organs within the chest.

Thoracic radiography may be performed as a routine screening test for certain conditions, such as lung cancer, or it may be ordered when a patient presents with symptoms suggestive of a respiratory or cardiovascular disorder. It is a safe and non-invasive procedure that can provide valuable information to help guide clinical decision making and improve patient outcomes.

Reagent kits, diagnostic are prepackaged sets of chemical reagents and other components designed for performing specific diagnostic tests or assays. These kits are often used in clinical laboratories to detect and measure the presence or absence of various biomarkers, such as proteins, antibodies, antigens, nucleic acids, or small molecules, in biological samples like blood, urine, or tissues.

Diagnostic reagent kits typically contain detailed instructions for their use, along with the necessary reagents, controls, and sometimes specialized equipment or supplies. They are designed to simplify the testing process, reduce human error, and increase standardization, ensuring accurate and reliable results. Examples of diagnostic reagent kits include those used for pregnancy tests, infectious disease screening, drug testing, genetic testing, and cancer biomarker detection.

Genotype, in genetics, refers to the complete heritable genetic makeup of an individual organism, including all of its genes. It is the set of instructions contained in an organism's DNA for the development and function of that organism. The genotype is the basis for an individual's inherited traits, and it can be contrasted with an individual's phenotype, which refers to the observable physical or biochemical characteristics of an organism that result from the expression of its genes in combination with environmental influences.

It is important to note that an individual's genotype is not necessarily identical to their genetic sequence. Some genes have multiple forms called alleles, and an individual may inherit different alleles for a given gene from each parent. The combination of alleles that an individual inherits for a particular gene is known as their genotype for that gene.

Understanding an individual's genotype can provide important information about their susceptibility to certain diseases, their response to drugs and other treatments, and their risk of passing on inherited genetic disorders to their offspring.

Minisatellites, also known as VNTRs (Variable Number Tandem Repeats), are repetitive DNA sequences that consist of a core repeat unit of 10-60 base pairs, arranged in a head-to-tail fashion. They are often found in non-coding regions of the genome and can vary in the number of times the repeat unit is present in an individual's DNA. This variation in repeat number can occur both within and between individuals, making minisatellites useful as genetic markers for identification and forensic applications. They are also associated with certain genetic disorders and play a role in genome instability.

Bacterial load refers to the total number or concentration of bacteria present in a given sample, tissue, or body fluid. It is a measure used to quantify the amount of bacterial infection or colonization in a particular area. The bacterial load can be expressed as colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter (ml), gram (g), or other units of measurement depending on the sample type. High bacterial loads are often associated with more severe infections and increased inflammation.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

Disease notification is the process by which health care professionals, laboratories, or other relevant individuals or organizations inform public health authorities about cases of specific diseases or conditions that are reportable (also known as notifiable) within a particular jurisdiction. Reportable diseases are those that have been designated by law or regulation as posing a significant risk to public health and for which timely reporting is necessary to enable effective surveillance, control measures, and prevention strategies.

The specific diseases and conditions that must be reported, as well as the procedures for reporting, vary by jurisdiction. Common reportable diseases include infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, measles, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as non-infectious conditions like cancer and lead poisoning.

The purpose of disease notification is to provide public health officials with accurate and up-to-date information about the occurrence and spread of diseases in a population. This information can help inform policy decisions, guide resource allocation, and support the development and implementation of evidence-based interventions to protect and promote the health of communities.

A "colony count" is a method used to estimate the number of viable microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, in a sample. In this technique, a known volume of the sample is spread onto the surface of a solid nutrient medium in a petri dish and then incubated under conditions that allow the microorganisms to grow and form visible colonies. Each colony that grows on the plate represents an individual cell (or small cluster of cells) from the original sample that was able to divide and grow under the given conditions. By counting the number of colonies that form, researchers can make a rough estimate of the concentration of microorganisms in the original sample.

The term "microbial" simply refers to microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Therefore, a "colony count, microbial" is a general term that encompasses the use of colony counting techniques to estimate the number of any type of microorganism in a sample.

Colony counts are used in various fields, including medical research, food safety testing, and environmental monitoring, to assess the levels of contamination or the effectiveness of disinfection procedures. However, it is important to note that colony counts may not always provide an accurate measure of the total number of microorganisms present in a sample, as some cells may be injured or unable to grow under the conditions used for counting. Additionally, some microorganisms may form clusters or chains that can appear as single colonies, leading to an overestimation of the true cell count.

Aminosalicylic acid is an anti-inflammatory medication that is primarily used to treat inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It works by reducing the production of chemicals in the body that cause inflammation in the intestines.

Aminosalicylic acid is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and enema formulations. The medication is typically taken at regular intervals, often several times a day, to maintain its effectiveness in reducing inflammation.

Common side effects of aminosalicylic acid include headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. In some cases, the medication may cause more serious side effects such as kidney or liver problems, allergic reactions, or blood disorders. It is important to discuss any potential risks or side effects with a healthcare provider before starting treatment with aminosalicylic acid.

A tuberculoma is a granulomatous lesion in the brain caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It typically consists of caseating necrosis surrounded by a layer of epithelioid histiocytes, Langhans' giant cells, and lymphocytes. Tuberculomas can be single or multiple and may cause various neurological symptoms depending on their size and location. They are often associated with tuberculous meningitis but can also occur in immunocompromised individuals without obvious systemic infection.

I must clarify that "Ethiopia" is not a medical term or condition. Ethiopia is a country located in the Horn of Africa, known for its rich history and cultural heritage. It is the second-most populous nation in Africa, with diverse ethnic groups, languages, and religious practices.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, please feel free to ask! I'm here to help.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

"Cardiovascular Tuberculosis" refers to a form of tuberculosis (TB) where the bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) infects the heart or the blood vessels. This is a less common manifestation of TB, but it can have serious consequences if left untreated.

In cardiovascular TB, the bacteria can cause inflammation and damage to the heart muscle (myocarditis), the sac surrounding the heart (pericarditis), or the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. This can lead to symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, coughing, fatigue, and fever. In severe cases, it can cause heart failure or life-threatening arrhythmias.

Cardiovascular TB is usually treated with a combination of antibiotics that are effective against the TB bacteria. The treatment may last for several months to ensure that all the bacteria have been eliminated. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or replace damaged heart valves or vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent serious complications and improve outcomes in patients with cardiovascular TB.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Virulence, in the context of medicine and microbiology, refers to the degree or severity of damage or harm that a pathogen (like a bacterium, virus, fungus, or parasite) can cause to its host. It is often associated with the ability of the pathogen to invade and damage host tissues, evade or suppress the host's immune response, replicate within the host, and spread between hosts.

Virulence factors are the specific components or mechanisms that contribute to a pathogen's virulence, such as toxins, enzymes, adhesins, and capsules. These factors enable the pathogen to establish an infection, cause tissue damage, and facilitate its transmission between hosts. The overall virulence of a pathogen can be influenced by various factors, including host susceptibility, environmental conditions, and the specific strain or species of the pathogen.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Molecular diagnostic techniques are a group of laboratory methods used to analyze biological markers in DNA, RNA, and proteins to identify specific health conditions or diseases at the molecular level. These techniques include various methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, gene expression analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and mass spectrometry.

Molecular diagnostic techniques are used to detect genetic mutations, chromosomal abnormalities, viral and bacterial infections, and other molecular changes associated with various diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and neurological disorders. These techniques provide valuable information for disease diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning, and monitoring of treatment response.

Compared to traditional diagnostic methods, molecular diagnostic techniques offer several advantages, such as higher sensitivity, specificity, and speed. They can detect small amounts of genetic material or proteins, even in early stages of the disease, and provide accurate results with a lower risk of false positives or negatives. Additionally, molecular diagnostic techniques can be automated, standardized, and performed in high-throughput formats, making them suitable for large-scale screening and research applications.

"Mycobacterium marinum" is a slow-growing, gram-positive bacterium that belongs to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It is commonly found in fresh and saltwater environments, including aquariums and swimming pools. This pathogen can cause skin infections, known as swimmer's granuloma or fish tank granuloma, in individuals who have exposure to contaminated water. The infection typically occurs through minor cuts or abrasions on the skin, leading to a localized, chronic, and slowly progressive lesion. In some cases, disseminated infection can occur in people with weakened immune systems.

References:
1. Chan, R. C., & Cohen, S. M. (2017). Nontuberculous mycobacterial skin infections. Clinics in dermatology, 35(4), 416-423.
2. Kohler, P., Bloch, A., & Pfyffer, G. E. (2002). Nontuberculous mycobacteria: an overview. Swiss medical weekly, 132(35-36), 548-557.
3. Sanguinetti, M., & Bloch, S. A. (2019). Mycobacterium marinum skin infection. American journal of clinical dermatology, 20(2), 219-226.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Cluster analysis is a statistical method used to group similar objects or data points together based on their characteristics or features. In medical and healthcare research, cluster analysis can be used to identify patterns or relationships within complex datasets, such as patient records or genetic information. This technique can help researchers to classify patients into distinct subgroups based on their symptoms, diagnoses, or other variables, which can inform more personalized treatment plans or public health interventions.

Cluster analysis involves several steps, including:

1. Data preparation: The researcher must first collect and clean the data, ensuring that it is complete and free from errors. This may involve removing outlier values or missing data points.
2. Distance measurement: Next, the researcher must determine how to measure the distance between each pair of data points. Common methods include Euclidean distance (the straight-line distance between two points) or Manhattan distance (the distance between two points along a grid).
3. Clustering algorithm: The researcher then applies a clustering algorithm, which groups similar data points together based on their distances from one another. Common algorithms include hierarchical clustering (which creates a tree-like structure of clusters) or k-means clustering (which assigns each data point to the nearest centroid).
4. Validation: Finally, the researcher must validate the results of the cluster analysis by evaluating the stability and robustness of the clusters. This may involve re-running the analysis with different distance measures or clustering algorithms, or comparing the results to external criteria.

Cluster analysis is a powerful tool for identifying patterns and relationships within complex datasets, but it requires careful consideration of the data preparation, distance measurement, and validation steps to ensure accurate and meaningful results.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Peru" is not a medical term. It is a country located in South America, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and beautiful landscapes. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

Diarylquinolines are a class of antimicrobial compounds, which include drugs such as bedaquiline and TBA-354. These agents inhibit mycobacterial ATP synthase and have been used in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB).

Bedaquiline, for example, is a first-in-class diarylquinoline medication that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2012 for use in combination with other antituberculosis drugs to treat adults with pulmonary MDR-TB.

It's important to note that the use of diarylquinolines should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have potential side effects and drug interactions.

Nontuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) infections refer to illnesses caused by a group of bacteria called mycobacteria that do not cause tuberculosis or leprosy. These bacteria are commonly found in the environment, such as in water, soil, and dust. They can be spread through inhalation, ingestion, or contact with contaminated materials.

NTM infections can affect various parts of the body, including the lungs, skin, and soft tissues. Lung infections are the most common form of NTM infection and often occur in people with underlying lung conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis. Symptoms of NTM lung infection may include cough, fatigue, weight loss, fever, and night sweats.

Skin and soft tissue infections caused by NTM can occur through direct contact with contaminated water or soil, or through medical procedures such as contaminated injections or catheters. Symptoms of NTM skin and soft tissue infections may include redness, swelling, pain, and drainage.

Diagnosis of NTM infections typically involves a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies, and laboratory tests to identify the specific type of mycobacteria causing the infection. Treatment may involve multiple antibiotics for an extended period of time, depending on the severity and location of the infection.

Avian tuberculosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), specifically Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare. It primarily affects birds, particularly poultry such as chickens and turkeys, but can also rarely infect mammals including humans.

In humans, avian tuberculosis is usually acquired through the inhalation of contaminated aerosols or ingestion of contaminated food or water. The infection typically involves the lungs (pulmonary TB) and less commonly other organs (extrapulmonary TB).

Symptoms of avian tuberculosis in humans may include cough, fever, night sweats, fatigue, weight loss, and chest pain. Diagnosis is confirmed through microbiological culture, PCR, or histopathological examination of tissue samples. Treatment typically involves a combination of antibiotics such as clarithromycin, rifabutin, and ethambutol for an extended period of time.

It's worth noting that avian tuberculosis is not the same as human tuberculosis, which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is much more common in humans.

Bacterial antibodies are a type of antibodies produced by the immune system in response to an infection caused by bacteria. These antibodies are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the bacterial cells, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Bacterial antibodies can be classified into several types based on their structure and function, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE. They play a crucial role in the body's defense against bacterial infections and provide immunity to future infections with the same bacteria.

A bacterial genome is the complete set of genetic material, including both DNA and RNA, found within a single bacterium. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the bacterium to grow, reproduce, and survive in its environment. The bacterial genome typically includes circular chromosomes, as well as plasmids, which are smaller, circular DNA molecules that can carry additional genes. These genes encode various functional elements such as enzymes, structural proteins, and regulatory sequences that determine the bacterium's characteristics and behavior.

Bacterial genomes vary widely in size, ranging from around 130 kilobases (kb) in Mycoplasma genitalium to over 14 megabases (Mb) in Sorangium cellulosum. The complete sequencing and analysis of bacterial genomes have provided valuable insights into the biology, evolution, and pathogenicity of bacteria, enabling researchers to better understand their roles in various diseases and potential applications in biotechnology.

"Mycobacterium avium is a species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that belongs to the family Mycobacteriaceae. It is a slow-growing mycobacterium that is widely distributed in the environment, particularly in soil and water. M. avium is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause pulmonary disease, lymphadenitis, and disseminated infection in individuals with compromised immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS. It is also known to cause pulmonary disease in elderly people with structural lung damage. The bacteria are resistant to many common disinfectants and can survive in hostile environments for extended periods."

Immunologic tests are a type of diagnostic assay that detect and measure the presence or absence of specific immune responses in a sample, such as blood or tissue. These tests can be used to identify antibodies, antigens, immune complexes, or complement components in a sample, which can provide information about the health status of an individual, including the presence of infection, autoimmune disease, or immunodeficiency.

Immunologic tests use various methods to detect these immune components, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), Western blots, immunofluorescence assays, and radioimmunoassays. The results of these tests can help healthcare providers diagnose and manage medical conditions, monitor treatment effectiveness, and assess immune function.

It's important to note that the interpretation of immunologic test results should be done by a qualified healthcare professional, as false positives or negatives can occur, and the results must be considered in conjunction with other clinical findings and patient history.

"Mycobacterium leprae" is a slow-growing, rod-shaped, gram-positive bacterium that is the causative agent of leprosy, a chronic infectious disease that primarily affects the skin, peripheral nerves, and mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract. The bacterium was discovered in 1873 by Gerhard Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian physician, and is named after him as "Hansen's bacillus."

"Mycobacterium leprae" has a unique cell wall that contains high amounts of lipids, which makes it resistant to many common disinfectants and antibiotics. It can survive and multiply within host macrophages, allowing it to evade the immune system and establish a chronic infection.

Leprosy is a treatable disease with multidrug therapy (MDT), which combines several antibiotics such as dapsone, rifampicin, and clofazimine. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent the progression of the disease and reduce its transmission to others.

Pleural effusion is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the pleural space, which is the thin, fluid-filled space that surrounds the lungs and lines the inside of the chest wall. This space typically contains a small amount of fluid to allow for smooth movement of the lungs during breathing. However, when an excessive amount of fluid accumulates, it can cause symptoms such as shortness of breath, coughing, and chest pain.

Pleural effusions can be caused by various underlying medical conditions, including pneumonia, heart failure, cancer, pulmonary embolism, and autoimmune disorders. The fluid that accumulates in the pleural space can be transudative or exudative, depending on the cause of the effusion. Transudative effusions are caused by increased pressure in the blood vessels or decreased protein levels in the blood, while exudative effusions are caused by inflammation, infection, or cancer.

Diagnosis of pleural effusion typically involves a physical examination, chest X-ray, and analysis of the fluid in the pleural space. Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the effusion and may include medications, drainage of the fluid, or surgery.

Microbial drug resistance is a significant medical issue that refers to the ability of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites) to withstand or survive exposure to drugs or medications designed to kill them or limit their growth. This phenomenon has become a major global health concern, particularly in the context of bacterial infections, where it is also known as antibiotic resistance.

Drug resistance arises due to genetic changes in microorganisms that enable them to modify or bypass the effects of antimicrobial agents. These genetic alterations can be caused by mutations or the acquisition of resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer. The resistant microbes then replicate and multiply, forming populations that are increasingly difficult to eradicate with conventional treatments.

The consequences of drug-resistant infections include increased morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and the potential for widespread outbreaks. Factors contributing to the emergence and spread of microbial drug resistance include the overuse or misuse of antimicrobials, poor infection control practices, and inadequate surveillance systems.

To address this challenge, it is crucial to promote prudent antibiotic use, strengthen infection prevention and control measures, develop new antimicrobial agents, and invest in research to better understand the mechanisms underlying drug resistance.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Russia" is not a medical term or concept. Russia is the largest country in the world by land area, located primarily in Asia with a smaller portion extending into Europe. It is a nation rich in history and culture, known for its diverse landscapes, from tundra and forests to subtropical beaches.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please feel free to ask!

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Mustelidae is not a medical term, but a biological term referring to a family of mammals that includes weasels, badgers, otters, ferrets, and wolverines. These animals are characterized by their elongated bodies, short legs, and specialized scent glands used for marking territory and communication. While the study of these animals is not typically within the scope of medical science, understanding the biology and behavior of various species can have implications for public health, conservation efforts, and ecological research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Uganda" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in East Africa, known officially as the Republic of Uganda. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

A phagosome is a type of membrane-bound organelle that forms around a particle or microorganism following its engulfment by a cell, through the process of phagocytosis. This results in the formation of a vesicle containing the ingested material, which then fuses with another organelle called a lysosome to form a phago-lysosome. The lysosome contains enzymes that digest and break down the contents of the phagosome, allowing the cell to neutralize and dispose of potentially harmful substances or pathogens.

In summary, phagosomes are important organelles involved in the immune response, helping to protect the body against infection and disease.

Acyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an acyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to a hydrogen atom) from one molecule to another. This transfer involves the formation of an ester bond between the acyl group donor and the acyl group acceptor.

Acyltransferases play important roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of lipids, fatty acids, and other metabolites. They are also involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) by catalyzing the addition of an acyl group to these compounds, making them more water-soluble and easier to excrete from the body.

Examples of acyltransferases include serine palmitoyltransferase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of sphingolipids, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters between lipoproteins.

Acyltransferases are classified based on the type of acyl group they transfer and the nature of the acyl group donor and acceptor molecules. They can be further categorized into subclasses based on their sequence similarities, three-dimensional structures, and evolutionary relationships.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

Molecular typing is a laboratory technique used to identify and characterize specific microorganisms, such as bacteria or viruses, at the molecular level. This method is used to differentiate between strains of the same species based on their genetic or molecular differences. Molecular typing techniques include methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and whole genome sequencing (WGS). These techniques allow for high-resolution discrimination between strains, enabling epidemiological investigations of outbreaks, tracking the transmission of pathogens, and studying the evolution and population biology of microorganisms.

Interspersed Repeats or Interspersed Repetitive Sequences (IRSs) are repetitive DNA sequences that are dispersed throughout the eukaryotic genome. They include several types of repeats such as SINEs (Short INterspersed Elements), LINEs (Long INterspersed Elements), and LTR retrotransposons (Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons). These sequences can make up a significant portion of the genome, with varying copy numbers among different species. They are typically non-coding and have been associated with genomic instability, regulation of gene expression, and evolution of genomes.

Paleopathology is the study of ancient diseases and injuries as recorded in bones, mummies, and other archaeological remains. It is an interdisciplinary field that combines knowledge from pathology, epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology to understand the health and disease patterns of past populations. The findings of paleopathology can provide valuable insights into the evolution of diseases, the effectiveness of ancient medical practices, and the impact of environmental and social factors on human health over time. Examples of conditions that may be studied in paleopathology include infectious diseases (such as tuberculosis or leprosy), nutritional deficiencies, trauma, cancer, and genetic disorders.

"Evaluation studies" is a broad term that refers to the systematic assessment or examination of a program, project, policy, intervention, or product. The goal of an evaluation study is to determine its merits, worth, and value by measuring its effects, efficiency, and impact. There are different types of evaluation studies, including formative evaluations (conducted during the development or implementation of a program to provide feedback for improvement), summative evaluations (conducted at the end of a program to determine its overall effectiveness), process evaluations (focusing on how a program is implemented and delivered), outcome evaluations (assessing the short-term and intermediate effects of a program), and impact evaluations (measuring the long-term and broad consequences of a program).

In medical contexts, evaluation studies are often used to assess the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of new treatments, interventions, or technologies. These studies can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about patient care, guide policymakers in developing evidence-based policies, and promote accountability and transparency in healthcare systems. Examples of evaluation studies in medicine include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compare the outcomes of a new treatment to those of a standard or placebo treatment, observational studies that examine the real-world effectiveness and safety of interventions, and economic evaluations that assess the costs and benefits of different healthcare options.

Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) is a group of slow-growing mycobacteria that includes Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare. These bacteria are commonly found in water, soil, and dust, and can cause pulmonary disease, lymphadenitis, and disseminated infection, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS. The infection caused by MAC is often chronic and difficult to eradicate, requiring long-term antibiotic therapy.

'Aza compounds' is a general term used in chemistry to describe organic compounds containing a nitrogen atom (denoted by the symbol 'N' or 'aza') that has replaced a carbon atom in a hydrocarbon structure. The term 'aza' comes from the Greek word for nitrogen, 'azote.'

In medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, aza compounds are of particular interest because the presence of the nitrogen atom can significantly affect the chemical and biological properties of the compound. For example, aza compounds may exhibit enhanced bioavailability, metabolic stability, or receptor binding affinity compared to their non-aza counterparts.

Some common examples of aza compounds in medicine include:

1. Aza-aromatic compounds: These are aromatic compounds that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in the ring structure. Examples include pyridine, quinoline, and isoquinoline derivatives, which have been used as anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer agents.
2. Aza-heterocyclic compounds: These are non-aromatic compounds that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in a cyclic structure. Examples include azepine, diazepine, and triazole derivatives, which have been used as anxiolytic, anti-viral, and anti-fungal agents.
3. Aza-peptides: These are peptide compounds that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in the backbone structure. Examples include azapeptides and azabicyclopeptides, which have been used as enzyme inhibitors and neuroprotective agents.
4. Aza-sugars: These are sugar derivatives that contain one or more nitrogen atoms in the ring structure. Examples include azasugars and iminosugars, which have been used as glycosidase inhibitors and anti-viral agents.

Overall, aza compounds represent an important class of medicinal agents with diverse chemical structures and biological activities.

Microscopy is a technical field in medicine that involves the use of microscopes to observe structures and phenomena that are too small to be seen by the naked eye. It allows for the examination of samples such as tissues, cells, and microorganisms at high magnifications, enabling the detection and analysis of various medical conditions, including infections, diseases, and cellular abnormalities.

There are several types of microscopy used in medicine, including:

1. Light Microscopy: This is the most common type of microscopy, which uses visible light to illuminate and magnify samples. It can be used to examine a wide range of biological specimens, such as tissue sections, blood smears, and bacteria.
2. Electron Microscopy: This type of microscopy uses a beam of electrons instead of light to produce highly detailed images of samples. It is often used in research settings to study the ultrastructure of cells and tissues.
3. Fluorescence Microscopy: This technique involves labeling specific molecules within a sample with fluorescent dyes, allowing for their visualization under a microscope. It can be used to study protein interactions, gene expression, and cell signaling pathways.
4. Confocal Microscopy: This type of microscopy uses a laser beam to scan a sample point by point, producing high-resolution images with reduced background noise. It is often used in medical research to study the structure and function of cells and tissues.
5. Scanning Probe Microscopy: This technique involves scanning a sample with a physical probe, allowing for the measurement of topography, mechanical properties, and other characteristics at the nanoscale. It can be used in medical research to study the structure and function of individual molecules and cells.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Specimen handling is a set of procedures and practices followed in the collection, storage, transportation, and processing of medical samples or specimens (e.g., blood, tissue, urine, etc.) for laboratory analysis. Proper specimen handling ensures accurate test results, patient safety, and data integrity. It includes:

1. Correct labeling of the specimen container with required patient information.
2. Using appropriate containers and materials to collect, store, and transport the specimen.
3. Following proper collection techniques to avoid contamination or damage to the specimen.
4. Adhering to specific storage conditions (temperature, time, etc.) before testing.
5. Ensuring secure and timely transportation of the specimen to the laboratory.
6. Properly documenting all steps in the handling process for traceability and quality assurance.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

A tuberculoma is a specific type of granulomatous lesion that occurs in the brain due to infection with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium. This condition is relatively rare in developed countries but is still common in developing nations where tuberculosis (TB) is prevalent.

Intracranial tuberculomas are formed when M. tuberculosis bacteria spread through the bloodstream from a primary focus, usually in the lungs, and lodge in the brain tissue. The bacteria then multiply within the brain, leading to an inflammatory response characterized by the formation of granulomas. These granulomas consist of central caseous necrosis (cheese-like material) surrounded by a layer of epithelioid histiocytes, lymphocytes, and multinucleated giant cells.

Tuberculomas can vary in size from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. They may be solitary or multiple and are often found near the surface of the brain, particularly in the cerebral cortex or meninges (the protective membranes surrounding the brain). The presence of intracranial tuberculomas can lead to various neurological symptoms, such as headaches, seizures, focal deficits, and cognitive impairment.

Diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas typically involves a combination of imaging techniques (such as CT or MRI scans) and laboratory tests (such as cerebrospinal fluid analysis and PCR for M. tuberculosis). Treatment usually consists of a prolonged course of anti-tuberculous medications, which can help to reduce the size of the lesions and alleviate symptoms. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove or decompress large or symptomatic tuberculomas.

Nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAATs) are medical laboratory methods used to increase the number of copies of a specific DNA or RNA sequence. These techniques are widely used in molecular biology and diagnostics, including the detection and diagnosis of infectious diseases, genetic disorders, and cancer.

The most commonly used NAAT is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate and replicate DNA strands. Other NAATs include loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), and transcription-mediated amplification (TMA).

NAATs offer several advantages over traditional culture methods for detecting pathogens, including faster turnaround times, increased sensitivity and specificity, and the ability to detect viable but non-culturable organisms. However, they also require specialized equipment and trained personnel, and there is a risk of contamination and false positive results if proper precautions are not taken.

Rifamycins are a class of antibiotics derived from the bacterium Amycolatopsis rifamycinica. They have a unique chemical structure and mechanism of action, which involves inhibiting bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. This leads to the prevention of bacterial transcription and ultimately results in bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity, depending on the drug concentration and the susceptibility of the bacteria.

Rifamycins are primarily used in the treatment of various types of infections caused by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as mycobacteria. Some examples of rifamycin antibiotics include rifampin (also known as rifampicin), rifabutin, and rifapentine. These drugs are often used to treat tuberculosis, meningitis, and other serious infections. It is important to note that resistance to rifamycins can develop rapidly if the drugs are not used appropriately or if they are used to treat infections caused by bacteria that are already resistant to these antibiotics.

"World Health" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is often used in the context of global health, which can be defined as:

"The area of study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. It emphasizes trans-national health issues, determinants, and solutions; involves many disciplines within and beyond the health sciences and engages stakeholders from across sectors and societies." (World Health Organization)

Therefore, "world health" could refer to the overall health status and health challenges faced by populations around the world. It encompasses a broad range of factors that affect the health of individuals and communities, including social, economic, environmental, and political determinants. The World Health Organization (WHO) plays a key role in monitoring and promoting global health, setting international standards and guidelines, and coordinating responses to global health emergencies.

HIV seronegativity is a term used to describe a person who has tested negative for HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) antibodies in their blood. This means that the individual does not show evidence of current or past infection with HIV, which can cause AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). However, it's important to note that there is a window period after initial infection during which a person may test negative for HIV antibodies, even though they are indeed infected. This window period typically lasts between 2-6 weeks but can extend up to 3 months in some cases. Therefore, if someone believes they have been exposed to HIV, they should consider getting tested again after this window period has passed.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

An emigrant is a person who leaves their native country to live permanently in another country. The process of leaving one's country to settle in another is called emigration.

On the other hand, an immigrant is a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country. The process of coming to live permanently in a new country is called immigration.

So, the main difference between emigrants and immigrants lies in the perspective: emigrants are people leaving their own country, while immigrants are people entering a new country.

Microbial viability is the ability of a microorganism to grow, reproduce and maintain its essential life functions. It can be determined through various methods such as cell growth in culture media, staining techniques that detect metabolic activity, or direct observation of active movement. In contrast, non-viable microorganisms are those that have been killed or inactivated and cannot replicate or cause further harm. The measurement of microbial viability is important in various fields such as medicine, food safety, water quality, and environmental monitoring to assess the effectiveness of disinfection and sterilization procedures, and to determine the presence and concentration of harmful bacteria in different environments.

Diagnostic errors refer to inaccurate or delayed diagnoses of a patient's medical condition, which can lead to improper or unnecessary treatment and potentially serious harm to the patient. These errors can occur due to various factors such as lack of clinical knowledge, failure to consider all possible diagnoses, inadequate communication between healthcare providers and patients, and problems with testing or interpretation of test results. Diagnostic errors are a significant cause of preventable harm in medical care and have been identified as a priority area for quality improvement efforts.

Medical mass screening, also known as population screening, is a public health service that aims to identify and detect asymptomatic individuals in a given population who have or are at risk of a specific disease. The goal is to provide early treatment, reduce morbidity and mortality, and prevent the spread of diseases within the community.

A mass screening program typically involves offering a simple, quick, and non-invasive test to a large number of people in a defined population, regardless of their risk factors or symptoms. Those who test positive are then referred for further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical interventions. Examples of mass screening programs include mammography for breast cancer detection, PSA (prostate-specific antigen) testing for prostate cancer, and fecal occult blood testing for colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that mass screening programs should be evidence-based, cost-effective, and ethically sound, with clear benefits outweighing potential harms. They should also consider factors such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, the accuracy and reliability of the screening test, and the availability and effectiveness of treatment options.

CD4-positive T-lymphocytes, also known as CD4+ T cells or helper T cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune response. They express the CD4 receptor on their surface and help coordinate the immune system's response to infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria.

CD4+ T cells recognize and bind to specific antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages. Once activated, they can differentiate into various subsets of effector cells, including Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cells, each with distinct functions in the immune response.

CD4+ T cells are particularly important in the immune response to HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), which targets and destroys these cells, leading to a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. The number of CD4+ T cells is often used as a marker of disease progression in HIV infection, with lower counts indicating more advanced disease.

Combination drug therapy is a treatment approach that involves the use of multiple medications with different mechanisms of action to achieve better therapeutic outcomes. This approach is often used in the management of complex medical conditions such as cancer, HIV/AIDS, and cardiovascular diseases. The goal of combination drug therapy is to improve efficacy, reduce the risk of drug resistance, decrease the likelihood of adverse effects, and enhance the overall quality of life for patients.

In combining drugs, healthcare providers aim to target various pathways involved in the disease process, which may help to:

1. Increase the effectiveness of treatment by attacking the disease from multiple angles.
2. Decrease the dosage of individual medications, reducing the risk and severity of side effects.
3. Slow down or prevent the development of drug resistance, a common problem in chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and cancer.
4. Improve patient compliance by simplifying dosing schedules and reducing pill burden.

Examples of combination drug therapy include:

1. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment, which typically involves three or more drugs from different classes to suppress viral replication and prevent the development of drug resistance.
2. Chemotherapy regimens for cancer treatment, where multiple cytotoxic agents are used to target various stages of the cell cycle and reduce the likelihood of tumor cells developing resistance.
3. Cardiovascular disease management, which may involve combining medications such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta-blockers, diuretics, and statins to control blood pressure, heart rate, fluid balance, and cholesterol levels.
4. Treatment of tuberculosis, which often involves a combination of several antibiotics to target different aspects of the bacterial life cycle and prevent the development of drug-resistant strains.

When prescribing combination drug therapy, healthcare providers must carefully consider factors such as potential drug interactions, dosing schedules, adverse effects, and contraindications to ensure safe and effective treatment. Regular monitoring of patients is essential to assess treatment response, manage side effects, and adjust the treatment plan as needed.

Vaccination is a simple, safe, and effective way to protect people against harmful diseases, before they come into contact with them. It uses your body's natural defenses to build protection to specific infections and makes your immune system stronger.

A vaccination usually contains a small, harmless piece of a virus or bacteria (or toxins produced by these germs) that has been made inactive or weakened so it won't cause the disease itself. This piece of the germ is known as an antigen. When the vaccine is introduced into the body, the immune system recognizes the antigen as foreign and produces antibodies to fight it.

If a person then comes into contact with the actual disease-causing germ, their immune system will recognize it and immediately produce antibodies to destroy it. The person is therefore protected against that disease. This is known as active immunity.

Vaccinations are important for both individual and public health. They prevent the spread of contagious diseases and protect vulnerable members of the population, such as young children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems who cannot be vaccinated or for whom vaccination is not effective.

Thioacetazone is an antituberculous drug that is primarily used in the treatment of tuberculosis. It works by inhibiting the synthesis of mycobacterial cell walls, thereby preventing the growth and multiplication of the bacteria that cause tuberculosis. Thioacetazone is often used in combination with other antituberculous drugs such as isoniazid and rifampicin to improve treatment outcomes and prevent drug resistance.

The chemical formula for thioacetazone is C4H6Cl2N2OS, and it is available in the form of tablets or capsules for oral administration. Common side effects of thioacetazone include skin rashes, gastrointestinal disturbances, and abnormal liver function tests. Rare but serious side effects may include severe skin reactions, hepatitis, and blood disorders. Thioacetazone is generally well-tolerated, but it should be used with caution in patients with liver or kidney disease, as well as those taking other medications that may interact with thioacetazone.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

Tuberculous pericarditis is a specific form of pericarditis (inflammation of the pericardium, the thin sac-like membrane that surrounds the heart) that is caused by the bacterial infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This type of pericarditis is more common in areas where tuberculosis is prevalent and can lead to serious complications if not diagnosed and treated promptly.

In tuberculous pericarditis, the bacteria typically spread from the lungs (the most common site of TB infection) or other infected organs through the bloodstream to the pericardium. The infection causes an inflammatory response, leading to the accumulation of fluid in the pericardial space (pericardial effusion), which can put pressure on the heart and impair its function. In some cases, the inflammation may lead to the formation of scar tissue, causing the pericardium to thicken and constrict, a condition known as constrictive pericarditis.

Symptoms of tuberculous pericarditis can include chest pain, cough, fever, fatigue, weight loss, and difficulty breathing. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging tests (such as echocardiography, CT scan, or MRI), and laboratory tests (including analysis of the pericardial fluid). Treatment usually consists of a long course of antibiotics specific to TB, along with anti-inflammatory medications and close monitoring for potential complications.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

"Mycobacterium kansasii" is a slow-growing, gram-positive bacterium that belongs to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It is named after the state of Kansas where it was first isolated. This bacterium can cause pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in humans, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis.

The symptoms of M. kansasii infection are similar to those of tuberculosis and can include cough, fever, night sweats, fatigue, weight loss, and chest pain. The diagnosis of M. kansasii infection is usually made by culturing the bacterium from clinical specimens such as sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Treatment typically involves a combination of antibiotics such as rifampin, ethambutol, and isoniazid for an extended period of time, often up to 12-24 months.

Thioridazine is an antipsychotic medication that belongs to the class of phenothiazines. It works by blocking dopamine receptors in the brain, which helps to reduce psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, and disordered thought processes. Thioridazine is used to treat schizophrenia and other mental disorders associated with anxiety, agitation, or hostility.

It's important to note that thioridazine has been associated with serious side effects, including prolongation of the QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG), which can lead to potentially fatal arrhythmias. Therefore, its use is generally reserved for patients who have not responded to other antipsychotic medications or who cannot tolerate them. Thioridazine has been withdrawn from the market in many countries due to these safety concerns.

DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase enzyme that plays a crucial role in the negative supercoiling and relaxation of DNA in bacteria. It functions by introducing transient double-stranded breaks into the DNA helix, allowing the strands to pass through one another and thereby reducing positive supercoils or introducing negative supercoils as required for proper DNA function, replication, and transcription.

DNA gyrase is composed of two subunits, GyrA and GyrB, which form a heterotetrameric structure (AB-BA) in the functional enzyme. The enzyme's activity is targeted by several antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and novobiocin, making it an essential target for antibacterial drug development.

In summary, DNA gyrase is a bacterial topoisomerase responsible for maintaining the correct supercoiling of DNA during replication and transcription, which can be inhibited by specific antibiotics to combat bacterial infections.

Clinical laboratory techniques are methods and procedures used in medical laboratories to perform various tests and examinations on patient samples. These techniques help in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases by analyzing body fluids, tissues, and other specimens. Some common clinical laboratory techniques include:

1. Clinical chemistry: It involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid to measure the levels of chemicals, hormones, enzymes, and other substances in the body. These measurements can help diagnose various medical conditions, monitor treatment progress, and assess overall health.

2. Hematology: This technique focuses on the study of blood and its components, including red and white blood cells, platelets, and clotting factors. Hematological tests are used to diagnose anemia, infections, bleeding disorders, and other hematologic conditions.

3. Microbiology: It deals with the identification and culture of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Microbiological techniques are essential for detecting infectious diseases, determining appropriate antibiotic therapy, and monitoring the effectiveness of treatment.

4. Immunology: This technique involves studying the immune system and its response to various antigens, such as bacteria, viruses, and allergens. Immunological tests are used to diagnose autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiencies, and allergies.

5. Histopathology: It is the microscopic examination of tissue samples to identify any abnormalities or diseases. Histopathological techniques are crucial for diagnosing cancer, inflammatory conditions, and other tissue-related disorders.

6. Molecular biology: This technique deals with the study of DNA, RNA, and proteins at the molecular level. Molecular biology tests can be used to detect genetic mutations, identify infectious agents, and monitor disease progression.

7. Cytogenetics: It involves analyzing chromosomes and genes in cells to diagnose genetic disorders, cancer, and other diseases. Cytogenetic techniques include karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

8. Flow cytometry: This technique measures physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles as they flow through a laser beam. Flow cytometry is used to analyze cell populations, identify specific cell types, and detect abnormalities in cells.

9. Diagnostic radiology: It uses imaging technologies such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound to diagnose various medical conditions.

10. Clinical chemistry: This technique involves analyzing body fluids, such as blood and urine, to measure the concentration of various chemicals and substances. Clinical chemistry tests are used to diagnose metabolic disorders, electrolyte imbalances, and other health conditions.

A granuloma in the respiratory tract refers to a small nodular lesion that forms in the lung tissue due to an ongoing immune response. It is typically composed of macrophages, lymphocytes, and other inflammatory cells that cluster together around a foreign substance or organism that the body cannot eliminate.

Granulomas can form in response to various stimuli, including infectious agents such as mycobacteria (tuberculosis, nontuberculous mycobacteria), fungi, and parasites, as well as non-infectious causes like inhaled particles (e.g., silica, beryllium) or autoimmune diseases (e.g., sarcoidosis).

These lesions can cause damage to the lung tissue over time, leading to symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, and fatigue. Diagnosis often involves imaging studies like chest X-rays or CT scans, followed by biopsy and microscopic examination to confirm the presence of granulomas and identify the underlying cause. Treatment depends on the underlying cause but may include antibiotics, corticosteroids, or other immunosuppressive medications.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

HIV seropositivity is a term used to describe a positive result on an HIV antibody test. This means that the individual has developed antibodies against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), indicating that they have been infected with the virus. However, it's important to note that this does not necessarily mean that the person has AIDS, as there can be a long period between HIV infection and the development of AIDS.

Patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases refers to the spread of an infectious agent or disease from a patient to a healthcare professional. This can occur through various routes, including:

1. Contact transmission: This includes direct contact, such as touching or shaking hands with an infected patient, or indirect contact, such as touching a contaminated surface or object.
2. Droplet transmission: This occurs when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or breathes out droplets containing the infectious agent, which can then be inhaled by a nearby healthcare professional.
3. Airborne transmission: This involves the spread of infectious agents through the air over long distances, usually requiring specialized medical procedures or equipment.

Healthcare professionals are at risk of patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases due to their close contact with patients and the potential for exposure to various pathogens. It is essential for healthcare professionals to follow standard precautions, including hand hygiene, personal protective equipment (PPE), and respiratory protection, to minimize the risk of transmission. Additionally, proper vaccination and education on infection prevention and control measures can further reduce the risk of patient-to-professional transmission of infectious diseases.

Diagnostic techniques for the respiratory system are methods used to identify and diagnose various diseases and conditions affecting the lungs and breathing. Here are some commonly used diagnostic techniques:

1. Physical Examination: A healthcare provider will listen to your chest with a stethoscope to check for abnormal breath sounds, such as wheezing or crackles. They may also observe your respiratory rate and effort.
2. Chest X-ray: This imaging test can help identify abnormalities in the lungs, such as tumors, fluid accumulation, or collapsed lung sections.
3. Computed Tomography (CT) Scan: A CT scan uses X-rays to create detailed cross-sectional images of the lungs and surrounding structures. It can help detect nodules, cysts, or other abnormalities that may not be visible on a chest X-ray.
4. Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs): These tests measure how well your lungs are working by assessing your ability to inhale and exhale air. Common PFTs include spirometry, lung volume measurement, and diffusing capacity testing.
5. Bronchoscopy: A thin, flexible tube with a camera and light is inserted through the nose or mouth into the airways to examine the lungs' interior and obtain tissue samples for biopsy.
6. Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL): During a bronchoscopy, fluid is introduced into a specific area of the lung and then suctioned out to collect cells and other materials for analysis.
7. Sleep Studies: These tests monitor your breathing patterns during sleep to diagnose conditions like sleep apnea or other sleep-related breathing disorders.
8. Sputum Analysis: A sample of coughed-up mucus is examined under a microscope to identify any abnormal cells, bacteria, or other organisms that may be causing respiratory issues.
9. Blood Tests: Blood tests can help diagnose various respiratory conditions by measuring oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, identifying specific antibodies or antigens, or detecting genetic markers associated with certain diseases.
10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scan: A PET scan uses a small amount of radioactive material to create detailed images of the body's internal structures and functions, helping identify areas of abnormal cell growth or metabolic activity in the lungs.

Clofazimine is an antimycobacterial medication used mainly in the treatment of leprosy (Hansen's disease) and also has some activity against Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections. It is an oral riminophenazine dye that accumulates in macrophages and bacterial cells, where it inhibits mycobacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Its side effects include skin discoloration, gastrointestinal symptoms, and potential eye toxicity.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

Serologic tests are laboratory tests that detect the presence or absence of antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum (the clear liquid that separates from clotted blood). These tests are commonly used to diagnose infectious diseases, as well as autoimmune disorders and other medical conditions.

In serologic testing for infectious diseases, a sample of the patient's blood is collected and allowed to clot. The serum is then separated from the clot and tested for the presence of antibodies that the body has produced in response to an infection. The test may be used to identify the specific type of infection or to determine whether the infection is active or has resolved.

Serologic tests can also be used to diagnose autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, by detecting the presence of antibodies that are directed against the body's own tissues. These tests can help doctors confirm a diagnosis and monitor the progression of the disease.

It is important to note that serologic tests are not always 100% accurate and may produce false positive or false negative results. Therefore, they should be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical findings and laboratory test results.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Vietnam" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Southeast Asia. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Delayed hypersensitivity, also known as type IV hypersensitivity, is a type of immune response that takes place several hours to days after exposure to an antigen. It is characterized by the activation of T cells (a type of white blood cell) and the release of various chemical mediators, leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction is typically associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as contact dermatitis, granulomatous disorders (e.g. tuberculosis), and certain autoimmune diseases.

The reaction process involves the following steps:

1. Sensitization: The first time an individual is exposed to an antigen, T cells are activated and become sensitized to it. This process can take several days.
2. Memory: Some of the activated T cells differentiate into memory T cells, which remain in the body and are ready to respond quickly if the same antigen is encountered again.
3. Effector phase: Upon subsequent exposure to the antigen, the memory T cells become activated and release cytokines, which recruit other immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to the site of inflammation. These cells cause tissue damage through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and the release of reactive oxygen species.
4. Chronic inflammation: The ongoing immune response can lead to chronic inflammation, which may result in tissue destruction and fibrosis (scarring).

Examples of conditions associated with delayed hypersensitivity include:

* Contact dermatitis (e.g. poison ivy, nickel allergy)
* Tuberculosis
* Leprosy
* Sarcoidosis
* Rheumatoid arthritis
* Type 1 diabetes mellitus
* Multiple sclerosis
* Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis)

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Gambia" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in West Africa, officially known as the Republic of The Gambia. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

The term "developing countries" is a socio-economic classification used to describe nations that are in the process of industrialization and modernization. This term is often used interchangeably with "low and middle-income countries" or "Global South." The World Bank defines developing countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of less than US $12,695.

In the context of healthcare, developing countries face unique challenges including limited access to quality medical care, lack of resources and infrastructure, high burden of infectious diseases, and a shortage of trained healthcare professionals. These factors contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes between developing and developed nations.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

A CD4 lymphocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the number of CD4 T-cells (also known as CD4+ T-cells or helper T-cells) in a sample of blood. CD4 cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune response, particularly in fighting off infections caused by viruses and other pathogens.

CD4 cells express a protein on their surface called the CD4 receptor, which is used by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to infect and destroy these cells. As a result, people with HIV infection or AIDS often have low CD4 lymphocyte counts, which can make them more susceptible to opportunistic infections and other complications.

A normal CD4 lymphocyte count ranges from 500 to 1,200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (cells/mm3) in healthy adults. A lower than normal CD4 count is often used as a marker for the progression of HIV infection and the development of AIDS. CD4 counts are typically monitored over time to assess the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to guide clinical decision-making regarding the need for additional interventions, such as prophylaxis against opportunistic infections.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

Gastric lavage, also known as stomach pumping, is a medical procedure where the stomach's contents are emptied using a tube that is inserted through the mouth or nose and into the stomach. The tube is then connected to suction, which helps remove the stomach contents. This procedure is often used in emergency situations to treat poisonings or overdoses by removing the toxic substance before it gets absorbed into the bloodstream. It can also be used to empty the stomach before certain surgeries or procedures.

Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine, a type of small signaling protein involved in immune response and inflammation. It is primarily produced by activated macrophages, although other cell types such as T-cells, natural killer cells, and mast cells can also produce it.

TNF-α plays a crucial role in the body's defense against infection and tissue injury by mediating inflammatory responses, activating immune cells, and inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in certain types of cells. It does this by binding to its receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, which are found on the surface of many cell types.

In addition to its role in the immune response, TNF-α has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, as well as cancer, where it can promote tumor growth and metastasis.

Therapeutic agents that target TNF-α, such as infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept, have been developed to treat these conditions. However, these drugs can also increase the risk of infections and other side effects, so their use must be carefully monitored.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hospitals, Chronic Disease" is not a recognized medical term or concept. Hospitals are healthcare facilities that provide medical care for patients with various conditions, including both acute and chronic diseases. A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often requires ongoing management and care. Examples of chronic diseases include diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and arthritis.

If you have any questions related to the management or treatment of specific chronic diseases in a hospital setting, I would be happy to try to help clarify those topics for you.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Prisons" are not a medical term, but rather a term used to describe facilities where individuals who have been convicted of crimes serve their sentences of incarceration. They are run by correctional systems and law enforcement agencies, not healthcare providers or medical organizations.

However, I can certainly provide information about the potential impact of prisons on health and healthcare. Prisons can have significant effects on the physical and mental health of inmates due to factors such as overcrowding, violence, limited access to healthcare services, and the transmission of infectious diseases like HIV and hepatitis C. Additionally, many inmates have underlying health issues that may be exacerbated by incarceration, including substance use disorders, mental illness, and chronic medical conditions.

Therefore, it is important for correctional facilities to provide adequate healthcare services to their inmates, not only to meet basic human rights standards but also to promote public health more broadly by reducing the spread of infectious diseases and improving the health outcomes of individuals who will eventually be released back into the community.

Skin tests are medical diagnostic procedures that involve the application of a small amount of a substance to the skin, usually through a scratch, prick, or injection, to determine if the body has an allergic reaction to it. The most common type of skin test is the patch test, which involves applying a patch containing a small amount of the suspected allergen to the skin and observing the area for signs of a reaction, such as redness, swelling, or itching, over a period of several days. Another type of skin test is the intradermal test, in which a small amount of the substance is injected just beneath the surface of the skin. Skin tests are used to help diagnose allergies, including those to pollen, mold, pets, and foods, as well as to identify sensitivities to medications, chemicals, and other substances.

Ofloxacin is an antibacterial drug, specifically a fluoroquinolone. It works by inhibiting the bacterial DNA gyrase, which is essential for the bacteria to replicate. This results in the death of the bacteria and helps to stop the infection. Ofloxacin is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. It is available in various forms, such as tablets, capsules, and eye drops. As with any medication, it should be used only under the direction of a healthcare professional, and its use may be associated with certain risks and side effects.

Amidohydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of amides and related compounds, resulting in the formation of an acid and an alcohol. This reaction is also known as amide hydrolysis or amide bond cleavage. Amidohydrolases play important roles in various biological processes, including the metabolism of xenobiotics (foreign substances) and endogenous compounds (those naturally produced within an organism).

The term "amidohydrolase" is a broad one that encompasses several specific types of enzymes, such as proteases, esterases, lipases, and nitrilases. These enzymes have different substrate specificities and catalytic mechanisms but share the common ability to hydrolyze amide bonds.

Proteases, for example, are a major group of amidohydrolases that specifically cleave peptide bonds in proteins. They are involved in various physiological processes, such as protein degradation, digestion, and regulation of biological pathways. Esterases and lipases hydrolyze ester bonds in various substrates, including lipids and other organic compounds. Nitrilases convert nitriles into carboxylic acids and ammonia by cleaving the nitrile bond (C≡N) through hydrolysis.

Amidohydrolases are found in various organisms, from bacteria to humans, and have diverse applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. For instance, they can be used for the production of pharmaceuticals, biofuels, detergents, and other chemicals. Additionally, inhibitors of amidohydrolases can serve as therapeutic agents for treating various diseases, such as cancer, viral infections, and neurodegenerative disorders.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Galactans are a type of complex carbohydrates known as oligosaccharides that are composed of galactose molecules. They can be found in certain plants, including beans, lentils, and some fruits and vegetables. In the human body, galactans are not digestible and can reach the colon intact, where they may serve as a substrate for fermentation by gut bacteria. This can lead to the production of short-chain fatty acids, which have been shown to have various health benefits. However, in some individuals with irritable bowel syndrome or other functional gastrointestinal disorders, consumption of galactans may cause digestive symptoms such as bloating, gas, and diarrhea.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

There is no single, universally accepted medical definition of "homeless persons." However, in the public health and healthcare contexts, homeless individuals are often defined as those who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence. This can include people who are living on the streets, in shelters, vehicles, or other temporary or emergency housing situations. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, a major federal law in the United States that provides funding for homeless services programs, defines homeless individuals as those who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, and includes people who are living in shelters, transitional housing, or doubled up with family or friends due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or similar reasons.

Quinolines are a class of organic compounds that consist of a bicyclic structure made up of a benzene ring fused to a piperidine ring. They have a wide range of applications, but they are perhaps best known for their use in the synthesis of various medications, including antibiotics and antimalarial drugs.

Quinolone antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, work by inhibiting the bacterial enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. They are commonly used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and skin infections.

Quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells. They are commonly used to prevent and treat malaria.

It is important to note that quinolines have been associated with serious side effects, including tendinitis and tendon rupture, nerve damage, and abnormal heart rhythms. As with any medication, it is important to use quinolines only under the supervision of a healthcare provider, and to follow their instructions carefully.

Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibiotics that are widely used to treat various types of bacterial infections. They work by interfering with the bacteria's ability to replicate its DNA, which ultimately leads to the death of the bacterial cells. Fluoroquinolones are known for their broad-spectrum activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Some common fluoroquinolones include ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and ofloxacin. These antibiotics are often used to treat respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and gastrointestinal infections, among others.

While fluoroquinolones are generally well-tolerated, they can cause serious side effects in some people, including tendonitis, nerve damage, and changes in mood or behavior. As with all antibiotics, it's important to use fluoroquinolones only when necessary and under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Aerosols are defined in the medical field as suspensions of fine solid or liquid particles in a gas. In the context of public health and medicine, aerosols often refer to particles that can remain suspended in air for long periods of time and can be inhaled. They can contain various substances, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, or chemicals, and can play a role in the transmission of respiratory infections or other health effects.

For example, when an infected person coughs or sneezes, they may produce respiratory droplets that can contain viruses like influenza or SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). Some of these droplets can evaporate quickly and leave behind smaller particles called aerosols, which can remain suspended in the air for hours and potentially be inhaled by others. This is one way that respiratory viruses can spread between people in close proximity to each other.

Aerosols can also be generated through medical procedures such as bronchoscopy, suctioning, or nebulizer treatments, which can produce aerosols containing bacteria, viruses, or other particles that may pose an infection risk to healthcare workers or other patients. Therefore, appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and airborne precautions are often necessary to reduce the risk of transmission in these settings.

Cellular immunity, also known as cell-mediated immunity, is a type of immune response that involves the activation of immune cells, such as T lymphocytes (T cells), to protect the body against infected or damaged cells. This form of immunity is important for fighting off infections caused by viruses and intracellular bacteria, as well as for recognizing and destroying cancer cells.

Cellular immunity involves a complex series of interactions between various immune cells and molecules. When a pathogen infects a cell, the infected cell displays pieces of the pathogen on its surface in a process called antigen presentation. This attracts T cells, which recognize the antigens and become activated. Activated T cells then release cytokines, chemicals that help coordinate the immune response, and can directly attack and kill infected cells or help activate other immune cells to do so.

Cellular immunity is an important component of the adaptive immune system, which is able to learn and remember specific pathogens in order to mount a faster and more effective response upon subsequent exposure. This form of immunity is also critical for the rejection of transplanted organs, as the immune system recognizes the transplanted tissue as foreign and attacks it.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

I apologize, but I am not able to find a medical definition for "Benzophenoneidum." It is possible that this term may be used in other scientific fields, such as chemistry or materials science, but it does not appear to have a specific meaning within the field of medicine.

Benzophenones are a class of chemical compounds that contain a benzene ring linked to a ketone group through a carbon-carbon bond. They are often used in industrial and consumer products as UV absorbers, fragrances, and photographic developers. Some benzophenones have been studied for their potential toxicity and endocrine-disrupting effects, but they do not have a specific medical definition or application.

If you meant to ask about a different term or if you need information on a related topic, please let me know!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Africa" actually refers to a continent, not a medical condition or concept. Africa is the second-largest continent in the world, consisting of 54 countries and a wide range of diverse ethnic groups, cultures, languages, and landscapes. It is home to a vast array of wildlife, including many species that are not found anywhere else in the world. If you have any questions about Africa's geography, history, or culture, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Tanzania" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in East Africa. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Gene deletion is a type of mutation where a segment of DNA, containing one or more genes, is permanently lost or removed from a chromosome. This can occur due to various genetic mechanisms such as homologous recombination, non-homologous end joining, or other types of genomic rearrangements.

The deletion of a gene can have varying effects on the organism, depending on the function of the deleted gene and its importance for normal physiological processes. If the deleted gene is essential for survival, the deletion may result in embryonic lethality or developmental abnormalities. However, if the gene is non-essential or has redundant functions, the deletion may not have any noticeable effects on the organism's phenotype.

Gene deletions can also be used as a tool in genetic research to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes. For example, researchers may use gene deletion techniques to create genetically modified animal models to investigate the impact of gene deletion on disease progression or development.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is not a medical condition or term, but rather a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. Here's a brief description:

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that acts as the global authority on public health issues. Established in 1948, WHO's primary role is to coordinate and collaborate with its member states to promote health, prevent diseases, and ensure universal access to healthcare services. WHO is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and has regional offices around the world. It plays a crucial role in setting global health standards, monitoring disease outbreaks, and providing guidance on various public health concerns, including infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, mental health, environmental health, and maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health.

Host-pathogen interactions refer to the complex and dynamic relationship between a living organism (the host) and a disease-causing agent (the pathogen). This interaction can involve various molecular, cellular, and physiological processes that occur between the two entities. The outcome of this interaction can determine whether the host will develop an infection or not, as well as the severity and duration of the illness.

During host-pathogen interactions, the pathogen may release virulence factors that allow it to evade the host's immune system, colonize tissues, and obtain nutrients for its survival and replication. The host, in turn, may mount an immune response to recognize and eliminate the pathogen, which can involve various mechanisms such as inflammation, phagocytosis, and the production of antimicrobial agents.

Understanding the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. This knowledge can help identify new targets for therapeutic interventions, inform vaccine design, and guide public health policies to control the spread of infectious agents.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Medically, the term "refugees" does not have a specific definition. However, in a broader social and humanitarian context, refugees are defined by the United Nations as:

"People who are outside their country of nationality or habitual residence; have a well-founded fear of persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion; and are unable or unwilling to avail themselves of the protection of that country, or to return there, for fear of persecution."

Refugees often face significant health challenges due to forced displacement, violence, trauma, limited access to healthcare services, and harsh living conditions. They may experience physical and mental health issues, including infectious diseases, malnutrition, depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Providing medical care and support for refugees is an important aspect of global public health.

Glycolipids are a type of lipid (fat) molecule that contain one or more sugar molecules attached to them. They are important components of cell membranes, where they play a role in cell recognition and signaling. Glycolipids are also found on the surface of some viruses and bacteria, where they can be recognized by the immune system as foreign invaders.

There are several different types of glycolipids, including cerebrosides, gangliosides, and globosides. These molecules differ in the number and type of sugar molecules they contain, as well as the structure of their lipid tails. Glycolipids are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of cells, and they are transported to the cell membrane through vesicles.

Abnormalities in glycolipid metabolism or structure have been implicated in a number of diseases, including certain types of cancer, neurological disorders, and autoimmune diseases. For example, mutations in genes involved in the synthesis of glycolipids can lead to conditions such as Tay-Sachs disease and Gaucher's disease, which are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal glycolipids in cells.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

A "false positive reaction" in medical testing refers to a situation where a diagnostic test incorrectly indicates the presence of a specific condition or disease in an individual who does not actually have it. This occurs when the test results give a positive outcome, while the true health status of the person is negative or free from the condition being tested for.

False positive reactions can be caused by various factors including:

1. Presence of unrelated substances that interfere with the test result (e.g., cross-reactivity between similar molecules).
2. Low specificity of the test, which means it may detect other conditions or irrelevant factors as positive.
3. Contamination during sample collection, storage, or analysis.
4. Human errors in performing or interpreting the test results.

False positive reactions can have significant consequences, such as unnecessary treatments, anxiety, and increased healthcare costs. Therefore, it is essential to confirm any positive test result with additional tests or clinical evaluations before making a definitive diagnosis.

Lymphocyte activation is the process by which B-cells and T-cells (types of lymphocytes) become activated to perform effector functions in an immune response. This process involves the recognition of specific antigens presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages.

The activation of B-cells leads to their differentiation into plasma cells that produce antibodies, while the activation of T-cells results in the production of cytotoxic T-cells (CD8+ T-cells) that can directly kill infected cells or helper T-cells (CD4+ T-cells) that assist other immune cells.

Lymphocyte activation involves a series of intracellular signaling events, including the binding of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of cytokines, which ultimately result in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions. The activation process is tightly regulated to prevent excessive or inappropriate immune responses that can lead to autoimmunity or chronic inflammation.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Delayed diagnosis is a term used in the medical field to describe a situation where a medical condition or disease was not diagnosed in a timely manner, despite the patient having sought medical attention and presented with symptoms that should have led to an earlier diagnosis. This can occur due to various reasons such as failure to recognize symptoms, misinterpretation of test results, lack of appropriate follow-up care, or communication breakdowns between healthcare providers and patients.

A delayed diagnosis can result in worsening of the medical condition, increased severity of symptoms, decreased treatment options, and potentially poorer outcomes for the patient. It may also lead to additional medical expenses, longer recovery times, and emotional distress for the patient and their family members. In some cases, a delayed diagnosis may be considered medical malpractice if it can be shown that the healthcare provider failed to meet the standard of care required in diagnosing the condition.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a chronic, life-threatening condition caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). AIDS is the most advanced stage of HIV infection, characterized by the significant weakening of the immune system, making the person more susceptible to various opportunistic infections and cancers.

The medical definition of AIDS includes specific criteria based on CD4+ T-cell count or the presence of certain opportunistic infections and diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a person with HIV is diagnosed with AIDS when:

1. The CD4+ T-cell count falls below 200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (mm3) - a normal range is typically between 500 and 1,600 cells/mm3.
2. They develop one or more opportunistic infections or cancers that are indicative of advanced HIV disease, regardless of their CD4+ T-cell count.

Some examples of these opportunistic infections and cancers include:

* Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP)
* Candidiasis (thrush) affecting the esophagus, trachea, or lungs
* Cryptococcal meningitis
* Toxoplasmosis of the brain
* Cytomegalovirus disease
* Kaposi's sarcoma
* Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Invasive cervical cancer

It is important to note that with appropriate antiretroviral therapy (ART), people living with HIV can maintain their CD4+ T-cell counts, suppress viral replication, and prevent the progression to AIDS. Early diagnosis and consistent treatment are crucial for managing HIV and improving life expectancy and quality of life.

Mononuclear leukocytes are a type of white blood cells (leukocytes) that have a single, large nucleus. They include lymphocytes (B-cells, T-cells, and natural killer cells), monocytes, and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the body's immune system, including defending against infection and disease, and participating in immune responses and surveillance. Mononuclear leukocytes can be found in the bloodstream as well as in tissues throughout the body. They are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity, providing specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms to protect the body from harmful pathogens and other threats.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pakistan" is a country in South Asia and not a medical term or condition. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I would be happy to help!

"Multiple drug resistance" (MDR) is a term used in medicine to describe the condition where a patient's infection becomes resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs. This means that the bacteria, virus, fungus or parasite that is causing the infection has developed the ability to survive and multiply despite being exposed to medications that were originally designed to kill or inhibit its growth.

In particular, MDR occurs when an organism becomes resistant to at least one drug in three or more antimicrobial categories. This can happen due to genetic changes in the microorganism that allow it to survive in the presence of these drugs. The development of MDR is a significant concern for public health because it limits treatment options and can make infections harder, if not impossible, to treat.

MDR can develop through several mechanisms, including mutations in the genes that encode drug targets or enzymes involved in drug metabolism, as well as the acquisition of genetic elements such as plasmids and transposons that carry resistance genes. The overuse and misuse of antimicrobial drugs are major drivers of MDR, as they create selective pressure for the emergence and spread of resistant strains.

MDR infections can occur in various settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, and communities. They can affect people of all ages and backgrounds, although certain populations may be at higher risk, such as those with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. Preventing the spread of MDR requires a multifaceted approach that includes surveillance, infection control, antimicrobial stewardship, and research into new therapies and diagnostics.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

The Predictive Value of Tests, specifically the Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV), are measures used in diagnostic tests to determine the probability that a positive or negative test result is correct.

Positive Predictive Value (PPV) is the proportion of patients with a positive test result who actually have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true positives divided by the total number of positive results (true positives + false positives). A higher PPV indicates that a positive test result is more likely to be a true positive, and therefore the disease is more likely to be present.

Negative Predictive Value (NPV) is the proportion of patients with a negative test result who do not have the disease. It is calculated as the number of true negatives divided by the total number of negative results (true negatives + false negatives). A higher NPV indicates that a negative test result is more likely to be a true negative, and therefore the disease is less likely to be present.

The predictive value of tests depends on the prevalence of the disease in the population being tested, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of the test. A test with high sensitivity and specificity will generally have higher predictive values than a test with low sensitivity and specificity. However, even a highly sensitive and specific test can have low predictive values if the prevalence of the disease is low in the population being tested.

Chaperonin 60, also known as CPN60 or HSP60 (heat shock protein 60), is a type of molecular chaperone found in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. Molecular chaperones are proteins that assist in the proper folding and assembly of other proteins. Chaperonin 60 is a member of the HSP (heat shock protein) family, which are proteins that are upregulated in response to stressful conditions such as heat shock or oxidative stress.

Chaperonin 60 forms a large complex with a barrel-shaped structure that provides a protected environment for unfolded or misfolded proteins to fold properly. The protein substrate is bound inside the central cavity of the chaperonin complex, and then undergoes a series of conformational changes that facilitate its folding. Chaperonin 60 has been shown to play important roles in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and assembly, as well as in the regulation of apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Defects in chaperonin 60 have been linked to a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Recurrence, in a medical context, refers to the return of symptoms or signs of a disease after a period of improvement or remission. It indicates that the condition has not been fully eradicated and may require further treatment. Recurrence is often used to describe situations where a disease such as cancer comes back after initial treatment, but it can also apply to other medical conditions. The likelihood of recurrence varies depending on the type of disease and individual patient factors.

Colorimetry is the scientific measurement and quantification of color, typically using a colorimeter or spectrophotometer. In the medical field, colorimetry may be used in various applications such as:

1. Diagnosis and monitoring of skin conditions: Colorimeters can measure changes in skin color to help diagnose or monitor conditions like jaundice, cyanosis, or vitiligo. They can also assess the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions.
2. Vision assessment: Colorimetry is used in vision testing to determine the presence and severity of visual impairments such as color blindness or deficiencies. Special tests called anomaloscopes or color vision charts are used to measure an individual's ability to distinguish between different colors.
3. Environmental monitoring: In healthcare settings, colorimetry can be employed to monitor the cleanliness and sterility of surfaces or equipment by measuring the amount of contamination present. This is often done using ATP (adenosine triphosphate) bioluminescence assays, which emit light when they come into contact with microorganisms.
4. Medical research: Colorimetry has applications in medical research, such as studying the optical properties of tissues or developing new diagnostic tools and techniques based on color measurements.

In summary, colorimetry is a valuable tool in various medical fields for diagnosis, monitoring, and research purposes. It allows healthcare professionals to make more informed decisions about patient care and treatment plans.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Alveolar macrophages are a type of macrophage (a large phagocytic cell) that are found in the alveoli of the lungs. They play a crucial role in the immune defense system of the lungs by engulfing and destroying any foreign particles, such as dust, microorganisms, and pathogens, that enter the lungs through the process of inhalation. Alveolar macrophages also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to coordinate the immune response. They are important for maintaining the health and function of the lungs by removing debris and preventing infection.

Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a type of protein belonging to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which play a crucial role in the innate immune system's response to pathogens. TLR2 is primarily expressed on the surface of various immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells.

TLR2 recognizes a wide range of microbial components, such as lipopeptides, lipoteichoic acid, and zymosan, derived from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and certain viruses. Upon recognition and binding to these ligands, TLR2 initiates a signaling cascade that activates various transcription factors, leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and costimulatory molecules. This response is essential for the activation and recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection, thereby contributing to the clearance of invading pathogens.

In summary, TLR2 is a vital pattern recognition receptor that helps the innate immune system detect and respond to various microbial threats by initiating an inflammatory response upon ligand binding.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Molecular probe techniques are analytical methods used in molecular biology and medicine to detect, analyze, and visualize specific biological molecules or cellular structures within cells, tissues, or bodily fluids. These techniques typically involve the use of labeled probes that bind selectively to target molecules, allowing for their detection and quantification.

A molecular probe is a small molecule or biomacromolecule (such as DNA, RNA, peptide, or antibody) that has been tagged with a detectable label, such as a fluorescent dye, radioisotope, enzyme, or magnetic particle. The probe is designed to recognize and bind to a specific target molecule, such as a gene, protein, or metabolite, through complementary base pairing, antigen-antibody interactions, or other forms of molecular recognition.

Molecular probe techniques can be broadly classified into two categories:

1. In situ hybridization (ISH): This technique involves the use of labeled DNA or RNA probes to detect specific nucleic acid sequences within cells or tissues. The probes are designed to complement the target sequence and, upon hybridization, allow for the visualization of the location and quantity of the target molecule using various detection methods, such as fluorescence microscopy, brightfield microscopy, or radioisotopic imaging.
2. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF): These techniques utilize antibodies as probes to detect specific proteins within cells or tissues. Primary antibodies are raised against a target protein and, upon binding, can be detected using various methods, such as enzyme-linked secondary antibodies, fluorescent dyes, or gold nanoparticles. IHC is typically used for brightfield microscopy, while IF is used for fluorescence microscopy.

Molecular probe techniques have numerous applications in basic research, diagnostics, and therapeutics, including gene expression analysis, protein localization, disease diagnosis, drug development, and targeted therapy.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Arkansas" is a proper noun and refers to a state in the United States. It does not have a medical definition. Arkansas is located in the southern region of the U.S. and is known for its diverse geography, which includes mountains, forests, and lowlands. The capital and largest city of Arkansas is Little Rock.

If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Patient compliance, also known as medication adherence or patient adherence, refers to the degree to which a patient's behavior matches the agreed-upon recommendations from their healthcare provider. This includes taking medications as prescribed (including the correct dosage, frequency, and duration), following dietary restrictions, making lifestyle changes, and attending follow-up appointments. Poor patient compliance can negatively impact treatment outcomes and lead to worsening of symptoms, increased healthcare costs, and development of drug-resistant strains in the case of antibiotics. It is a significant challenge in healthcare and efforts are being made to improve patient education, communication, and support to enhance compliance.

Bronchoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the examination of the inside of the airways and lungs with a flexible or rigid tube called a bronchoscope. This procedure allows healthcare professionals to directly visualize the airways, take tissue samples for biopsy, and remove foreign objects or secretions. Bronchoscopy can be used to diagnose and manage various respiratory conditions such as lung infections, inflammation, cancer, and bleeding. It is usually performed under local or general anesthesia to minimize discomfort and risks associated with the procedure.

Nitrate reductase is an enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of nitrate (NO3-) to nitrite (NO2-). It is widely distributed in nature and plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle, particularly in the process of nitrate assimilation by plants, fungi, and some bacteria.

In plants, nitrate reductase is primarily located in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts of plant cells. It requires reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) or flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2) as electron donors to facilitate the reduction of nitrate to nitrite.

The reaction catalyzed by nitrate reductase can be summarized as follows:
NO3- + NAD(P)H + H+ -> NO2- + NAD(P)+ + H2O

It is worth noting that there are different types of nitrate reductases, each with distinct properties and functions. For example, some nitrate reductases require molybdenum cofactor as a prosthetic group for their catalytic activity, while others do not. Additionally, some nitrate reductases are membrane-bound, while others are soluble enzymes.

Overall, nitrate reductase is an essential enzyme in the global nitrogen cycle and has significant implications for agriculture, environmental science, and microbiology.

Truncated hemoglobins are a group of hemoglobin variants that lack the normal C-terminal extension of the beta-globin chain. They were first identified in organisms living in extreme environments, such as bacteria found in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and in animals adapted to high-altitude hypoxia. These hemoglobins have unique structural and functional properties that allow them to function efficiently under low oxygen concentrations.

Truncated hemoglobins are characterized by the absence of the last 1-3 amino acids at the C-terminus of the beta-globin chain, which results in a more compact structure compared to normal hemoglobin. This structural difference leads to altered oxygen binding properties and increased stability under extreme conditions.

Truncated hemoglobins have been studied for their potential applications in biotechnology and medicine, particularly in the development of new strategies for the treatment of hypoxia-related disorders such as ischemia, stroke, and cancer. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Uzbekistan" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in Central Asia. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Tuberculous empyema is a specific type of empyema, which is a collection of pus in the pleural space (the space between the lungs and the chest wall). It is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium, which is the same bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) of the lungs.

In tuberculous empyema, the bacteria spread from the lungs to the pleural space, where they cause an infection and inflammation. This can lead to the accumulation of pus and the development of a chronic empyema. Symptoms may include chest pain, cough, fever, and difficulty breathing. Treatment typically involves a prolonged course of multiple antibiotics to kill the bacteria, as well as drainage of the pus from the pleural space. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the infected tissue and prevent recurrence.

I apologize for any confusion, but "prisoners" is not a medical term. It generally refers to individuals who are deprived of their personal freedom and are being held in a prison or jail as a result of being convicted of a crime or while awaiting trial. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help!

Rifabutin is an antibiotic drug that belongs to the class of rifamycins. According to the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) database of the National Library of Medicine, Rifabutin is defined as: "A semi-synthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei and related to rifamycin B. It has iron-binding properties and is used, usually in combination with other antibiotics, to treat tuberculosis. Its antibacterial action is due to inhibition of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity."

Rifabutin is primarily used to prevent and treat Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections in people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). It may also be used off-label for other bacterial infections, such as tuberculosis, atypical mycobacteria, and Legionella pneumophila.

Rifabutin has a unique chemical structure compared to other rifamycin antibiotics like rifampin and rifapentine. This structural difference results in a longer half-life and better tissue distribution, allowing for once-daily dosing and improved penetration into the central nervous system (CNS).

As with any medication, Rifabutin can have side effects, including gastrointestinal disturbances, rashes, and elevated liver enzymes. Additionally, it is known to interact with several other medications, such as oral contraceptives, anticoagulants, and some anti-seizure drugs, which may require dose adjustments or monitoring for potential interactions.

Genetic polymorphism refers to the occurrence of multiple forms (called alleles) of a particular gene within a population. These variations in the DNA sequence do not generally affect the function or survival of the organism, but they can contribute to differences in traits among individuals. Genetic polymorphisms can be caused by single nucleotide changes (SNPs), insertions or deletions of DNA segments, or other types of genetic rearrangements. They are important for understanding genetic diversity and evolution, as well as for identifying genetic factors that may contribute to disease susceptibility in humans.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Catalase is a type of enzyme that is found in many living organisms, including humans. Its primary function is to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water (H2O) and oxygen (O2). This reaction helps protect cells from the harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide, which can be toxic at high concentrations.

The chemical reaction catalyzed by catalase can be represented as follows:

H2O2 + Catalase → H2O + O2 + Catalase

Catalase is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that plays an important role in protecting cells from oxidative damage. It is found in high concentrations in tissues that produce or are exposed to hydrogen peroxide, such as the liver, kidneys, and erythrocytes (red blood cells).

Deficiency in catalase activity has been linked to several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging. On the other hand, overexpression of catalase has been shown to have potential therapeutic benefits in various disease models, such as reducing inflammation and oxidative stress.

A Laboratory Infection, also known as a laboratory-acquired infection (LAI), is an infection that occurs in individuals who are exposed to pathogens or other harmful microorganisms while working in a laboratory setting. These infections can occur through various routes of exposure, including inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion of contaminated materials.

Laboratory infections pose significant risks to laboratory workers, researchers, and even visitors who may come into contact with infectious agents during their work or visit. To minimize these risks, laboratories follow strict biosafety protocols, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), proper handling and disposal of contaminated materials, and adherence to established safety guidelines.

Examples of laboratory infections include tuberculosis, salmonella, hepatitis B and C, and various other bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections. Prompt diagnosis, treatment, and implementation of appropriate infection control measures are crucial to prevent the spread of these infections within the laboratory setting and beyond.

Leprosy, also known as Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae. It primarily affects the skin, peripheral nerves, mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract, and the eyes. The disease mainly spreads through droplets from the nose and mouth of infected people.

Leprosy is characterized by granulomatous inflammation, which leads to the formation of distinctive skin lesions and nerve damage. If left untreated, it can cause progressive and permanent damage to the skin, nerves, limbs, and eyes. However, with early diagnosis and multidrug therapy (MDT), the disease can be cured, and disability can be prevented or limited.

The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies leprosy into two types based on the number of skin lesions and bacteriological index: paucibacillary (one to five lesions) and multibacillary (more than five lesions). This classification helps determine the appropriate treatment regimen.

Although leprosy is curable, it remains a public health concern in many developing countries due to its stigmatizing nature and potential for social exclusion of affected individuals.

Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of various substrates using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the electron acceptor. These enzymes contain a heme prosthetic group, which plays a crucial role in their catalytic activity. Peroxidases are widely distributed in nature and can be found in plants, animals, and microorganisms. They play important roles in various biological processes, including defense against oxidative stress, lignin degradation, and host-pathogen interactions. Some common examples of peroxidases include glutathione peroxidase, which helps protect cells from oxidative damage, and horseradish peroxidase, which is often used in laboratory research.

I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. "Tuberculosis Societies" is not a recognized medical term or diagnosis. However, I can provide you with information about Tuberculosis (TB) and relevant societies that work towards its control, research, and awareness.

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It primarily affects the lungs but can also impact other parts of the body. When people refer to "TB Societies," they usually mean organizations dedicated to addressing various aspects of TB, such as:

1. Research and development of new diagnostics, treatments, and vaccines
2. Advocacy for policy changes and increased funding
3. Raising awareness about TB and reducing stigma associated with the disease
4. Supporting patients and their families
5. Collaboration with national and international health authorities to strengthen TB control programs

Some examples of such organizations include:

* International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union): A global scientific organization that focuses on lung health, including TB, tobacco control, and air quality.
* Stop TB Partnership: A United Nations-hosted organization that aims to eliminate TB as a global public health threat by mobilizing political will and resources, fostering collaboration, and promoting innovation.
* Treatment Action Group (TAG): An activist and advocacy organization that works on HIV, TB, and hepatitis C research and access to treatment.
* Global TB Caucus: A network of parliamentarians from various countries working together to end TB through political action and increased funding.

These societies play a crucial role in addressing the challenges posed by TB and contribute significantly to global efforts towards its control, research, and awareness.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in North America. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

CD8-positive T-lymphocytes, also known as CD8+ T cells or cytotoxic T cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the adaptive immune system. They are named after the CD8 molecule found on their surface, which is a protein involved in cell signaling and recognition.

CD8+ T cells are primarily responsible for identifying and destroying virus-infected cells or cancerous cells. When activated, they release cytotoxic granules that contain enzymes capable of inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in the target cells. They also produce cytokines such as interferon-gamma, which can help coordinate the immune response and activate other immune cells.

CD8+ T cells are generated in the thymus gland and are a type of T cell, which is a lymphocyte that matures in the thymus and plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They recognize and respond to specific antigens presented on the surface of infected or cancerous cells in conjunction with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules.

Overall, CD8+ T cells are an essential component of the immune system's defense against viral infections and cancer.

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system. They are large cells with a round or oval shape and a nucleus that is typically indented or horseshoe-shaped. Monocytes are produced in the bone marrow and then circulate in the bloodstream, where they can differentiate into other types of immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells.

Monocytes play an important role in the body's defense against infection and tissue damage. They are able to engulf and digest foreign particles, microorganisms, and dead or damaged cells, which helps to clear them from the body. Monocytes also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to coordinate the immune response.

Elevated levels of monocytes in the bloodstream can be a sign of an ongoing infection, inflammation, or other medical conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disorders.

Aminosalicylic acids are a group of medications that contain a chemical structure related to salicylic acid, which is the active ingredient in aspirin. These medications are primarily used to treat inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The most common aminosalicylates used for IBD include mesalamine, sulfasalazine, and olsalazine.

These drugs work by reducing the production of chemicals in the body that cause inflammation in the lining of the intestines. By decreasing inflammation, they can help alleviate symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding associated with IBD. Additionally, aminosalicylates may also have a protective effect on the lining of the intestines, helping to prevent further damage.

Aminosalicylates are available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, suppositories, and enemas, depending on the specific medication and the location of the inflammation within the digestive tract. While these medications are generally well-tolerated, they can cause side effects such as headache, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain in some individuals. It is essential to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking aminosalicylates to ensure their safe and effective use.

Nitroimidazoles are a class of antibiotic drugs that contain a nitro group (-NO2) attached to an imidazole ring. These medications have both antiprotozoal and antibacterial properties, making them effective against a range of anaerobic organisms, including bacteria and parasites. They work by being reduced within the organism, which leads to the formation of toxic radicals that interfere with DNA function and ultimately kill the microorganism.

Some common examples of nitroimidazoles include:

* Metronidazole: used for treating infections caused by anaerobic bacteria and protozoa, such as bacterial vaginosis, amebiasis, giardiasis, and pseudomembranous colitis.
* Tinidazole: similar to metronidazole, it is used to treat various infections caused by anaerobic bacteria and protozoa, including trichomoniasis, giardiasis, and amebiasis.
* Secnidazole: another medication in this class, used for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and amebiasis.

Nitroimidazoles are generally well-tolerated, but side effects can include gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Rare but serious side effects may include peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) and central nervous system toxicity, particularly with high doses or long-term use. It is essential to follow the prescribed dosage and duration closely to minimize potential risks while ensuring effective treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Turkey" is not a medical term. It is a common name for the country located in Eastern Europe and Western Asia, as well as a type of large bird native to North America that is often eaten as a holiday meal. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

Oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which involve the transfer of electrons from one molecule (the reductant) to another (the oxidant). These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy production, metabolism, and detoxification.

The oxidoreductase-catalyzed reaction typically involves the donation of electrons from a reducing agent (donor) to an oxidizing agent (acceptor), often through the transfer of hydrogen atoms or hydride ions. The enzyme itself does not undergo any permanent chemical change during this process, but rather acts as a catalyst to lower the activation energy required for the reaction to occur.

Oxidoreductases are classified and named based on the type of electron donor or acceptor involved in the reaction. For example, oxidoreductases that act on the CH-OH group of donors are called dehydrogenases, while those that act on the aldehyde or ketone groups are called oxidases. Other examples include reductases, peroxidases, and catalases.

Understanding the function and regulation of oxidoreductases is important for understanding various physiological processes and developing therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with impaired redox homeostasis, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

An immunocompromised host refers to an individual who has a weakened or impaired immune system, making them more susceptible to infections and decreased ability to fight off pathogens. This condition can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (developed during one's lifetime).

Acquired immunocompromised states may result from various factors such as medical treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunosuppressive drugs), infections (e.g., HIV/AIDS), chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, malnutrition, liver disease), or aging.

Immunocompromised hosts are at a higher risk for developing severe and life-threatening infections due to their reduced immune response. Therefore, they require special consideration when it comes to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases.

Anti-retroviral agents are a class of drugs used to treat and prevent infections caused by retroviruses, most commonly the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These medications work by interfering with the replication process of the retrovirus, thereby preventing it from infecting and destroying immune cells.

There are several different classes of anti-retroviral agents, including:

1. Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) - These drugs block the action of the reverse transcriptase enzyme, which is necessary for the retrovirus to convert its RNA into DNA.
2. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) - These drugs bind directly to the reverse transcriptase enzyme and alter its shape, preventing it from functioning properly.
3. Protease inhibitors (PIs) - These drugs block the action of the protease enzyme, which is necessary for the retrovirus to assemble new viral particles.
4. Integrase inhibitors (INIs) - These drugs block the action of the integrase enzyme, which is necessary for the retrovirus to integrate its DNA into the host cell's genome.
5. Fusion inhibitors - These drugs prevent the retrovirus from entering host cells by blocking the fusion of the viral and host cell membranes.
6. Entry inhibitors - These drugs prevent the retrovirus from attaching to and entering host cells.

Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) typically involves a combination of at least three different anti-retroviral agents from two or more classes, in order to effectively suppress viral replication and prevent drug resistance. Regular monitoring of viral load and CD4+ T cell counts is necessary to ensure the effectiveness of ART and make any necessary adjustments to the treatment regimen.

I could not find a specific medical definition for "Vaccines, DNA." However, I can provide you with some information about DNA vaccines.

DNA vaccines are a type of vaccine that uses genetically engineered DNA to stimulate an immune response in the body. They work by introducing a small piece of DNA into the body that contains the genetic code for a specific antigen (a substance that triggers an immune response). The cells of the body then use this DNA to produce the antigen, which prompts the immune system to recognize and attack it.

DNA vaccines have several advantages over traditional vaccines. They are relatively easy to produce, can be stored at room temperature, and can be designed to protect against a wide range of diseases. Additionally, because they use DNA to stimulate an immune response, DNA vaccines do not require the growth and culture of viruses or bacteria, which can make them safer than traditional vaccines.

DNA vaccines are still in the experimental stages, and more research is needed to determine their safety and effectiveness. However, they have shown promise in animal studies and are being investigated as a potential tool for preventing a variety of infectious diseases, including influenza, HIV, and cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Somalia" is not a medical term. It is a country located in the Horn of Africa. If you have any questions about medical terms or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them for you.

Th1 cells, or Type 1 T helper cells, are a subset of CD4+ T cells that play a crucial role in the cell-mediated immune response. They are characterized by the production of specific cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Th1 cells are essential for protecting against intracellular pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. They activate macrophages to destroy ingested microorganisms, stimulate the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells that produce antibodies, and recruit other immune cells to the site of infection. Dysregulation of Th1 cell responses has been implicated in various autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Malawi" is not a medical term. It is the name of a country located in southeastern Africa. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New York City" is not a medical term or concept. It's a city located in the state of New York, United States. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

A laboratory (often abbreviated as lab) is a facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific or technological research, experiments, and measurements may be performed. In the medical field, laboratories are specialized spaces for conducting diagnostic tests and analyzing samples of bodily fluids, tissues, or other substances to gain insights into patients' health status.

There are various types of medical laboratories, including:

1. Clinical Laboratories: These labs perform tests on patient specimens to assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. They analyze blood, urine, stool, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), and other samples for chemical components, cell counts, microorganisms, and genetic material.
2. Pathology Laboratories: These labs focus on the study of disease processes, causes, and effects. Histopathology involves examining tissue samples under a microscope to identify abnormalities or signs of diseases, while cytopathology deals with individual cells.
3. Microbiology Laboratories: In these labs, microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites are cultured, identified, and studied to help diagnose infections and determine appropriate treatments.
4. Molecular Biology Laboratories: These labs deal with the study of biological molecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins, to understand their structure, function, and interactions. They often use techniques like PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and gene sequencing for diagnostic purposes.
5. Immunology Laboratories: These labs specialize in the study of the immune system and its responses to various stimuli, including infectious agents and allergens. They perform tests to diagnose immunological disorders, monitor immune function, and assess vaccine effectiveness.
6. Toxicology Laboratories: These labs analyze biological samples for the presence and concentration of chemicals, drugs, or toxins that may be harmful to human health. They help identify potential causes of poisoning, drug interactions, and substance abuse.
7. Blood Banks: Although not traditionally considered laboratories, blood banks are specialized facilities that collect, test, store, and distribute blood and its components for transfusion purposes.

Medical laboratories play a crucial role in diagnosing diseases, monitoring disease progression, guiding treatment decisions, and assessing patient outcomes. They must adhere to strict quality control measures and regulatory guidelines to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Oligonucleotides are short sequences of nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA. They typically contain fewer than 100 nucleotides, and can be synthesized chemically to have specific sequences. Oligonucleotides are used in a variety of applications in molecular biology, including as probes for detecting specific DNA or RNA sequences, as inhibitors of gene expression, and as components of diagnostic tests and therapies. They can also be used in the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions and in the development of new drugs.

A DNA probe is a single-stranded DNA molecule that contains a specific sequence of nucleotides, and is labeled with a detectable marker such as a radioisotope or a fluorescent dye. It is used in molecular biology to identify and locate a complementary sequence within a sample of DNA. The probe hybridizes (forms a stable double-stranded structure) with its complementary sequence through base pairing, allowing for the detection and analysis of the target DNA. This technique is widely used in various applications such as genetic testing, diagnosis of infectious diseases, and forensic science.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Indonesia" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Southeast Asia and Oceania, between the Indian and Pacific oceans. It is the world's largest island country, with more than thirteen thousand islands. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

An Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay (ELISPOT) is a sensitive and specific assay used to detect and quantify the number of cells secreting a particular cytokine in response to an antigenic stimulus. It combines the principles of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunospot assays.

In this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or other cell populations are isolated from a sample and added to a culture plate that has been precoated with an antibody specific to the cytokine of interest. The cells are then stimulated with an antigen, mitogen, or other activating agents. If any of the cells secrete the cytokine of interest, it will bind to the capture antibody on the plate. After a washing step, a detection antibody specific to the same cytokine is added and allowed to bind to the captured cytokine. This antibody is conjugated with an enzyme that catalyzes a colorimetric reaction when a substrate is added. The resulting spots can be visualized under a microscope, counted, and correlated with the number of cells secreting the cytokine in the original sample.

ELISPOT assays are widely used to study various aspects of cell-mediated immunity, such as T-cell responses against viral infections or cancer cells, vaccine efficacy, and autoimmune diseases. They offer several advantages over other methods for cytokine detection, including high sensitivity, the ability to detect individual cytokine-secreting cells, and the capacity to analyze multiple cytokines simultaneously. However, they also have some limitations, such as the requirement for specialized equipment and reagents, potential variability in spot size and morphology, and the possibility of false positives due to non-specific binding or contamination.

Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) is not a disease itself, but rather a reaction that can occur in some individuals who have a weakened immune system and then receive treatment to restore their immune function.

IRIS is defined as a paradoxical clinical worsening or appearance of new symptoms following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients, or after the administration of other immunomodulatory agents in patients with other types of immune deficiency.

This reaction is thought to be due to an overactive immune response to opportunistic infections or malignancies that were present but not causing symptoms while the patient's immune system was severely compromised. As the immune system begins to recover, it may mount a strong inflammatory response to these underlying infections or cancers, leading to worsening of symptoms or the development of new ones.

IRIS can affect various organs and systems, causing a wide range of clinical manifestations. The most common opportunistic infections associated with IRIS include Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP), and Cryptococcus neoformans.

The management of IRIS involves a careful balance between continuing the immune-restoring therapy and providing appropriate treatment for the underlying infection or malignancy, while also managing the inflammatory response with anti-inflammatory medications if necessary.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (Multiplex PCR) is a laboratory technique that allows the simultaneous amplification and detection of multiple specific DNA sequences in a single reaction. This method utilizes multiple sets of primers, each specifically designed to recognize and bind to a unique target sequence within the DNA sample.

The process involves several steps:

1. Denaturation: The DNA sample is heated to separate the double-stranded DNA into single strands.
2. Annealing: Primers specific to the target sequences are added, and the mixture is cooled, allowing the primers to attach to their respective complementary sequences on the DNA strands.
3. Extension/Amplification: Polymerase enzymes extend the primers along the DNA template, synthesizing new strands of DNA that contain the target sequence. This step is repeated multiple times (usually 25-40 cycles) to exponentially amplify the targeted sequences.

In multiplex PCR, several primer sets are used in a single reaction, allowing for the simultaneous amplification of different target sequences. After amplification, various methods can be employed to distinguish and detect the specific products, such as gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, or microarray analysis.

Multiplex PCR is widely used in diagnostic tests, pathogen detection, genetic testing, and research applications where multiple DNA targets need to be analyzed simultaneously.

Innate immunity, also known as non-specific immunity or natural immunity, is the inherent defense mechanism that provides immediate protection against potentially harmful pathogens (like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) without the need for prior exposure. This type of immunity is present from birth and does not adapt to specific threats over time.

Innate immune responses involve various mechanisms such as:

1. Physical barriers: Skin and mucous membranes prevent pathogens from entering the body.
2. Chemical barriers: Enzymes, stomach acid, and lysozyme in tears, saliva, and sweat help to destroy or inhibit the growth of microorganisms.
3. Cellular responses: Phagocytic cells (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages) recognize and engulf foreign particles and pathogens, while natural killer (NK) cells target and eliminate virus-infected or cancerous cells.
4. Inflammatory response: When an infection occurs, the innate immune system triggers inflammation to increase blood flow, recruit immune cells, and remove damaged tissue.
5. Complement system: A group of proteins that work together to recognize and destroy pathogens directly or enhance phagocytosis by coating them with complement components (opsonization).

Innate immunity plays a crucial role in initiating the adaptive immune response, which is specific to particular pathogens and provides long-term protection through memory cells. Both innate and adaptive immunity work together to maintain overall immune homeostasis and protect the body from infections and diseases.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Macrophage activation is a process in which these immune cells become increasingly active and responsive to various stimuli, such as pathogens or inflammatory signals. This activation triggers a series of changes within the macrophages, allowing them to perform important functions like phagocytosis (ingesting and destroying foreign particles or microorganisms), antigen presentation (presenting microbial fragments to T-cells to stimulate an immune response), and production of cytokines and chemokines (signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response).

There are two main types of macrophage activation: classical (or M1) activation and alternative (or M2) activation. Classical activation is typically induced by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), leading to a proinflammatory response, enhanced microbicidal activity, and the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Alternative activation, on the other hand, is triggered by cytokines like interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13, resulting in an anti-inflammatory response, tissue repair, and the promotion of wound healing.

It's important to note that macrophage activation plays a crucial role in various physiological and pathological processes, including immune defense, inflammation, tissue remodeling, and even cancer progression. Dysregulation of macrophage activation has been implicated in several diseases, such as autoimmune disorders, chronic infections, and cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Morocco" is not a medical term. It is the constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary national unity government located in North Africa. It has a population of over 33 million and an area of 446,550 km2. The capital city is Rabat, and the largest city is Casablanca. Morocco's official languages are Arabic and Berber, with French widely spoken as well.

If you have any medical questions or terms that you would like me to define, please let me know!

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. They are found throughout the body, especially in the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, which carries waste and unwanted substances such as bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. They contain white blood cells called lymphocytes that help fight infections and diseases by attacking and destroying the harmful substances found in the lymph fluid. When an infection or disease is present, lymph nodes may swell due to the increased number of immune cells and fluid accumulation as they work to fight off the invaders.

Czechoslovakia was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 28, 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until January 1, 1993. On that date, Czechoslovakia underwent a "velvet divorce" into two separate countries, the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

The medical definition of 'Czechoslovakia' is not applicable as it was a country and not a medical term or condition.

Kanamycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that is derived from the bacterium Streptomyces kanamyceticus. It works by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis and leading to bacterial cell death. Kanamycin is primarily used to treat serious infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. It is also used in veterinary medicine to prevent bacterial infections in animals.

Like other aminoglycosides, kanamycin can cause ototoxicity (hearing loss) and nephrotoxicity (kidney damage) with prolonged use or high doses. Therefore, it is important to monitor patients closely for signs of toxicity and adjust the dose accordingly. Kanamycin is not commonly used as a first-line antibiotic due to its potential side effects and the availability of safer alternatives. However, it remains an important option for treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

Oxazines are heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a six-membered ring with one nitrogen atom, one oxygen atom, and four carbon atoms. The structure of oxazine is similar to benzene, but with one methine group (=CH−) replaced by a nitrogen atom and another methine group replaced by an oxygen atom.

Oxazines have important applications in the pharmaceutical industry as they are used in the synthesis of various drugs, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer agents. However, oxazines themselves do not have a specific medical definition, as they refer to a class of chemical compounds rather than a medical condition or treatment.

In the field of medicine and particularly in forensic pathology, mummies are human or animal bodies that have been preserved naturally or intentionally after death, through processes such as desiccation (drying), freezing, or exposure to chemicals like salt or smoke. The study of mummies, known as mummy science or mummy studies, can provide valuable insights into various aspects including the biological characteristics, health conditions, dietary habits, and cultural practices of past civilizations.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Chaperonins are a type of molecular chaperone found in cells that assist in the proper folding of other proteins. They are large, complex protein assemblies that form a protective cage-like structure around unfolded polypeptides, providing a protected environment for them to fold into their correct three-dimensional shape.

Chaperonins are classified into two groups: Group I chaperonins, which are found in bacteria and archaea, and Group II chaperonins, which are found in eukaryotes (including humans). Both types of chaperonins share a similar overall structure, consisting of two rings stacked on top of each other, with each ring containing multiple subunits.

Group I chaperonins, such as GroEL in bacteria, function by binding to unfolded proteins and encapsulating them within their central cavity. The chaperonin then undergoes a series of conformational changes that help to facilitate the folding of the encapsulated protein. Once folding is complete, the chaperonin releases the now-folded protein.

Group II chaperonins, such as TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) in humans, function similarly but have a more complex mechanism of action. They not only assist in protein folding but also help to prevent protein aggregation and misfolding. Group II chaperonins are involved in various cellular processes, including protein quality control, protein trafficking, and the regulation of cell signaling pathways.

Defects in chaperonin function have been linked to several human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is a type of clinical specimen obtained through a procedure called bronchoalveolar lavage. This procedure involves inserting a bronchoscope into the lungs and instilling a small amount of saline solution into a specific area of the lung, then gently aspirating the fluid back out. The fluid that is recovered is called bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

BAL fluid contains cells and other substances that are present in the lower respiratory tract, including the alveoli (the tiny air sacs where gas exchange occurs). By analyzing BAL fluid, doctors can diagnose various lung conditions, such as pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and lung cancer. They can also monitor the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions by comparing the composition of BAL fluid before and after treatment.

BAL fluid is typically analyzed for its cellular content, including the number and type of white blood cells present, as well as for the presence of bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms. The fluid may also be tested for various proteins, enzymes, and other biomarkers that can provide additional information about lung health and disease.

Infectious disease transmission refers to the spread of an infectious agent or pathogen from an infected person, animal, or contaminated object to another susceptible host. This can occur through various routes, including:

1. Contact transmission: Direct contact with an infected person or animal, such as through touching, kissing, or sexual contact.
2. Droplet transmission: Inhalation of respiratory droplets containing the pathogen, which are generated when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or breathes heavily.
3. Airborne transmission: Inhalation of smaller particles called aerosols that can remain suspended in the air for longer periods and travel farther distances than droplets.
4. Fecal-oral transmission: Consuming food or water contaminated with fecal matter containing the pathogen, often through poor hygiene practices.
5. Vector-borne transmission: Transmission via an intermediate vector, such as a mosquito or tick, that becomes infected after feeding on an infected host and then transmits the pathogen to another host during a subsequent blood meal.
6. Vehicle-borne transmission: Consuming food or water contaminated with the pathogen through vehicles like soil, water, or fomites (inanimate objects).

Preventing infectious disease transmission is crucial in controlling outbreaks and epidemics. Measures include good personal hygiene, vaccination, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), safe food handling practices, and environmental disinfection.

Artificial pneumothorax is a medical condition that is intentionally induced for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. It involves the introduction of air or another gas into the pleural space, which is the potential space between the lungs and the chest wall. This results in the collapse of the lung on the side where the air was introduced, creating negative pressure that can help to relieve certain medical conditions.

Artificial pneumothorax is typically used as a treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis, although its use has become less common with the advent of more effective antibiotics and other treatments. It may also be used in rare cases to help collapse a lung that has been damaged or injured, making it easier to remove or repair.

The procedure for creating an artificial pneumothorax involves inserting a needle or catheter into the pleural space and introducing air or another gas. This can be done through the chest wall or through a tube that has been inserted into the lung. The amount of air introduced is carefully controlled to avoid over-inflation of the pleural space, which can cause complications such as tension pneumothorax.

While artificial pneumothorax is a useful medical procedure in certain circumstances, it carries risks and should only be performed by trained medical professionals in a controlled setting.

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... refers to certain forms of chronic melioidosis that look clinically very similar to tuberculosis. It is ...
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... tuberculosis elimination will require not just treating active tuberculosis but also latent cases, and eliminating tuberculosis ... As of 2017, tuberculosis has not been eliminated from any country. Tuberculosis has been a curable illness since the 1940s when ... Tuberculosis elimination is the effort to reduce the number of tuberculosis (TB) cases to less than one per 1 million ... So far, tuberculosis has not been eliminated from any country. According to European Respiratory Review, tuberculosis ...
Tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are vaccinations intended for the prevention of tuberculosis. Immunotherapy as a defence against TB ... Other tuberculosis vaccines are at various stages of development, including: MVA85A rBCG30 72F fusion protein MTBVAC New ... "Childhood Tuberculosis: Old And New Vaccines." Paediatric Respiratory Reviews 8.2 (2007): 148-154. Print. Verma, Indu, and Ajay ... "Targeting multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) by therapeutic vaccines." Med Microbiol Immunol 202 (2013): 95-1041. Print ...
Tuberculosis radiology for CXR details Tuberculosis diagnosis Diagnostic Standards and Classification of Tuberculosis in Adults ... The current clinical classification system for tuberculosis (TB) is based on the pathogenesis of the disease. Health care ... CDC Immigration Requirements: Technical Instructions for Tuberculosis Screening and Treatment. October 1, 2009. Classifications ...
Central nervous system tuberculosis takes two major forms: tuberculous meningitis and tuberculoma. Tuberculosis may affect the ... Tuberculosis management describes the techniques and procedures utilized for treating tuberculosis (TB). The medical standard ... DOTS not only aims to provide structure for tuberculosis programs, but also to ensure that citizens diagnosed with tuberculosis ... Tuberculosis not affecting the lungs is called extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Disease of the central nervous system is ...
... is a form of tuberculosis that is characterized by a wide dissemination into the human body and by the ... Miliary tuberculosis is present in about 2% of all reported cases of tuberculosis and accounts for up to 20% of all extra- ... pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Patients with miliary tuberculosis often experience non-specific signs, such as coughing and ... Miliary tuberculosis can also present with enlarged liver (40% of cases), enlarged spleen (15%), inflammation of the pancreas ( ...
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Hepatic tuberculosis: Hepatic tuberculosis can present as miliary hepatic tuberculosis and local hepatic tuberculosis. The ... It can occur most commonly following re-activation of a latent focus of tuberculosis. Intestinal tuberculosis: Tuberculosis of ... Approximately 20% of individuals with abdominal tuberculosis have active tuberculosis. The incidence of abdominal tuberculosis ... Abdominal tuberculosis accounts for It makes up for 5% of the tuberculosis cases worldwide, out of which 1-3% is ...
Tuberculosis is diagnosed by finding Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria in a clinical specimen taken from the patient. While ... Pulmonary tuberculosis featuring necrotizing granulomas, H&E stain. Pulmonary tuberculosis featuring necrotizing granulomas, ... of tuberculosis. A recent study shows that "rats increased pediatric tuberculosis detection by 67.6%" and that training these ... A definitive diagnosis of tuberculosis can only be made by culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis organisms from a specimen taken ...
... is tuberculosis (TB) within a location in the body other than the lungs. It accounts for an ... A potentially more serious, widespread form of TB is called "disseminated tuberculosis", also known as miliary tuberculosis. ... Ketata W, Rekik WK, Ayadi H, Kammoun S (2015). "Les tuberculoses extrapulmonaires [Extrapulmonary tuberculosis]". Revue de ... it is known as skeletal tuberculosis, a form of osteomyelitis. Tuberculosis has been present in humans since ancient times. ...
The 2007 tuberculosis scare occurred when Atlanta personal-injury lawyer Andrew "Drew" Speaker flew from Atlanta, Georgia, to ... Once Speaker was in Europe, however, test results showed his strain of tuberculosis was even rarer than originally thought, ... "Flight Itinerary of U.S. Traveler with Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB) (May 30, 2007)". Cdc.gov. Archived from ... Speaker's earlier diagnosis was incorrect and that he instead had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a more treatable ...
Krishna Murthy VV (1991). Facts and figures on tuberculosis and National Tuberculosis Programme. TNIB. Krishna Murthy MS, ... 1994 India portal Robert Koch World Tuberculosis Day Global Plan to Stop Tuberculosis "acronym". Retrieved 14 July 2014. "TB". ... 1990 Introduction to District Tuberculosis Programme - 1994 Manual for District Tuberculosis Officers - 1994 Manual for ... The National Tuberculosis Institute owes its origin to the findings of a 1955-1958 survey conducted by the Indian Council of ...
The Tuberculosis sanatorium Hohenstein (German: Lungenheilstätte Hohenstein) was a sanatorium in Hohenstein, East Prussia ( ... Tuberculosis sanatoria in Germany, East Prussia, Pages using the Kartographer extension). ... Olsztynek, Poland) specialized in pulmonology and Tuberculosis treatment for male patients. Founded in 1903, it was located ...
The SDS Tuberculosis and Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest diseases (formerly SDS Tuberculosis Sanatorium) is a government run ... Tuberculosis sanatoria, Tuberculosis in India, 1948 establishments in India, Pages using the Kartographer extension). ... Specialised treatment of tuberculosis and its varied complications are dealt with medically and if be need surgically yet being ... SDS Tuberculosis Sanatorium is named after the wife of philanthropist Devarao Shivaram as Shanthabai Devarao Shivaram ...
... was a sanatorium located on Marquam Hill in Portland, Oregon, United States, established in ... The hospital was active until 1963, when the number of tuberculosis patients in the state had dwindled, and the Oregon State ... "Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital Collection, 1920-1960". ArchivesWest. Retrieved May 12, 2017. "Housing the Victims of the ... "From the Archives: The University-State Tuberculosis Hospital". Oregon Health & Sciences University. Retrieved May 12, 2017. " ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tuberculosis. Tuberculosis in China at Curlie (CDC) - Division of Tuberculosis ... Tuberculosis. Medical Research Council (MRC) Tuberculosis (SciDev.Net) Tuberculosis (All articles with dead external links, ... the failure to control tuberculosis in the past-when tuberculosis services were not free-and the success in tuberculosis ... Tuberculosis is a serious public health problem in China. China has the world's third largest cases of tuberculosis (after ...
Tuberculosis is a common ailment that affects the lungs and is damaging.Tuberculosis: The Greatest Story Never Told. ... World Tuberculosis Day, 24 March 2018 "World Tuberculosis Day 2019". World Health Organization. Retrieved 23 March 2019. "World ... Wikinews has related news: Canada commits $127.4 million to fighting tuberculosis "Health in prison - The tuberculosis epidemic ... ". "Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative". "International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease - Tuberculosis". 9 July 2020 ...
Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains at least nine small RNA families in its genome. The small RNA (sRNA) families were ... Pelly S, Bishai WR, Lamichhane G (May 2012). "A screen for non-coding RNA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a cAMP- ... Overexpression of G2 sRNA, for example, prevented growth of M. tuberculosis and greatly reduced the growth of M. smegmatis; ... Hfq protein homologues have yet to be found in M. tuberculosis; an alternative pathway - potentially involving conserved C-rich ...
Tuberculosis is a disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The nature of the host-pathogen interaction ... Tuberculosis. Recent Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified three genetic risk loci, including at positions ... "Early progression to active tuberculosis is a highly heritable trait driven by 3q23 in Peruvians". Nature Communications. 10 (1 ... "Common variants at 11p13 are associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis". Nature Genetics. 44 (3): 257-9. doi:10.1038/ng. ...
The resurgence of tuberculosis in the United States, the advent of HIV-related tuberculosis, and the development of strains of ... Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a form of tuberculosis (TB) infection caused by bacteria that are resistant to ... Because MDR tuberculosis is an airborne pathogen, persons with active, pulmonary tuberculosis caused by a multidrug-resistant ... As of 2013, 3.7% of new tuberculosis cases have MDR-TB. Levels are much higher in those previously treated for tuberculosis - ...
... (also known as "acute tuberculous ulcer") is a form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs at the ...
The Lima Tuberculosis Hospital was a tuberculosis sanatorium built in 1911 to deal with the leading causes of death in the ... Youtube: Abandoned Tuberculosis Hospital - Lima, Ohio v t e (Webarchive template wayback links, Articles with short description ... Lima Tuberculosis Hospital: The White Plague Architecturalafterlife.com Retrieved on March 28, 2016. Lima TB Hospital Archived ... The hospital was renamed Ottawa Valley Tuberculosis Hospital in 1960. By 1970 it was nearly empty. In 1972 use of the second ...
The history of tuberculosis encompasses the origins of the disease, tuberculosis (TB) through to the vaccines and treatments ... The first genuine success in immunizing against tuberculosis was developed from attenuated bovine-strain tuberculosis by Albert ... Smith, F. B. Retreat of Tuberculosis, 1850-1950 (1988) 271p Waksman, Selman A. (1964). The Conquest of Tuberculosis. University ... "Preventing the White Death: Tuberculosis Dispensaries." The Economic Journal Graham JE (1893). "The Treatment of Tuberculosis ...
Global tuberculosis control. WHO report. WHO/HTM/TB/2006.362. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2006. Global Tuberculosis ... Scholia has a topic profile for Tuberculosis in India. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tuberculosis in India. Central ... As part of its efforts to eliminate tuberculosis, the Union Government changed the name of Revised National Tuberculosis ... the lessons of HIV/AIDS activism in the struggle to eradicate tuberculosis". The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung ...
... , also called Muirdale Tuberculosis Hospital, was built in 1914-15 by Milwaukee County, ... Muirdale ceased treating tuberculosis patients in 1970 and, although the main structure still remains, many of the outlying ... By the mid-1930s, thoracic surgery had become an increasingly important option in the treatment of tuberculosis. To provide ... "Muirdale Tuberculosis Santatorium". Wisconsin Historical Society. January 2012. Retrieved 2018-11-12. unknown authors, Annals ...
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Criteria for the control of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000;97:8180-5. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Tuberculosis. We developed a decision tree model to estimate the impact of reduced treatment coverage on the TB burdens in ... Effects of Response to 2014-2015 Ebola Outbreak on Deaths from Malaria, HIV/AIDS, and Tuberculosis, West Africa On This Page ... Tuberculosis. Using a 50% reduction in treatment coverage for both drug susceptible and multidrug-resistant TB, we estimated ...
... : Proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) adjusted for age, sex, and race by NORA industrial sector, U.S. ... Respiratory tuberculosis: Proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) adjusted for age, sex, and race by usual industry, U.S. residents ... Respiratory tuberculosis: Proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) adjusted for age, sex, and race by usual occupation, U.S. ...
Disseminated tuberculosis is a mycobacterial infection in which mycobacteria have spread from the lungs to other parts of the ... Disseminated tuberculosis is a mycobacterial infection in which mycobacteria have spread from the lungs to other parts of the ... Tuberculosis (TB) infection can develop after breathing in droplets sprayed into the air from a cough or sneeze by someone ... Disseminated tuberculosis is a mycobacterial infection in which mycobacteria have spread from the lungs to other parts of the ...
Tuberculosis (TB) (see the image below), a multisystemic disease with myriad presentations and manifestations, is the most ... Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA using polymerase chain reaction in cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids. Int J ... Tuberculosis burden in households of patients with multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: a ... encoded search term (Tuberculosis (TB)) and Tuberculosis (TB) What to Read Next on Medscape ...
A case of primary pulmonary tuberculosis is depicted in the image below. ... Preferred examination If patients with primary tuberculosis undergo imaging, a conventional chest radiograph may be sufficient ... Imaging of tuberculosis--experience from 503 patients. I. Tuberculosis of the chest. Acta Radiol. 1996 Jul. 37(4):482-8. [QxMD ... Postprimary pulmonary tuberculosis. The findings of reactivation tuberculosis typically become radiographically apparent within ...
Factsheet Key Facts Tuberculosis (TB) is the ninth leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause from a single ... Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. Tuberculosis is curable ... Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a form of TB caused by bacteria that do not respond to isoniazid and rifampicin, ... Tuberculosis mostly affects adults in their most productive years. However, all age groups are at risk. Over 25% of cases and ...
Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) bacteria. Tuberculosis generally ... Tuberculosis at Curlie "Tuberculosis (TB)". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 24 October 2018. "Tuberculosis ( ... Number of new cases of tuberculosis per 100,000 people in 2016 Tuberculosis deaths per million persons in 2012 Tuberculosis ... Tuberculosis has been present in humans since ancient times. Tuberculosis may infect any part of the body, but most commonly ...
Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Homepage. Provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ... Self-Study Modules on Tuberculosis, 1-5 Slide Sets. *The Tuberculosis (TB) in Correctional Settingsplus icon*Facilitator Guide ... Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993-2017. *Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in ... Epidemiology of Pediatric Tuberculosis in the United States. *Targeted Tuberculosis Testing and Treatment of Latent ...
TUBERCULOSIS Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB is a disease that has seen its prevalence not only in developing countries but ... Tuberculosis : Tuberculosis And Tuberculosis. TUBERCULOSIS Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB is a disease that has seen its ... Tuberculosis Essay. Tuberculosis What is Tuberculosis? 1. Tuberculosis is a chronic bacterial infection which can affect all ... Tuberculosis ( Tb ) Is Caused By Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is ...
Guidance for Tuberculosis Prevention and Control in Indigenous Populations in the Region of the Americas ... Fact sheet: Drug-resistant tuberculosis in the Americas; 2020. Hoja informativa 2022: Estrategia Fin de la TB: Principales ... Handbook for the use of digital technologies to support tuberculosis medication adherence (PAHO/WHO) ... World Tuberculosis Day "Its Time for Action. End TB" - VHL - Window of Knowledge ...
... the prevalence of tuberculosis is much higher than among the native white population.2 5 In the native population, tuberculosis ... none of these symptoms is peculiar to tuberculosis. Nowadays, patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who present the full ... How is pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed?. Symptoms and signs. Literature, opera, and art have popularised the traditional ... Pulmonary tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment BMJ 2006; 332 :1194 doi:10.1136/bmj.332.7551.1194 ...
However, the same description is applicable to tuberculosis (TB), a respiratory infection that has been with us for a much ...
This week Tom and Zorba discuss if heartbreak actually affects our brains, and they look at a new treatment for Tuberculosis*. ... Since the time this episode was originally broadcast the CDC altered their guildelines for Latent Tuberculosis treatment. ...
California health officials warn that the number of active tuberculosis cases in the state rose last year. ... Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease caused by the microbe Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually affects the lungs and spreads ... Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection that can be latent in the body and then later activate, if the immune system is weakened ... 2nd tuberculosis outbreak linked to bone grafts in the US. -Womans foul-smelling turkey ear caused by decades-long infection ...
... of researchers at the University of Central Florida has discovered a potential new weapon in the fight against tuberculosis, ... "Tuberculosis is very difficult to treat and in most cases, takes six to nine months of taking at least four drugs daily. And ... Tuberculosis, an infectious bacterial disease that mainly affects the lungs, is spread from person to person through the air. ... Tuberculosis bacteria have thick cell walls that drugs have difficulty penetrating. The bacteria also express proteins that ...
We excluded cases with concurrent extrapulmonary-pulmonary tuberculosis and cases of disseminated (miliary) tuberculosis. ... Epidemiology of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in the United States, 1993-2006 Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Nov 1;49(9):1350-7. doi: ... Methods: US tuberculosis cases reported from 1993 to 2006 were classified as either EPTB or PTB. EPTB encompassed lymphatic, ... Background: Almost one-fifth of United States tuberculosis cases are extrapulmonary; unexplained slower annual case count ...
A new study has shed fresh light on how a key front-line drug kills the tuberculosis bacterium. ... in the tuberculosis epidemic was how the tuberculosis community viewed rapid molecular tests for tuberculosis and tuberculosis ... 18, 2024 Tuberculosis, caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills upwards of 1.6 million people a year, ... A new study has shed fresh light on how a key front-line drug kills the tuberculosis bacterium. Share:. Facebook Twitter ...
Modeling Tuberculosis in Nonhuman Primates. Charles A. Scanga and JoAnne L. Flynn. SECTION 2. DRUGS AND BIOLOGY OF TUBERCULOSIS ... Mouse Model of Tuberculosis. Andrea M. Cooper. Animal Models of Tuberculosis: Guinea Pigs. Simon Clark, Yper Hall, and Ann ... Imaging in Tuberculosis. Jamshed B. Bomanji, Narainder Gupta, Parveen Gulati, and Chandan J. Das. Tuberculosis Treatment and ... Tuberculosis in Children. Ben J. Marais and H. Simon Schaaf. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Extensively Drug-Resistant ...
PepsiCo and TB Alliance are partnering to improve the bitter and unpleasant taste of todays tuberculosis (TB) treatments - ... PepsiCo & TB Alliance partner to improve tuberculosis drug taste. By Rachel Arthur 26-Oct-2016. - Last updated on 27-Oct-2016 ... PepsiCo and TB Alliance are partnering to improve the bitter and unpleasant taste of todays tuberculosis (TB) treatments - ...
tuberculosis. COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICIALS REPORT 17 PERCENT RISE IN TB LAST YEAR *tuberculosis ... ACTIVE TUBERCULOSIS REPORTED IN TRANSIT RIDER, INCLUDING EAST COUNTY TRANSIT LINES DURING LAST HALF OF 2022 *Lemon Grove ... TUBERCULOSIS CASE REPORTED AT SYCUAN CASINO; EXPOSURE POSSIBLE FROM APRIL 1 TO DECEMBER 9, 2021 *Sycuan Casino ... The Tuberculosis Program in the Public Health Services (PHS) department of the County of San Diego Health and Human Services ...
Policy - National programme on control of Tuberculosis 2016-2020. PDF versionExport as CSV ...
The Leicester Tuberculosis Research Group (LTBRG) is working on different aspects of tuberculosis. From fundamental biological ... Therefore the LTBRG focuses on raising public awareness about tuberculosis, promoting tuberculosis research and training new ... Tuberculosis is an ancient disease which never went away - today it remains the worlds deadliest infectious killer. Each day, ... Scientists from the University of Leicester help promote important public health message about tuberculosis (TB) for World TB ...
Institution: Center for Tuberculosis, Mayo Clinic. Reference Number: CAN-101. Official Title: PAHO/WHO CC for Tuberculosis ... Official Title: PAHO/WHO CC for Tuberculosis Elimination. Institution: National Reference Laboratory on Tuberculosis, Leprosy ... Official Title: PAHO/WHO CC for Epidemiology and Control of Tuberculosis. Institution: Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades ... Rafael Lopez Olarte, Regional Advisor, Tuberculosis Prevention and Control, is the PAHO staff member who acts as the Regions ...
  • If you have pulmonary tuberculosis, you may have spread it to other people without knowing it. (canada.ca)
  • https://doi.org/10.1016/j. from 93 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. (cdc.gov)
  • [ 5 ] Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to evaluate complications of thoracic disease, such as the extent of thoracic wall involvement with empyema, but is of limited value in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. (medscape.com)
  • Angiography is not used in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. (medscape.com)
  • Angiographic techniques, such as bronchial arteriography and embolization in patients with hemoptysis, may be used to treat the complications of cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary imaging findings in individuals with primary tuberculosis are nonspecific. (medscape.com)
  • Atelectasis may occur in primary pulmonary tuberculosis, often as a consequence of tuberculous airway involvement. (medscape.com)
  • Tuberculosis may infect any part of the body, but most commonly occurs in the lungs (known as pulmonary tuberculosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Extrapulmonary TB occurs when tuberculosis develops outside of the lungs, although extrapulmonary TB may coexist with pulmonary TB. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1. Tuberculosis is a chronic bacterial infection which can affect all the organs of the body but most commonly the lungs which is called pulmonary TB. (bartleby.com)
  • How is pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed? (bmj.com)
  • Nowadays, patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who present the full spectrum of symptoms and signs are unusual in developed countries, but doctors and health workers often see such patients in developing countries. (bmj.com)
  • unexplained slower annual case count decreases have occurred in extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), compared with annual case count decreases in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases. (nih.gov)
  • We excluded cases with concurrent extrapulmonary-pulmonary tuberculosis and cases of disseminated (miliary) tuberculosis. (nih.gov)
  • Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem, with increasing rates of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). (wikipedia.org)
  • Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB). (medscape.com)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs of the lungs or throat are capable of spreading that are spread from person to person through germs to others. (cdc.gov)
  • Disseminated tuberculosis is a mycobacterial infection in which mycobacteria have spread from the lungs to other parts of the body through the blood or lymph system . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. (who.int)
  • Tuberculosis generally affects the lungs, but it can also affect other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tuberculosis is spread from one person to the next through the air when people who have active TB in their lungs cough, spit, speak, or sneeze. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a tuberculosis infection does become active, it most commonly involves the lungs (in about 90% of cases). (wikipedia.org)
  • Tuberculosis may become a chronic illness and cause extensive scarring in the upper lobes of the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tuberculosis, also known by the abbreviation "TB", is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria usually attacks the lungs, but tuberculosis bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. (bartleby.com)
  • Tuberculosis, an infectious bacterial disease that mainly affects the lungs, is spread from person to person through the air. (ucf.edu)
  • A surg i cal procedure wa s planned and the left breast mass was completely removed by an open surgical biopsy including left axillary lymphnodes and the hystopathological evaluation of the specimen revealed findings consistent with mammary tuberculosis whereas no other nidus for tuberculosis were found within the organs including lungs. (scirp.org)
  • Tuberculosis usually affects the lungs in one or a few locations. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Miliary tuberculosis is so named because the innumerable tiny spots that form in the lungs are the size of millet, the small round seeds in bird food. (msdmanuals.com)
  • California reported around 2,100 cases of active tuberculosis (TB) in 2023, a 15% jump from the previous year, preliminary data show. (livescience.com)
  • February 17, 2023 (San Diego's East County) - If you rode the Trolley's Blue and Orange lines between June 31 and December 31 last year, you may have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB) and at risk of infection. (eastcountymagazine.org)
  • The global tuberculosis diagnostics market size was valued at USD 2.28 billion in 2022 and is anticipated to grow at a compound anuual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.2% from 2023 to 2030. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • This is called latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). (canada.ca)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) infection can develop after breathing in droplets sprayed into the air from a cough or sneeze by someone infected with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium. (medlineplus.gov)
  • ABSTRACT In a prospective cohort study in Iraq, schoolchildren with a positive tuberculin skin test during the nationwide survey in 2000 were followed up in 2002 to determine prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection and risk factors among household contacts. (who.int)
  • Notable extrapulmonary infection sites include the pleura (in tuberculous pleurisy), the central nervous system (in tuberculous meningitis), the lymphatic system (in scrofula of the neck), the genitourinary system (in urogenital tuberculosis), and the bones and joints (in Pott disease of the spine), among others. (wikipedia.org)
  • TB, or Tuberculosis, is a chronic or acute contagious disease caused by a bacterial infection. (bartleby.com)
  • However, the same description is applicable to tuberculosis (TB), a respiratory infection that has been with us for a much longer period of time. (thestar.com.my)
  • Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection that can be latent in the body and then later activate, if the immune system is weakened by a health condition or age. (livescience.com)
  • Tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection that occurs worldwide, is acquired mainly through inhalation of airborne droplets from an infected person. (tripprep.com)
  • Written and edited by experts in the field, this collection from Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine examines all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, transmission, and infection, as well as ongoing strategies to treat and control it. (cshlpress.com)
  • is a contagious infection caused by the airborne bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis . (msdmanuals.com)
  • Diagnosis Tuberculosis is a chronic contagious infection caused by the airborne bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis . (msdmanuals.com)
  • Sanofi Receives FDA Approval of Priftin® (Rifapentine) Tablets for the Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection. (medscape.com)
  • Three months of rifapentine and isoniazid for latent tuberculosis infection. (medscape.com)
  • Targeted tuberculin testing and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection. (medscape.com)
  • Recommendations for use of an isoniazid-rifapentine regimen with direct observation to treat latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. (medscape.com)
  • We analyzed 98 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex platform to enhance SARS-CoV-2 testing capacity. (cdc.gov)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main cause of TB is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), a small, aerobic, nonmotile bacillus. (wikipedia.org)
  • TB is an air borne disease which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (bartleby.com)
  • Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is also called TB bacillus. (bartleby.com)
  • Etiology During the interview with healthcare provider Mrs. Tonya Simpson, she when in great detail explaining that Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. (bartleby.com)
  • Nearly one-third of the population is infected with mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative organism. (medindia.net)
  • Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease caused by the microbe Mycobacterium tuberculosis . (livescience.com)
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) adalah spesies bakteri patogen dalam famili Mycobacteriaceae serta menjadi penyebab dari tuberkulosis (TBC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis can sometimes be identified by doing nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) on certain types of samples. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A team of researchers at the University of Central Florida has discovered a potential new weapon in the fight against tuberculosis, and it lives in the Little Mermaid's realm. (ucf.edu)
  • Through a partnership with Research Professor Amy Wright of the Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, the team screened 4,400 chemical extracts derived from extracts of sponges and other marine organisms to see if they could kill the dormant tuberculosis bacteria. (ucf.edu)
  • The team identified 26 compounds that were active against replicating tuberculosis bacteria, 19 killed dormant bacteria including seven that were active against both. (ucf.edu)
  • Tuberculosis bacteria have thick cell walls that drugs have difficulty penetrating. (ucf.edu)
  • MDR tuberculosis is a disease caused by bacteria that resist rifampicin and isoniazid, which are some of the most effective antimicrobial drugs used to treat TB. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Miliary tuberculosis is a potentially life-threatening type of tuberculosis that occurs when a large number of the bacteria travel through the bloodstream and spread throughout the body. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In the United States, most people with primary tuberculosis get better and have no further evidence of disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If patients with primary tuberculosis undergo imaging, a conventional chest radiograph may be sufficient for diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting. (medscape.com)
  • This is a case of primary tuberculosis in an adult. (medscape.com)
  • As many as 15% of patients with primary tuberculosis have normal chest radiographic findings. (medscape.com)
  • The imaging features of primary tuberculosis may mimic those of other infectious processes. (medscape.com)
  • A finding that differentiates primary tuberculosis from other infectious processes is lymphadenopathy, which is typically absent in bacterial pneumonia. (medscape.com)
  • F. Zandrino, F. Monetti and N. Gandolfo, "Primary Tuberculosis of the Breast. (scirp.org)
  • A new study has shed fresh light on how a key front-line drug kills the tuberculosis bacterium. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Aug. 2, 2019 A new study has shown that probably 1 in 4 people in the world carry the tuberculosis bacterium in the body. (sciencedaily.com)
  • (http://www.un.org/en/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/RES/73/3, accessed 23 October 2019). (who.int)
  • high-level meeting of the General Assembly.1 The report includes key findings of the Global tuberculosis report 2019,2 with data provided by over 200 countries representing 99% of the world's population. (who.int)
  • 2 Global tuberculosis report 2019. (who.int)
  • M. tuberculosis yang ditemukan pada tahun 2019 memiliki 9 sub spesies antara lain M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, M. africanum, M. canetti, M. bovis, M. caprae, M. microti, M. pinnipedii, M. mungi, dan M. orygis . (wikipedia.org)
  • 26, 2022 A potential game-changer in the tuberculosis epidemic was how the tuberculosis community viewed rapid molecular tests for tuberculosis and tuberculosis drug resistance. (sciencedaily.com)
  • November 25, 2022 (San Marcos) - Students and staff at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) may have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB) during this Fall Semester 2022 session, the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) announced yesterday. (eastcountymagazine.org)
  • January 3, 2022 (San Diego's East County) - Tuberculosis has been diagnosed in a person at Sycuan Casino who may have exposed customers and employees, the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) announced today. (eastcountymagazine.org)
  • The Centre at the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias "Emilio Coni" supported PAHO in the data analysis and drafting of the Tuberculosis in the Americas 2018 report, which was later presented at a UN High-Level meeting on tuberculosis in September 2018. (paho.org)
  • Methods: Quantiferon-TB results obtained during ANC in Sweden, 2014-2018, were linked to data from national registers (Pregnancy Register, Patient Register and Tuberculosis Register). (lu.se)
  • These are collectively denoted as extrapulmonary tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • World TB Day celebrated on 24 March each year, is an opportunity to raise awareness about the burden of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide and the status of TB prevention and care efforts. (who.int)
  • The rising burden of tuberculosis is one of the biggest concerns among the government and healthcare agencies. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • TUBERCULOSIS Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB is a disease that has seen its prevalence not only in developing countries but also in developed nations. (bartleby.com)
  • Among immigrants to the West from the Indian subcontinent, sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia, the Baltic states and Russia (especially if they were previously imprisoned 4 ), the prevalence of tuberculosis is much higher than among the native white population. (bmj.com)
  • In addition, the tuberculosis diagnostics market is further driven by the growing prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) around the world. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Those who do get sick have active tuberculosis disease. (canada.ca)
  • The radiograph shows a classic posterior segment right upper lobe density consistent with active tuberculosis. (medscape.com)
  • California health officials warn that the number of active tuberculosis cases in the state rose last year. (livescience.com)
  • Tuberculosis, an airborne and curable communicable disease, remains the greatest single infectious cause of death worldwide. (who.int)
  • Tuberculosis is curable and preventable. (who.int)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is both preventable and with LTBI represent the next generation of curable. (who.int)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is the world's biggest infectious killer - even though it's treatable, curable, and preventable. (results.org)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) (see the image below), a multisystemic disease with myriad presentations and manifestations, is the most common cause of infectious disease-related mortality worldwide. (medscape.com)
  • Introduction: Tuberculosis is an infectious disease which causes millions of death in humans. (bartleby.com)
  • A third of the world's population is said to have contracted M tuberculosis , with estimates of 10 million new infections globally each year. (medscape.com)
  • In connection to Oskar Olsson's dissertation on January 19, 2024, we organize a seminar with presentations of recent research on tuberculosis and HIV. (lu.se)
  • Most infections show no symptoms, in which case it is known as latent tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3 However, none of these symptoms is peculiar to tuberculosis. (bmj.com)
  • Symptoms of miliary tuberculosis can be vague and difficult to identify. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Response to the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa overwhelmed the healthcare systems of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, reducing access to health services for diagnosis and treatment for the major diseases that are endemic to the region: malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. (cdc.gov)
  • The 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa debilitated the healthcare systems of affected countries, hampering diagnosis and treatment for endemic diseases such as malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis (TB) ( 1 , 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is the ninth leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause from a single infectious agent, ranking above HIV/AIDS. (who.int)
  • Contributors explore the biological characteristics of M. tuberculosis, its complex interactions with the human immune system, and factors that influence the progression from latent to active TB disease (e.g., coinfection with HIV/AIDS). (cshlpress.com)
  • Manual This manual is an initiative of the Stop TB partnership, funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, and written by the Centre for Applied Spatial Epidemiology (CASE) of KIT Royal Tropical Institute. (kit.nl)
  • Apart from M. tuberculosis, there are many strains of Mycobacterial species like M. bovis , M .africanum , M. microti, M. caprae , M. pinnipedi i, M. canetti and M. mungi. (bartleby.com)
  • We describe the epidemiology of EPTB by means of US national tuberculosis surveillance data. (nih.gov)
  • The Centre for Applied Spatial Epidemiology (CASE) of KIT Royal Tropical Institute was requested by The Global Fund to apply the MATCH Approach to tuberculosis care to support National Toxicology Programs in the Central Asian region. (kit.nl)
  • The Centre for Applied Spatial Epidemiology (CASE) of KIT Royal Tropical Institute provided training in the MATCH Approach to tuberculosis (TB) programme staff who use data to improve programme effectiveness. (kit.nl)
  • Reduction in tuberculosis incidence and mortality. (who.int)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health challenge, responsible for around 1.5 million deaths each year, with particularly high incidence in India, China and Indonesia. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Background: Pregnancy has been associated with elevated incidence of tuberculosis (TB) disease. (lu.se)
  • In patients with progressive primary or postprimary tuberculosis , computed tomography scanning is often performed, in addition to chest radiography. (medscape.com)
  • 2 5 In the native population, tuberculosis is most commonly found among people living in poor conditions and in deprived areas, especially in elderly people and those with unstable social or psychiatric backgrounds, such as hostel dwellers, street dwellers, alcoholics, and drug misusers, as well as in immunocompromised patients. (bmj.com)
  • S. R. Shinde, R. Y. Chandawarkar and S. P. Deshmukh, "Tuberculosis of the Breast Masquerading as Carcinoma: A Study of 100 Patients," World Journal of Surgery, Vol. 19, No. 3, 1995, pp. 379-381. (scirp.org)
  • Efficacy of a 6-month versus 9-month intermittent treatment regimen in HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis: a randomized clinical trial. (medscape.com)
  • Dr Galina Mukamolova, Reader in Microbial Physiology in Leicester's Department of Respiratory Sciences , said: "Tuberculosis is a dreadful disease and a global health challenge which should not be underestimated. (le.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Rafael Lopez Olarte, Regional Advisor, Tuberculosis Prevention and Control, is the PAHO staff member who acts as the Region's focal point and also has a supporting role to the WHO focal point to coordinate the collaboration between the institution and the Organization. (paho.org)
  • Miliary tuberculosis may affect one organ or several organs or occur throughout the body. (msdmanuals.com)
  • 1 2 We review the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of tuberculosis. (bmj.com)
  • Since the time this episode was originally broadcast the CDC altered their guildelines for Latent Tuberculosis treatment. (wpr.org)
  • PepsiCo and TB Alliance are partnering to improve the bitter and unpleasant taste of today's tuberculosis (TB) treatments - important in the treatment of children. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Alcoholism affects the prognosis of tuberculosis (TB) treatment, and it is possible to avoid complications if alcohol use is detected at the Primary Health Care Center. (bvsalud.org)
  • Guideline] Treatment of tuberculosis. (medscape.com)
  • Managing Drug Interactions in the Treatment of HIV-Related Tuberculosis. (medscape.com)
  • This woman was admitted to isolation and started empirically on a 4-drug regimen in the ED. Tuberculosis was confirmed on sputum testing. (medscape.com)
  • Hilar lymphadenopathy is a hallmark radiologic finding of tuberculosis, with other common findings being perihilar and right-sided infiltration and pleural effusion. (medscape.com)
  • Scientists have been isolating marine natural compounds from sea sponges and other marine organisms to find treatments for diseases such as cancer and tuberculosis. (ucf.edu)
  • To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to work with global stakeholders to address investment in research and development in global health, and particularly to support the development of new tools and treatments for tuberculosis. (parliament.uk)
  • In 2015, Heads of State and Government at the United Nations adopted the Sustainable Development Goals, which include a target (Target 3.3) to end the tuberculosis epidemic by 2030. (who.int)
  • WHO reported, in its annual reports on tuberculosis in 2016 and 2017, that actions as well as investments were falling far short of those needed to reach the 2030 targets. (who.int)
  • Tuberculosis : the essentials. (who.int)
  • Chest radiographic results are not specific for tuberculosis, and other entities must remain in the differential diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • Primary mammary tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any case of a painful breast mass that appears refractory to conventional therapy. (scirp.org)
  • About 90% of people who become infected with tuberculosis do not develop the disease. (canada.ca)
  • informed me that Tuberculosis is a disease that she sees profusely at St. Joseph hospital. (bartleby.com)
  • Tuberculosis is a highly contagious disease that is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. (ucf.edu)
  • Tuberculosis is an ancient disease which never went away - today it remains the world's deadliest infectious killer. (le.ac.uk)
  • KIT Royal Tropical Institute proudly presents: the MATCH approach (Mapping and Analysis for Tailored disease Control and Health system strengthening) for National Tuberculosis Programmes. (kit.nl)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is well known for its ability to masquerade as other infectious and disease processes. (medscape.com)
  • The upper lung lobes are more frequently affected by tuberculosis than the lower ones. (wikipedia.org)
  • 6 - 8 In developing countries, tuberculosis is most common among very poor people, especially those who are severely malnourished or HIV positive. (bmj.com)
  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2021, 10.6 million people around the world were infected with tuberculosis. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • So far, they have identified five pure compounds with verified antibiotic potential against tuberculosis. (ucf.edu)
  • Yet most WHO regions and many countries with a high tuberculosis burden4 are not yet on track to reach the 2020 milestones of the End TB Strategy. (who.int)