Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Cecal Diseases: Pathological developments in the CECUM.Frontal Sinus: One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.Ethmoid Sinus: The numerous (6-12) small thin-walled spaces or air cells in the ETHMOID BONE located between the eyes. These air cells form an ethmoidal labyrinth.Lip DiseasesCystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Frontal Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the FRONTAL SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE or HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE.Salivary Gland DiseasesTrauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Osteoma: A benign tumor composed of bone tissue or a hard tumor of bonelike structure developing on a bone (homoplastic osteoma) or on other structures (heteroplastic osteoma). (From Dorland, 27th ed)Forehead: The part of the face above the eyes.Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Cranial Fossa, Anterior: The compartment containing the inferior part and anterior extremities of the frontal lobes (FRONTAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. It is formed mainly by orbital parts of the FRONTAL BONE and the lesser wings of the SPHENOID BONE.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Cystic Duct: The duct that is connected to the GALLBLADDER and allows the emptying of bile into the COMMON BILE DUCT.Orbital Diseases: Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Exophthalmos: Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Mucocele: A retention cyst of the salivary gland, lacrimal sac, paranasal sinuses, appendix, or gallbladder. (Stedman, 26th ed)Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Enophthalmos: Recession of the eyeball into the orbit.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Mouth DiseasesBronchography: Radiography of the bronchial tree after injection of a contrast medium.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Hematuria: Presence of blood in the urine.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Traumatology: The medical specialty which deals with WOUNDS and INJURIES as well as resulting disability and disorders from physical traumas.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Glasgow Coma Scale: A scale that assesses the response to stimuli in patients with craniocerebral injuries. The parameters are eye opening, motor response, and verbal response.Air Ambulances: Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Maxillofacial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Rib FracturesShock, Hemorrhagic: Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.Advanced Trauma Life Support Care: The initial life support care of the severely injured patient.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Adult Survivors of Child Abuse: Persons who were child victims of violence and abuse including physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment.AccidentsDissociative Disorders: Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Abbreviated Injury Scale: Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Vascular System Injuries: Injuries to blood vessels caused by laceration, contusion, puncture, or crush and other types of injuries. Symptoms vary by site and mode of injuries and may include bleeding, bruising, swelling, pain, and numbness. It does not include injuries secondary to pathologic function or diseases such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS.War: Hostile conflict between organized groups of people.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Trauma, Nervous System: Traumatic injuries to the brain, cranial nerves, spinal cord, autonomic nervous system, or neuromuscular system, including iatrogenic injuries induced by surgical procedures.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Transportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.First Aid: Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Cerebrovascular Trauma: Penetrating and nonpenetrating traumatic injuries to an extracranial or intracranial blood vessel that supplies the brain. This includes the CAROTID ARTERIES; VERTEBRAL ARTERIES; MENINGEAL ARTERIES; CEREBRAL ARTERIES; veins, and venous sinuses.Sex Offenses: Any violation of established legal or moral codes in respect to sexual behavior.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Emergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Usually they are caused by trauma. Classically, a mucocele is blusish and fluctuant, and most commonly occurs on the lower lip ... Ranula - the name used when a mucocele occurs in the floor of the mouth (underneath the tongue). Ranulas may grow to a larger ... Human immunodeficiency virus-associated salivary gland disease (HIV-SGD). Mucocele - these are common and are caused by rupture ... allergic reactions or trauma. Congenital disorders of the salivary glands are rare, but may include: Aplasia Atresia Ectopic ...
Minor trauma to the floor of the mouth is thought to damage the delicate ducts that drain saliva from the sublingual gland into ... A ranula is a type of mucocele found on the floor of the mouth. Ranulas present as a swelling of connective tissue consisting ... Infection Repeated trauma Bursting and reformation Dysphagia (in the case of a large ranula) The lesion is usually present in ... A ranula is a type of mucocele, and therefore could be classified as a disorder of the salivary glands. Usually a ranula is ...
Mucocele Ranula Araujo, MR; Centurion, BS; Albuquerque, DF; Marchesano, LH; Damante, JH (Jul-Aug 2010). "Management of a ... It is caused by trauma (e.g. violence, accident or surgery) or infection. They most commonly develop about 8-14 days after ...
This occurs because of a ruptured salivary gland duct usually caused by local trauma (damage), in the case of mucus ... Mucocele on Dermatlas Mucocele surgical removal Mucocele images. ... again a mucocele can form. A variant of a mucocele is found on ... Rather, it would be more accurate to classify mucoceles as polyps (i.e. a lump). The size of oral mucoceles vary from 1 mm to ... The mucocele has a bluish translucent color, and is more commonly found in children and young adults. Although the term cyst is ...
Dental trauma • DenTek Oral Care • Dentifrice • Dentigerous Cyst • Dentin • Dentin dysplasia • Dentine bonding agents • Dentine ... Mucocele • Mucoepidermoid carcinoma • Mucogingival junction • Mucosal lichen planus • Mucous membrane pemphigoid • Mucous ... Occlusal trauma • Occlusion • Odontoblast • Odontoblast process • Odontode • Odontogenesis • Odontogenic keratocyst • ...
The lesions, which may be caused by mild trauma to the mouth tissues such as hot foods, typically rupture quickly and heal ... Mucocele Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis Mucous membrane List of cutaneous conditions James, William D.; Berger, ...
... which commonly follows trauma or ischemia and causes acute inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of gallstones. A ... palpable non-tender gallbladder results from precisely a mucocele of the fibrotic gallbladder) Cholangiocarcinoma, Klatskin ...
Mucocele of salivary gland Ranula (K11.7) Disturbances of salivary secretion Hypoptyalism Ptyalism Xerostomia (K11.8) Other ... Gingival and edentulous alveolar ridge lesions associated with trauma (K06.8) Other specified disorders of gingiva and ...
Functionally, the subcutaneous fat insulates the body, absorbs trauma, and serves as a reserve energy source. Conditions of the ... mucocele) Nagayama's spots Oral Crohn's disease Oral florid papillomatosis Oral melanosis Osseous choristoma of the tongue ...
Local trauma is also associated with aphthous stomatitis, and it is known that trauma can decrease the mucosal barrier. Trauma ... Tricarico A, Molteni G, Mattioli F, Guerra A, Mordini B, Presutti L, Iughetti L (November-December 2012). "Nipple trauma in ... Different individuals have different triggers, which may include nutritional deficiencies, local trauma, stress, hormonal ... Trauma can be reduced by avoiding rough or sharp foodstuffs and by brushing teeth with care. If sodium lauryl sulfate is ...
Papules are arranged in a line (the "Blaschko line").[15] This pattern may develop secondary to trauma (koebnerization) or, ... Additionally, The Koebner phenomenon (the development of new lesions at sites of trauma) is not only present in cutaneous ... They may also experience mucosal bleeding in response to mild trauma, such as toothbrushing. ...
Receding gums can be a sign of long-term trauma from excessive or forceful toothbrushing, or brushing with an abrasive ...
The cause is uncertain,[5] but it is thought to be caused by accumulation of epithelial squames and proliferation of chromogenic (i.e., color-producing) microorganisms.[7] There may be an increase in keratin production or a decrease in normal desquamation (shedding of surface epithelial cells).[5] Many people with BHT are heavy smokers.[5] Other possible associated factors are poor oral hygiene,[5] general debilitation,[5] hyposalivation (i.e., decreased salivary flow rate),[7] radiotherapy,[5] overgrowth of fungal or bacterial organisms,[5] and a soft diet.[7] Occasionally, BHT may be caused by the use of antimicrobial medications (e.g., tetracyclines),[7] or oxidizing mouthwashes or antacids.[5] A soft diet may be involved as normally food has an abrasive action on the tongue, which keeps the filiform papillae short. Pellagra, a condition caused by niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency, may cause a thick greyish fur to develop on the dorsal tongue, along with other oral signs.[8] Transient surface ...
Chronic trauma may produce an ulcer with a keratotic (white, thickened mucosa) margin.[5] Malignant lesions may ulcerate either ... The two most common causes of oral ulceration are local trauma (e.g. rubbing from a sharp edge on a broken filling) and ... Aphthous stomatitis and local trauma are very common causes of oral ulceration; the many other possible causes are all rare in ... Other possible causes include hematinic deficiency (folate, vitamin B, iron), stopping smoking, stress, menstruation, trauma, ...
The focus of treatment is to remove plaque. Therapy is aimed at the reduction of oral bacteria and may take the form of regular periodic visits to a dental professional together with adequate oral hygiene home care. Thus, several of the methods used in the prevention of gingivitis can also be used for the treatment of manifest gingivitis, such as scaling, root planing, curettage, mouth washes containing chlorhexidine or hydrogen peroxide, and flossing. Interdental brushes also help remove any causative agents. Powered toothbrushes work better than manual toothbrushes in reducing the disease.[15] The active ingredients that "reduce plaque and demonstrate effective reduction of gingival inflammation over a period of time" are triclosan, chlorhexidine digluconate, and a combination of thymol, menthol, eucalyptol, and methyl salicylate. These ingredients are found in toothpaste and mouthwash. Hydrogen peroxide was long considered a suitable over-the-counter agent to treat gingivitis. There has been ...
Mothers infected with HSV are advised to avoid procedures that would cause trauma to the infant during birth (e.g. fetal scalp ... Other identified triggers include local injury to the face, lips, eyes, or mouth; trauma; surgery; radiotherapy; and exposure ... after trauma". J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. 66 (1): 136-38. doi:10.1016/j.joms.2006.07.019. PMID 18083428.. ...
Diagnosis is suspected when a patient presents with the symptoms of the classic form of "Eagle syndrome" e.g. unilateral neck pain, sore throat or tinnitus. Sometimes the tip of the styloid process is palpable in the back of the throat. The diagnosis of the vascular type is more difficult and requires an expert opinion. One should have a high level of suspicion when neurological symptoms occur upon head rotation. Symptoms tend to be worsened on bimanual palpation of the styloid through the tonsillar bed. They may be relieved by infiltration of lidocaine into the tonsillar bed. Because of the proximity of several large vascular structures in this area this procedure should not be considered to be risk free. Imaging is important and is diagnostic. Visualizing the styloid process on a CT scan with 3D reconstruction is the suggested imaging technique.[8] The enlarged styloid may be visible on an orthopantogram or a lateral soft tissue X ray of the neck. It is worth noting that the styloid may be ...
Symptoms include sudden fever with sore throat, headache, loss of appetite, and often neck pain. Within two days of onset an average of four or five (but sometimes up to twenty) 1 to 2 mm diameter grayish lumps form and develop into vesicles with red surrounds, and over 24 hours these become shallow ulcers, rarely larger than 5 mm diameter, that heal in one to seven days. These lesions most often appear on the tonsillar pillars (adjacent to the tonsils), but also on the soft palate, tonsils, uvula, or tongue.[5] A small number of lesions (usually 2 - 6) form in the back area of the mouth, particularly the soft palate or tonsillar pillars. The lesions progress initially from red macules to vesicles and lastly to ulcerations which can be 2 - 4 mm in size. ...
As abfraction is still a controversial theory there are various ideas on what causes the lesions. Because of this controversy the true causes of abfraction also remain disputable.[10] Researchers have proposed that abfraction is caused by forces on the tooth from the teeth touching together, occlusal forces, when chewing and swallowing.[3][11] These lead to a concentration of stress and flexion at the area where the enamel and cementum meet (CEJ).[2][4] This theoretical stress concentration[12] and flexion over time causes the bonds in the enamel of the tooth to break down and either fracture or be worn away from other stressors such as erosion or abrasion.[2][4][10][11] The people who initially proposed the theory of abfraction believe the occlusal forces alone cause the lesions[12] without requiring the added abrasive components such as toothbrush and paste or erosion.[12] If teeth come together in a non-ideal bite the researchers state that this would create further stress in areas on the ...
... are named after Henry Koplik (1858-1927), an American pediatrician who published a short description of them in 1896, emphasising their appearance before the skin rash and their value in the differential diagnosis of diseases with which measles might be mistaken.[4][6] He published two further papers on the spots, including one with a colour illustration.[7] An anonymous reviewer of Koplik's The Diseases of Infancy and Childhood refers to the illustration as "the now famous coloured plate".[8] Some authors ascribe the first written description of these spots to Reubold, Würzburg 1854, and others to Johann Andreas Murray (1740-1791). Before Koplik, the German internist Carl Jakob Adolf Christian Gerhardt (1833-1902) in 1874, the Danish physician N. Flindt in 1879, and the Russian Nil Filatov (1847-1902) in 1895, had observed equivalent phenomena.[9] Koplik was aware of Filatov's work,[10] thought his evidence insufficient and rejected his claim for priority.[7] ...
Cold sore outbreaks may be influenced by stress, menstruation, sunlight, sunburn, fever, dehydration, or local skin trauma. ...
Chronic low-grade trauma due to parafunctional habits (e.g. rubbing the tongue against the teeth or pressing it against the ...
Trauma[edit]. Trauma, both micro and macrotrauma, is sometimes identified as a possible cause of TMD; however, the evidence for ... It has been suggested that TMD may develop following physical trauma, particularly whiplash injury, although the evidence for ... trauma, occlusal changes, parafunction), and also factors which may prolong it (stress and again parafunction).[17] Overall, ... and that pTMD has a poorer response to treatment than TMD which has not developed in relation to trauma.[13] ...
A reaction to past trauma or infection but it's difficult to rule out in some cases. ...
The syndrome is rare in the United States, Africa and South America, but is common in the Middle East and Asia, suggesting a possible cause endemic to those tropical areas.[38] A theory suggested that past exposure to lethal infectious agents might have fixed the genetic susceptibility factors to Behçet's disease in those area.[39] It is not associated with cancer, and links with tissue-types (which are under investigation) are not certain. It also does not follow the usual pattern for autoimmune diseases. However, one study has revealed a possible connection to food allergies, particularly to dairy products.[40] An estimated 15,000 to 20,000 Americans have been diagnosed with this disease. In the UK, it is estimated to have about 1 case for every 100,000 people.[41] Globally, males are affected more frequently than females.[42] In the United States, more females are affected than males.[citation needed]. In an epidemiologic study, 56 percent of patients with Behçet's disease developed ocular ...
K06.2) en:Gingival and edentulous alveolar ridge lesions associated with trauma ... K11.6) en:Mucocele of en:salivary gland *Ranula. *(K11.7) Disturbances of en:salivary secretion *en:Hypoptyalism ...
... orbital mucocele arising from contralateral sinus disease that crossed the midline upon diversion by the effect of prior trauma ... Mucocele is a rare complication of chronic rhinosinusitis that typically presents with delayed diagnosis and results in local ... Normal drainage of the paranasal sinuses can be disrupted by facial trauma leading to mucocele formation. A mucocele may be ... A history of trauma is occasionally elicited in patients with a sinus mucocele, often years or decades after the injury [3]. ...
These lesions occur as the result of trauma or obstruction to the salivary gland excretory duct and spillage of mucin into the ... the mucocele, the oral ranula, and the cervical, or plunging, ranula are clinical terms for a pseudocyst that is associated ... Regarding superficial mucoceles, trauma does not always appear to play an important role in the pathogenesis. In many cases, ... Birth trauma that affects the oral cavity is believed to cause some congenital mucoceles in some newborns. Potential causes ...
The recurrence rate for superficial mucoceles is high (approximately 50%), despite surgical removal. Because these lesions are ... Trauma from sucking on the lower lip was suspected to be the cause. ... Drugs & Diseases , Dentistry , Mucocele and Ranula Q&A What is the recurrence rate of superficial mucoceles after surgery?. ... The red lesion represents a recently ruptured mucocele, and the translucent papular lesion represents an intact mucocele. ...
The development of mucoceles and ranulas depend on the disruption of the flow of saliva from the secretory apparatus of the ... Regarding superficial mucoceles, trauma does not always appear to play an important role in the pathogenesis. In many cases, ... Drugs & Diseases , Dentistry , Mucocele and Ranula Q&A What is the pathophysiology of mucocele and ranula?. Updated: Apr 16, ... encoded search term (What is the pathophysiology of mucocele and ranula?) and What is the pathophysiology of mucocele and ...
What is nasolacrimal mucocele? Meaning of nasolacrimal mucocele medical term. What does nasolacrimal mucocele mean? ... Looking for online definition of nasolacrimal mucocele in the Medical Dictionary? nasolacrimal mucocele explanation free. ... A mucocele is usually caused by trauma. See mucus extravasation phenomenon, mucus retention cyst. ... mucocele. (redirected from nasolacrimal mucocele). Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia. mucocele. [mu´ko-sēl] 1. dilation ...
These are called mucoceles. They are often caused by lip biting, lip sucking, or other trauma. ... Scheinfield N. Mucoceles. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann WR, Berth-Jones J, Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive ... Your health care provider can usually diagnose a mucocele or ranula simply by looking at it. Other tests that may be done ... Avoiding intentionally sucking the cheeks or biting the lips may help prevent some mucoceles. ...
These lesions occur as the result of trauma or obstruction to the salivary gland excretory duct and spillage of mucin into the ... the mucocele, the oral ranula, and the cervical, or plunging, ranula are clinical terms for a pseudocyst that is associated ... encoded search term (Mucocele and Ranula) and Mucocele and Ranula What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and ... The red lesion represents a recently ruptured mucocele, and the translucent papular lesion represents an intact mucocele. View ...
Trauma to nose: picking, foreign body, blowing. -Platelet disorders. -Drugs: aspirin, anti-coagulant, cocaine. -Vessel ... Trauma. -Neurological: Guillain-Barre syndrome, mononeuropathy. -Neoplastic: parotid gland tumours. UMN. -Cerebrovascular ...
Emergency & Trauma Care. For the seriously sick to the critically injured, Level 1 trauma care, built just for kids. ... Emergency & Trauma Care. › Primary Care Clinics. › Hospitals. › Rehab Clinics. › Specialty Care. › Surgery Centers. ...
A mucocele of the retromolar region is unusual and more often proven to be what? ... A clinical mucocele on the upper lip is more likely to be what? ... Surgical excision of the mucocele and adjacent (minor) salivary ... Salivary duct cysts occur mostly in ________ whereas mucoceles occur more often in __________. ...
Mucoceles usually occur on the lower lip and inner part of the cheek, as these are frequent areas of mouth trauma, but they can ... Mucoceles occur most commonly in children or young adults. There may be a history of trauma or lip biting. The similar- ... A mucocele is usually a single bump with a slight bluish or normal skin color, varying in size from 1/2 to 1 inch, and it is ... Many mucoceles will go away on their own in 3-6 weeks. Mucus-retention cysts often last longer. Avoid the habit of chewing or ...
Find details on Salivary mucocele in dogs including diagnosis and symptoms, pathogenesis, prevention, treatment, prognosis and ... Trauma/bites/neoplasia/idiopathic/iatrogenic → leakage of saliva into surrounding tissue.. Sublingual - acute *Firm and painful ... Treatment: affected salivary gland resection, marsupialization for intraoral mucoceles.. *Prognosis: may recur, good if entire ...
The predisposing factors can be fractures, mucosal edema, polyps, tumors, surgical trauma, and chronic sinusitis. Mucoceles are ... The wider the mucocele is marsupialized, the better the result. Once a frontal and/or ethmoid mucocele has been marsupialized, ... Mucoceles. Mucocele is a chronic, expansive, benign cystic lesion limited by the mucosa of the paranasal sinus, with thick, ... a small mucocele may be drained via the endoscopic approach but mucoceles with lateral extension may be difficult to access via ...
Mucocele. -Neck Mass (Ddx). -Leukoplakia. -Osteoradionecrosis (Orn). Chapter 7: Oral And Maxillofacial Trauma. -Subcondyle ... Orbital Trauma: Fracture of the Orbital Floor. -Panfacial Fracture. Chapter 8: Orthognathic Surgery. -Mandibular Orthognathic ...
Mucoceles are gradually expanding lesions involving paranasal sinuses. Theyre usually caused by obstruction within the normal ... This obstruction can be due to past trauma, chronic rhinosinusitis or in some cases there is no clear cause. Symptoms often ... What Is Sinonasal Mucocele?. Mucoceles are gradually expanding lesions involving paranasal sinuses. They are usually caused due ... Removal of the sinonasal mucoceles is the primary treatment for these lesions. In the majority of cases, minimally-invasive, ...
Lacrimal sac mucocele. *Trauma. *Dacryocystitis. *Malignancy. *Congenital glaucoma - rule out congenital glaucoma in any infant ...
Marsupialization, complete excision (mucocele with its associated minor salivary gland), or dissection can be performed. Trauma ... Histology of a mucocele.. Superficial mucoceles, a less common variant, are small (,5 mm), vesicular, frequently translucent, ... There are no systemic disorders associated with mucoceles. There are rare reports of superficial mucoceles associated with ... Re Cecconi, D. "Mucoceles of the oral cavity: a large case series (1994-2008) and a literature review". Med Oral Patol Oral Cir ...
Mucocele - salivary blister caused by trauma to salivary tube. Term. What are 2 variations from normal in the labial mucosa?. ...
Blunt trauma is usually suspected as the cause for a mucocele, but rarely is an actual event identified as the cause of the ... Even though trauma is suspected to be the cause for most mucoceles, it is unreasonable to try to avoid all situations that ... Trauma to the neck, as might occur with the use of a choke collar, can result in development of a cervical mucocele. ... Treatment of Salivary Mucocele in Dogs. Treatment may include:. * Periodic lancing or drainage of the mucocele. Unfortunately, ...
Mucoceles occur when a salivary gland is blocked or injured, usually caused by trauma such as accidentally biting your lip. ... A mucocele might pop up on the inside of your lower lip. Its a rubbery, bubble-like swelling which may look blue. ...
History of facial trauma that distorts sinus anatomy and precludes access to the ethmoid sinus ... Ethmoid mucocele. *Extensive Nasal Polyps. *Asthmatic patients with aspirin sensitivity. *Pregnant or lactating females ...
Usually they are caused by trauma. Classically, a mucocele is blusish and fluctuant, and most commonly occurs on the lower lip ... Ranula - the name used when a mucocele occurs in the floor of the mouth (underneath the tongue). Ranulas may grow to a larger ... Human immunodeficiency virus-associated salivary gland disease (HIV-SGD). Mucocele - these are common and are caused by rupture ... allergic reactions or trauma. Congenital disorders of the salivary glands are rare, but may include: Aplasia Atresia Ectopic ...
Most of the time a mucocele will heal on its own, though a... ... A mucocele is a painless cyst that appears on the inside of the ... Continued trauma to the affected area can result in delayed healing, and potentially cause the enlargement of the cyst due to ... After getting mucoceles for years, my friend found a home remedy that worked for her. She puts alum on the mucocele and leaves ... A painless cyst that appears on the inside of the lip is known as a mucocele, or a mucous retention cyst. Mucoceles are a ...
Minor trauma to the floor of the mouth is thought to damage the delicate ducts that drain saliva from the sublingual gland into ... A ranula is a type of mucocele found on the floor of the mouth. Ranulas present as a swelling of connective tissue consisting ... Infection Repeated trauma Bursting and reformation Dysphagia (in the case of a large ranula) The lesion is usually present in ... A ranula is a type of mucocele, and therefore could be classified as a disorder of the salivary glands. Usually a ranula is ...
Trauma. *Petrous apex mucoceles. *Fibrous dysplasia. *Paget disease. *Petrous apex osteomyelitis. *Petrous apex cholesteatomas ...
  • This article aims to present a rare case of mucocele in a Blandin-Nuhn gland highlighting the importance of the initial approach. (imed.pub)
  • Because necrotizing cholecystitis is often associated with gallbladder mucocele in dogs, early intervention by prophylactic cholecystectomy may reduce need for emergency surgery. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Individuals who habitually suck their inner lip between their teeth often experience the formation of a mucocele. (wisegeek.org)
  • Mucoceles are painless, asymptomatic swellings that have a relatively rapid onset and fluctuate in size. (medscape.com)
  • A mucocele is usually a single bump with a slight bluish or normal skin color, varying in size from 1/2 to 1 inch, and it is soft and painless. (skinsight.com)
  • Generally the development of a cervical mucocele (Figure 1) is seen as a gradually enlarging soft, painless, fluctuant mass in the upper cervical (neck) or intermandibular region. (acvs.org)
  • The duct may become occluded by a sialolith, congenital malformation, stenosis, periductal fibrosis, periductal scarring due to prior trauma, excretory duct agenesis, or even a tumor. (medscape.com)
  • Although trauma is considered to be the usual cause for the damage to the duct or gland, it is rare that a specific traumatic event can be identified. (petplace.com)
  • If a duct becomes blocked or damaged, a mucocele may form. (oralsurgerywashingtondc.com)
  • Patients with superficial mucoceles report small fluid-filled vesicles on the soft palate, the retromolar pad, the posterior buccal mucosa, and, occasionally, the lower labial mucosa. (medscape.com)
  • The mucosa has Breschet s characteristic vascular pits, together with venous drainage points, which on the one hand can lead to intracranial dissemination of infections, and on the other to mucocele formation, if the mucosa covering them is not eliminated adequately. (isciii.es)
  • Mucoceles, fibroepithelial polyps and pyogenic granulomas are rare in the hard palate because the firm, keratinised palatal mucosa is relatively resistant to trauma. (racgp.org.au)
  • What is the recurrence rate of superficial mucoceles after surgery? (medscape.com)
  • This may reduce the extent of resection, which, in the context of meningiomas, may lead to higher recurrence rates.4,5 In the setting of skull base dural defects resulting from trauma, primary dural repair can be challenging, especially along the posterior and lateral margins of the anterior fossa. (deepdyve.com)
  • Patients with prior sinus surgery, sinonasal tumors, facial trauma and patients younger than 16 years were excluded because according to Gray, the extension of the nasal cavity into the body of the sphenoid bone to form the sphenoid sinus is present before birth but does not reach its full extension until adolescence. (indmedica.com)
  • If you had prior sinus surgery or been in an accident causing facial trauma and get intermittent yellow discolored nasal drainage, or focal facial pressure in a specific area on one side of the face, you may be suffering from a sinus mucocele. (houstonadvancedsinus.com)
  • But simply draining the fluid filled lumen of the mucocele will not solve the problem permanently. (healthtap.com)
  • She reported no recent trauma, no violent valsalva maneuver, and no history of sinusitis. (harvard.edu)
  • Las complicaciones descritas son: deformidad estética frontal, sinusitis frontal, mucocele frontal, celulitis fronto-orbitaria, intolerancia al material de osteosíntesis, complicaciones infecciosas del SNC y persistencia de fístula de líquido cefalorraquídeo. (isciii.es)
  • Parotid Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Mimicking a Large Mucocele. (pubfacts.com)
  • Where there is a large mucocele, the associated mass effect can cause the indentation or lateral displacement of the cecum . (radiopaedia.org)
  • We present the case of a symptomatic orbital mucocele arising from contralateral sinus disease that crossed the midline upon diversion by the effect of prior trauma. (mdpi.com)
  • We present an unusual case in which disruption by prior trauma led to diversion of mucus from occult sinus disease into adjacent sinus cavities and orbital mucocele formation. (mdpi.com)
  • This is frequently seen in association with a cervical mucocele. (acvs.org)
  • It is essential a variation of the cervical mucocele, but the fluid accumulation is almost entirely within the throat (pharynx). (acvs.org)