Asparagine: A non-essential amino acid that is involved in the metabolic control of cell functions in nerve and brain tissue. It is biosynthesized from ASPARTIC ACID and AMMONIA by asparagine synthetase. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)Aspartate-Ammonia Ligase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of asparagine from ammonia and aspartic acid, in the presence of ATP. EC 6.3.1.1.Asparaginase: A hydrolase enzyme that converts L-asparagine and water to L-aspartate and NH3. EC 3.5.1.1.Aspartic Acid: One of the non-essential amino acids commonly occurring in the L-form. It is found in animals and plants, especially in sugar cane and sugar beets. It may be a neurotransmitter.Glutamine: A non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and is involved in many metabolic processes. It is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID and AMMONIA. It is the principal carrier of NITROGEN in the body and is an important energy source for many cells.Peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminyl) Asparagine Amidase: An amidohydrolase that removes intact asparagine-linked oligosaccharide chains from glycoproteins. It requires the presence of more than two amino-acid residues in the substrate for activity. This enzyme was previously listed as EC 3.2.2.18.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Aspartate-tRNA Ligase: An enzyme that activates aspartic acid with its specific transfer RNA. EC 6.1.1.12.RNA, Transfer, Asn: A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying asparagine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Glycosylation: The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Ligases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the formation of a bond between two substrate molecules, coupled with the hydrolysis of a pyrophosphate bond in ATP or a similar energy donor. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 6.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Carbon-Nitrogen Ligases with Glutamine as Amide-N-Donor: Enzymes that catalyze the joining of glutamine-derived ammonia and another molecule. The linkage is in the form of a carbon-nitrogen bond. EC 6.3.5.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Isoaspartic Acid: An ASPARTIC ACID residue in polypeptide chains that is linked at the beta-carboxyl group instead of at the normal, alpha-carboxyl group, polypeptide linkage. It is a result of the spontaneous decomposition of aspartic acid or ASPARAGINE residues.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Thymidylate Synthase: An enzyme of the transferase class that catalyzes the reaction 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate and dUMP to dihydrofolate and dTMP in the synthesis of thymidine triphosphate. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 2.1.1.45.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Nitrogenous Group Transferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nitrogenous groups, primarily amino groups, from a donor, generally an amino acid, to an acceptor, usually a 2-oxoacid. EC 2.6.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Histidine: An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Oligosaccharides: Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.Glycopeptides: Proteins which contain carbohydrate groups attached covalently to the polypeptide chain. The protein moiety is the predominant group with the carbohydrate making up only a small percentage of the total weight.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.AmidohydrolasesCarbohydrate Sequence: The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Deamination: The removal of an amino group (NH2) from a chemical compound.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Protein Processing, Post-Translational: Any of various enzymatically catalyzed post-translational modifications of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS in the cell of origin. These modifications include carboxylation; HYDROXYLATION; ACETYLATION; PHOSPHORYLATION; METHYLATION; GLYCOSYLATION; ubiquitination; oxidation; proteolysis; and crosslinking and result in changes in molecular weight and electrophoretic motility.Carbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)RNA, Transfer, Amino Acyl: Intermediates in protein biosynthesis. The compounds are formed from amino acids, ATP and transfer RNA, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase. They are key compounds in the genetic translation process.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.GlutaminaseAlanine: A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Point Mutation: A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Carbohydrate Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a carbohydrate.PolysaccharidesElectrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Glutamates: Derivatives of GLUTAMIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the 2-aminopentanedioic acid structure.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Nucleoside Q: A modified nucleoside which is present in the first position of the anticodon of tRNA-tyrosine, tRNA-histidine, tRNA-asparagine and tRNA-aspartic acid of many organisms. It is believed to play a role in the regulatory function of tRNA. Nucleoside Q can be further modified to nucleoside Q*, which has a mannose or galactose moiety linked to position 4 of its cyclopentenediol moiety.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Catalytic Domain: The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Acrylamide: A colorless, odorless, highly water soluble vinyl monomer formed from the hydration of acrylonitrile. It is primarily used in research laboratories for electrophoresis, chromatography, and electron microscopy and in the sewage and wastewater treatment industries.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).RNA, Transfer, Asp: A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying aspartic acid to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Serine: A non-essential amino acid occurring in natural form as the L-isomer. It is synthesized from GLYCINE or THREONINE. It is involved in the biosynthesis of PURINES; PYRIMIDINES; and other amino acids.Hexosyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of hexose groups. EC 2.4.1.-.Turner Syndrome: A syndrome of defective gonadal development in phenotypic females associated with the karyotype 45,X (or 45,XO). Patients generally are of short stature with undifferentiated GONADS (streak gonads), SEXUAL INFANTILISM, HYPOGONADISM, webbing of the neck, cubitus valgus, elevated GONADOTROPINS, decreased ESTRADIOL level in blood, and CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS. NOONAN SYNDROME (also called Pseudo-Turner Syndrome and Male Turner Syndrome) resembles this disorder; however, it occurs in males and females with a normal karyotype and is inherited as an autosomal dominant.Glycine: A non-essential amino acid. It is found primarily in gelatin and silk fibroin and used therapeutically as a nutrient. It is also a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter.Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Fluoroacetates: Derivatives of acetic acid with one or more fluorines attached. They are almost odorless, difficult to detect chemically, and very stable. The acid itself, as well as the derivatives that are broken down in the body to the acid, are highly toxic substances, behaving as convulsant poisons with a delayed action. (From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)Protein O-Methyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine to free carboxyl groups of a protein molecule forming methyl esters. EC 2.1.1.-.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
Hamster BHK ts11 cells produce an inactive asparagine synthetase enzyme, and this loss of asparagine synthetase activity ... Asparagine synthetase (or aspartate-ammonia ligase) is a chiefly cytoplasmic enzyme that generates asparagine from aspartate. ... This depletion of serum asparagine leads to a subsequent rapid efflux of cellular asparagine, which is immediately acted upon ... In addition, these normal cells are able to upregulate their expression of asparagine synthetase in response to the asparagine ...
Human asparagine synthetase (glutamine-hydrolyzing) (ASNS), transcript variant 5 available for purchase from OriGene - Your ... This gene complements a mutation in the temperature-sensitive hamster mutant ts11, which blocks progression through the G1 ... Asns (Myc-DDK-tagged) - Mouse asparagine synthetase (Asns). $690. Next day. MG208883. Asns (GFP-tagged) - Mouse asparagine ... Asns (untagged) - Mouse asparagine synthetase (Asns), (10ug). $190. Next day. MR208883. ...
Rabbit recombinant monoclonal Asparagine synthetase antibody [EP282Y] validated for WB, IHC, ICC/IF and tested in Human, Mouse ... Asparagine synthetase antibody. *Cell cycle control protein TS11 antibody. *Glutamine dependent asparagine synthetase 3 ... Amino-acid biosynthesis; L-asparagine biosynthesis; L-asparagine from L-aspartate (L-Gln route): step 1/1. ... Anti-Asparagine synthetase antibody [EP282Y] (ab40850) at 1/2000 dilution + K562 cell lysate at 10 µg. Predicted band size : 61 ...
Browse our Asparagine synthetase product catalog backed by our Guarantee+. ... Cell cycle control protein TS11. *TS11 cell cycle control protein. *asparagine synthetase ... Diseases related to Asparagine synthetase. Discover more about diseases related to Asparagine synthetase.. Leukemia. Malignant ... PTMs for Asparagine synthetase. Learn more about PTMs related to Asparagine synthetase.. Phosphorylation. Acetylation. ...
Asparagine Synthetase (Glutamine-Hydrolyzing), including: function, proteins, disorders, pathways, orthologs, and expression. ... Asparagine Synthetase [Glutamine-Hydrolyzing] 3 * TS11 Cell Cycle Control Protein 3 * Cell Cycle Control Protein TS11 4 ... Asparagine synthetase deficiency (ASNSD) [MIM:615574]: An inborn error of asparagine biosynthesis that results in a severe ... ASNS (Asparagine Synthetase (Glutamine-Hydrolyzing)) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with ASNS include Asparagine ...
The ASNS gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called asparagine synthetase. Learn about this gene and related health ... glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase. *TS11. *TS11 cell cycle control protein. Additional Information & Resources. Tests ... Asparagine synthetase deficiency. At least 15 mutations in the ASNS gene have been found to cause asparagine synthetase ... Asparagine is needed to produce many proteins but also plays other roles. Asparagine helps to break down toxic ammonia within ...
Hamster BHK ts11 cells produce an inactive asparagine synthetase enzyme, and this loss of asparagine synthetase activity ... Asparagine synthetase (or aspartate-ammonia ligase) is a chiefly cytoplasmic enzyme that generates asparagine from aspartate. ... This depletion of serum asparagine leads to a subsequent rapid efflux of cellular asparagine, which is immediately acted upon ... In addition, these normal cells are able to upregulate their expression of asparagine synthetase in response to the asparagine ...
Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing], Cell cycle control protein TS11, Glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase, ASNS ... PMID 18940792.Asparagine synthetase is a predictive biomarker of L-asparaginase activity in ovarian cancer cell lines. Lorenzi ... Declined asparagine synthetase mRNA expression and enhanced sensitivity to asparaginase in HL-60 cells committed to monocytic ... The protein encoded by this gene is involved in the synthesis of asparagine. This gene complements a mutation in the ...
Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing]. Alternative Protein Names. Cell cycle control protein TS11, Glutamine-dependent ...
Cell cycle control protein TS11) (Glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase) [TS11] ASZ1 7q31.2 Q8WWH4 ASZ1_HUMAN 605797 ... HUMAN 108370 Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing] (EC 6.3.5.4) ( ...
... asparagine synthetase (glutamine-hydrolyzing)) for IHC-P, WB. Anti-Asparagine synthetase pAb (GTX114269) is tested in Human ... TS11 antibody, ASNS antibody, glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase antibody, TS11 cell cycle control protein antibody, ... asparagine synthetase (glutamine-hydrolyzing). Background. The protein encoded by this gene is involved in the synthesis of ... Storage Conditions: Asparagine synthetase antibody. Storage Buffer. 1XPBS, 1% BSA, 20% Glycerol (pH7). 0.01% Thimerosal was ...
This gene complements a mutation in the temperature-sensitive hamster mutant ts11, which blocks progression through the G1 ... Amino-acid biosynthesis; L-asparagine biosynthesis; L-asparagine from L-aspartate (L-Gln route): step 1/1. 1 ... The protein encoded by this gene is involved in the synthesis of asparagine. ...
The carrot mutant cell line ts11 is defective in the secretion of a chitinase, but the enzymatic activity of the chitinase is ... Some glycoproteins from rice have been shown to contain GlcNAc dimers attached to asparagines (Hoson and Wada, 1986). Chitinase ... carrot ts11 cells failed to undergo normal somatic embryogenesis because of a transient reduction of secretion of a chitinase ... a role of chitinases in normal plant development came from the study of the temperature-sensitive carrot mutant cell line ts11 ...
Asparagine \ 2703 for more molecular products just contact us ... ASNS TS11] Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing] (EC ... asnO SCO3236 SCE29.05c] L-asparagine oxygenase (EC 1.14.11.39) (L-asparagine 3-hydroxylase). [Asns] Asparagine synthetase [ ... Asns] Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing] (EC 6.3.5.4) (Glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase). [Aga] N(4)-(beta- ... ASN2 At5g65010 MXK3.25] Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing] 2 (EC 6.3.5.4) (Glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase ...
ASNS TS11] Asparagine synthetase [glutamine-hydrolyzing] (EC 6.3.5.4) (Cell cycle control protein TS11) (Glutamine-dependent ... ADAM-TS 11) (ADAMTS-11) (ADMP-2) (Aggrecanase-2). [SD18 ARK3 At4g21380 T6K22.110] Receptor-like serine/threonine-protein kinase ... asparagine synthetase). [TYMS TS OK/SW-cl.29] Thymidylate synthase (TS) (TSase) (EC 2.1.1.45). [] Non-structural polyprotein ( ...
TS11_GIAIN. ,p>This subsection of the Entry information section provides one or more accession number(s). These are stable ... N-linked (GlcNAc...) asparagineSequence analysis. 1. Glycosylationi. 630. N-linked (GlcNAc...) asparagineSequence analysis. 1. ... sp,Q03185,TS11_GIAIN Major surface trophozoite antigen 11 OS=Giardia intestinalis OX=5741 GN=TSP11 PE=3 SV=1 ...
asparagine greatly increase the rate of frond multiplication but the new fronds produced soon become necrotic, indicating that ... de oos i ts.. 11.. Dissection.. l2.. F ithdrawal o f the sea .. 13.. Quaternary alluvium formed in va lleys.. Faulting of Ha ...
asparagine synthetase;ASNS;TS11 ;. Publications. Publication List. Datasheet URL. View Datasheet. Categories. Antibodies, ...
Greco A, Gong SS, Ittmann M, Basilico C. Organization and expression of the cell cycle gene, ts11, that encodes asparagine ...
  • The particularly low-level expression of asparagine synthetase in primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and numerous ALL cell lines, as compared to that of normal cells, makes asparagine depletion an effective method of treatment due to the cells' unusual dependency on circulating serum asparagine as a necessary nutrition for growth. (wikipedia.org)