Receptors, Transferrin: Membrane glycoproteins found in high concentrations on iron-utilizing cells. They specifically bind iron-bearing transferrin, are endocytosed with its ligand and then returned to the cell surface where transferrin without its iron is released.Transferrin: An iron-binding beta1-globulin that is synthesized in the LIVER and secreted into the blood. It plays a central role in the transport of IRON throughout the circulation. A variety of transferrin isoforms exist in humans, including some that are considered markers for specific disease states.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Endocytosis: Cellular uptake of extracellular materials within membrane-limited vacuoles or microvesicles. ENDOSOMES play a central role in endocytosis.Iron-Regulatory Proteins: Proteins that regulate cellular and organismal iron homeostasis. They play an important biological role by maintaining iron levels that are adequate for metabolic need, but below the toxicity threshold.Transferrins: A group of iron-binding proteins that tightly bind two ferrate ions along with two carbonate ions. They are found in the bodily fluids of vertebrates where they act as transport and storage molecules for iron.Iron Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iron that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Fe atoms with atomic weights 52, 53, 55, and 59-61 are radioactive iron isotopes.Endosomes: Cytoplasmic vesicles formed when COATED VESICLES shed their CLATHRIN coat. Endosomes internalize macromolecules bound by receptors on the cell surface.Hemochromatosis: A disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a triad of HEMOSIDEROSIS; LIVER CIRRHOSIS; and DIABETES MELLITUS. It is caused by massive iron deposits in parenchymal cells that may develop after a prolonged increase of iron absorption. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Iron-Binding Proteins: Proteins that specifically bind to IRON.Conalbumin: A glycoprotein albumin from hen's egg white with strong iron-binding affinity.Iron Regulatory Protein 1: A multifunctional iron-sulfur protein that is both an iron regulatory protein and cytoplasmic form of aconitate hydratase. It binds to iron regulatory elements found on mRNAs involved in iron metabolism and regulates their translation. Its RNA binding ability and its aconitate hydrolase activity are dependent upon availability of IRON.Transferrin-Binding Proteins: A class of carrier proteins that bind to TRANSFERRIN. Many strains of pathogenic bacteria utilize transferrin-binding proteins to acquire their supply of iron from serum.Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Hepcidins: Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.Gallium: A rare, metallic element designated by the symbol, Ga, atomic number 31, and atomic weight 69.72.Deferoxamine: Natural product isolated from Streptomyces pilosus. It forms iron complexes and is used as a chelating agent, particularly in the mesylate form.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Coated Pits, Cell-Membrane: Specialized regions of the cell membrane composed of pits coated with a bristle covering made of the protein CLATHRIN. These pits are the entry route for macromolecules bound by cell surface receptors. The pits are then internalized into the cytoplasm to form the COATED VESICLES.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Iron Regulatory Protein 2: A multifunctional iron-sulfur protein that is both an iron regulatory protein and cytoplasmic form of aconitate hydratase. It binds to iron regulatory elements found on mRNAs involved in iron metabolism and regulates their translation. Its rate of degradation is increased in the presence of IRON.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Cell Compartmentation: A partitioning within cells due to the selectively permeable membranes which enclose each of the separate parts, e.g., mitochondria, lysosomes, etc.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Transferrin-Binding Protein A: A subtype of bacterial transferrin-binding protein found in bacteria. It forms a cell surface receptor complex with TRANSFERRIN-BINDING PROTEIN B.Transferrin-Binding Protein B: A subtype of bacterial transferrin-binding protein found in bacteria. It forms a cell surface receptor complex with TRANSFERRIN-BINDING PROTEIN A.Ferric Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Lactoferrin: An iron-binding protein that was originally characterized as a milk protein. It is widely distributed in secretory fluids and is found in the neutrophilic granules of LEUKOCYTES. The N-terminal part of lactoferrin possesses a serine protease which functions to inactivate the TYPE III SECRETION SYSTEM used by bacteria to export virulence proteins for host cell invasion.Iron Overload: An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)Clathrin: The main structural coat protein of COATED VESICLES which play a key role in the intracellular transport between membranous organelles. Each molecule of clathrin consists of three light chains (CLATHRIN LIGHT CHAINS) and three heavy chains (CLATHRIN HEAVY CHAINS) that form a structure called a triskelion. Clathrin also interacts with cytoskeletal proteins.Apoproteins: The protein components of a number of complexes, such as enzymes (APOENZYMES), ferritin (APOFERRITINS), or lipoproteins (APOLIPOPROTEINS).Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.rab4 GTP-Binding Proteins: A genetically related subfamily of RAB GTP-BINDING PROTEINS involved in recycling of proteins such as cell surface receptors from early endosomes to the cell surface. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides: Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.Heptanoates: Salts and esters of the 7-carbon saturated monocarboxylic acid heptanoic acid.Anemia, Hypochromic: Anemia characterized by a decrease in the ratio of the weight of hemoglobin to the volume of the erythrocyte, i.e., the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is less than normal. The individual cells contain less hemoglobin than they could have under optimal conditions. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by iron deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, lead poisoning, and other conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Miale, Laboratory Medicine: Hematology, 6th ed, p393)Iron Chelating Agents: Organic chemicals that form two or more coordination links with an iron ion. Once coordination has occurred, the complex formed is called a chelate. The iron-binding porphyrin group of hemoglobin is an example of a metal chelate found in biological systems.Arenaviruses, New World: One of two groups of viruses in the ARENAVIRUS genus and considered part of the New World complex. It includes JUNIN VIRUS; PICHINDE VIRUS; Amapari virus, and Machupo virus among others. They are the cause of human hemorrhagic fevers mostly in Central and South America.Parvovirus, Canine: A species of the genus PARVOVIRUS and a host range variant of FELINE PANLEUKOPENIA VIRUS. It causes a highly infectious fulminating ENTERITIS in dogs producing high mortality. It is distinct from CANINE MINUTE VIRUS, a species in the genus BOCAVIRUS. This virus can also infect cats and mink.rab GTP-Binding Proteins: A large family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that play a key role in cellular secretory and endocytic pathways. EC 3.6.1.-.Feline panleukopenia virus: A species of PARVOVIRUS infecting cats with a highly contagious enteric disease. Host range variants include mink enteritis virus, canine parvovirus (PARVOVIRUS, CANINE), and raccoon parvovirus. After infecting their new hosts, many of these viruses have further evolved and are now considered distinct species.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute: A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by neoplastic proliferation of erythroblastic and myeloblastic elements with atypical erythroblasts and myeloblasts in the peripheral blood.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Bacterial Transferrin Receptor Complex: A complex of proteins that forms a receptor for TRANSFERRIN in BACTERIA. Many pathogenic bacteria utilize the transferrin-binding complex to acquire their supply of iron from serum.Clathrin-Coated Vesicles: Vesicles formed when cell-membrane coated pits (COATED PITS, CELL-MEMBRANE) invaginate and pinch off. The outer surface of these vesicles is covered with a lattice-like network of the protein CLATHRIN. Shortly after formation, however, the clathrin coat is removed and the vesicles are referred to as ENDOSOMES.Apoferritins: The protein components of ferritins. Apoferritins are shell-like structures containing nanocavities and ferroxidase activities. Apoferritin shells are composed of 24 subunits, heteropolymers in vertebrates and homopolymers in bacteria. In vertebrates, there are two types of subunits, light chain and heavy chain. The heavy chain contains the ferroxidase activity.Histocompatibility Antigens Class I: Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cation Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of positively charged molecules (cations) across a biological membrane.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Aconitate Hydratase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of cis-aconitate to yield citrate or isocitrate. It is one of the citric acid cycle enzymes. EC 4.2.1.3.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein 3: A member of the vesicle associated membrane protein family. It has a broad tissue distribution and is involved in MEMBRANE FUSION events of the endocytic pathways.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Gallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ga atoms with atomic weights 63-68, 70 and 72-76 are radioactive gallium isotopes.Erythrocyte Indices: ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).Chromosomes, Human, 1-3: The large, metacentric human chromosomes, called group A in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 1, 2, and 3.Iron-Sulfur Proteins: A group of proteins possessing only the iron-sulfur complex as the prosthetic group. These proteins participate in all major pathways of electron transport: photosynthesis, respiration, hydroxylation and bacterial hydrogen and nitrogen fixation.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Erythroblasts: Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.Transcytosis: The transport of materials through a cell. It includes the uptake of materials by the cell (ENDOCYTOSIS), the movement of those materials through the cell, and the subsequent secretion of those materials (EXOCYTOSIS).Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Avidin: A specific protein in egg albumin that interacts with BIOTIN to render it unavailable to mammals, thereby producing biotin deficiency.Immunotoxins: Semisynthetic conjugates of various toxic molecules, including RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES and bacterial or plant toxins, with specific immune substances such as IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; and ANTIGENS. The antitumor or antiviral immune substance carries the toxin to the tumor or infected cell where the toxin exerts its poisonous effect.Ferrous Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain divalent iron.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins: A genetically related subfamily of RAB GTP-BINDING PROTEINS involved in transport from the cell membrane to early endosomes. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Lysosomes: A class of morphologically heterogeneous cytoplasmic particles in animal and plant tissues characterized by their content of hydrolytic enzymes and the structure-linked latency of these enzymes. The intracellular functions of lysosomes depend on their lytic potential. The single unit membrane of the lysosome acts as a barrier between the enzymes enclosed in the lysosome and the external substrate. The activity of the enzymes contained in lysosomes is limited or nil unless the vesicle in which they are enclosed is ruptured. Such rupture is supposed to be under metabolic (hormonal) control. (From Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Adaptor Protein Complex 2: An adaptor protein complex primarily involved in the formation of clathrin-related endocytotic vesicles (ENDOSOMES) at the CELL MEMBRANE.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Asialoglycoprotein Receptor: A C-type lectin that is a cell surface receptor for ASIALOGLYCOPROTEINS. It is found primarily in the LIVER where it mediates the endocytosis of serum glycoproteins.Reticulocyte Count: The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
In low-iron conditions, IRE-BPs allow the cell to keep producing transferrin receptors. And more transferrin receptors make it ... they change shape and unbind the transferrin receptor mRNA. The transferrin receptor mRNA is rapidly degraded without the IRE- ... Since iron is tightly bound to transferrin, cells throughout the body have receptors for transferrin-iron complexes on their ... On its own, the IRE-BP binds to the IREs of ferritin and transferrin receptor mRNA. But, when iron binds to the IRE-BP, the IRE ...
1986). "The p97 antigen is mapped to the q24-qter region of chromosome 3; the same region as the transferrin receptor". Am. J. ... 1996). "Coincident expression and distribution of melanotransferrin and transferrin receptor in human brain capillary ... This gene resides in the same region of chromosome 3 as members of the transferrin superfamily. Alternative splicing results in ... The protein shares sequence similarity and iron-binding properties with members of the transferrin superfamily. The importance ...
"Transcytosis and brain uptake of transferrin-containing nanoparticles by tuning avidity to transferrin receptor". Proc Natl ... However, vectors targeting BBB transporters, such as the transferrin receptor, have been found to remain entrapped in brain ... receptor-mediated transcytosis for insulin or transferrin; and the blocking of active efflux transporters such as p- ... It was reported that those natural substances such as albumin, α-1-fetoprotein or transferrin with elevated plasma ...
"Identification and characterization of the chicken transferrin receptor". The Biochemical Journal. 232 (3): 735-741. doi: ...
"Comparison of the interactions of transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2 with transferrin and the hereditary ... The HFE protein interacts with the transferrin receptor TFRC. Its primary mode of action is the regulation of the iron storage ... functions to regulate circulating iron uptake by regulating the interaction of the transferrin receptor with transferrin. The ... an extracellular transferrin receptor-binding region (α1 and α2), a portion that resembles immunoglobulin molecules (α3), a ...
Farkas-Himsley H, Musclow CE (1986). "Bacteriocin receptors on malignant mammalian cells: are they transferrin receptors?". ... They often consist of a receptor binding domain, a translocation domain and a cytotoxic domain. Combinations of these domains ...
2006). "TTP specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor". Cell. 123 (5): 875-88. doi:10.1016/j.cell. ... 1995). "A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution". ... specifically controlling the internalization of a specific protein receptor. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000130147 - ...
"Mechanism for Multiple Ligand Recognition by the Human Transferrin Receptor". PLoS Biology. 1 (3): e1. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio ...
Green F, O'Hare T, Blackwell A, Enns CA (May 2002). "Association of human transferrin receptor with GABARAP". FEBS Letters. 518 ... Gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptors [GABA(A) receptors] are ligand-gated chloride channels that mediate inhibitory ... receptor-associated protein links GABA(A) receptors and the cytoskeleton". Nature. 397 (6714): 69-72. doi:10.1038/16264. PMID ... receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) and GABA(A) receptors". Journal of Neurochemistry. 80 (5): 815-823. doi:10.1046/j.0022- ...
... is a type of Iron overload disorder associated with deficiencies in transferrin receptor 2. It exhibits ... 2002). "Hemochromatosis due to mutations in transferrin receptor 2". Blood Cells Mol. Dis. 29 (3): 465-70. doi:10.1006/bcmd. ... May 2001). "New mutations inactivating transferrin receptor 2 in hemochromatosis type 3". Blood. 97 (9): 2555-60. doi:10.1182/ ...
... undergoes RMT across the BBB via transport on brain endothelial receptors such as the insulin receptor or transferrin receptor ... One arm had a low-affinity anti-transferrin receptor binding site that induces transcytosis. A high-affinity binding site would ... Monoclonal antibody Trojan horses that target the BBB insulin or transferrin receptor have been in drug development for over 10 ... ArmaGen has developed genetically engineered antibodies against both the insulin and transferrin receptors, and has fused to ...
2005). "A role for transferrin receptor in triggering apoptosis when targeted with gambogic acid". Proceedings of the National ... a novel ligand for transferrin receptor, potentiates TNF-induced apoptosis through modulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB ... Gambogic acid has also been found to bind to transferrin receptor1 (TfR) and rapidly induce cell apoptosis without competing ... with the transferrin (Tf) binding site. A brief exposure to this compound resulted in a rapid start to apoptosis, including ...
Lu JP, Hayashi K, Okada S, Awai M (1991). "Transferrin receptors and selective iron deposition in pancreatic B cells of iron- ... Selective iron deposition in the beta cells of pancreatic islets leads to diabetes due to distribution of transferrin receptor ... Brown induration Siderosis Lu JP, Hayashi K (1995). "Transferrin receptor distribution and iron deposition in the hepatic ...
"The macrophage cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a novel transferrin receptor". The Journal of ... "Characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a novel transferrin receptor". The International Journal of ... 5-trisphosphate receptor to regulate intracellular Ca2+ signaling; Oct-1 to form the coactivator complex OCA-S, which is ... Transferrin on the surface of diverse cells and in extracellular fluid; Lactate dehydrogenase; Lactoferrin; Apurinic/ ...
... iron is released from the transferrin, and then the iron-free transferrin (still bound to the transferrin receptor) returns ... 1983). "Internalization and processing of transferrin and the transferrin receptor in human carcinoma A431 cells". Journal of ... Dautry-Varsat, A. (Mar 1986). "Receptor-mediated endocytosis: the intracellular journey of transferrin and its receptor". ... and the iron transport protein transferrin. Internalization of these receptors from the plasma membrane occurs by receptor- ...
Schaar DG, Medina DJ, Moore DF, Strair RK, Ting Y (2009). "miR-320 targets transferrin receptor 1 (CD71) and inhibits cell ...
Exosomes from red blood cells contain the transferrin receptor which is absent in mature erythrocytes. Dendritic cell-derived ...
"Serum transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index identify healthy subjects with subclinical iron deficits". ... In spite of an increased level of transferrin, serum iron level is decreased along with transferrin saturation. Erythropoiesis ... "The assessment of frequency of iron deficiency in athletes from the transferrin receptor-ferritin index". International Journal ... Increased iron absorption, a compensatory change, results in an increased amount transferrin and consequent increased iron- ...
Bretscher, M. S. (1983). "Distribution of receptors for transferrin and low density lipoprotein on the surface of giant HeLa ... where these are located appears in turn to be determined by the chemoattractant signals as these impinge on specific receptors ...
Binding to the transferrin receptor is required for endocytosis of HFE and regulation of iron homeostasis". Nat. Cell Biol. 5 ( ...
These receptors also have a high affinity for coated pits. Like the LDL receptor, the transferrin receptor is internalised into ... But in motile cells exocytosis now occurs at the front of the cell: It is here that both LDL- and transferrin-receptors emerge ... The route this receptor takes inside the cell appears to be different from that taken by the LDL receptor, because it takes ... Dividing cells, which need the iron, gain it by binding the ferritransferrin to transferrin receptors on their surfaces. ...
"Canine and feline parvoviruses can use human or feline transferrin receptors to bind, enter, and infect cells". Journal of ... and estrogen receptors, along with estrogen-like compounds such as quercetin and its cancer reducing properties. There have ...
Although transferrin receptors may be limited on cell surfaces the parvovirus will find available transferrin receptors and ... Ross, S; Schofield J; Farr C; Bucan M (2002). "Mouse transferrin receptor 1 is the cell entry receptor for mouse mammary tumor ... Goodman, L; Lyi A; Johnson N; Cifuente J; Hafenstein S; Parrish C (2010). "Binding site on the transferrin receptor for the ... Deleterious mutations have been noted to lead to inability to bind to transferrin receptors, bind to non- receptive parts of ...
Majority of Rab11b neither colocalize with transferrin receptor nor with the polymeric IgA receptor. This protein also exhibits ... Schlierf B, Fey GH, Hauber J, Hocke GM, Rosorius O (Aug 2000). "Rab11b is essential for recycling of transferrin to the plasma ... Schlierf B, Fey GH, Hauber J, Hocke GM, Rosorius O (Aug 2000). "Rab11b is essential for recycling of transferrin to the plasma ... It is required for the transfer of internalized transferrin from the recycling compartment to the plasma membrane for which ...
Amet N, Chen X, Lee H-F, Zaro J & Shen W-C (2010). "Transferrin Receptor-Mediated Transcytosis in Intestinal Epithelial Cells ... the IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R), and the insulin receptor. The IGF-1 receptor seems to be the "physiologic" receptor - it binds IGF- ... Like the insulin receptor, the IGF-1 receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase - meaning it signals by causing the addition of a ... However, IGF-2 alone binds a receptor called the "IGF-2 receptor" (also called the mannose-6 phosphate receptor). The insulin- ...
July 2005). "Sodium ascorbate (vitamin C) induces apoptosis in melanoma cells via the down-regulation of transferrin receptor ...
What is soluble transferrin receptor? Meaning of soluble transferrin receptor as a legal term. What does soluble transferrin ... Definition of soluble transferrin receptor in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... receptor. (redirected from soluble transferrin receptor). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.. Related ... Soluble transferrin receptor legal definition of soluble transferrin receptor https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/ ...
... Bourgeade, M. F.; Silbermann, F.; Kühn, L. C.; Testa ... This effect is not attributable to a change in the transcription rate of the transferrin receptor gene or in the cytoplasmic ... The IFN gamma-induced reduction of the transferrin receptor mRNA content is already present at the nuclear level to an extent ... IFN gamma inhibits the rise in transferrin receptor mRNA level which is normally observed when stationary WISH cells are ...
Hepatic levels of transferrin receptors 1 and 2 and ZRT/IRT-like protein 14, which may also participate in iron uptake, were ... DMT1 is also present in the liver, where it has been implicated in the uptake of transferrin-bound iron (TBI) and non- ... Hepatocyte divalent metal-ion transporter-1 is dispensable for hepatic iron accumulation and non-transferrin-bound iron uptake ... or 59Fe-transferrin into plasma of Dmt1liv/liv and Dmt1flox/flox mice and measured uptake of 59Fe by the liver. Dmt1liv/liv ...
If iron avidity is not suspected, it may mimic undertreatment with persistently elevated transferrin saturation. Dietary ... and the frequency is guided by serial measurements of serum ferritin levels and transferrin saturation. Iron avidity can result ... Diagnosis requires confirmation of increased serum ferritin levels and transferrin saturation, with or without symptoms. ... Type 3-nonclassical resulting from mutations in the transferrin receptor protein 2 (TFR2 gene) ...
Lu JP, Hayashi K. Transferrin receptor distribution and iron deposition in the hepatic lobule of iron-overloaded rats. Pathol ... Lu JP, Hayashi K. Transferrin receptor distribution and iron deposition in the hepatic lobule of iron-overloaded rats. Pathol ... labtestsonline.org , TIBC & UIBC, Transferrin Last reviewed on October 28, 2009.. *↑ 16.0 16.1 Lua error in Module:Citation/CS1 ...
... conjugate with anticancer activity is dependent upon the expression level of the surface transferrin receptor. Yang Jiadan , ... conjugate with anticancer activity is dependent upon the expression level of the surface transferrin receptor. Yang Jiadan, ... indicated that the cytotoxicity of HAIYPRH-EPI was correlated with the expression of the cell surface transferrin receptor (TfR ... It was hypothesized that transferrin (Tf) can promote cytotoxicity. Conversely, the conjugate exhibited very low cytotoxicity ...
VIP Receptors *XIAP Recent Posts. * Opportunistic infections certainly are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in ... We have previously demonstrated the full-length gonococcal transferrin binding proteins (TbpA. We have previously demonstrated ... and amplified the spot encoding the C-terminus from the described transferrin binding area [13] previously. The causing PCR ... the full-length gonococcal transferrin binding proteins (TbpA and TbpB) to be promising antigens in the development of a ...
"Comparison of the interactions of transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2 with transferrin and the hereditary ... Transferrin receptor protein 1 (TfR1), also known as Cluster of Differentiation 71 (CD71), is a protein that in humans is ... Green F, OHare T, Blackwell A, Enns CA (May 2002). "Association of human transferrin receptor with GABARAP". FEBS Lett. 518 (1 ... Transferrin receptor 2 Cluster of differentiation GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000072274 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: ...
Earlier two transferrin receptors in humans, transferrin receptor 1 and transferrin receptor 2 had been characterized and until ... "Comparison of the interactions of transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2 with transferrin and the hereditary ... Transferrin receptor 1 Transferrin receptor 2 GAPDH Qian ZM, Li H, Sun H, Ho K (December 2002). "Targeted drug delivery via the ... "Transferrin receptor-independent uptake of differic transferrin by human hepatoma cells with antisense inhibition of receptor ...
... along with those of transferrin and HFE, opened research on molecular mapping of the transferrin-HFE- transferrin receptor ... now known as transferrin receptor 1, is required for iron delivery from transferrin to cells. (A recently described second ... competes with transferrin for binding to receptor, thereby impeding the uptake of iron from transferrin. Mutation of HFE ... Transferrin receptor 1.. Aisen P1.. Author information. 1. Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Albert Einstein College of ...
Cell SurfaceReceptors, TransferrinBacterial Transferrin Receptor ComplexTransferrin-Binding Protein ATransferrin-Binding ... TransferrinBacterial Transferrin Receptor ComplexTransferrin-Binding Protein ATransferrin-Binding Protein B ... Receptors, Transferrin. Membrane glycoproteins found in high concentrations on iron-utilizing cells. They specifically bind ... and ProteinsProteinsCarrier ProteinsTransferrin-Binding ProteinsReceptors, ...
Cryoelectron microscopy and biochemical analyses show that transferrin receptor, the cellular receptor for canine parvovirus, ... Asymmetric binding of transferrin receptor to parvovirus capsids. Susan Hafenstein, Laura M. Palermo, Victor A. Kostyuchenko, ... Asymmetric binding of transferrin receptor to parvovirus capsids. Susan Hafenstein, Laura M. Palermo, Victor A. Kostyuchenko, ... Asymmetric binding of transferrin receptor to parvovirus capsids. Susan Hafenstein, Laura M. Palermo, Victor A. Kostyuchenko, ...
The transferrin receptor (TfR) assists iron uptake into vertebrate cells through a cycle of endo- and exocytosis of the iron ... Transferrin receptor-like, dimerisation domain (IPR007365). Short name: TFR-like_dimer_dom ... This entry represents the dimerisation domain found in the transferrin receptor, as well as in a number of other proteins ... Crystal structure of the ectodomain of human transferrin receptor.. Science 286 779-82 1999 ...
Transferrin Receptor (mg/L). Variable Name: LBXTFR. SAS Label: Transferrin Receptor (mg/L). English Text: Transferrin Receptor ... Transferrin Receptor (TFR_E) Data File: TFR_E.xpt First Published: September 2009. Last Revised: NA ... The method for measurement of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is immuno-turbidimetry using Roche kits on the Hitachi 912 ...
Transferrin receptor (mg/L). Variable Name: LBXTFR SAS Label: Transferrin receptor (mg/L). English Text: Transferrin receptor ( ... Transferrin Receptor (TFR_F) Data File: TFR_F.xpt First Published: February 2012. Last Revised: NA ... For the transferrin receptor analysis, in 2007-2008 the Roche Hitachi 912 immunoturbidimetric assay was used and in 2009-2010 ... The method principle for measurement of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is immuno-turbidimetry using Roche kits on the ...
Other aspects of this invention include a delivery system comprising an antibody reactive with a transferrin receptor linked to ... of an antibody-neuropharmaceutical or diagnostic agent conjugate wherein the antibody is reactive with a transferrin receptor. ... The term transferrin receptor is intended to encompass the entire receptor or portions thereof. Portions of the transferrin ... In-Vivo Binding of OX-26 Murine Monoclonal Antibody to Rat Transferrin Receptor. Dose Range. The anti-rat transferrin receptor ...
Goat polyclonal Transferrin Receptor antibody. Validated in WB and tested in Human. Cited in 1 publication(s). Independently ... Cellular uptake of iron occurs via receptor-mediated endocytosis of ligand-occupied transferrin receptor into specialized ... Anti-Transferrin Receptor antibody (ab166929) at 1 µg/ml + Human Breast lysate at 35 µg. Developed using the ECL technique.. ... Transferrin receptor is necessary for development of erythrocytes and the nervous system (By similarity). A second ligand, the ...
References for Abcams Human Transferrin Receptor peptide (ab101219). Please let us know if you have used this product in your ...
Serum transferrin receptor levels in beta-thalassemia trait. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone, iPad, or Android ... "Serum Transferrin Receptor Levels in Beta-thalassemia Trait." Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, vol. 50, no. 6, 2004, pp. 369-71. ... Serum transferrin receptor levels in beta-thalassemia trait.. J Trop Pediatr. 2004 Dec; 50(6):369-71.JT ... Serum Transferrin Receptor Levels in Beta-thalassemia Trait. J Trop Pediatr. 2004;50(6):369-71. PubMed PMID: 15537726. ...
Tanner LI, Lienhard GE: Localization of transferrin receptors and insulin-like growth factor II receptors in vesicles from 3T3- ... iron circulates bound to transferrin and is taken up from the blood by a high-affinity specific transferrin receptor (TfR) (1 ... Circulating Soluble Transferrin Receptor According to Glucose Tolerance Status and Insulin Sensitivity. José Manuel Fernández- ... TfR, transferrin receptor. Insulin is an anabolic hormone that stimulates the cellular uptake of many nutrients, including ...
Circulating Soluble Transferrin Receptor According to Glucose Tolerance Status and Insulin Sensitivity. ... Circulating Soluble Transferrin Receptor According to Glucose Tolerance Status and Insulin Sensitivity ... Circulating Soluble Transferrin Receptor According to Glucose Tolerance Status and Insulin Sensitivity ... Circulating Soluble Transferrin Receptor According to Glucose Tolerance Status and Insulin Sensitivity ...
... Jiexia Wen,1,2 Sumin Pan ... Jiexia Wen, Sumin Pan, Shuang Liang, et al., "Soluble Form of Canine Transferrin Receptor Inhibits Canine Parvovirus Infection ...
... ... 2014)‎. Serum transferrin receptor levels for the assessment of iron status and iron deficiency in populations. World Health ...
... the transferrin receptor (TfR). The soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated form (shorten) 0f the transferrin ... Soluble transferrin receptor is a marker of iron status. In iron deficiency anaemia, soluble transferrin receptor levels are ... About the Soluble Transferrin Receptor (sTfR) assay. Biological significance of sTfR. Transferrin transports iron around the ... In ACD, soluble transferrin receptor levels do not correlate with iron status. This was observed in patients with chronic ...
... A. E. Kennedy1, E ... An interaction between the transferrin receptor (TFRC) rs3817672 (S142G) and hereditary hemochromatosis gene (HFE) rs1800672 ( ... but not in the transferrin or HFE binding sites), and the SNP alters a splicing site. S142G itself is not associated with any ...
  • Furthermore, the distinction between the mechanism of regulation exerted by IFN gamma and that exerted by cell proliferation on transferrin receptor gene expression suggests that, in WISH cells, the IFN-induced transferrin receptor decay is not a consequence of cell growth arrest but rather one of the causes of the antiproliferative effect of IFN through iron deprivation. (epfl.ch)
  • Studies with these antibodies establish that the transferrin receptor plays an important role in cell growth and suggest that monoclonal antibodies that interfere with the function of growth-related receptors may be useful in regulating tumour cell growth. (nih.gov)
  • Here we used fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize the association of single canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids with cellular transferrin receptors (TfR) on the surfaces of live feline cells and to monitor how these CPV-TfR complexes access endocytic structures. (asm.org)
  • In the present study, we have found that two ligands of TfR1, gambogic acid (GA) but not holo-transferrin (Tf) induced apoptosis in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and activated the JNK and p38 signal pathways. (aacrjournals.org)
  • A recently described second transferrin receptor, with as yet poorly understood function, will not be discussed in this brief review. (nih.gov)
  • TfR binds iron-loaded transferrin (Fe-Tf) from the blood and transports it to acidic recycling endosomes where iron is released from Fe-Tf in a TfR-facilitated process. (caltech.edu)
  • Inside endosomes the lower pH promotes the protonation of the carbonate anion coordinating the position of the ferric ion, induces conformational change in transferrin, and additionally membrane bound oxidoreductase catalyses the reduction of Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ . (turkupetcentre.net)
  • The third is in the basolateral endosomes, where the receptor must be sorted into transcytotic vesicles and thus avoids transport to the degradative compartment or the recycling compartment or both. (jneurosci.org)
  • For the transferrin receptor analysis, in 2007-2008 the Roche Hitachi 912 immunoturbidimetric assay was used and in 2009-2010 the Roche Hitachi Mod P immunoturbidimetric method was used. (cdc.gov)
  • Transferrin receptors in detergent extracts of subcellular membrane fractions prepared from 3T3-L1 adipocytes were measured by a binding assay. (rupress.org)
  • The amount of bound Rat Transferrin Receptor is proportional to the signal generated by the reaction meaning the kit assay gives you a quantitative measurement of the analyte in your samples. (elisagenie.com)
  • Although many viruses are icosahedral when they initially bind to one or more receptor molecules on the cell surface, such an interaction is asymmetric, probably causing a breakdown in the symmetry and conformation of the original infecting virion in preparation for membrane penetration and release of the viral genome. (pnas.org)
  • Nevertheless, the initial interaction of such a virus with a membrane-bound receptor is inherently asymmetric ( 5 ). (pnas.org)