Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Influenza B virus: Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Weather: The state of the ATMOSPHERE over minutes to months.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 2. The H3N2 subtype was responsible for the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968.Anestrus: A state of sexual inactivity in female animals exhibiting no ESTROUS CYCLE. Causes of anestrus include pregnancy, presence of offspring, season, stress, and pathology.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Estrus: The period in the ESTROUS CYCLE associated with maximum sexual receptivity and fertility in non-primate female mammals.Meteorological Concepts: The atmospheric properties, characteristics and other atmospheric phenomena especially pertaining to WEATHER or CLIMATE.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Gambia: A republic in western Africa, constituting an enclave within SENEGAL extending on both sides of the Gambia River. Its capital is Banjul, formerly Bathurst.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.North DakotaParturition: The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Burkina Faso: A republic in western Africa, south and east of MALI and west of NIGER. Its capital is Ouagadougou. It was formerly called Upper Volta until 1984.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Luteinizing Hormone: A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Luteinizing hormone regulates steroid production by the interstitial cells of the TESTIS and the OVARY. The preovulatory LUTEINIZING HORMONE surge in females induces OVULATION, and subsequent LUTEINIZATION of the follicle. LUTEINIZING HORMONE consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Pandemics: Epidemics of infectious disease that have spread to many countries, often more than one continent, and usually affecting a large number of people.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Meteorology: The science of studying the characteristics of the atmosphere such as its temperature, density, winds, clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric phenomena and aiming to account for the weather in terms of external influences and the basic laws of physics. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)BrazilCryptomeria: A plant genus of the family TAXODIACEAE. Its POLLEN is one of the major ALLERGENS.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Influenza A virus: The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.Anopheles: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Hibernation: The dormant state in which some warm-blooded animal species pass the winter. It is characterized by narcosis and by sharp reduction in body temperature and metabolic activity and by a depression of vital signs.MontanaIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Skiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.United StatesSenegal: A republic in western Africa, southwest of MAURITANIA and east of MALI. Its capital is Dakar.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Sexual Maturation: Achievement of full sexual capacity in animals and in humans.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Betula: A plant genus of the family BETULACEAE. The tree has smooth, resinous, varicolored or white bark, marked by horizontal pores (lenticels), which usually peels horizontally in thin sheets.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Agricultural Irrigation: The routing of water to open or closed areas where it is used for agricultural purposes.Ambrosia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The POLLEN is one cause of HAYFEVER.
  • We report here that cholera incidence in Mandalay generally exhibited a single annual peak, with an annual average of 312 patients with severe dehydration over the past 5 years (since 2011) and was closely associated with the rainy season. (ajtmh.org)
  • Non-rainy season growing flowering. (ebay.ca)
  • He noted that mosquito numbers are high this year because many mosquitoes have drought-resistant eggs that stayed dormant until the summer rainy season triggered them to hatch. (healthcanal.com)
  • Satellite data indicates that the sea surface temperatures in Lane's path are as cool as 24 Celsius (75.2 Fahrenheit), cooler than the 26.6C (80F) needed to maintain a tropical cyclone, so forecasters note that after a day, Lane should begin to weaken. (nasa.gov)
  • Other researchers have also predicted above-normal activity for the year, including forecasters at Colorado State University in Fort Collins and the University of Arizona in Tucson, as well as a consortium of risk experts known as Tropical Storm Risk at University College London. (sciencenews.org)
  • Forecasters issued a tropical storm warning for the north part of the coast, from Cape Lookout to the Oregon Inlet, along with Pamlico Sound. (miamiherald.com)
  • Both produced gale force winds for a period along the north Kimberley coast but were not classified as tropical cyclones since the gale areas did not surround the low centres. (bom.gov.au)
  • EDT, Tropical Storm Kristy's maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph (85 kmh). (nasa.gov)
  • But in a twist, the system turned fully tropical today with a more symmetric grouping of thunderstorms and 35 mph winds four miles below tropical storm status. (palmbeachpost.com)
  • Tropical cyclones have their strongest winds at the center and are fueled by a warm core that draws energy from evaporation of warm ocean waters. (palmbeachpost.com)
  • MIAMI (AP) - Josephine continued to just barely hold on to its tropical storm status Friday as Tropical Storm Kyle formed in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of New England, packing winds near gale force but with no major population centers in its projected path. (ap.org)
  • After lashing the central Gulf Coast with tropical downpours, tropical-storm-force winds and coastal flooding over the weekend, Cristobal will race northward along the Mississippi Valley and into Great Lakes into the middle of the week. (upi.com)
  • Regardless of development, the storm will bring gusty winds and heavy tropical downpours to areas of the Caribbean from Puerto Rico and Hispaniola to the Bahamas. (cnn.com)
  • July through October is peak jackfruit season. (azcentral.com)
  • Jackfruit: All you need to know to enjoy this exotic tropical fruit that's in season July through October is peak jackfruit season. (azcentral.com)
  • Jackfruit is in peak season. (azcentral.com)
  • The semen was collected from individual ostrich bird in two different breeding seasons (early and peak) and evaluated for macroscopical and microscopical seminal attributes. (ijapsa.com)
  • The overall mean values for volume, pH, appearance, per cent motility, concentration, per cent live and abnormal spermatozoa were better in Peak season than early. (ijapsa.com)
  • The maiden attempt of study ensures the possibility of semen collection in ostrich and facilitated further processing or artificial insemination of semen in peak season based on macroscopical and microscopical seminal attributes. (ijapsa.com)
  • Shoulder season refers to the off-peak travel times when Vrbo vacation homeowners decrease nightly rates due to less traveler demand and changing seasons. (vrbo.com)
  • La Niña, the flipside of El Niño, is a cyclical phenomenon that brings cooler waters to the tropical Pacific Ocean and changes wind patterns over the Atlantic in ways that can help strengthen hurricanes ( SN: 6/9/16 ). (sciencenews.org)
  • Hera is easy to maintain, will grow side buds from the bottom, spring and autumn season, try to give enough light, full light, Hera form can be more compact and beautiful, the color is more beautiful, the light is not enough, the plant is easy to grow, the leaf color turns green even The red edge disappears. (ebay.ca)
  • I had a plant of 'Tri-color' (pictured at right) which was very pretty, but it only lasted 2 seasons and did not grow much for me. (davesgarden.com)
  • Seedling must be in the suitable season and the right temperature, if the high or low temperature, may cause the seeds low sprout rate or even zero sprout. (ebay.ca)
  • The researchers used geochemical clues in fossils called foraminifera, tiny sea creatures with a hard shell, collected from a sediment core located off the northern coast of Venezuela, to generate a 22,000-year record of past ocean temperature and salinity changes in the upper 1,500 feet of water in the western tropical Atlantic. (eponline.com)
  • What is the average temperature of a tropical dry forest? (reference.com)
  • The average temperature in a tropical dry forest is approximately 63 degrees Fahrenheit. (reference.com)
  • A tropical rain forest is a biome that gets at least 79 inches of rain every year and has a year-round temperature of between 68 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit. (reference.com)
  • We used routine multi-environment trials data of diverse tropical maize varieties to: (1) fit 82 temperature dependent phenology models and select the best model for an individual variety, (2) develop a spatial framework that uses the phenology model to predict at landscape level the length of the vegetative and reproductive phases of diverse varieties of maize in different agro-ecologies. (springer.com)
  • The wildfire season in Washington state has been one of the most destructive on record, charring 550 square miles of wilderness and destroying hundreds of homes and structures, the state Department of Natural Resources said on Thursday. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The lack of deep convection also means that Fred is no longer a tropical cyclone and is now declared a remnant low pressure area. (nasa.gov)
  • August and September are the primary transmission season for mosquito-borne diseases. (euobserver.com)
  • Warmer weather and summer travel put tropical mosquito-borne diseases on the European health authorities' radar. (euobserver.com)
  • The Asian Tiger mosquito and Yellow Fever mosquito species, which can act as disease vectors between humans, have facilitated the rise in cases of tropical diseases in Southern Europe in the last decade. (euobserver.com)
  • The rising trend in cases of tropical diseases is concerning. (euobserver.com)
  • For the same reasons, donations of blood by those who have travelled to an endemic region for tropical diseases, like malaria, would be refused for a period of months after their return as a precaution. (euobserver.com)
  • While data reporting by member states of the ECDC is not mandatory, the level of compliance is high on tropical diseases. (euobserver.com)
  • Disease fact sheets for governments and healthcare professionals are important aspects of the response, given how healthcare professionals usually know little to nothing about tropical diseases. (euobserver.com)
  • However, governments, academia and industry are increasingly turning their attention to finding new treatments for tropical diseases in recent years. (euobserver.com)
  • NGOs have run campaigns to raise awareness and funding for the developing world on tropical diseases. (euobserver.com)
  • There are also organisations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which has provided hundreds of millions of dollars in research funding towards the prevention of tropical diseases, with programmes on bed nets and mosquito control. (euobserver.com)
  • Leading philanthropists as well as African and European governments have announced more than $150m to tackle neglected tropical diseases largely unknown in western countries, but which affect 1.5 billion people - or one in five on the planet. (bellanaija.com)
  • The announcements to fund the prevention and treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) were made at a star-studded festival in Johannesburg, South Africa, co-hosted by the Government of South Africa, the House of Mandela, Motsepe Foundation, and the activist network Global Citizen . (bellanaija.com)
  • This study aimed to assess the effect of depth and season on the symbiotic bacterial dynamics and major metabolite profiles of specimens of X. muta thriving in a tropical marine biome (Portobelo Bay, Panamá), which allow us to determine whether variability patterns are similar to those reported for subtropical latitudes. (springer.com)
  • This work presents findings about the composition and dynamics of the microbial assemblages of X. muta expanding and confirming current knowledge about its remarkable diversity and geographic variability as observed in this tropical marine biome. (springer.com)
  • Factors that create these biases, which reached 98 percent in the study, include placement of field inventory plots, which for practical reasons must be accessible to field teams, and the tremendous natural variability of tropical forests. (phys.org)