Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Transportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Bicycling: The use of a bicycle for transportation or recreation. It does not include the use of a bicycle in studying the body's response to physical exertion (BICYCLE ERGOMETRY TEST see EXERCISE TEST).Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Noise, Transportation: Noise associated with transportation, particularly aircraft and automobiles.Air Ambulances: Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.Confined Spaces: A space which has limited openings for entry and exit combined with unfavorable natural ventilation such as CAVES, refrigerators, deep tunnels, pipelines, sewers, silos, tanks, vats, mines, deep trenches or pits, vaults, manholes, chimneys, etc.Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.City Planning: Comprehensive planning for the physical development of the city.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Architectural Accessibility: Designs for approaching areas inside or outside facilities.Aviation: Design, development, manufacture, and operation of heavier-than-air AIRCRAFT.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Capillary Fragility: The susceptibility of CAPILLARIES, under conditions of increased stress, to leakage.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Energy-Generating Resources: Materials or phenomena which can provide energy directly or via conversion.Tooth Apex: The tip or terminal end of the root of a tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p62)Clonixin: Anti-inflammatory analgesic.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Stretchers: Bed-like structures for transporting or temporarily holding patients.Handling (Psychology): Physical manipulation of animals and humans to induce a behavioral or other psychological reaction. In experimental psychology, the animal is handled to induce a stress situation or to study the effects of "gentling" or "mothering".Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Accidents, AviationTravel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.United StatesAnimal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Fossil Fuels: Any combustible hydrocarbon deposit formed from the remains of prehistoric organisms. Examples are petroleum, coal, and natural gas.Schools: Educational institutions.Patient Transfer: Interfacility or intrahospital transfer of patients. Intrahospital transfer is usually to obtain a specific kind of care and interfacility transfer is usually for economic reasons as well as for the type of care provided.Hanseniaspora: A genus of the ascomycetous yeast in the family Saccharomycodaceae, order SACCHAROMYCETALES, that contributes to the spontaneous fermentation of cider. Anamorphic forms are in the genus KLOECKERA.Anatomy, Cross-Sectional: Descriptive anatomy based on three-dimensional imaging (IMAGING, THREE-DIMENSIONAL) of the body, organs, and structures using a series of computer multiplane sections, displayed by transverse, coronal, and sagittal analyses. It is essential to accurate interpretation by the radiologist of such techniques as ultrasonic diagnosis, MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING, and computed tomography (TOMOGRAPHY, X-RAY COMPUTED). (From Lane & Sharfaei, Modern Sectional Anatomy, 1992, Preface)Elevators and Escalators: Mechanical ascending and descending devices which convey objects and/or people.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Biofuels: Hydrocarbon-rich byproducts from the non-fossilized BIOMASS that are combusted to generate energy as opposed to fossilized hydrocarbon deposits (FOSSIL FUELS).Engineering: The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)Policy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.KentuckyMotor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Recreation: Activity engaged in for pleasure.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.First Aid: Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Bottle-Nosed Dolphin: The species Tursiops truncatus, in the family Delphinidae, characterized by a bottle-shaped beak and slightly hooked broad dorsal fin.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Fuel Oils: Complex petroleum hydrocarbons consisting mainly of residues from crude oil distillation. These liquid products include heating oils, stove oils, and furnace oils and are burned to generate energy.Benzocaine: A surface anesthetic that acts by preventing transmission of impulses along NERVE FIBERS and at NERVE ENDINGS.Strikes, Employee: Work-related situations in which the employees as a group refuse to work until certain conditions of employment are granted by the employer.Freeze Drying: Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.Egg Shell: A hard or leathery calciferous exterior covering of an egg.Calcium Sulfate: A calcium salt that is used for a variety of purposes including: building materials, as a desiccant, in dentistry as an impression material, cast, or die, and in medicine for immobilizing casts and as a tablet excipient. It exists in various forms and states of hydration. Plaster of Paris is a mixture of powdered and heat-treated gypsum.Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.Root Canal Irrigants: Chemicals used mainly to disinfect root canals after pulpectomy and before obturation. The major ones are camphorated monochlorophenol, EDTA, formocresol, hydrogen peroxide, metacresylacetate, and sodium hypochlorite. Root canal irrigants include also rinsing solutions of distilled water, sodium chloride, etc.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.BelgiumEnvironmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Esthetics: The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Herbicide Resistance: Diminished or failed response of PLANTS to HERBICIDES.Preservation, Biological: The process of protecting various samples of biological material.Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.GlobulinsPublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Radio Frequency Identification Device: Machine readable patient or equipment identification device using radio frequency from 125 kHz to 5.8 Ghz.Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.Housing, AnimalPhiladelphiaVehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.CaliforniaPaperMeat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Leisure Activities: Voluntary use of free time for activities outside the daily routine.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Conservation of Energy Resources: Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Sodium Hypochlorite: It is used as an oxidizing and bleaching agent and as a disinfectant. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Animals, LaboratoryEquipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.AlabamaNarration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.AccidentsRandom Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Food Deprivation: The withholding of food in a structured experimental situation.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Telecommunications: Transmission of information over distances via electronic means.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Stainless Steel: Stainless steel. A steel containing Ni, Cr, or both. It does not tarnish on exposure and is used in corrosive environments. (Grant & Hack's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Urbanization: The process whereby a society changes from a rural to an urban way of life. It refers also to the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas.Electric Power Supplies: Devices that control the supply of electric current for running electrical equipment.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.

Operational factors affecting maternal mortality in Tanzania. (1/381)

Identification of the main operational factors in cases of maternal death within and outside the health care system is necessary for safe motherhood programmes. In this study, a follow-up was done of all 117 cases of maternal deaths in Ilala district, Dar es Salaam, 1991-1993, at all levels of care. In all, 79% received some medical care whereas 11% arrived too late for treatment. For each case the major operational factors and all health care interventions were defined through interviews with family members and health care staff and from hospital records, and the avoidability of each case was determined. In the health institutions where the women had consulted, the available resources were assessed. It was found that in most cases the husband (29%) or the mother (31%) of the woman decided on her care in cases of complications, and together with the lack of transport, this often caused delay at home. Also, delay in transfer from the district hospital was common. Cases of abortion complications were often not managed on time because of the delay in reporting to hospital or misleading information. Suboptimal care was identified in 77% of the cases reaching health care. Inadequate treatment was identified by the district health staff in 61% and by the referral centres in 12% of their cases. Wrong decision at the district level and lack of equipment at the referral centre were the main reasons for inadequate care. It is concluded that although community education on danger signs in pregnancy and labour is important, provision of the core resources and supplies for emergency obstetric interventions, as well as clear protocols for management and referral, are absolutely necessary for improvement of maternal survival.  (+info)

Safety of air medical transportation after tissue plasminogen activator administration in acute ischemic stroke. (2/381)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We sought to determine the safety of air medical transport (AMT) of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) immediately after or during administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients with AIS treated with tPA in nonuniversity hospitals frequently need transfer to tertiary care centers that can provide specialized care. AMT is a widely available mode of transport that is crucial in providing expedient and quality health care to critically ill patients while assuring high level of care during transportation. The safety of AMT of patients with AIS after or during administration of tPA has not been examined. METHODS: We performed retrospective chart review of 24 patients with AIS who were treated with intravenous tPA and transferred by helicopter to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania or the University of Cincinnati Hospital. The charts were reviewed for neurological complications, systemic complications, and adherence to the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) protocol for AIS management. RESULTS: No major neurological or systemic complications occurred. Four patients had hypertension warranting treatment, 3 patients experienced motion sickness, 1 patient developed a transient confusional state, and 1 patient experienced minor systemic bleeding. Four NINDS protocol violations occurred, all related to blood pressure management. CONCLUSIONS: In this small series, AMT of AIS patients after thrombolysis was not associated with any major neurological or systemic complications. Flight crew education on the NINDS AIS protocol is essential in limiting the number of protocol violations. AMT of patients with AIS provides fast and safe access to tertiary centers that can provide state of the art stroke therapy.  (+info)

A single-center 8-year experience with percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. (3/381)

OBJECTIVE: To determine surgical, postoperative, and postdischarge complications associated with percutaneous dilational tracheostomy (PDT) in an 8-year experience at the University of Kentucky. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: There are known risks associated with the transport of critically ill patients to the operating room for elective tracheostomy, and less-than-optimal conditions may interfere with open bedside tracheostomy. PDT has been introduced as an alternative to open tracheostomy. Despite information supporting its safety and utility, the technique has been criticized because advocates had not provided sufficient information regarding complications. METHODS: A prospective database was initiated on all patients who underwent PDT between September 1990 and May 1998. The database provided indication, procedure time, duration of intubation before PDT, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. Retrospective review of medical records and phone interviews provided long-term follow-up information. RESULTS: In the 8-year period, 827 PDTs were performed in 824 patients. Two patients were excluded because PDT could not be completed for technical reasons. There were 519 male and 305 female patients. Mean age was 56 years. Prolonged mechanical ventilatory support was the most common indication. Mean procedure time was 15 minutes, and the average duration of intubation before PDT was 10 days. The intraoperative complication rate was 6%, with premature extubation the most common complication. The procedure-related death rate was 0.6%. Postoperative complications were found in 5%, with bleeding the most common. With a mean follow-up of greater than 1 year, the tracheal stenosis rate was 1.6%. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of this large, single-center study, the authors conclude that when performed by experienced surgeons, PDT is a safe and effective alternative to open surgical tracheostomy for intubated patients who require elective tracheostomy.  (+info)

Pediatric emergency preparedness in the office. (4/381)

Pediatric office emergencies occur more commonly than is usually perceived by family physicians, and most offices are not optimally prepared to deal with these situations. Obtaining specific training in pediatric emergencies and performing mock "codes" to check office readiness can improve the proper handling of pediatric emergencies. Common airway emergencies include foreign-body aspiration and croup. Cool mist, racemic epinephrine nebulization and dexamethasone are typical treatment measures for croup. Asthma and bronchiolitis are common causes of respiratory distress. Hypovolemic shock is the most common cause of circulatory failure in children. Intraosseous access is a simple and underutilized route for vascular access in a critically ill child. Status epilepticus is the most common neurologic emergency. Avoidance of iatrogenic respiratory depression and hypotension can be optimized by taking an algorithmic approach to the use of anticonvulsant medications. Transport of patients after initial stabilization of an emergency should always be done in a manner that provides adequate safety and monitoring.  (+info)

What does it cost the patient to see the doctor? (5/381)

Against a background of increasing demands on limited resources, there will be an emphasis on undertaking studies that relate benefits of an intervention to the costs that are incurred in their production. Patient costs are an important, but often overlooked, part of an economic exercise and include transport costs, loss of employment, and loss of leisure time. This paper highlights the theoretical difficulties inherent in deriving patient costs and suggests a pragmatic framework to derive unit costs in these areas. We demonstrate that these costs are not inconsiderable when compared with the cost of a general practitioner consultation.  (+info)

Effects of ambulance transport in critically ill patients. (6/381)

Two groups of critically ill patients were transferred by ambulance from other hospitals to a central intensive therapy unit. The effect of transport was reviewed retrospectively in 46 patients and prospectively in 20 patients. Of the 46 patients reviewed retrospectively six became hypotensive, six became hypertensive, and seven developed delayed hypotension. One patient developed fits and six out of 13 patients had a rise in arterial PCO-2 of 1-6-4-1 kPa (12-31 mm Hg). Of the 20 patients reviewed prospectively, one patient became hypertensive due to overtransfusion, one had a fit, but none became hypotensive. Three out of four cases of delayed hypotension were related to starting intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Arterial PCO-2 fell in one patient and arterial PCO-2 rose in two, each change being related to changed oxygen therapy or narcotics. There were no changes in other cardiovascular or respiratory indices, body temperature, or urine production. Earlier transfer, resuscitation before transfer, continuing medical care during the journey, and hence a slower smoother journey seemed to be important factors in the management of these patients. Our findings, may have important implications in the future regional organization of the care of critically ill patients.  (+info)

Movement of criticall ill patients within hospital. (7/381)

Critically ill patients were observed during routine movement inside the hospital to and from the intensive therapy unit. One patient a month suffered major cardiorespiratory collapse or death as a direct result of movement. Renewed bleeding of a pelvic fracture, cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac embarrassment due to a haemothorax, and cardiovascular decompensation were seen. It was difficult to continue treatment during movement, especially maintaining an airway or providing adequate intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Seventy postoperative patients suffered few ill effects on being moved. Greater awareness of the dangers of moving critically ill patients within hospital is needed. Thorough preparation for the move and adequate maintenance of treatment during movement requires the skill of experienced medical staff.  (+info)

Heart transplantation in children in foreign countries with reference to medical, transportation, and financial issues. (8/381)

Heart transplantation is increasingly becoming accepted worldwide as therapy for end-stage heart failure not only in adult patients but also in pediatric practice. The new law in Japan for organ transplantation from brain-dead patients was established on 16 October 1998, but there is no definite law or protocol for brain death in children under the age of 6 years and children less than 15 years of age cannot become donors. These facts make organ transplantation from the cadavers of neonates, infants and young children almost impossible in Japan, even though there are children who need heart or heart-lung transplantation. The present authors have to date transferred 8 patients to the USA or Germany for heart transplantation: 4 successfully underwent heart transplantation, but 4 died during the waiting period overseas. There are many things to consider; not only the medical problems involved in transportation, but also the financial issues when transferring patients to other countries. This report details the experience with the 8 cases that were transferred overseas for heart transplantation, and highlights the problems that need to be considered.  (+info)

  • ABSTRACT: Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. (nursingcenter.com)
  • The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Treat patients with care, discovery, and integrity. (simplyhired.com)
  • Working in Patient Care Unit (e.g. (simplyhired.com)
  • Understanding that transportation is a common problem for people seeking breast cancer treatment, Ford and Lyft will be offering free rides (up to $40) to current breast care patients via Free Ride Codes. (scripps.org)
  • Requestor is an integrated health system offering health care services in a rural community with limited access to public transportation. (lexology.com)
  • Specifically, the ACA amendments exclude from the definition, any remuneration that promotes access to care and poses a low risk of harm to patients and federal health care programs. (lexology.com)
  • Having a specialty critical care transportation team on hand 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, ensures that patients are safely transported with the most appropriate level of on-board medical care. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • This new collaboration complements our partnership by providing patients access to specialized Scripps teams on our ambulances between all Scripps facilities," said Benjamin Miller, AMR critical care transport nurse manager. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • The critical care transportation program centers on a team of registered nurses with years of intensive care experience and other specially trained care providers, such as respiratory therapists and cardiac perfusionists. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • The critical care transportation program represents a $1 million investment by Scripps to enhance the level of care that can be provided when a critically ill patient must be moved from one facility to another. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • Types of specialty critical care patients transported through the program include those who are on mechanical circulatory support devices, those who are suffering profound respiratory failure and needing specialty breathing machines, patients who have suffered traumas, or those who have had a stroke. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • Our investment in this critical care transportation program ensures a continuum of care for those patients, and it fits with our long-standing mission to provide the highest level of care to our community. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • The AMA leads physicians' efforts to measurably improve patient safety and quality of care by working to ensure the implementation of the Patient Safety Act. (ama-assn.org)
  • The AMA encourages physicians to take the lead in providing safe and effective patient care. (ama-assn.org)
  • Proper implementation of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (PSQIA), which establishes a voluntary reporting system designed to enhance the data available to assess and resolve patient safety and health care quality issues. (ama-assn.org)
  • Planning ahead for long-term care options can help patients and families ensure a seamless transition between care facilities. (mesothelioma.com)
  • Medicaid coverage laws differ by state, but it's important to note that in many cases, Medicaid doesn't cover long-term care for cancer patients. (mesothelioma.com)
  • We know that our patients and their families have questions related to care during this time. (ucsd.edu)
  • To address this, I needed to unlearn that on-time appointments were a measure of success in health care delivery, and our team implemented a system that made subway cards available to patients. (aafp.org)
  • These devices may also be set up at patients homes and ambulatory care settings for long-term monitoring. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • For example, in July 2017, the company acquired Medtronic s Patient Care, Deep Vein Thrombosis, and Nutritional Insufficiency business segments. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Ivey makes arrangements for patients from Century, Brewton, Jay, Munson, and other rural communities to get the prescriptions and medical care they need. (pensacolatoday.com)
  • Chmiel plans to open their doors in June, but she also worries about transportation being an obstacle to pre-natal care. (pensacolatoday.com)
  • The integrated solution also helps to determine which tasks should be completed in which order to provide the most effective care for patients, as it notifies the appropriate caregiver by mobile device or offers real-time prompts when clinicians enter the room. (thomasnet.com)
  • One phone call brings the expertise of Cleveland Clinic physicians, nurse practitioners, critical care nurses, and critical care paramedics to patients in need anywhere at anytime across the globe. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Cleveland Clinic's Critical Care Transport (CCT) team is recognized as a world leader in transporting critical patients anywhere around the globe. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • The CCT team is an expert team of critical care providers available 24/7 to transport critically ill and injured patients of all ages via ground mobile intensive care unit, helicopter or jet aircraft. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • We conducted an observational study of 33 VHA facilities with homeless medical homes and patient- aligned care teams that served more than 14,000 patients. (cdc.gov)
  • We correlated site-specific health care performance data for the 3,543 homeless veterans enrolled in the program from October 2013 through March 2014, including those receiving ambulatory or acute health care services during the 6 months prior to enrollment in our study and 6 months post-enrollment with corresponding survey data on the Homeless Patient Aligned Care Team (H-PACT) program implementation. (cdc.gov)
  • Six-month patterns of acute-care use pre-enrollment and post-enrollment for 3,543 consecutively enrolled patients showed a 19.0% reduction in emergency department use and a 34.7% reduction in hospitalizations. (cdc.gov)
  • Homeless people face multiple barriers to health care, including transportation, limited availability and fragmentation of health care services, difficulty scheduling and keeping appointments, perceived or actual stigma of homelessness, lack of trust, social isolation, and competing sustenance needs (13-15). (cdc.gov)
  • While previous research has established the feasibility of implementing ECHO Care to address high-need Medicaid patients , less is known about the impact on cost of care for this group. (bmc.org)
  • Determine whether ECHO helps reduce utilization of inpatient and emergency care among high-need, high-cost Medicaid patients. (bmc.org)
  • 770 Medicaid-insured patients in New Mexico received intensive outpatient care by interdisciplinary outpatient teams made up of nurse practitioners or physician assistants and behavioral health providers, community health workers, and nurses. (bmc.org)
  • 2019). A Novel Intervention for High-Need, High-Cost Medicaid Patients: A Study of ECHO Care . (bmc.org)
  • When it comes to patient monitoring, you want the best products to give top-notch care. (3m.com)
  • Finally, a reliable option for enhancing patient care while helping minimize the risk of cross-contamination. (3m.com)
  • Major payers in more than 30 states use 3M patient classification methodologies to pay providers and measure health care quality. (3m.com)
  • Start with an approach that captures the current changes in clinical practice and resources used to provide a broader, more inclusive classification of outpatient care like 3M™ Enhanced Ambulatory Patient Groups (EAPGs). (3m.com)
  • During this webinar 3M experts described key features of 3M CRGs, how they are used to manage patient care and how they have an impact on population health management. (3m.com)
  • A new safe harbor was recently issued by the Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) that permits eligible health care providers to offer free or discounted transportation to established patients. (jdsupra.com)
  • Patient Care Technician I - PBL Pediatric Med-Surg(non benef. (indeed.com)
  • The International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans recently released the findings from its fourth survey about how employer health plans are affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (neworleanscitybusiness.com)
  • Major elements of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act take effect next year, forcing New Orleans-area companies to learn more about how it will effect the health insurance coverage they offer to employees. (neworleanscitybusiness.com)
  • Despite the growing population of senior citizens, the home health care industry is facing a nearly $68 billion cut in Medicare payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (neworleanscitybusiness.com)
  • For many patients with asthma and their health care providers, delivering effective asthma care and control can be challenging. (nih.gov)
  • These projects have implemented strategic activities and gained valuable knowledge about how to get health care providers, patients, and others to follow six key actions (based on the NAEPP's clinical practice guidelines ) that can chart a smoother course toward asthma control. (nih.gov)
  • For patients with asthma ages 5 and up, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's (NAEPP) clinical practice guidelines recommend spirometry to assess asthma severity and monitor asthma control , two of six key actions that the NAEPP has identified as critical to the improvement of asthma control and care. (nih.gov)
  • Through its NACI-funded Spirometry Integration Project, Dorchester House sought to increase its patients' access to spirometry testing within the primary care setting, with the aim of improving the overall quality of asthma care they received. (nih.gov)
  • Learn about our expanded patient care options and visitor guidelines . (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • With an open surgery, patients sometimes have to spend up to five days in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). (wtop.com)
  • They have a great deal of experience, they've been doing this for many years, they've gone through their learning curves already and they are able to offer patients an advanced level of robotic care at the cutting edge," he said. (wtop.com)
  • The Direct Patient Care Volunteer works under the supervision of the Volunteer Coordinator in collaboration with other members of the Hospice Team. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Volunteers will see patients in nursing homes and extended care facilities, where their main role will be to break the monotony of the day. (volunteermatch.org)
  • With less time spent by site staff and study coordinators on the tasks handled by the patient concierge, more of their time can be devoted to patient care and completing the trial within expected timeframes. (businesswire.com)
  • We find that a marginally diagnosed patient with diabetes spends $1,097 more on drugs and diabetes-related care annually after diagnosis, but find no corresponding changes in self-reported health or healthy behaviors. (nber.org)
  • Our results imply that a small relaxation in the diagnosis cutoff would increase total spending on diabetes-related care by about $2.4 billion annually and minimally impact patient health. (nber.org)
  • The city of Baltimore has many hotels and Johns Hopkins negotiates with many of them to provide reduced rates for families of patients under their care. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Patients must have a caregiver stay with them, as the Pavilion does not provide direct medical care. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Air Charity Network™ (ACN) provides access for people in the United States who are in need of free air transportation to specialized health care facilities or distant destinations due to family, community or national crisis. (lls.org)
  • With more patients covered under high-deductible plans or Medicaid managed care plans, the new payer mix has shifted more of the burden for payment onto the patient and collection onto the provider. (behavioral.net)
  • The best patient care includes not only medical care but also spiritual and emotional care of the whole person - for people of every faith. (rochester.edu)
  • Barbara Cimaglio of the Vermont Department of Health says the state has asked primary care physicians to help by treating addicted patients in their practices, and also has offered to pay for nurses and counselors to work alongside them. (cpr.org)
  • Confirm and communicate location for transition of patient care at air field. (cdc.gov)
  • Failure to admit patients with major trauma in a dedicated trauma centre may lead to inappropriate care and consequently an increase of preventable deaths [ 4 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If you are a prostate cancer patient, we are excited to offer the Prostate Cancer Supportive Care (PCSC) Program to support you and your family. (bccancer.bc.ca)
  • UH Geneva Medical Center is committed to helping patients and families with health care goals. (uhhospitals.org)
  • The MICA units were typically staffed with one specially trained paramedic which includes advanced life support (ALS), who are used in cases where extensive patient care is required in addition to a regular unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The shuttle service would provide transportation for patients and those accompanying them to visits at any of the Requestor's facilities along the two routes without regard to their health insurance status or ability to pay for medical services. (lexology.com)
  • Although OIG issued a proposed rule in 2014 that would establish a new AKS safe harbor intended to protect free and/or discounted local transportation services, this proposed rule has yet to be finalized. (lexology.com)
  • H.R.3966 - 114th Congress (2015-2016): To provide transportation of dependent patients relating to obstetrical anesthesia services. (congress.gov)
  • The program was launched in partnership with AMR, which provides emergency and non-emergency medical transportation services throughout San Diego County and across the nation. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • The codes ensure uniform language for medical services and procedures, physicians tell a federal court in a brief, and other uses erode patient trust. (ama-assn.org)
  • MTS Access provides curb-to-curb accessible transportation service for individuals who are unable to use regular public bus, trolley or Coaster services due to a physical or cognitive impairment. (ucsd.edu)
  • 2 The Lieutenant Governor in Council may establish and maintain facilities and services for the examination, diagnosis and treatment of persons with a mental disorder and the rehabilitation of patients and for that purpose may, by order, authorize the minister, for the government, to acquire, manage and operate property. (bclaws.ca)
  • More than 96% of VHA patients enrolled in these programs were concurrently receiving VHA homeless services. (cdc.gov)
  • As a result, Transportation Services does not control many of the various campus parking areas for permits during portions of the break. (uky.edu)
  • If you need help getting to and from one of our units, our social workers will let you know if transportation services are available in your area. (uvahealth.com)
  • In order to make your visit as efficient as possible, we encourage patients to pre-register online for Labor & Delivery and Surgery services. (providence.org)
  • These services are provided at no cost once you begin treatment as a patient. (cancercenter.com)
  • We offer our patients access to computers, printers, high-speed internet service, Wi-Fi and video-calling services. (cancercenter.com)
  • A sole practitioner is steering his patients toward cash-only payments, noting that what insurance companies reimburse him for services doesn't meet his cost of doing business. (neworleanscitybusiness.com)
  • That's why Boston's Dorchester House Multi-Service Center ("Dorchester House")-a community-based organization providing an array of health and social services for a racially and ethnically diverse patient population-took a bold step with funding and technical assistance through the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program's (NAEPP) National Asthma Control Initiative (NACI). (nih.gov)
  • Some transportation services are paid for by Medicare or Medicaid insurance coverage, while others are paid for by the senior citizen themselves. (reference.com)
  • Companies that provide transportation for seniors include public transit systems, paratransit services, private transportation companies and volunteer driv. (reference.com)
  • All profits made through donations and fundraising go directly to patients in need of services. (volunteermatch.org)
  • By providing modifications, advocacy, mentoring, and other services, MDP (Muscular Dystrophy Patients United) hopes that individuals with MD continue to live successful, prosperous albeit adaption-friendly lives. (volunteermatch.org)
  • It was very important that MDP be run 100% by volunteers because all of the services are so costly, it is imperative that every CENT goes to patient services. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Other volunteers may be assigned to a home patient where the list of possible services could be expaned. (volunteermatch.org)
  • Observation services are a specific set of services provided to a patient while the physician. (hcpro.com)
  • Skat Transit, operated by Aging, Disability and Transit Services of Rockingham County, provides public transportation on their Reidsville route . (conehealth.com)
  • That ongoing interaction helps to build a one-to-one relationship, enabling a concierge to better assess and address patient motivation, satisfaction and other non-medical issues, while facilitating services aimed at retaining the patient in the trial. (businesswire.com)
  • When you arrive, a clerk will give you a new patient brochure, which contains contact details and important information about BC Cancer services, and the Patient Reported Information and Symptom Measurement (PRISM) form. (bccancer.bc.ca)
  • STAMFORD, Conn., June 26, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Cara Therapeutics, Inc. ( CARA ), a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing new chemical entities designed to alleviate pruritus by selectively targeting peripheral kappa opioid receptors, today announced the initiation of a Phase 2 trial of Oral KORSUVA (CR845/difelikefalin) for the treatment of pruritus in patients with hepatic impairment due to primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). (yahoo.com)
  • March 4, 2019-A team of researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health Data Sciences Institute have harnessed the power of artificial intelligence to better match cancer patients with clinical trials. (ornl.gov)
  • We described the national implementation of a "homeless medical home" initiative in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and correlated patient health outcomes with characteristics of high-performing sites. (cdc.gov)
  • 3M™ Littmann® Stethoscopes are used by millions of medical professionals around the world who are dedicated to achieving the best patient outcomes. (3m.com)
  • It's still being studied, but surgeons are always working to get the best outcomes for their patients, Dr. Lazar said. (wtop.com)
  • Telemedicine is proven to be effective in improving patient outcomes for asthma, diabetes, and hypertension. (lww.com)
  • The shuttle service would be made broadly available to patients without regard to their diagnoses, conditions, treatments or type of insurance coverage, suggesting that the free transportation's availability would not be determined in a manner related to past or anticipated volume or value of Medicare or Medicaid referrals. (lexology.com)
  • As part of their "More Good Days" campaign, Ford Warriors in Pink has partnered with Scripps Health and Lyft, a ride-sharing service, to offer free rides to and from appointments for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment and/or for their annual mammogram screenings. (scripps.org)
  • AMR transports more than 18,000 patients per year for Scripps Health. (oceansidechamber.com)
  • The monitoring protocol for transportation must necessarily exceed the Harvard standard, especially in patients on artificial ventilation and on inotropic support. (morehealthis.com)
  • We reported single-center data regarding complications and mortality associated with the transportation of patients on ECMO support. (springeropen.com)
  • Additionally, we searched multiple databases for case series, observational studies, and randomized controlled trials regarding mortality of patients transferred on ECMO support. (springeropen.com)
  • A total of 38 manuscripts, including our series, were included in the final analysis, totaling 1481 patients transported on ECMO support. (springeropen.com)
  • Using the available pooled data, we found that patient transfer to a referral institution while on ECMO support seems to be safe and adds no significant risk of mortality to ECMO patients. (springeropen.com)
  • In the CESAR trial, the cost-effectiveness of ECMO respiratory support was demonstrated with 81% (73 out of 90) of ECMO-supported patients being transported to only one UK ECMO referral center [ 3 ]. (springeropen.com)
  • However, the severity of those patients' respiratory insufficiency makes transportation without ECMO support unsafe. (springeropen.com)
  • A successful case interview allows for the collection of critical information about a person (patient) diagnosed with COVID-19 and potentially exposed contacts, while providing support, referrals, and answers to questions the patient may have. (cdc.gov)
  • Developing trust and a warm, empathetic rapport while maintaining a professional relationship with the patient is key to providing the most effective support and collecting the most accurate information to inform the next steps in the contact tracing investigation. (cdc.gov)
  • Volunteers provide emotional support and companionship to hospice patients and their families. (volunteermatch.org)
  • We're introducing this innovative concierge service to help patients navigate the complexity of clinical trials, while providing support designed to enable them to better understand trials and the trial process, participation logistics and technologies," said Niklas Morton, senior vice president of site and patient access for PPD. (businesswire.com)
  • Patients facing a diagnosis of an aggressive, terminal cancer such as mesothelioma face a growing amount of bills, including existing bills, treatment costs and secondary costs. (mesothelioma.com)
  • Upon completion of this module, learners will be able to: Describe the typical presentation and differential diagnosis of patients with suspect EVD. (coursera.org)
  • Start with the 3M™ Clinical Risk Groups (CRGs), a patient classification methodology that uses inpatient and ambulatory diagnosis and procedure codes to categorize every person in a patient population to a single, clinically meaningful risk group. (3m.com)
  • "As a patient living in Gaza, I couldn't get permission to travel to the West Bank for a specialist to diagnosis of my condition," Mustafa says. (anera.org)
  • This paper explores the impact of receiving a diagnosis of a common disease among such "marginally ill" patients. (nber.org)
  • These marginally diagnosed patients experience improved blood sugar after the first year of diagnosis, but this improvement does not persist in subsequent years. (nber.org)
  • Offers a free guide for education professionals to help patients, their siblings, and classmates cope with a diagnosis or death in their school community. (lls.org)
  • Assessment of tumor status was performed every 12 weeks for two years and then every 24 weeks for three years, and patients without disease progression could be treated for up to 24 months. (yahoo.com)
  • Secondary endpoints include change from baseline in itch-related quality of life scores at the end of Week 16 as assessed by the total Skindex-10 and 5-D itch scales, as well as the assessment of proportion of patients achieving an improvement from baseline of ≥3 points with respect to the weekly mean of the daily 24-hour WI-NRS score at week 16. (yahoo.com)
  • Nursing documentation for observation patients must reflect the assessment and reassessment of. (hcpro.com)
  • The creation of an ECMO team, with various experts in the treatment of ARDS, assured a safe transfer of patients with severe hypoxia, over long distances, when in other cases they wouldn't have been be transportable. (springer.com)
  • In this study, we report a single-center experience and a systematic review of the available published data on complications and mortality associated with ECMO transportation. (springeropen.com)
  • Pruritus continues to be a significant comorbidity in patients with chronic cholestatic liver diseases and may be exacerbated by certain bile acid-related drugs," said Derek Chalmers, Ph.D., D.Sc. (yahoo.com)
  • Nearly all patients had a chronic mental illness, and more than three-quarters had a chronic substance use disorder. (bmc.org)
  • A PurpLE Clinic patient seeking asylum after being tortured while living in his native country had an appointment to address ongoing pain related to his injuries. (aafp.org)
  • As I mentioned, patients at our clinic often come in later than scheduled for many reasons. (aafp.org)
  • But then I started to wonder whether PurpLE Clinic patients were accounted for in these findings. (aafp.org)
  • It's a problem for many of the patients we see," said Jessica Simpson, executive director of Health & Hope Clinic. (pensacolatoday.com)
  • We had a similar problem at the Pensacola clinic before we instituted a healthy no-show policy," said Simpson, "but we haven't dropped the hammer here because it's not irresponsibility, it's lack of transportation. (pensacolatoday.com)
  • From left, Maxine Ivey, Executive Director North West Florida Rural Health Network, Theresa Chmiel, Executive Director Escambia County Healthy Start Coalition and Jessica Simpson Executive Director of the Health and Hope Clinic, discuss transportation problems in Century, Fl. (pensacolatoday.com)
  • The analysis of market developments between 2015 and 2018 revealed that several growth strategies, such as product launches & approvals, acquisitions, partnerships, and agreements were adopted by market players to strengthen their product portfolios and maintain a competitive position in the patient temperature monitoring market. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Some of them are afraid that maybe when they come they will get in contact with [an] Ebola patient. (cpr.org)
  • Of all of PAF's patients who reported a transportation issue in 2014, almost half, 49% travelled more than 20 miles one way to their treatment provider," Dr. Balch adds. (copays.org)
  • The scope of the report includes patient monitoring devices for continuous monitoring, detection, and treatment of heart, brain, lungs, and blood activities and measurement of temperature and weight of the body. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Today's approval of KEYTRUDA reinforces our company's commitment to expanding existing treatment options for certain patients with high-risk, non-muscle invasive bladder cancer," said Dr. Scot Ebbinghaus, vice president, clinical research, Merck Research Laboratories. (yahoo.com)
  • Historically, patients with high-risk, non-muscle invasive bladder cancer with CIS whose cancer is unresponsive to BCG treatment had limited non-surgical treatment options. (yahoo.com)
  • As a physician who specializes in the management of bladder cancer, it is encouraging to now have a new treatment option for these patients. (yahoo.com)
  • Prior to treatment, all patients had undergone transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) to remove all resectable disease (Ta and T1 components). (yahoo.com)
  • Despite these and other available therapies, a significant proportion of patients do not respond to treatment. (yahoo.com)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Breakthrough Therapy designation to I.V. CR845 for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pruritus in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis. (yahoo.com)
  • Our patients receive an individualized, comprehensive treatment plan from a team of cancer experts. (cancercenter.com)
  • Although there is no cure for Crohn's, through treatment and therapy patients can adapt to it and greatly reduce the symptoms. (anera.org)
  • Anera recently imported a shipment of Humira to Gaza and Mustafa is one of the many patients who now have access to treatment as a result. (anera.org)
  • Dr. Sohair El Zomarah looks forward to moving patients off waiting lists and into treatment. (anera.org)
  • The patient must be in active outpatient treatment for cancer, 18 or older and traveling 40 miles or more one way for treatment. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Patients who are added to the Hope Lodge wait list must have alternative accommodations is case a room is not available at the start of their treatment. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Depending on the type of treatment needed, some patients and families will need to relocate to Baltimore for several weeks or months. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Patient must be diagnosed by age 18 and be under 21 and in active oncology treatment following a relapse, or enrolling in or currently participating in a clinical trial for active oncology treatment or a treatment innovation not available at their local institution. (lls.org)
  • Travel Assistance: To ensure that patients can see a specialist to seek the best course of treatment. (lls.org)
  • We are bringing melanoma, vitiligo, and XP patients together with internationally-recognized dermatologists to talk about the latest advances in treatment and research to improve skin health. (ohsu.edu)
  • They're leery when the same patients come back for addiction treatment. (cpr.org)
  • Traveling is difficult for the specially abled, senior citizens and patients undergoing orthopedic, and musculoskeletal surgical procedures, OPD procedures like dialysis, chemotherapy and stroke treatment. (healthtechnology.in)
  • Pruritus has been commonly reported with varying severity in patients with PBC and contributes to a large symptomatic burden, including reduced quality of life. (yahoo.com)
  • This also contributes to patients feeling valued when participating in a trial, as we seek to increase their overall satisfaction and interest in continuing. (businesswire.com)
  • As part of the NuVista Living Smart Room solution, clinicians wear locating tags that identify them and display their names on a wall-mounted monitor visible to patients. (thomasnet.com)
  • Patients received KEYTRUDA 200 mg every three weeks until unacceptable toxicity, persistent or recurrent high-risk NMIBC, or progressive disease. (yahoo.com)
  • February is traditionally the month for lovers, but it is also American Heart Month, which aims to help patients make heart-healthy choices. (ama-assn.org)
  • Robotic surgery can help patients have quicker recoveries, less pain, smaller incisions and a lower risk of infection, Dr. Lazar said. (wtop.com)
  • Depression, the most common form of mental illness in America, disproportionately affects low-income Americans and has been shown to significantly increase the cost of treating patients for other diseases. (brookings.edu)
  • This session focuses on effective communication skills that you and your colleagues can 'hardwire' into your daily interactions with patients and family members. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • The dose of Oral KORSUVA (1 mg BID) in the Phase 2 trial is based on comparison to the exposure levels achieved with 0.5 mcg/kg dose of I.V. KORSUVA that exhibited statistically significant and clinically meaningful reduction in itch intensity in hemodialysis patients with moderate-to-severe pruritus in the Phase 2 and 3 trials. (yahoo.com)