Meristem: A group of plant cells that are capable of dividing infinitely and whose main function is the production of new growth at the growing tip of a root or stem. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Tubers: An enlarged underground root or stem of some plants. It is usually rich in carbohydrates. Some, such as POTATOES, are important human FOOD. They may reproduce vegetatively from buds.Plant Dormancy: The state of failure to initiate and complete the process of growth, reproduction, or gemination of otherwise normal plants or vegetative structures thereof.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Inflorescence: A cluster of FLOWERS (as opposed to a solitary flower) arranged on a main stem of a plant.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Indoleacetic Acids: Acetic acid derivatives of the heterocyclic compound indole. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Cytokinins: Plant hormones that promote the separation of daughter cells after mitotic division of a parent cell. Frequently they are purine derivatives.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Plant Growth Regulators: Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.MADS Domain Proteins: A superfamily of proteins that share a highly conserved MADS domain sequence motif. The term MADS refers to the first four members which were MCM1 PROTEIN; AGAMOUS 1 PROTEIN; DEFICIENS PROTEIN; and SERUM RESPONSE FACTOR. Many MADS domain proteins have been found in species from all eukaryotic kingdoms. They play an important role in development, especially in plants where they have an important role in flower development.Gibberellins: A class of plant growth hormone isolated from cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi, a fungus causing Bakanae disease in rice. There are many different members of the family as well as mixtures of multiple members; all are diterpenoid acids based on the gibberellane skeleton.Poa: A plant genus of the family POACEAE that contains the Poa p Ia allergen and allergen C KBGP.Abscisic Acid: Abscission-accelerating plant growth substance isolated from young cotton fruit, leaves of sycamore, birch, and other plants, and from potatoes, lemons, avocados, and other fruits.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Angiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Plant Vascular Bundle: A strand of primary conductive plant tissue consisting essentially of XYLEM, PHLOEM, and CAMBIUM.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Seedling: Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.Zea mays: A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.Oryza sativa: Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.Dioscorea: A plant genus best known for edible underground tubers. Yam may also refer to a moist variety of sweet potato, IPOMOEA BATATAS.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Cotyledon: A part of the embryo in a seed plant. The number of cotyledons is an important feature in classifying plants. In seeds without an endosperm, they store food which is used in germination. In some plants, they emerge above the soil surface and become the first photosynthetic leaves. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Plant Root Cap: A cone-shaped structure in plants made up of a mass of meristematic cells that covers and protects the tip of a growing root. It is the putative site of gravity sensing in plant roots.Viroids: A group of pathogens comprising the smallest known agents of infectious disease. They are unencapsulated and are capable of replicating autonomously in susceptible cells. Positively identified viroids composed of single-stranded RNA have been isolated from higher plants, but the existence of DNA viroids pathogenic to animals is suspected.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Prunus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of edible fruits such as apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and almond.Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cambium: A layer of living cells between the bark and hardwood that each year produces additional wood and bark cells, forming concentric growth rings.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Corydalis: A plant genus of the family FUMARIACEAE (classified by some in PAPAVERACEAE) that contains isoquinoline alkaloids.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Flowering Tops: Tops of plants when in flower, including the stems, leaves and blooms.Populus: A plant genus of the family SALICACEAE. Balm of Gilead is a common name used for P. candicans, or P. gileadensis, or P. jackii, and sometimes also used for ABIES BALSAMEA or for COMMIPHORA.Apiaceae: A large plant family in the order Apiales, also known as Umbelliferae. Most are aromatic herbs with alternate, feather-divided leaves that are sheathed at the base. The flowers often form a conspicuous flat-topped umbel. Each small individual flower is usually bisexual, with five sepals, five petals, and an enlarged disk at the base of the style. The fruits are ridged and are composed of two parts that split open at maturity.Lycopersicon esculentum: A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Phloem: Plant tissue that carries nutrients, especially sucrose, by turgor pressure. Movement is bidirectional, in contrast to XYLEM where it is only upward. Phloem originates and grows outwards from meristematic cells (MERISTEM) in the vascular cambium. P-proteins, a type of LECTINS, are characteristically found in phloem.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Convolvulaceae: The morning glory family of flowering plants, of the order Solanales, which includes about 50 genera and at least 1,400 species. Leaves are alternate and flowers are funnel-shaped. Most are twining and erect herbs, with a few woody vines, trees, and shrubs.Tuberous Sclerosis: Autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by MENTAL RETARDATION; EPILEPSY; and skin lesions (e.g., adenoma sebaceum and hypomelanotic macules). There is, however, considerable heterogeneity in the neurologic manifestations. It is also associated with cortical tuber and HAMARTOMAS formation throughout the body, especially the heart, kidneys, and eyes. Mutations in two loci TSC1 and TSC2 that encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, are associated with the disease.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Plant Epidermis: A thin layer of cells forming the outer integument of seed plants and ferns. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Zeatin: An aminopurine factor in plant extracts that induces cell division. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dict, 5th ed)Ipomoea: A plant genus in the family CONVOLVULACEAE best known for morning glories (a common name also used with CONVOLVULUS) and sweet potato.Plant Cells: Basic functional unit of plants.Coniferophyta: A plant division of GYMNOSPERMS consisting of cone-bearing trees and shrubs.Glucose-1-Phosphate Adenylyltransferase: An ATP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the addition of ADP to alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate to form ADP-glucose and diphosphate. The reaction is the rate-limiting reaction in prokaryotic GLYCOGEN and plant STARCH biosynthesis.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Viburnum: A plant genus in the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE. The common name derives from its traditional use for menstrual cramps. It is a source of viburnine, valerianic acid, vibsanin, and ursolic acid. Note that true cranberry is VACCINIUM MACROCARPON.Genes, Homeobox: Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS.Helianthus: A genus herbs of the Asteraceae family. The SEEDS yield oil and are used as food and animal feed; the roots of Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke) are edible.Cistaceae: A plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. The common name of rock rose is used with several plants of this family.Polypodiaceae: The fern plant family of the order Polypodiales, class Filicopsida, division Pteridophyta, subkingdom Tracheobionta.Sapindaceae: The soapberry plant family of the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Some members contain SAPONINS.Gametogenesis, Plant: The process of germ cell development in plants, from the primordial PLANT GERM CELLS to the mature haploid PLANT GAMETES.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Opuntia: A plant genus of the family CACTACEAE. Species with cylindrical joints are called Cholla; flat jointed ones are Prickly-pear.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.GlucuronidaseCold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Hydrocarbons, BrominatedGene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.Solanum tuberosum: A plant species of the genus SOLANUM, family SOLANACEAE. The starchy roots are used as food. SOLANINE is found in green parts.Botany: The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Chenopodiaceae: The goosefoot plant family of the order Caryophyllales, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Magnoliopsida. It includes beets and chard (BETA VULGARIS), as well as SPINACH, and salt tolerant plants.Plant Physiological Phenomena: The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.Plant Viruses: Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.Antirrhinum: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain DEFICIENS PROTEIN.
Stolons and tubers are examples of shoots that can grow roots. Roots that spread out close to the surface, such as those of ... They are involved in the promotion of germination and dormancy-breaking in seeds, in regulation of plant height by controlling ... Chaffey, Nigel (2007). "Esau's Plant Anatomy, Meristems, Cells, and Tissues of the Plant Body: their Structure, Function, and ... The formation of stem tubers in potato is one example. Particularly in arctic or alpine habitats, where opportunities for ...
Tuber - an enlarged stem or root that stores nutrients. Turgid - swollen. Twigs - Opposite - buds are arranged in pairs on ... Branching occurs to form new apical meristems. Growth of the stem is indeterminate in pattern (not pre-determined to stop at a ... Evergreen - remaining green in the winter or during the normal dormancy period for other plants. Eupotamous - living in rivers ... Here can be found buds (axillary buds), which are miniature and often dormant branches with their own apical meristem. They are ...
The formation of stem tubers in potato is one example. Particularly in arctic or alpine habitats, where opportunities for ... They are involved in the promotion of germination and dormancy-breaking in seeds, in regulation of plant height by controlling ... "Esau's Plant Anatomy, Meristems, Cells, and Tissues of the Plant Body: their Structure, Function, and Development". Annals of ... It inhibits cell division, promotes seed maturation, and dormancy, and promotes stomatal closure. It was so named because it ...
DormancyEdit. Main article: Seed dormancy. Seed dormancy has two main functions: the first is synchronizing germination with ... Key: 1. Endosperm 2. Zygote 3. Embryo 4. Suspensor 5. Cotyledons 6. Shoot Apical Meristem 7. Root Apical Meristem 8. Radicle 9 ... whereas the potato is a tuber. ... This true dormancy or innate dormancy is therefore caused by ... Thus dormancy is a state of the seed, not of the environment.[24] Induced dormancy, enforced dormancy or seed quiescence occurs ...
Potato Meristems: Potato tubers are an ideal system for basic studies into meristem dormancy. The meristems of potato tubers ... More recent research has been focused on the analysis of transcriptome changes that occur in potato tuber meristems as dormancy ... northern regions of the species range are subjected to a very short growing season and have a long period of meristem dormancy ... that the arrest of cell division common in a dormant meristem is a condition that is downstream from the imposition of dormancy ...
... tuber dormancy and tuber sprout number. These aspects of tuber development are orchestrated by a complex interplay of ... Reactivation of meristem activity and sprout growth in potato tubers require both cytokinin and gibberellin. Plant Physiology ... a, b) Formation of new tubers directly from mother tubers. (c) Control cv Desiree mature tubers. (d) StCCD8-RNAi mature tubers ... The buds from the aerial tubers exhibited a low degree of dormancy and produced sprouts as the aerial tubers were developing, ...
In our study, we found that seed and bud dormancy are similar to some extent but show different reactions to chemical ... In our study, we found that seed and bud dormancy are similar to some extent but show different reactions to chemical ... Three CYP707As play an overlapping role in controlling ABA inactivation, resulting in dormancy-release. In addition, Transcript ... Three CYP707As play an overlapping role in controlling ABA inactivation, resulting in dormancy-release. In addition, Transcript ...
Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized ... Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and ... Release of apical dominance in potato tuber is accompanied by programmed cell death in the apical bud meristem. ... We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of ...
Dormancy of both aboveground and belowground meristems is another important trait for stress resistance. The positive role ... dormancy during most of the year, and reduced growth rates can explain long life in this species, in which the tuber plays a ... For instance, a tree will still be alive if just one of the apical shoot meristems and one of the root meristems are alive and ... Root apical meristems allow the plants to explore the soil vertically, whereas lateral meristems develop new roots from the ...
... meristem DNA during progression of tubers through dormancy precede the resumption of sprout growth. Plant Mol. Biol. 51: 437- ... Changes in histone H3 and H4 multiacetylation during natural and forced dormancy break in potato tubers. Physiol. Plant. 120: ...
... have demonstrated that symplastic connectivity between the phloem and bud meristems in potato tubers controls bud dormancy (see ... Symplastic connection is required for bud outgrowth following dormancy in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers., Plant, Cell ... Symplastic connection is required for bud outgrowth following dormancy in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers., Plant, Cell ... Control Of The Potato Tuber Life-cycle 138.2 KB. Plasmodesmatal targeting of TMV movement protein utilises the ER/actin network ...
Abscisic acid (ABA) has been shown to play a critical role in tuber dormancy... ... potato tubers will not sprout and are physiologically dormant. ... meristem DNA during progression of tubers through dormancy ... Claassens, MMJ, Vreugdenhil, D 2000Is dormancy breaking of potato tubers the reverse of tuber initiation?Potato Res43347369 ... has been shown to play a critical role in tuber dormancy control but the mechanisms controlling ABA content during dormancy as ...
But Offers Only a Weak Impact on Potato Tuber Sprouting To further investigate the part of GA in potato tuber dormancy we ... These vegetation formed many long stolons but both the quantity of tubers and tuber yield were reduced in the highest ... and did not lead to a significantly modified dormancy period whereas transgenic potato tubers expressing showed a slightly long ... Reactivation of dormant meristems is of central importance for flower fitness. May 14, 2017 3:32 am. \ by Randall Harvey ...
1996). A review of the physiology of potato tuber dormancy. Ann. Appl. Biol. 129, 553-569. ... G) The dormant apical meristem (M) shows little or no CF import. In the region subtending the meristem (encircled), dye is ... With continued tuber enlargement (stage 4 and larger, Figure 1B), the subdividing phloem within the tuber was more clearly ... D) Sequential transverse sections from the same growing tuber. The stolon region is shown to the left and the tuber apex at the ...
Here we show that the ectopic expression of GhPRF1 gene in tobacco resulted in the hyperactivation of apical meristem and early ... During apical meristem determinacy and flower development, the GhPRF1 gene directly influences key flowering regulators through ... Spatial expression alteration in CLV1, a key meristem-determinacy gene, is induced by the GhPRF1 overexpression in a WUS- ... FLC1 and FT1 genes involved in the apical-to-floral meristem signalling cascade which is consistent with our in silico profilin ...
... facilitates examination of gene expression during breakage of vegetative dormancy in the potato tuber shoot apical meristem ... While the shoot apical meristems role during dormancy emergence in seeds is relatively well-understood, molecular factors ...
Currently, my research focus is on the study of postharvest biology of broccoli senescence and potato tuber dormancy for the ... I also study meristem and leaf development in Arabidopsis and Brassica plants. ...
... paints a picture of modern potato research and how it will change our understanding of potato as well as other tuber producing ... 2008) Dormancy in potato tuber meristems: Chemically induced cessation in dormancy matches the natural process based on ... 2015) Transcriptomic changes during tuber dormancy release process revealed by RNA sequencing in potato. J Biotechnol 198: 17- ... 2005) Tuber on a chip: Differential gene expression during potato tuber development. Plant Biotechnol J 3: 505-519. ...
Cold snap to plants causes transcription factor DAM (dormancy associated MADS-box group) gene to undergo chromatin alteration. ... The sweet potatos purple is an anthocyanin & that tuber is not woody. ... DAM action is quite readily induced in meristem growth tips, less so in leaves in buds impact usually needs longer duration of ...
Chemically forced dormancy termination mimics natural dormancy progression in potato tuber meristems by reducing ABA content ... Bachem C.W., Horvath B., Trindade L., Claassens M., Davelaar E., Jordi W., Visser R.G., (2001). A potato tuber-expressed mRNA ... Yu J.W., Choi J.S., Upadhyaya C.P., Kwon S.O., Gururani MA, Nookaraju A, .(2012). Dynamic proteomic profile of potato tuber ... Tuber meristem dormancy progression was determined ex vitro in control, diniconazole-, and 8-acetylene-ABA-treated microtubers ...
Carbohydrate metabolism and tuber dormancy Read more…. Mina Kyriacos - Agricultural Research Officer (Cultivar Registration ... Tissue culture, particularly micrografting and meristem culture in vitro for sanitation of citrus, stonefruits and grapevines. ...
... summer dormancy (S-stage) and bolting stage (B-stage). Root length and diameter were lower at V-stage than the other two stages ... The cropping system of Baizhi with its unique summer dormancy feature, is easily affected by the transition of its growth ... Summer dormancy in herbaceous perennials is characterized by: (1) cessation or reduction of leaf meristem growth; (2) ... corm/tuber) or swollen leaf bases (such as bulbs) (Volaire and Norton 2006). Although a report indicated NtFTs are target genes ...
Brassinolide effect on growth of apical meristems, ethylene production, and abscisic acid content in potato tubers. Biol ... Bud dormancy in perennial plants: a mechanism for survival. In: Lubzens E, Cerda J, Clark M, editors. Dormancy and resistance ... following dormancy release [6]. Cytokinins control cell division, shoot meristem initiation, leaf and root differentiation, and ... Plant dormancy in the perennial context. Trends Plant Sci. 2007;12:217-23.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar. ...
Breaks dormancy of buds, timing of flowering and tubers formed for winter. ... Stimulate growth of main apical shoot: auxins synthesised in meristem cells; auxins bind to receptor sites, forming vacuoles ...
Varieties with Long Dormancy Period, Breaking of Dormancy, Mechanical Method, Heating of Seed Tubers, Cutting of Seed Tubers, ... from Infected Tubers, Steps involved in Potato Meristem Culture, Meristem Tipculture, Micro Propagation of Mericlones:, Micro ... The small size tubers should be kept as seed tubers.. Seed treatment After grading the tubers are washed with 1% chlorocin ... Certified seed tubers should be preferred.. Source of seed tubers for commercial use. There are three sources of seed tubers ...
Tuber A thickened underground stem in which carbohydrates are stored. Tunicate bulb A bulb that has a dry membranous outer ... Vascular cambium A meristem that produces secondary xylem and secondary phloem cells. Vascular cambium is found in biennials ... Stratification The practice of exposing seeds to a low temperature to break dormancy. Sucker A vertically growing shoot arising ...
Dormancy has been described as a temporary suspension of visible growth of any plant structure containing a meristem (Lang et ... Vegetative propagules (including stems, rhizomes, tubers, bulbs, stolons, creeping roots, etc.) contain axillary and ... The molecular nature and cellular basis of signals that carry out the processes of dormancy or dormancy breaking are largely ... Bud dormancy is the primary mechanism by which the many perennial weeds escape herbicidal and mechanical control. We developed ...
Micropropagation of Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew from meristem cultur. Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew is a tuber- ... The present study aimed to evaluate some methods to overcome dormancy of seeds from P. edulis grown under in vitro conditions. ... Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop micropropagation protocol for this plant using meristem to produce clean ... Seeds from yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims) present dormancy imposed by the seed-coat. ...
Loss of seed dormancy. Rapid uniform germination is necessary if a stand of a crop is to be established before there is serious ... The number of floral parts in tomato is determined by the size of the floral meristem, which in turn depends on the number of ... Tubers of wild potatoes contain bitter glycoalkaloids at levels that may be toxic to humans (Johns, 1989); domesticated ... Seed dormancy is often associated with the presence of germination inhibitors in the testa and/or impermeability of the seed to ...
  • Conversely, expression patterns of three putative ABA-8′-hydroxylase ( CYP707A ) genes during storage varied in a tissue-specific manner with expression of two of these genes rising in meristems and periderm and declining in cortex during storage. (springer.com)
  • Nevertheless as released previously GA amounts were beneath the recognition limit in tuber tissue (Morris et al. (cylch.org)
  • Tissue culture , particularly micrografting and meristem culture in vitro for sanitation of citrus, stonefruits and grapevines. (moa.gov.cy)
  • 1999). Its commercial product, the tuber, is the summarizes some relevant results obtained with underground stem adapted to work as reserve source tissue culture in potatoes from 1977 to 2018. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the case of the potato tuber, sucrose delivered by the phloem from source tissue can be metabolised in different ways. (medicinalplantsarchive.us)
  • The preparation comprises an extract which is obtained from cells or tissue originating in an organism capable of entering a phase of dormancy in at least one of its parts and comprises at least. (google.de)
  • As a first step in defining the sites of synthesis and cognate processes regulating ABA turnover during storage and dormancy progression, gene sequences encoding the ABA biosynthetic enzymes zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) and 9- cis -epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) and three catabolism-related genes were used to quantify changes in their relative mRNA abundances in three specific tuber tissues (meristems, their surrounding periderm and underlying cortex) by qRT-PCR. (springer.com)
  • X. badius-p. abies and R. ochroleuca-p. abies displayed the most active fungal tissues and proportion increased on the acidic plots while Tuber puberulum-p. abies and Piceirhiza nigra were the most active types and occurred in higher proportion after liming. (sciencedocbox.com)
  • It is expected that the identified variations would form a pattern of genetic relationship usable in grouping genotypes (Aremu, 2012).The reason that potato plants form tubers, or the process of tuberization, has long puzzled both farmers and scientists. (jnsciences.org)
  • They are the floral organ identity gene AGAMOUS ( AG ), the floral meristem-size gene CLAVATA3 ( CLV3 ), the floral meristem identity gene APETALA1 ( AP1 ), and the floral organ number gene PERIANTHIA ( PAN ) ( 27 - 30 ). (pnas.org)
  • Dormancy inhibits seed and bud growth of perennial plants until the environmental conditions are optimal for survival. (frontiersin.org)
  • Dormancy is defined as the inability to initiate growth from meristems under favorable conditions ( Rohde and Bhalerao, 2007 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Particularities of roots in perennial plants, such as meristem indeterminacy, modular growth, stress resistance, and patterns of senescence, are crucial in establishing perenniality and understanding adaptation of perennial plants to their habitats. (plantphysiol.org)
  • 1996 Launch from this arrest requires D-type cyclins (CycD) of which three organizations have been isolated in Arabidopsis (and from Arabidopsis Affects Flower Growth and Morphology But Offers Only a Weak Impact on Potato Tuber Sprouting To further investigate the part of GA in potato tuber dormancy we generated transgenic vegetation with an modified endogenous GA content material. (cylch.org)
  • GA Measurements Confirm Changes in Endogenous GA Levels in the Transgenic Lines Even though strong growth phenotype of the transgenic vegetation indicated changes in GA content only an undetermined effect on tuber dormancy could be observed. (cylch.org)
  • The cropping system of Baizhi with its unique summer dormancy feature, is easily affected by the transition of its growth stages. (springeropen.com)
  • In sweet cherry, as other temperate woody perennials, cycles of growth and dormancy are synchronized with the seasons. (usda.gov)
  • Transcriptome assembly and analyses confirmed differential abundance among 12,918 transcripts (FDR ≤ 0.05) and highlighted numerous processes associated with shoot apical meristem maintenance and stem growth, which is consistent with the increased number of actively growing meristems in response to glyphosate. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This form of growth wherein new cells are always being added to the plant body by the activity of the meristem is called the open form of growth. (aglasem.com)
  • Another significant evolutionary advancement over the nonvascular and the more primitive vascular plants is the presence of localized regions for plant growth, called meristems ( meristem ) and cambia ( cambium ), which extend the length and width of the plant body, respectively . (academic.ru)
  • It is likely that the reduction of ABA and sugars played an important role in bud dormancy release or alteration in bud growth of tree peonies. (horticultureresearch.net)
  • They found with the intention of here was a noteworthy amount of established alteration in compactness of growth problem, maturity, appointment, tuber homogeny, tuber skin colour and photoperiodic supplies. (ebioworld.com)
  • In all potato-producing regions, the demand for high-quality tubers has been paramount to ensure crops production. (bvsalud.org)
  • Many people in the tropics and subtropics rely on root and tuber crops as their primary source of carbohydrate. (oregonstate.edu)
  • According to IFPRI 's projections for 2020, demand for root and tuber crops will increase by 55 percent in the developing world, with greatest increases in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. (oregonstate.edu)
  • In this lecture we will discuss the most widely grown tropical root and tuber crops - cassava, sweetpotato, and yams. (oregonstate.edu)
  • The carbohydrate supplied by these crops is mostly starch, which is stored in underground plant organs, including enlarged roots, corms, rhizomes, or tubers. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Twenty micrograms of total RNA isolated from leaves … Table I. Abiraterone Phenotypic characteristics of transgenic potato vegetation expressing either a GA20ox Abiraterone or a GA2ox gene from Arabidopsis In contrast stem length of and manifestation on potato tuber sprouting. (cylch.org)
  • A Sprouting behavior of the crazy type (WT) and did not lead to a significantly modified dormancy period whereas transgenic potato tubers expressing showed a slightly long term rest period. (cylch.org)
  • In our study, we found that seed and bud dormancy are similar to some extent but show different reactions to chemical treatments that induce breaking of dormancy. (frontiersin.org)
  • Generally, short days generally induce tubers in potatoes, although many modern cultivars can initiate tuberization in the long days of north temperate regions. (jnsciences.org)
  • 10 Light from above Light from one side Auxins Auxins Light from one side Stem Root (A) When a stem is directly under light, the auxins produced by the stem apical meristem, and transported downward through the plant then distributed equally. (sciencedocbox.com)
  • Using fluorescent tracers, recent studies have d emonstrated that symplastic connectivity between the phloem and bud meristems in potato tubers controls bud dormancy (see Viola et al. (hutton.ac.uk)
  • Phloem unloading was studied in potato plants in real time during the early stages of tuberization using carboxyfluorescein (CF) as a phloem-mobile tracer, and the unloading pattern was compared with autoradiography of tubers that had transported 14 C assimilates. (plantcell.org)
  • Dormancy in UABs of leafy spurge also contributes to escape from conventional control measures and long-term management often requires follow up application with herbicides. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Nine Andean species with edible roots and tubers are of great economic and nutritional importance to subsistence Andean farmers, and are often used as substitutes for expensive fruits and vegetables in the diet. (oregonstate.edu)
  • At harvest and the beginning of the storage period tubers were unresponsive to CK but exhibited increasing level of sensitivity as dormancy progressed (Turnbull and Hanke 1985 Suttle 2001 Suttle (2001) also found that this was not associated with changes in CK metabolism and hypothesized that CK transmission understanding and/or transduction were influenced from the physiological status of the tuber. (cylch.org)
  • Features of the domestication syndrome include loss of dispersal, increase in size (especially of the harvested part of the plant), loss of seed dormancy and loss of chemical or mechanical protection against herbivores. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • New methods that have been developed to address some of the challenges of quantity and quality of seed tubers are not yet widely applied, so farmers continue to use traditional methods and save seed from a previous harvest to plant the ware crop. (springer.com)
  • Notwithstanding striking discoveries in the genetics of cell-wall organization in plants, little is explicit about the manner in which profilin-mediated molecular interplay and corresponding networks are altered, especially during cellular signalling of apical meristem determinacy and flower development. (biomedcentral.com)