ArthritisArthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Arthritis, Experimental: ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.Arthritis, Psoriatic: A type of inflammatory arthritis associated with PSORIASIS, often involving the axial joints and the peripheral terminal interphalangeal joints. It is characterized by the presence of HLA-B27-associated SPONDYLARTHROPATHY, and the absence of rheumatoid factor.Arthritis, Infectious: Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.Synovial Membrane: The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Arthritis, Juvenile: Arthritis of children, with onset before 16 years of age. The terms juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refer to classification systems for chronic arthritis in children. Only one subtype of juvenile arthritis (polyarticular-onset, rheumatoid factor-positive) clinically resembles adult rheumatoid arthritis and is considered its childhood equivalent.Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Arthritis, Reactive: An aseptic, inflammatory arthritis developing secondary to a primary extra-articular infection, most typically of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or UROGENITAL SYSTEM. The initiating trigger pathogens are usually SHIGELLA; SALMONELLA; YERSINIA; CAMPYLOBACTER; or CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. Reactive arthritis is strongly associated with HLA-B27 ANTIGEN.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Spondylarthropathies: Heterogeneous group of arthritic diseases sharing clinical and radiologic features. They are associated with the HLA-B27 ANTIGEN and some with a triggering infection. Most involve the axial joints in the SPINE, particularly the SACROILIAC JOINT, but can also involve asymmetric peripheral joints. Subsets include ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS; REACTIVE ARTHRITIS; PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS; and others.Mice, Inbred DBATenosynovitis: Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.Collagen Type II: A fibrillar collagen found predominantly in CARTILAGE and vitreous humor. It consists of three identical alpha1(II) chains.Rheumatoid Factor: Antibodies found in adult RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS patients that are directed against GAMMA-CHAIN IMMUNOGLOBULINS.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Antirheumatic Agents: Drugs that are used to treat RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.Arthritis, Gouty: Arthritis, especially of the great toe, as a result of gout. Acute gouty arthritis often is precipitated by trauma, infection, surgery, etc. The initial attacks are usually monoarticular but later attacks are often polyarticular.Gout: Hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase: An aldose-ketose isomerase that catalyzes the reversible interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. In prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms it plays an essential role in glycolytic and gluconeogenic pathways. In mammalian systems the enzyme is found in the cytoplasm and as a secreted protein. This secreted form of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase has been referred to as autocrine motility factor or neuroleukin, and acts as a cytokine which binds to the AUTOCRINE MOTILITY FACTOR RECEPTOR. Deficiency of the enzyme in humans is an autosomal recessive trait, which results in CONGENITAL NONSPHEROCYTIC HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Metacarpophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.Foot Joints: The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.Rats, Inbred LewRheumatic Diseases: Disorders of connective tissue, especially the joints and related structures, characterized by inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Mice, Inbred C57BLMice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Rheumatology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of inflammatory or degenerative processes and metabolic derangement of connective tissue structures which pertain to a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, such as arthritis.Interleukin-1beta: An interleukin-1 subtype that is synthesized as an inactive membrane-bound pro-protein. Proteolytic processing of the precursor form by CASPASE 1 results in release of the active form of interleukin-1beta from the membrane.Spondylarthritis: Inflammation of the joints of the SPINE, the intervertebral articulations.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.RANK Ligand: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that specifically binds RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B and OSTEOPROTEGERIN. It plays an important role in regulating OSTEOCLAST differentiation and activation.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Gout Suppressants: Agents that increase uric acid excretion by the kidney (URICOSURIC AGENTS), decrease uric acid production (antihyperuricemics), or alleviate the pain and inflammation of acute attacks of gout.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Peptides, Cyclic: Peptides whose amino and carboxy ends are linked together with a peptide bond forming a circular chain. Some of them are ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS. Some of them are biosynthesized non-ribosomally (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NON-RIBOSOMAL).Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Joint DiseasesHindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)HLA-B27 Antigen: A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*27 allele family.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-kappa B: A tumor necrosis factor receptor family member that is specific for RANK LIGAND and plays a role in bone homeostasis by regulating osteoclastogenesis. It is also expressed on DENDRITIC CELLS where it plays a role in regulating dendritic cell survival. Signaling by the activated receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Interleukin-17: A proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T-LYMPHOCYTES or their precursors. Several subtypes of interleukin-17 have been identified, each of which is a product of a unique gene.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Inflammation Mediators: The endogenous compounds that mediate inflammation (AUTACOIDS) and related exogenous compounds including the synthetic prostaglandins (PROSTAGLANDINS, SYNTHETIC).Interleukin-1: A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Psoriasis: A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Freund's Adjuvant: An antigen solution emulsified in mineral oil. The complete form is made up of killed, dried mycobacteria, usually M. tuberculosis, suspended in the oil phase. It is effective in stimulating cell-mediated immunity (IMMUNITY, CELLULAR) and potentiates the production of certain IMMUNOGLOBULINS in some animals. The incomplete form does not contain mycobacteria.Mice, Inbred NOD: A strain of non-obese diabetic mice developed in Japan that has been widely studied as a model for T-cell-dependent autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in which insulitis is a major histopathologic feature, and in which genetic susceptibility is strongly MHC-linked.Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein: A ligand that binds to but fails to activate the INTERLEUKIN 1 RECEPTOR. It plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of INFLAMMATION and FEVER. Several isoforms of the protein exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of its mRNA.Interleukin-6: A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.HLA-DR Antigens: A subclass of HLA-D antigens that consist of alpha and beta chains. The inheritance of HLA-DR antigens differs from that of the HLA-DQ ANTIGENS and HLA-DP ANTIGENS.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Early Diagnosis: Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Autoimmunity: Process whereby the immune system reacts against the body's own tissues. Autoimmunity may produce or be caused by AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor: Cell surface receptors that bind TUMOR NECROSIS FACTORS and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Matrix Metalloproteinase 13: A secreted matrix metalloproteinase that plays a physiological role in the degradation of extracellular matrix found in skeletal tissues. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is activated by the proteolytic cleavage of its N-terminal propeptide.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Osteoprotegerin: A secreted member of the TNF receptor superfamily that negatively regulates osteoclastogenesis. It is a soluble decoy receptor of RANK LIGAND that inhibits both CELL DIFFERENTIATION and function of OSTEOCLASTS by inhibiting the interaction between RANK LIGAND and RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B.Leukotriene B4: The major metabolite in neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It stimulates polymorphonuclear cell function (degranulation, formation of oxygen-centered free radicals, arachidonic acid release, and metabolism). (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Tryptases: A family of neutral serine proteases with TRYPSIN-like activity. Tryptases are primarily found in the SECRETORY GRANULES of MAST CELLS and are released during mast cell degranulation.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 9: A c-jun amino-terminal kinase that is activated by environmental stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Several isoforms of the protein with molecular sizes of 48 and 54 KD exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Mice, Inbred BALB CGlucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Serum Albumin, Bovine: Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Th17 Cells: Subset of helper-effector T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-22. These cytokines are involved in host defenses and tissue inflammation in autoimmune diseases.Antigens, CD11b: A CD antigen that contains a conserved I domain which is involved in ligand binding. When combined with CD18 the two subunits form MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Autoantigens: Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Matrix Metalloproteinases: A family of zinc-dependent metalloendopeptidases that is involved in the degradation of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX components.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Blood Sedimentation: Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Chondrocytes: Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mast Cells: Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.Proteoglycans: Glycoproteins which have a very high polysaccharide content.Injections, Intraperitoneal: Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.NF-kappa B: Ubiquitous, inducible, nuclear transcriptional activator that binds to enhancer elements in many different cell types and is activated by pathogenic stimuli. The NF-kappa B complex is a heterodimer composed of two DNA-binding subunits: NF-kappa B1 and relA.Receptors, IgG: Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Chemotaxis, Leukocyte: The movement of leukocytes in response to a chemical concentration gradient or to products formed in an immunologic reaction.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Adoptive Transfer: Form of passive immunization where previously sensitized immunologic agents (cells or serum) are transferred to non-immune recipients. When transfer of cells is used as a therapy for the treatment of neoplasms, it is called adoptive immunotherapy (IMMUNOTHERAPY, ADOPTIVE).Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Dendritic Cells: Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).Sulfasalazine: A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Gold Sodium Thiomalate: A variable mixture of the mono- and disodium salts of gold thiomalic acid used mainly for its anti-inflammatory action in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is most effective in active progressive rheumatoid arthritis and of little or no value in the presence of extensive deformities or in the treatment of other forms of arthritis.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Rheumatoid Nodule: Subcutaneous nodules seen in 20-30% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. They may arise anywhere on the body, but are most frequently found over the bony prominences. The nodules are characterized histologically by dense areas of fibrinoid necrosis with basophilic streaks and granules, surrounded by a palisade of cells, mainly fibroblasts and histiocytes.HLA-DRB1 Chains: A subtype of HLA-DRB beta chains that includes over one hundred allele variants. The HLA-DRB1 subtype is associated with several of the HLA-DR SEROLOGICAL SUBTYPES.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Tarsal Joints: The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.HLA-DR4 Antigen: An HLA-DR antigen which is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*04 alleles.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.CitrullineCell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Tarsus, Animal: The region in the hindlimb of a quadruped, corresponding to the human ANKLE.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Organogold Compounds: Organic compounds that contain GOLD as an integral part of the molecule. Some are used as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS. The term chrysotherapy derives from an ancient Greek term for gold.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Hand Joints: The articulations extending from the WRIST distally to the FINGERS. These include the WRIST JOINT; CARPAL JOINTS; METACARPOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and FINGER JOINT.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress. It was established in 1986.Isoxazoles: Azoles with an OXYGEN and a NITROGEN next to each other at the 1,2 positions, in contrast to OXAZOLES that have nitrogens at the 1,3 positions.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Penicillamine: 3-Mercapto-D-valine. The most characteristic degradation product of the penicillin antibiotics. It is used as an antirheumatic and as a chelating agent in Wilson's disease.Borrelia burgdorferi: A specific species of bacteria, part of the BORRELIA BURGDORFERI GROUP, whose common name is Lyme disease spirochete.
Symptomatic Drug Treatment. Chapter 3 In: Inflammatory Arthritis in Clinical Practice (pp. 48-64). Springer London. 2007. ...
"Oral GABA treatment downregulates inflammatory responses in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis". Autoimmunity. 44 (6): 465- ... Immune cells express receptors for GABA[28][29] and administration of GABA can suppress inflammatory immune responses and ... "Gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibits T cell autoimmunity and the development of inflammatory responses in a mouse type 1 diabetes ... which may lead to new treatments for diabetes.[26] ...
Quilon, Augusto; Brent, Lawrence (2010). "The primary care physician's guide to inflammatory arthritis: diagnosis". The Journal ... And Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol In Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III)". Jama. 285 (19): 2486-97. May 2001. doi:10.1001/ ... The first line treatment is change of lifestyle (e.g., Dietary Guidelines for Americans and physical activity). However, if in ... Some natural compounds, like ursolic acid, have been suggested as a treatment for obesity/metabolic syndrome based on the ...
Treatment may involve symptomatic treatment with painkillers or anti-inflammatory medications, and more severe cases may ... For mild cases limited to joint pain or arthritis, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be used. Other ... Arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis Auricular chondritis. Infectious perichondritis, injury, insect bites and stings, ear ... Evidence for efficacy of treatments is based on case reports and series of small groups of patients.[citation needed] ...
The company focuses on developing treatments for arthritis, pain and inflammatory diseases. Horizon's product portfolio ... which aims to help physicians and patients better understand non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) risks. The program is ...
... is an anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It is approved for use in China and Japan, ... "Safety and efficacy of T-614 in the treatment of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: a double blind, randomized, placebo ...
"Oral GABA treatment downregulates inflammatory responses in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis". Autoimmunity. 44 (6): 465- ... Immune cells express receptors for GABAand administration of GABA can suppress inflammatory immune responses and promote " ... which may lead to new treatments for diabetes. GABA has also been detected in other peripheral tissues including intestines, ... "Gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibits T cell autoimmunity and the development of inflammatory responses in a mouse type 1 diabetes ...
... is used to treat many inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and bronchospasm. ... Early prenatal CAH treatment has been shown to reduce some CAH symptoms, but it does not treat the underlying congenital ... In India a course of treatment for preterm labor is about 0.5 USD. It is available in most areas of the world. Dexamethasone is ... Dexamethasone has anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant effects. Dexamethasone was first made in 1957. It is on the World ...
Inflammatory bowel disease. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Lyme disease, which is transmitted by ticks and is characterized by ... From a health-care perspective, it is important to know what malady affects the person so that the appropriate treatment can be ... Septic arthritis, a severe infection of the joint that can lead to permanent joint damage. Spondyloarthropathies. Viral ... Additionally, inflammatory lipids called prostaglandins, which are produced at high rates by cancer cells within tumors, ...
Other associated conditions include obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, arthritis, acne, and other inflammatory disorders. ... but they should probably be considered a third-line treatment, as treatment is associated with increased risk of infection, ... Birth control Medication may relieve some symptoms for women; there is a hormonal treatment for men as well but that has not ... Alternative treatments include alpha hydroxy acids (naturally available in small amounts in citrus fruits), Azelaic acid, and ...
These inhibitors have therapeutic application in the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis ... Zerbini CA, Lomonte AB (May 2012). "Tofacitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis". Expert Review of Clinical ... Henriques, C (29 January 2016). "AbbVie Launches Phase 3 Trial for Rheumatoid Arthritis". Rheumatoid Arthritis News. BioNews ... against JAK3 for psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. U.S. FDA approved it in November 2012 for rheumatoid arthritis (moderately ...
It is being developed for the treatment of neuropathic pain and inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. It does not however ... for the treatment of orphan life-threatening inflammatory diseases. Burstein, S.; Karst, M.; Schneider, U.; Zurier, R. (2004 ... with antiinflammatory properties in murine collagen-induced arthritis". Arthritis & Rheumatism. 50 (3): 985-998. doi:10.1002/ ... "Effect of the cannabinoid ajulemic acid on rat models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain". Neuroscience Letters. 382 (3): 231 ...
... s are mostly used in the treatment of degenerative diseases such as inflammatory arthritis and problems with the ... The treatment lasts about 15 minutes. In addition to full galvanic baths, when the patient's body is fully immersed in water, ... Galvanic bath is an alternative medical treatment (a type of electrotherapy) based on the simultaneous use of water and ... Frequency Specific Microcurrent Galvanic treatment (Cosmetic) "The Galvanic Bath and Dr. Jennie Kidd Trout". Search Your Love. ...
... is generally prescribed for arthritis-related inflammatory pains or severe toothaches that result in the ... Ketoprofen topical patches are being used for treatment of musculoskeletal pain. Ketoprofen can also be used for treatment of ... Anti-inflammatory effects and pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen in a model of equine synovitis, in Proceedings. 6th Int Cong Eur ... Mazières, B; Rouanet, S; Guillon, Y; Scarsi, C; Reiner, V (2005). "Topical ketoprofen patch in the treatment of tendinitis: a ...
Treatments[edit]. Treatments for autoimmune disease have traditionally been immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, or palliative ... Human and animal trials suggest that omega-3 is an effective treatment modality for many cases of Rheumatoid Arthritis, ... Steroidal or NSAID treatment limits inflammatory symptoms of many diseases. IVIG is used for CIDP and GBS. Specific ... systemic sclerosis juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis.[12][clarification needed] ...
Rheumatoid arthritis and p53: how oxidative stress might alter the course of inflammatory diseases. Immunol Today 2000; 21:78- ... Federal approval of a clinical trial on intravenous vitamin C as a cancer treatment lends credence to alternative cancer care, ... Martini E. Jacques Cartier witnesses a treatment for scurvy. Vesalius. June 2002. PMID 12422875.. ... Use of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of disease. J Int Fed Clin Chem 1998; 10:21-23 ...
Zileuton has shown some beneficial effects in clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel ... chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune diseases ... leukotriene production involved in inflammatory response. • leukotriene biosynthetic process. • inflammatory response. • ... inhibiting the pro-inflammatory action of the leukocytes, promoting leukocytes to exit from inflammatory sites, and stimulating ...
In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, which is primarily an inflammatory condition, in osteoarthritis, the joints do not ... "Effectiveness of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of pain in knee and hip osteoarthritis: a network meta ... "Arthritis-Related Statistics: Prevalence of Arthritis in the United States". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US ... American College of Rheumatology Factsheet on OA Arthritis Foundation National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and ...
... may have the potential for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.[non- ... Sophora could possibly be used as a treatment for mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases. Inhibitory effects on ... Zhou, H.; Lutterodt, H.; Cheng, Z.; Yu, L.L. (2009). "Anti-Inflammatory and antiproliferative activities of trifolirhizin, a ... In addition, glycyrrhiza + sophora had a protective effect on immunosuppression, a strong non-specific anti-inflammatory effect ...
Adams initially tested the drug as treatment for his hangover. The drug was launched as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis in ... It is used for inflammatory diseases such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It is also used for ... Ibuprofen is sometimes used for the treatment of acne because of its anti-inflammatory properties, and has been sold in Japan ... Ibuprofen is a medication in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) class that is used for treating pain, fever, and ...
... often suggested for those with rheumatoid arthritis or other forms of inflammatory arthritis when non-operative treatments have ... Synovectomy is indicated in following conditions: Inflammatory arthritis: rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, chondromatosis ... In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the synovial membrane becomes inflamed, it can become edematous and thicken with inflammatory ... Moreover, similar conditions can also be seen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Synovectomy for RA has ...
Clinical proof of concept for the use of JAK inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disease has been ... Additionally, tofacitinib is currently being studied for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, ... a JAK inhibitor recently approved in the US for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. ... PIAS proteins have potential applications in cancer treatment and prevention. They may also play an important role in ...
showed that many quinoline derivatives show promise in their anti-inflammatory effects for the treatment of arthritis,[6] ... Synthesis of novel quinoline and quinazoline derivatives and their anti-inflammatory effect". J. Med. Chem. 39 (26): 5176-5182 ... Synthesis of Novel Quinoline and Quinazoline Derivatives and Their Anti-inflammatory Effect (1996). "Studies on disease- ...
... the treatment plan will first focus on treating the arthritis through anti-inflammatory medications and wearing a splint when ... If these treatments do not help the symptoms of arthritis, steroid injections to the wrist may help alleviate pain. Should ... Treatment[edit]. Treatment of scaphoid fractures is guided by the location in the bone of the fracture (proximal, waist, distal ... Overview and Conservative Treatment". Hand surgery : an international journal devoted to hand and upper limb surgery and ...
Prevention and treatment[edit]. Diet[edit]. Folate is acquired in the diet by the consumption of leafy green vegetables, ... sulfasalazine (used to control inflammation associated with Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis) ... Folate supplementation is beneficial in patients being treated with long-term, low-dose methotrexate for inflammatory ... Without treatment there may be poor muscle tone, trouble with coordination, trouble talking, and seizures.[18] The causes of ...
... or mixed inflammatory cells. Treatment strategies are different for each subtype and detailed treatment options are beyond the ... US National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. ... involves use of anti-inflammatory medications. The goal of treatment is to decrease or eliminate the lymphocytic inflammatory ... Treatment may then be stopped. Unfortunately, the cicatricial alopecias may reactivate after a quiet period and treatment may ...
Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis at PatientsLikeMe ... 1503 patients with undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis experience fatigue, pain, depressed mood, anxious mood, and insomnia ... and Cannabidiol to treat their undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis and its symptoms. ... See all 81 treatments Data from patients with undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis, who reported starting treatments within ...
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... is less common than osteoarthritis and is an auto-immune disease; meaning that the bodys immune system ... Glen Eira Physiotherapy provides quality treatment for arthritis to local Carnegie, Caulfield, Glen Huntly & Ormond residents. ... Inflammatory Arthritis Carnegie. Inflammatory arthritis conditions are less common than osteoarthritis. These conditions are ... For more information about rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthritis conditions, see the Arthritis and Osteoporosis ...
Background Being physically active is an essential component of successful self-management for people with inflammatory ... arthritis; however, the vast majority of patients are inactive. This study aims... ... physical activity is a priority because it is an essential adjunct to medical treatment for people with inflammatory arthritis ... Arthritis Research Canada, Arthritis Patient Advisory Board), as well as Cheryl Koehn (Arthritis Consumer Experts). ...
... and Gilead Announce Global Partnership to Develop Filgotinib for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Inflammatory ... risks that the parties will be unable to develop and commercialize filgotinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis or any ... design and readouts of ongoing and planned clinical trials with filgotinib in rheumatoid arthritis (Phase 3) and Crohns ... that filgotinib has the potential to be an effective and well-tolerated oral therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA ...
... there is still a challenge of using conventional liposomes for the treatment of RA due to their short circulation time and ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the joints of the body. Although ... Improving the anti-inflammatory efficacy of dexamethasone in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with polymerized stealth ... Improving the anti-inflammatory efficacy of dexamethasone in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with polymerized stealth ...
PubMed journal article How do gastrointestinal or liver comorbidities influence the choice of pain treatment in inflammatory ... arthritis? A Cochrane systematic revie were found in PRIME PubMed. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone or iPad. ... Pain management for inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and other ... TY - JOUR T1 - How do gastrointestinal or liver comorbidities influence the choice of pain treatment in inflammatory arthritis ...
Get information and read articles on Arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease signs, symptoms, causes, treatment, ... Arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease - Get information and read articles on Arthritis associated with ... inflammatory bowel disease signs, symptoms, causes, treatment, prevention and diagnosis at onlymyhealth.com, your complete ...
Treatment of inflammatory arthritis via targeting of tristetraprolin, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory gene expression ... Treatment of inflammatory arthritis via targeting of tristetraprolin, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory gene expression ... Treatment of inflammatory arthritis via targeting of tristetraprolin, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory gene expression ...
Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N- ... Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N- ... Inhibition of Collagen-Induced Arthritis by IQ-1S. Igor A. Schepetkin, Liliya N. Kirpotina, Deepa Hammaker, Irina Kochetkova, ... Inhibition of Collagen-Induced Arthritis by IQ-1S. Igor A. Schepetkin, Liliya N. Kirpotina, Deepa Hammaker, Irina Kochetkova, ...
Severe gouty arthritis refractory to anti-inflammatory drugs: treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor α as a new therapeutic ... Severe gouty arthritis refractory to anti-inflammatory drugs: treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor α as a new therapeutic ... We describe the first published case of severe, recurrent tophaceous gouty arthritis refractory to anti-inflammatory treatment ... Chronic tophaceous gouty arthritis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis. Semin Arthritis Rheum1999;29:56-3. ...
However, treatment has not been standardized. Representatives from the German O … ... Uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is frequently associated with the development of complications and visual loss. ... interdisciplinary guidelines for anti-inflammatory treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis Rheumatol ... Evidence and recommendations were graded, and an algorithm for anti-inflammatory treatment and final statements confirmed in a ...
The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis. Other related conditions include gout and fibromyalgia. The article looks ... Arthritis is a term that describes around 200 conditions that cause pain in the joints and the tissues surrounding the joints. ... at the types, causes, and treatments, including natural remedies. ... Inflammatory arthritis. Inflammation is a normal part of the ... These treatments are also applied to inflammatory types of arthritis, such as RA, along with anti-inflammatory medications such ...
Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment and repair of inflammatory arthritis. In: Japanese Journal of Clinical Immunology. ... Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment and repair of inflammatory arthritis. Japanese Journal of Clinical Immunology. 2015 ... Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment and repair of inflammatory arthritis. Yoshiya Tanaka, Koshiro Sonomoto, Masahiro Kondo ... Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment and repair of inflammatory arthritis. / Tanaka, Yoshiya; Sonomoto, Koshiro; Kondo, ...
Eli Lillys Taltz Injection Gets FDA Nod For Inflammatory Spine Arthritis Treatment Sharon Wrobel- June 1, 2020, 9:02 AM EDT ... for its Taltz injection used for the treatment of active non-radiographic inflammatory arthritis affecting joints and the spine ... the approval makes Taltz the first antagonist to be approved by the FDA for inflammatory arthritis, also known as Axial ... "We recognize that many patients living with this condition suffer from chronic inflammatory back pain and other symptoms of ...
... for your arthritis? These drugs stop or slow the disease progress. Learn more about DMARDs and read an overview. ... Treatments > Medication > Drug Types > DMARDs > DMARDs Overview. DMARDs Overview. Understand these treatments for inflammatory ... If youve been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis ... People with inflammatory arthritis are living full active lives thanks to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, or DMARDs. ...
Our objectives were to determine rapidity of response of subcutaneous methotrexate in early rheumatoid arthritis. The change in ... is standard treatment for RA. Absorption is better in subcutaneous MTX (scMTX), which may impact speed of onset. In RA, earlier ... The rapid kinetics of optimal treatment with subcutaneous methotrexate in early inflammatory arthritis: an observational study ... Haraoui B, Pope J. Treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis: concepts in management. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2011;40(5):371-88. ...
The 5C6 treatment ameliorated arthritis in KO1 mice, showing decreases in inflammatory cell infiltration and osteoclast ... The outcome of 5C6 treatment was complex, in which the 5C6-mediated disease-preventive effect is likely due on one hand to the ... Here we treated KO1 mice with 5C6 mAb in order to study its effect on arthritis development. To evaluate the disease-preventive ... Arthritis severity and immunological abnormalities were compared among the groups, along with transcriptional levels of several ...
... loss in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides and highlights recent studies in animal models of arthritis ... Current treatment strategies primarily target suppression of the inflammatory cascade with varying success in limiting the ... pathway has been shown to be essential for osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory arthritis. In addition, in vitro and in ... has identified new pathways for potential targeted therapeutic intervention for focal bone loss in inflammatory arthritis. ...
Treatment of sJIA has significantly changed in recent years, possibly causing changes in inflammatory patterns. Therefore, data ... including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently associated with other immune- ... Treatment with IL-1 antagonists might be a relevant factor for a switch in the clinical phenotype of the underlying ... Inflammatory bowel disease can develop in the context of some rheumatic diseases in childhood, ...
People with arthritis are now living longer and healthier lives than ever before. ... Earlier diagnosis and advanced medicines for inflammatory arthritis have changed the landscape of arthritis treatment. ... Role of Advanced Therapies in Arthritis. Rheumatologists are treating inflammatory arthritis with targeted DMARDs and biologics ... Earlier diagnosis and advanced medicines have changed the landscape of arthritis treatment. As a result, people with arthritis ...
Dr Farhan Tahir offers treatment for inflammatory diseases like arthritis and joint pain in Pheladelphia, Blue Bell and Yardley ...
Weak opioids may be used for short-term treatment of pain in patients with IA when other therapies have failed or are ... TCAs and neuromodulators may be considered for uses as adjuvant treatment; muscle relaxants and benzodiazepines cannot be ... IA was defined as comprising RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). ... Paracetamol is recommended for the treatment of persistent pain in patients with IA. ...
... complex class of medications that help treat spinal inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing ... Medication treatments for spinal inflammatory arthritis; rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic RA, ankylosing spondylitis. ... Arthritis Foundation Web Site. http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/medication/drug-guide/drug-class/ ... but this article will focus on biologics used to treat types of spinal inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA ...
A hip affected by inflammatory arthritis will feel painful and stiff. Additional symptoms include a dull, aching pain in the ... Inflammatory arthritis may cause general symptoms throughout the body, such as fever, loss of appetite and fatigue. ... Treatment. Although there is no cure for inflammatory arthritis, there are a number of treatment options that can help prevent ... Although there is no cure for inflammatory arthritis, there have been many advances in treatment, particularly in the ...