The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, sequencing, and information analysis of an RNA SEQUENCE.
Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.
Partial cDNA (DNA, COMPLEMENTARY) sequences that are unique to the cDNAs from which they were derived.
Techniques of nucleotide sequence analysis that increase the range, complexity, sensitivity, and accuracy of results by greatly increasing the scale of operations and thus the number of nucleotides, and the number of copies of each nucleotide sequenced. The sequencing may be done by analysis of the synthesis or ligation products, hybridization to preexisting sequences, etc.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.
A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.
Sets of structured vocabularies used for describing and categorizing genes, and gene products by their molecular function, involvement in biological processes, and cellular location. These vocabularies and their associations to genes and gene products (Gene Ontology annotations) are generated and curated by the Gene Ontology Consortium.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.
Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.
Overlapping of cloned or sequenced DNA to construct a continuous region of a gene, chromosome or genome.
The simultaneous analysis, on a microchip, of multiple samples or targets arranged in an array format.
A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.
The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.
The protein complement of an organism coded for by its genome.
Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.
The genetic complement of a plant (PLANTS) as represented in its DNA.
The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.
A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.
Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.
The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
A process whereby multiple RNA transcripts are generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing involves the splicing together of other possible sets of EXONS during the processing of some, but not all, transcripts of the gene. Thus a particular exon may be connected to any one of several alternative exons to form a mature RNA. The alternative forms of mature MESSENGER RNA produce PROTEIN ISOFORMS in which one part of the isoforms is common while the other parts are different.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Methods used for detecting the amplified DNA products from the polymerase chain reaction as they accumulate instead of at the end of the reaction.
RNA which does not code for protein but has some enzymatic, structural or regulatory function. Although ribosomal RNA (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) and transfer RNA (RNA, TRANSFER) are also untranslated RNAs they are not included in this scope.
A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The different gene transcripts generated from a single gene by RNA EDITING or ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of RNA PRECURSORS.
The dynamic collection of metabolites which represent a cell's or organism's net metabolic response to current conditions.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs, 21-25 nucleotides in length generated from single-stranded microRNA gene transcripts by the same RIBONUCLEASE III, Dicer, that produces small interfering RNAs (RNA, SMALL INTERFERING). They become part of the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX and repress the translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) of target RNA by binding to homologous 3'UTR region as an imperfect match. The small temporal RNAs (stRNAs), let-7 and lin-4, from C. elegans, are the first 2 miRNAs discovered, and are from a class of miRNAs involved in developmental timing.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
The reproductive organs of plants.
Sets of enzymatic reactions occurring in organisms and that form biochemicals by making new covalent bonds.
The parts of the messenger RNA sequence that do not code for product, i.e. the 5' UNTRANSLATED REGIONS and 3' UNTRANSLATED REGIONS.
The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE known for the edible beans.
A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.
In eukaryotes, a genetic unit consisting of a noncontiguous group of genes under the control of a single regulator gene. In bacteria, regulons are global regulatory systems involved in the interplay of pleiotropic regulatory domains and consist of several OPERONS.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
RNA molecules which hybridize to complementary sequences in either RNA or DNA altering the function of the latter. Endogenous antisense RNAs function as regulators of gene expression by a variety of mechanisms. Synthetic antisense RNAs are used to effect the functioning of specific genes for investigative or therapeutic purposes.
Mathematical procedure that transforms a number of possibly correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components.
Databases containing information about NUCLEIC ACIDS such as BASE SEQUENCE; SNPS; NUCLEIC ACID CONFORMATION; and other properties. Information about the DNA fragments kept in a GENE LIBRARY or GENOMIC LIBRARY is often maintained in DNA databases.
Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
Diseases of plants.
The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.
A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.
Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.
Short RNA, about 200 base pairs in length or shorter, that does not code for protein.
Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.
A physiochemical process which occurs in a wide range of organisms which unlike BASAL METABOLISM is not required for or essential to short-term survivability but to long-term general well-being of the organism.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The genetic complement of a helminth (HELMINTHS) as represented in its DNA.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. It is the source of COTTON FIBER; COTTONSEED OIL, which is used for cooking, and GOSSYPOL. The economically important cotton crop is a major user of agricultural PESTICIDES.
Techniques using a laser to cut away and harvest a specific cell or cluster of cells from a tissue section while viewing it under the microscope.
The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.
Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.
Proteins found in any species of insect.
The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
The complete gene complement contained in a set of chromosomes in a fungus.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.
The GENETIC RECOMBINATION of the parts of two or more GENES resulting in a gene with different or additional regulatory regions, or a new chimeric gene product. ONCOGENE FUSION includes an ONCOGENE as at least one of the fusion partners and such gene fusions are often detected in neoplastic cells and are transcribed into ONCOGENE FUSION PROTEINS. ARTIFICIAL GENE FUSION is carried out in vitro by RECOMBINANT DNA technology.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.
The fruiting 'heads' or 'caps' of FUNGI, which as a food item are familiarly known as MUSHROOMS, that contain the FUNGAL SPORES.
A subset of various vascular plants (also known as the Tracheophyta) which include seed-bearing and non seed-bearing species.
Any of the hormones produced naturally in plants and active in controlling growth and other functions. There are three primary classes: auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins.
A plant genus of the family SALICACEAE. Balm of Gilead is a common name used for P. candicans, or P. gileadensis, or P. jackii, and sometimes also used for ABIES BALSAMEA or for COMMIPHORA.
The first nucleotide of a transcribed DNA sequence where RNA polymerase (DNA-DIRECTED RNA POLYMERASE) begins synthesizing the RNA transcript.
A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.
Very young plant after GERMINATION of SEEDS.
Commonly observed BASE SEQUENCE or nucleotide structural components which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE or a SEQUENCE LOGO.
A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.
Ribonucleic acid in helminths having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Proteins obtained from species of fish (FISHES).
A process that changes the nucleotide sequence of mRNA from that of the DNA template encoding it. Some major classes of RNA editing are as follows: 1, the conversion of cytosine to uracil in mRNA; 2, the addition of variable number of guanines at pre-determined sites; and 3, the addition and deletion of uracils, templated by guide-RNAs (RNA, GUIDE).
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.
Nucleotide sequences located at the ends of EXONS and recognized in pre-messenger RNA by SPLICEOSOMES. They are joined during the RNA SPLICING reaction, forming the junctions between exons.
The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.
A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is used for food in NIGERIA.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
The joining of RNA from two different genes. One type of trans-splicing is the "spliced leader" type (primarily found in protozoans such as trypanosomes and in lower invertebrates such as nematodes) which results in the addition of a capped, noncoding, spliced leader sequence to the 5' end of mRNAs. Another type of trans-splicing is the "discontinuous group II introns" type (found in plant/algal chloroplasts and plant mitochondria) which results in the joining of two independently transcribed coding sequences. Both are mechanistically similar to conventional nuclear pre-mRNA cis-splicing. Mammalian cells are also capable of trans-splicing.
Plants that can grow well in soils that have a high SALINITY.
The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.
The capacity of an organism to defend itself against pathological processes or the agents of those processes. This most often involves innate immunity whereby the organism responds to pathogens in a generic way. The term disease resistance is used most frequently when referring to plants.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Knobbed structures formed from and attached to plant roots, especially of LEGUMES, which result from symbiotic infection by nitrogen fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA. Root nodules are structures related to MYCORRHIZAE formed by symbiotic associations with fungi.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
The body of a fungus which is made up of HYPHAE.
The extent to which an RNA molecule retains its structural integrity and resists degradation by RNASE, and base-catalyzed HYDROLYSIS, under changing in vivo or in vitro conditions.
A multistage process that includes the determination of a sequence (protein, carbohydrate, etc.), its fragmentation and analysis, and the interpretation of the resulting sequence information.
Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Biological activities and function of the whole organism in human, animal, microorgansims, and plants, and of the biosphere.
A species of the family Ranidae which occurs primarily in the eastern half of the United States and Canada. Two subspecies exist, commonly referred to as green frog (R. c. melanota) and bronze frog (R. c. clamitans).
Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.
The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
A plant species of the family POACEAE. It is a tall grass grown for its EDIBLE GRAIN, corn, used as food and animal FODDER.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.
Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.
The Alu sequence family (named for the restriction endonuclease cleavage enzyme Alu I) is the most highly repeated interspersed repeat element in humans (over a million copies). It is derived from the 7SL RNA component of the SIGNAL RECOGNITION PARTICLE and contains an RNA polymerase III promoter. Transposition of this element into coding and regulatory regions of genes is responsible for many heritable diseases.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A plant species of the family SOLANACEAE, native of South America, widely cultivated for their edible, fleshy, usually red fruit.
The performance of dissections with the aid of a microscope.
A mitosporic fungal genus. P. brasiliensis (previously Blastomyces brasiliensis) is the etiologic agent of PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.
Paired sense organs connected to the anterior segments of ARTHROPODS that help them navigate through the environment.
A class of untranslated RNA molecules that are typically greater than 200 nucleotides in length and do not code for proteins. Members of this class have been found to play roles in transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional processing, CHROMATIN REMODELING, and in the epigenetic control of chromatin.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.
A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain scrosides (CINNAMATES) and phenylethanoid glycoside. P. kurrooa is the source of picroliv (a purified iridoid glycoside fraction from the roots having hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties).
Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.
A plant genus of the family ELAEAGNACEAE. Linoleic (18:2n-6) and alpha-linolenic acids (18:3n-3) comprised about 70% of seed oil fatty acids. This is unrelated to 'artificial sea buckthorn oil'. This genus does not belong to the buckthorn family (RHAMNACEAE).
The addition of a tail of polyadenylic acid (POLY A) to the 3' end of mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). Polyadenylation involves recognizing the processing site signal, (AAUAAA), and cleaving of the mRNA to create a 3' OH terminal end to which poly A polymerase (POLYNUCLEOTIDE ADENYLYLTRANSFERASE) adds 60-200 adenylate residues. The 3' end processing of some messenger RNAs, such as histone mRNA, is carried out by a different process that does not include the addition of poly A as described here.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Ligand-binding assays that measure protein-protein, protein-small molecule, or protein-nucleic acid interactions using a very large set of capturing molecules, i.e., those attached separately on a solid support, to measure the presence or interaction of target molecules in the sample.
A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
Ribonucleic acid in fungi having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.
A plant genus of the family TAXODIACEAE. Members contain DITERPENES.
A plant genus of the family DENNSTAEDTIACEAE. Members contain ptaquiloside, braxin A1, and braxin B. The name is similar to brake fern (PTERIS).
A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.
The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.
New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.
Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.
A plant division of GYMNOSPERMS consisting of cone-bearing trees and shrubs.
A method for comparing two sets of chromosomal DNA by analyzing differences in the copy number and location of specific sequences. It is used to look for large sequence changes such as deletions, duplications, amplifications, or translocations.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A large family of mollusks in the class BIVALVIA, known commonly as scallops. They possess flat, almost circular shells and are found in all seas from shallow water to great depths.
A plant species of the family FABACEAE used to study GENETICS because it is DIPLOID, self fertile, has a small genome, and short generation time.
An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.
Genes that are located on the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA. Mitochondrial inheritance is often referred to as maternal inheritance but should be differentiated from maternal inheritance that is transmitted chromosomally.
A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE known for its peppery red root.
A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE, order Euphorbiales, subclass Rosidae. Commercial natural RUBBER is mainly obtained from Hevea brasiliensis but also from some other plants.
Any of the DNA in between gene-coding DNA, including untranslated regions, 5' and 3' flanking regions, INTRONS, non-functional pseudogenes, and non-functional repetitive sequences. This DNA may or may not encode regulatory functions.
Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.
A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are coniferous evergreen trees with long, flat, spirally arranged needles that grow directly from the branch.
A genus of basidiomyceteous fungi in the family POLYPORACEAE. The species all contain bright orange, bracket-like fruiting bodies.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
Derivatives of ethylene, a simple organic gas of biological origin with many industrial and biological use.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE. Young shoots are eaten in Asian foods while the stiff mature stems are used for construction of many things. The common name of bamboo is also used for other genera of Poaceae including Phyllostachys, SASA, and Dendrocalamus.
Flagellate EUKARYOTES, found mainly in the oceans. They are characterized by the presence of transverse and longitudinal flagella which propel the organisms in a rotating manner through the water. Dinoflagellida were formerly members of the class Phytomastigophorea under the old five kingdom paradigm.
Comprehensive, methodical analysis of complex biological systems by monitoring responses to perturbations of biological processes. Large scale, computerized collection and analysis of the data are used to develop and test models of biological systems.
The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.
A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.
A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.
The most abundant natural aromatic organic polymer found in all vascular plants. Lignin together with cellulose and hemicellulose are the major cell wall components of the fibers of all wood and grass species. Lignin is composed of coniferyl, p-coumaryl, and sinapyl alcohols in varying ratios in different plant species. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
Proteins synthesized by organisms belonging to the phylum ARTHROPODA. Included in this heading are proteins from the subdivisions ARACHNIDA; CRUSTACEA; and HORSESHOE CRABS. Note that a separate heading for INSECT PROTEINS is listed under this heading.
Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.
Inorganic compounds that include a positively charged tetrahedral nitrogen (ammonium ion) as part of their structure. This class of compounds includes a broad variety of simple ammonium salts and derivatives.

Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the expressions of angiogenic gene profile and cyclooxygenase-2 in brain microvascular endothelial cells. (1/4463)

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the expressions of angioge-nesis-related genes in a mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell line, namely bEnd.3, using cDNA microarray. The effects of bFGF (10 ng/ml) on mRNA and protein expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an angiogenesis bystander molecule, were further investigated. cDNA microarray was employed to study the effects of bFGF on the expressions of angiogenic genes in a high throughput pattern. RT-PCR was used to study the effect of bFGF on COX-2 mRNA expression. Western blot and immunocytochemistry were utilized to study the effect of bFGF on COX-2 protein expression. The results showed that, 2 h after bFGF treatment, pro-angiogenic genes (Adamts1, MMP-9, Ang-1, PDGF B, G-CSF, FGF16, IGF-1, etc.) were significantly upregulated, whereas anti-angiogenic genes (TIMP-2, TSP-3, etc.) were significantly downregulated. The bystander molecule in angiogenic pathway COX-2 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly upregulated after bFGF treatment. It is suggested that triggering angiogensis switch through upregulating pro-angiogenic gene and downregulating anti-angiogenic gene expression is one of the major mechanisms of bFGF-induced angiogenesis. The expression change of COX-2, as a bystander molecule, was observed after bFGF treatment in bEnd.3 cells and the significance was discussed.  (+info)

Stress-dependent coordination of transcriptome and translatome in yeast. (2/4463)

 (+info)

Variation in dehydration tolerance, ABA sensitivity and related gene expression patterns in D-genome progenitor and synthetic hexaploid wheat lines. (3/4463)

 (+info)

Identification and classification of small RNAs in transcriptome sequence data. (4/4463)

Current methods for high throughput sequencing (HTS) for the first time offer the opportunity to investigate the entire transcriptome in an essentially unbiased way. In many species, small non-coding RNAs with specific secondary structures constitute a significant part of the transcriptome. Some of these RNA classes, in particular microRNAs and snoRNAs, undergo maturation processes that lead to the production of shorter RNAs. After mapping the sequences to the reference genome specific patterns of short reads can be observed. These read patterns seem to reflect the processing and thus are specific for the RNA transcripts of which they are derived from. We explore here the potential of short read sequence data in the classification and identification of non-coding RNAs.  (+info)

The transcriptome of human monocyte subsets begins to emerge. (5/4463)

 (+info)

A focus on natural variation for abiotic constraints response in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. (6/4463)

 (+info)

A marginal mixture model for selecting differentially expressed genes across two types of tissue samples. (7/4463)

 (+info)

Use of type I interferon-inducible mRNAs as pharmacodynamic markers and potential diagnostic markers in trials with sifalimumab, an anti-IFNalpha antibody, in systemic lupus erythematosus. (8/4463)

 (+info)

The transcriptome refers to the complete set of RNA molecules, including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), and other non-coding RNAs, that are present in a cell or a population of cells at a given point in time. It reflects the genetic activity and provides information about which genes are being actively transcribed and to what extent. The transcriptome can vary under different conditions, such as during development, in response to environmental stimuli, or in various diseases, making it an important area of study in molecular biology and personalized medicine.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Molecular sequence annotation is the process of identifying and describing the characteristics, functional elements, and relevant information of a DNA, RNA, or protein sequence at the molecular level. This process involves marking the location and function of various features such as genes, regulatory regions, coding and non-coding sequences, intron-exon boundaries, promoters, introns, untranslated regions (UTRs), binding sites for proteins or other molecules, and post-translational modifications in a given molecular sequence.

The annotation can be manual, where experts curate and analyze the data to predict features based on biological knowledge and experimental evidence. Alternatively, computational methods using various bioinformatics tools and algorithms can be employed for automated annotation. These tools often rely on comparative analysis, pattern recognition, and machine learning techniques to identify conserved sequence patterns, motifs, or domains that are associated with specific functions.

The annotated molecular sequences serve as valuable resources in genomic and proteomic studies, contributing to the understanding of gene function, evolutionary relationships, disease associations, and biotechnological applications.

RNA Sequence Analysis is a branch of bioinformatics that involves the determination and analysis of the nucleotide sequence of Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) molecules. This process includes identifying and characterizing the individual RNA molecules, determining their functions, and studying their evolutionary relationships.

RNA Sequence Analysis typically involves the use of high-throughput sequencing technologies to generate large datasets of RNA sequences, which are then analyzed using computational methods. The analysis may include comparing the sequences to reference databases to identify known RNA molecules or discovering new ones, identifying patterns and features in the sequences, such as motifs or domains, and predicting the secondary and tertiary structures of the RNA molecules.

RNA Sequence Analysis has many applications in basic research, including understanding gene regulation, identifying novel non-coding RNAs, and studying evolutionary relationships between organisms. It also has practical applications in clinical settings, such as diagnosing and monitoring diseases, developing new therapies, and personalized medicine.

Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis is a type of microarray analysis that allows for the simultaneous measurement of the expression levels of thousands of genes in a single sample. In this technique, oligonucleotides (short DNA sequences) are attached to a solid support, such as a glass slide, in a specific pattern. These oligonucleotides are designed to be complementary to specific target mRNA sequences from the sample being analyzed.

During the analysis, labeled RNA or cDNA from the sample is hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The level of hybridization is then measured and used to determine the relative abundance of each target sequence in the sample. This information can be used to identify differences in gene expression between samples, which can help researchers understand the underlying biological processes involved in various diseases or developmental stages.

It's important to note that this technique requires specialized equipment and bioinformatics tools for data analysis, as well as careful experimental design and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are short, single-pass DNA sequences that are derived from cDNA libraries. They represent a quick and cost-effective method for large-scale sequencing of gene transcripts and provide an unbiased view of the genes being actively expressed in a particular tissue or developmental stage. ESTs can be used to identify and study new genes, to analyze patterns of gene expression, and to develop molecular markers for genetic mapping and genome analysis.

High-throughput nucleotide sequencing, also known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), refers to a group of technologies that allow for the rapid and parallel determination of nucleotide sequences of DNA or RNA molecules. These techniques enable the sequencing of large numbers of DNA or RNA fragments simultaneously, resulting in the generation of vast amounts of sequence data in a single run.

High-throughput sequencing has revolutionized genomics research by allowing for the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes, transcriptomes, and epigenomes. It has numerous applications in basic research, including genome assembly, gene expression analysis, variant detection, and methylation profiling, as well as in clinical settings, such as diagnosis of genetic diseases, identification of pathogens, and monitoring of cancer progression and treatment response.

Some common high-throughput sequencing platforms include Illumina (sequencing by synthesis), Ion Torrent (semiconductor sequencing), Pacific Biosciences (single molecule real-time sequencing), and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (nanopore sequencing). Each platform has its strengths and limitations, and the choice of technology depends on the specific research question and experimental design.

Gene expression regulation in plants refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and RNA from the genes present in the plant's DNA. This regulation is crucial for normal growth, development, and response to environmental stimuli in plants. It can occur at various levels, including transcription (the first step in gene expression, where the DNA sequence is copied into RNA), RNA processing (such as alternative splicing, which generates different mRNA molecules from a single gene), translation (where the information in the mRNA is used to produce a protein), and post-translational modification (where proteins are chemically modified after they have been synthesized).

In plants, gene expression regulation can be influenced by various factors such as hormones, light, temperature, and stress. Plants use complex networks of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling complexes, and small RNAs to regulate gene expression in response to these signals. Understanding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation in plants is important for basic research, as well as for developing crops with improved traits such as increased yield, stress tolerance, and disease resistance.

A "gene library" is not a recognized term in medical genetics or molecular biology. However, the closest concept that might be referred to by this term is a "genomic library," which is a collection of DNA clones that represent the entire genetic material of an organism. These libraries are used for various research purposes, such as identifying and studying specific genes or gene functions.

Gene Ontology (GO) is not a medical term, but rather a bioinformatics term used to describe a controlled vocabulary or ontology for describing molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components in which genes and gene products are involved. It provides a standardized way to represent and share information about gene function across different species.

The GO ontology is organized as a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where each term has defined relationships with other terms, allowing for the representation of complex biological concepts. The GO terms can be used to describe molecular functions such as enzymatic activities or binding interactions, biological processes such as metabolic pathways or signal transduction cascades, and cellular components such as organelles or subcellular structures.

GO analysis is a common approach in bioinformatics for interpreting large-scale genomic data, such as microarray or next-generation sequencing experiments, to identify genes that are involved in specific biological processes or molecular functions of interest.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Cluster analysis is a statistical method used to group similar objects or data points together based on their characteristics or features. In medical and healthcare research, cluster analysis can be used to identify patterns or relationships within complex datasets, such as patient records or genetic information. This technique can help researchers to classify patients into distinct subgroups based on their symptoms, diagnoses, or other variables, which can inform more personalized treatment plans or public health interventions.

Cluster analysis involves several steps, including:

1. Data preparation: The researcher must first collect and clean the data, ensuring that it is complete and free from errors. This may involve removing outlier values or missing data points.
2. Distance measurement: Next, the researcher must determine how to measure the distance between each pair of data points. Common methods include Euclidean distance (the straight-line distance between two points) or Manhattan distance (the distance between two points along a grid).
3. Clustering algorithm: The researcher then applies a clustering algorithm, which groups similar data points together based on their distances from one another. Common algorithms include hierarchical clustering (which creates a tree-like structure of clusters) or k-means clustering (which assigns each data point to the nearest centroid).
4. Validation: Finally, the researcher must validate the results of the cluster analysis by evaluating the stability and robustness of the clusters. This may involve re-running the analysis with different distance measures or clustering algorithms, or comparing the results to external criteria.

Cluster analysis is a powerful tool for identifying patterns and relationships within complex datasets, but it requires careful consideration of the data preparation, distance measurement, and validation steps to ensure accurate and meaningful results.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

A gene in plants, like in other organisms, is a hereditary unit that carries genetic information from one generation to the next. It is a segment of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) that contains the instructions for the development and function of an organism. Genes in plants determine various traits such as flower color, plant height, resistance to diseases, and many others. They are responsible for encoding proteins and RNA molecules that play crucial roles in the growth, development, and reproduction of plants. Plant genes can be manipulated through traditional breeding methods or genetic engineering techniques to improve crop yield, enhance disease resistance, and increase nutritional value.

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) in plants refers to the long, single-stranded molecules that are essential for the translation of genetic information from deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into proteins. RNA is a nucleic acid, like DNA, and it is composed of a ribose sugar backbone with attached nitrogenous bases (adenine, uracil, guanine, and cytosine).

In plants, there are several types of RNA that play specific roles in the gene expression process:

1. Messenger RNA (mRNA): This type of RNA carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a sequence of three-base code units called codons. These codons specify the order of amino acids in a protein.
2. Transfer RNA (tRNA): tRNAs are small RNA molecules that serve as adaptors between the mRNA and the amino acids during protein synthesis. Each tRNA has a specific anticodon sequence that base-pairs with a complementary codon on the mRNA, and it carries a specific amino acid that corresponds to that codon.
3. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA): rRNAs are structural components of ribosomes, which are large macromolecular complexes where protein synthesis occurs. In plants, there are several types of rRNAs, including the 18S, 5.8S, and 25S/28S rRNAs, that form the core of the ribosome and help catalyze peptide bond formation during protein synthesis.
4. Small nuclear RNA (snRNA): These are small RNA molecules that play a role in RNA processing, such as splicing, where introns (non-coding sequences) are removed from pre-mRNA and exons (coding sequences) are joined together to form mature mRNAs.
5. MicroRNA (miRNA): These are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to complementary sequences in target mRNAs, leading to their degradation or translation inhibition.

Overall, these different types of RNAs play crucial roles in various aspects of RNA metabolism, gene regulation, and protein synthesis in plants.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

A genetic database is a type of biomedical or health informatics database that stores and organizes genetic data, such as DNA sequences, gene maps, genotypes, haplotypes, and phenotype information. These databases can be used for various purposes, including research, clinical diagnosis, and personalized medicine.

There are different types of genetic databases, including:

1. Genomic databases: These databases store whole genome sequences, gene expression data, and other genomic information. Examples include the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) GenBank, the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ).
2. Gene databases: These databases contain information about specific genes, including their location, function, regulation, and evolution. Examples include the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database, the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt), and the Gene Ontology (GO) database.
3. Variant databases: These databases store information about genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions/deletions (INDELs), and copy number variations (CNVs). Examples include the Database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (dbSNP), the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), and the International HapMap Project.
4. Clinical databases: These databases contain genetic and clinical information about patients, such as their genotype, phenotype, family history, and response to treatments. Examples include the ClinVar database, the Pharmacogenomics Knowledgebase (PharmGKB), and the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR).
5. Population databases: These databases store genetic information about different populations, including their ancestry, demographics, and genetic diversity. Examples include the 1000 Genomes Project, the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP), and the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND).

Genetic databases can be publicly accessible or restricted to authorized users, depending on their purpose and content. They play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of genetics and genomics, as well as improving healthcare and personalized medicine.

Contig mapping, short for contiguous mapping, is a process used in genetics and genomics to construct a detailed map of a particular region or regions of a genome. It involves the use of molecular biology techniques to physically join together, or "clone," overlapping DNA fragments from a specific region of interest in a genome. These joined fragments are called "contigs" because they are continuous and contiguous stretches of DNA that represent a contiguous map of the region.

Contig mapping is often used to study large-scale genetic variations, such as deletions, duplications, or rearrangements, in specific genomic regions associated with diseases or other traits. It can also be used to identify and characterize genes within those regions, which can help researchers understand their function and potential role in disease processes.

The process of contig mapping typically involves several steps, including:

1. DNA fragmentation: The genomic region of interest is broken down into smaller fragments using physical or enzymatic methods.
2. Cloning: The fragments are inserted into a vector, such as a plasmid or bacteriophage, which can be replicated in bacteria to produce multiple copies of each fragment.
3. Library construction: The cloned fragments are pooled together to create a genomic library, which contains all the DNA fragments from the region of interest.
4. Screening and selection: The library is screened using various methods, such as hybridization or PCR, to identify clones that contain overlapping fragments from the region of interest.
5. Contig assembly: The selected clones are ordered based on their overlapping regions to create a contiguous map of the genomic region.
6. Sequencing and analysis: The DNA sequence of the contigs is determined and analyzed to identify genes, regulatory elements, and other features of the genomic region.

Overall, contig mapping is an important tool for studying the structure and function of genomes, and has contributed significantly to our understanding of genetic variation and disease mechanisms.

Microarray analysis is a laboratory technique used to measure the expression levels of large numbers of genes (or other types of DNA sequences) simultaneously. This technology allows researchers to monitor the expression of thousands of genes in a single experiment, providing valuable information about which genes are turned on or off in response to various stimuli or diseases.

In microarray analysis, samples of RNA from cells or tissues are labeled with fluorescent dyes and then hybridized to a solid surface (such as a glass slide) onto which thousands of known DNA sequences have been spotted in an organized array. The intensity of the fluorescence at each spot on the array is proportional to the amount of RNA that has bound to it, indicating the level of expression of the corresponding gene.

Microarray analysis can be used for a variety of applications, including identifying genes that are differentially expressed between healthy and diseased tissues, studying genetic variations in populations, and monitoring gene expression changes over time or in response to environmental factors. However, it is important to note that microarray data must be analyzed carefully using appropriate statistical methods to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the results.

Computational biology is a branch of biology that uses mathematical and computational methods to study biological data, models, and processes. It involves the development and application of algorithms, statistical models, and computational approaches to analyze and interpret large-scale molecular and phenotypic data from genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and other high-throughput technologies. The goal is to gain insights into biological systems and processes, develop predictive models, and inform experimental design and hypothesis testing in the life sciences. Computational biology encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including bioinformatics, systems biology, computational genomics, network biology, and mathematical modeling of biological systems.

Genomics is the scientific study of genes and their functions. It involves the sequencing and analysis of an organism's genome, which is its complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. Genomics also includes the study of how genes interact with each other and with the environment. This field of study can provide important insights into the genetic basis of diseases and can lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and treatments.

The proteome is the entire set of proteins produced or present in an organism, system, organ, or cell at a certain time under specific conditions. It is a dynamic collection of protein species that changes over time, responding to various internal and external stimuli such as disease, stress, or environmental factors. The study of the proteome, known as proteomics, involves the identification and quantification of these protein components and their post-translational modifications, providing valuable insights into biological processes, functional pathways, and disease mechanisms.

Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) are complex systems of molecular interactions that regulate the expression of genes within an organism. These networks consist of various types of regulatory elements, including transcription factors, enhancers, promoters, and silencers, which work together to control when, where, and to what extent a gene is expressed.

In GRNs, transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences in the regulatory regions of target genes, either activating or repressing their transcription into messenger RNA (mRNA). This process is influenced by various intracellular and extracellular signals that modulate the activity of transcription factors, allowing for precise regulation of gene expression in response to changing environmental conditions.

The structure and behavior of GRNs can be represented as a network of nodes (genes) and edges (regulatory interactions), with the strength and directionality of these interactions determined by the specific molecular mechanisms involved. Understanding the organization and dynamics of GRNs is crucial for elucidating the underlying causes of various biological processes, including development, differentiation, homeostasis, and disease.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Gene expression regulation in bacteria refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins from specific genes. This regulation allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions and ensure the appropriate amount of protein is produced at the right time.

Bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for regulating gene expression, including:

1. Operon structure: Many bacterial genes are organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule. The expression of these genes can be coordinately regulated by controlling the transcription of the entire operon.
2. Promoter regulation: Transcription is initiated at promoter regions upstream of the gene or operon. Bacteria have regulatory proteins called sigma factors that bind to the promoter and recruit RNA polymerase, the enzyme responsible for transcribing DNA into RNA. The binding of sigma factors can be influenced by environmental signals, allowing for regulation of transcription.
3. Attenuation: Some operons have regulatory regions called attenuators that control transcription termination. These regions contain hairpin structures that can form in the mRNA and cause transcription to stop prematurely. The formation of these hairpins is influenced by the concentration of specific metabolites, allowing for regulation of gene expression based on the availability of those metabolites.
4. Riboswitches: Some bacterial mRNAs contain regulatory elements called riboswitches that bind small molecules directly. When a small molecule binds to the riboswitch, it changes conformation and affects transcription or translation of the associated gene.
5. CRISPR-Cas systems: Bacteria use CRISPR-Cas systems for adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids. These systems incorporate short sequences from foreign DNA into their own genome, which can then be used to recognize and cleave similar sequences in invading genetic elements.

Overall, gene expression regulation in bacteria is a complex process that allows them to respond quickly and efficiently to changing environmental conditions. Understanding these regulatory mechanisms can provide insights into bacterial physiology and help inform strategies for controlling bacterial growth and behavior.

A genome is the complete set of genetic material (DNA, or in some viruses, RNA) present in a single cell of an organism. It includes all of the genes, both coding and noncoding, as well as other regulatory elements that together determine the unique characteristics of that organism. The human genome, for example, contains approximately 3 billion base pairs and about 20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes.

The term "genome" was first coined by Hans Winkler in 1920, derived from the word "gene" and the suffix "-ome," which refers to a complete set of something. The study of genomes is known as genomics.

Understanding the genome can provide valuable insights into the genetic basis of diseases, evolution, and other biological processes. With advancements in sequencing technologies, it has become possible to determine the entire genomic sequence of many organisms, including humans, and use this information for various applications such as personalized medicine, gene therapy, and biotechnology.

A plant genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in the cells of a plant. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the development and functioning of the plant, including its structural and functional characteristics. The plant genome includes both coding regions that contain instructions for producing proteins and non-coding regions that have various regulatory functions.

The plant genome is composed of several types of DNA molecules, including chromosomes, which are located in the nucleus of the cell. Each chromosome contains one or more genes, which are segments of DNA that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Plants typically have multiple sets of chromosomes, with each set containing a complete copy of the genome.

The study of plant genomes is an active area of research in modern biology, with important applications in areas such as crop improvement, evolutionary biology, and medical research. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to determine the complete sequences of many plant genomes, providing valuable insights into their structure, function, and evolution.

Physiological stress is a response of the body to a demand or threat that disrupts homeostasis and activates the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This results in the release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, cortisol, and noradrenaline, which prepare the body for a "fight or flight" response. Increased heart rate, rapid breathing, heightened sensory perception, and increased alertness are some of the physiological changes that occur during this response. Chronic stress can have negative effects on various bodily functions, including the immune, cardiovascular, and nervous systems.

'Arabidopsis' is a genus of small flowering plants that are part of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). The most commonly studied species within this genus is 'Arabidopsis thaliana', which is often used as a model organism in plant biology and genetics research. This plant is native to Eurasia and Africa, and it has a small genome that has been fully sequenced. It is known for its short life cycle, self-fertilization, and ease of growth, making it an ideal subject for studying various aspects of plant biology, including development, metabolism, and response to environmental stresses.

Metabolic networks and pathways refer to the complex interconnected series of biochemical reactions that occur within cells to maintain life. These reactions are catalyzed by enzymes and are responsible for the conversion of nutrients into energy, as well as the synthesis and breakdown of various molecules required for cellular function.

A metabolic pathway is a series of chemical reactions that occur in a specific order, with each reaction being catalyzed by a different enzyme. These pathways are often interconnected, forming a larger network of interactions known as a metabolic network.

Metabolic networks can be represented as complex diagrams or models, which show the relationships between different pathways and the flow of matter and energy through the system. These networks can help researchers to understand how cells regulate their metabolism in response to changes in their environment, and how disruptions to these networks can lead to disease.

Some common examples of metabolic pathways include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and the pentose phosphate pathway. Each of these pathways plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and providing energy for cellular functions.

A plant root is not a medical term per se, but it is a term from botany, which is the study of plants. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you.

Plant roots are the underground organs of a plant that typically grow downward into the soil. They serve several important functions, including:

1. Anchorage: Roots help to stabilize the plant and keep it upright in the ground.
2. Absorption: Roots absorb water and nutrients from the soil, which are essential for the plant's growth and development.
3. Conduction: Roots conduct water and nutrients up to the above-ground parts of the plant, such as the stem and leaves.
4. Vegetative reproduction: Some plants can reproduce vegetatively through their roots, producing new plants from root fragments or specialized structures called rhizomes or tubers.

Roots are composed of several different tissues, including the epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and vascular tissue. The epidermis is the outermost layer of the root, which secretes a waxy substance called suberin that helps to prevent water loss. The cortex is the middle layer of the root, which contains cells that store carbohydrates and other nutrients. The endodermis is a thin layer of cells that surrounds the vascular tissue and regulates the movement of water and solutes into and out of the root. The vascular tissue consists of xylem and phloem, which transport water and nutrients throughout the plant.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Alternative splicing is a process in molecular biology that occurs during the post-transcriptional modification of pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) molecules. It involves the removal of non-coding sequences, known as introns, and the joining together of coding sequences, or exons, to form a mature messenger RNA (mRNA) molecule that can be translated into a protein.

In alternative splicing, different combinations of exons are selected and joined together to create multiple distinct mRNA transcripts from a single pre-mRNA template. This process increases the diversity of proteins that can be produced from a limited number of genes, allowing for greater functional complexity in organisms.

Alternative splicing is regulated by various cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that bind to specific sequences in the pre-mRNA molecule and influence which exons are included or excluded during splicing. Abnormal alternative splicing has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences in real-time. It is a sensitive and specific method that allows for the quantification of target nucleic acids, such as DNA or RNA, through the use of fluorescent reporter molecules.

The RT-PCR process involves several steps: first, the template DNA is denatured to separate the double-stranded DNA into single strands. Then, primers (short sequences of DNA) specific to the target sequence are added and allowed to anneal to the template DNA. Next, a heat-stable enzyme called Taq polymerase adds nucleotides to the annealed primers, extending them along the template DNA until a new double-stranded DNA molecule is formed.

During each amplification cycle, fluorescent reporter molecules are added that bind specifically to the newly synthesized DNA. As more and more copies of the target sequence are generated, the amount of fluorescence increases in proportion to the number of copies present. This allows for real-time monitoring of the PCR reaction and quantification of the target nucleic acid.

RT-PCR is commonly used in medical diagnostics, research, and forensics to detect and quantify specific DNA or RNA sequences. It has been widely used in the diagnosis of infectious diseases, genetic disorders, and cancer, as well as in the identification of microbial pathogens and the detection of gene expression.

Untranslated regions (UTRs) of RNA are the non-coding sequences that are present in mRNA (messenger RNA) molecules, which are located at both the 5' end (5' UTR) and the 3' end (3' UTR) of the mRNA, outside of the coding sequence (CDS). These regions do not get translated into proteins. They contain regulatory elements that play a role in the regulation of gene expression by affecting the stability, localization, and translation efficiency of the mRNA molecule. The 5' UTR typically contains the Shine-Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes or the Kozak consensus sequence in eukaryotes, which are important for the initiation of translation. The 3' UTR often contains regulatory elements such as AU-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) binding sites that can affect mRNA stability and translation.

RNA (Ribonucleic Acid) is a single-stranded, linear polymer of ribonucleotides. It is a nucleic acid present in the cells of all living organisms and some viruses. RNAs play crucial roles in various biological processes such as protein synthesis, gene regulation, and cellular signaling. There are several types of RNA including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), small nuclear RNA (snRNA), microRNA (miRNA), and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). These RNAs differ in their structure, function, and location within the cell.

"Plant proteins" refer to the proteins that are derived from plant sources. These can include proteins from legumes such as beans, lentils, and peas, as well as proteins from grains like wheat, rice, and corn. Other sources of plant proteins include nuts, seeds, and vegetables.

Plant proteins are made up of individual amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. While animal-based proteins typically contain all of the essential amino acids that the body needs to function properly, many plant-based proteins may be lacking in one or more of these essential amino acids. However, by consuming a variety of plant-based foods throughout the day, it is possible to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs from plant sources alone.

Plant proteins are often lower in calories and saturated fat than animal proteins, making them a popular choice for those following a vegetarian or vegan diet, as well as those looking to maintain a healthy weight or reduce their risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Additionally, plant proteins have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including improving gut health, reducing inflammation, and supporting muscle growth and repair.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

RNA isoforms, also known as alternative splicing isoforms or splice variants, refer to different forms of RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecules that are generated from a single gene through the process of RNA splicing. During this process, introns (non-coding sequences) are removed and exons (coding sequences) are joined together in various combinations to form mature RNA molecules.

In eukaryotic cells, many genes undergo alternative splicing, which results in the production of multiple RNA isoforms with distinct exon compositions from a single gene. These RNA isoforms can then be translated into different protein products or perform regulatory functions, contributing to proteome diversity and functional complexity in biological systems.

The existence of RNA isoforms has significant implications for genetics, molecular biology, and biomedical research, as they can influence phenotypic traits, disease susceptibility, and therapeutic responses. Identifying and characterizing RNA isoforms are essential for understanding gene function and regulation, as well as for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

The metabolome is the complete set of small molecule metabolites, such as carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and amino acids, present in a biological sample at a given moment. It reflects the physiological state of a cell, tissue, or organism and provides information about the biochemical processes that are taking place. The metabolome is dynamic and constantly changing due to various factors such as genetics, environment, diet, and disease. Studying the metabolome can help researchers understand the underlying mechanisms of health and disease and develop diagnostic tools and treatments for various medical conditions.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs, typically consisting of around 20-24 nucleotides, that play crucial roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. They primarily bind to the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to mRNA degradation or translational repression. MicroRNAs are involved in various biological processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and have been implicated in numerous diseases, such as cancers and neurological disorders. They can be found in various organisms, from plants to animals, and are often conserved across species. MicroRNAs are usually transcribed from DNA sequences located in introns or exons of protein-coding genes or in intergenic regions. After transcription, they undergo a series of processing steps, including cleavage by ribonucleases Drosha and Dicer, to generate mature miRNA molecules capable of binding to their target mRNAs.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Biosynthetic pathways refer to the series of biochemical reactions that occur within cells and living organisms, leading to the production (synthesis) of complex molecules from simpler precursors. These pathways involve a sequence of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, where each reaction builds upon the product of the previous one, ultimately resulting in the formation of a specific biomolecule.

Examples of biosynthetic pathways include:

1. The Krebs cycle (citric acid cycle) - an essential metabolic pathway that generates energy through the oxidation of acetyl-CoA derived from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.
2. Glycolysis - a process that breaks down glucose into pyruvate to generate ATP and NADH.
3. Gluconeogenesis - the synthesis of glucose from non-carbohydrate precursors such as lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and certain amino acids.
4. Fatty acid synthesis - a process that produces fatty acids from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA through a series of reduction reactions.
5. Amino acid synthesis - the production of various amino acids from simpler precursors, often involving intermediates in central metabolic pathways like the Krebs cycle or glycolysis.
6. Steroid biosynthesis - the formation of steroids from simple precursors such as cholesterol and its derivatives.
7. Terpenoid biosynthesis - the production of terpenes, terpenoids, and sterols from isoprene units (isopentenyl pyrophosphate).
8. Nucleotide synthesis - the generation of nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA, through complex biochemical pathways involving various precursors and cofactors.

Understanding biosynthetic pathways is crucial for comprehending cellular metabolism, developing drugs that target specific metabolic processes, and engineering organisms with desired traits in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications.

Untranslated regions (UTRs) are segments of messenger RNA (mRNA) that do not contain information for the synthesis of proteins. They are located at the 5' end (5' UTR) and 3' end (3' UTR) of the mRNA, outside of the coding sequence (CDS). The 5' UTR contains regulatory elements that control translation initiation, while the 3' UTR contains sequences involved in mRNA stability, localization, and translation efficiency. These regions do not code for proteins but play a crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

A human genome is the complete set of genetic information contained within the 23 pairs of chromosomes found in the nucleus of most human cells. It includes all of the genes, which are segments of DNA that contain the instructions for making proteins, as well as non-coding regions of DNA that regulate gene expression and provide structural support to the chromosomes.

The human genome contains approximately 3 billion base pairs of DNA and is estimated to contain around 20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The sequencing of the human genome was completed in 2003 as part of the Human Genome Project, which has had a profound impact on our understanding of human biology, disease, and evolution.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Cicer" is not a medical term or a widely recognized abbreviation in the medical field. It might be referring to Cicero, an ancient Roman philosopher and statesman, or it could have other meanings depending on the context. If you could provide more information about where you encountered this term, I would be happy to help you further.

Microsatellite repeats, also known as short tandem repeats (STRs), are repetitive DNA sequences made up of units of 1-6 base pairs that are repeated in a head-to-tail manner. These repeats are spread throughout the human genome and are highly polymorphic, meaning they can have different numbers of repeat units in different individuals.

Microsatellites are useful as genetic markers because of their high degree of variability. They are commonly used in forensic science to identify individuals, in genealogy to trace ancestry, and in medical research to study genetic diseases and disorders. Mutations in microsatellite repeats have been associated with various neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

A multigene family is a group of genetically related genes that share a common ancestry and have similar sequences or structures. These genes are arranged in clusters on a chromosome and often encode proteins with similar functions. They can arise through various mechanisms, including gene duplication, recombination, and transposition. Multigene families play crucial roles in many biological processes, such as development, immunity, and metabolism. Examples of multigene families include the globin genes involved in oxygen transport, the immune system's major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, and the cytochrome P450 genes associated with drug metabolism.

Organ specificity, in the context of immunology and toxicology, refers to the phenomenon where a substance (such as a drug or toxin) or an immune response primarily affects certain organs or tissues in the body. This can occur due to various reasons such as:

1. The presence of specific targets (like antigens in the case of an immune response or receptors in the case of drugs) that are more abundant in these organs.
2. The unique properties of certain cells or tissues that make them more susceptible to damage.
3. The way a substance is metabolized or cleared from the body, which can concentrate it in specific organs.

For example, in autoimmune diseases, organ specificity describes immune responses that are directed against antigens found only in certain organs, such as the thyroid gland in Hashimoto's disease. Similarly, some toxins or drugs may have a particular affinity for liver cells, leading to liver damage or specific drug interactions.

Gene expression regulation in fungi refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins and other functional gene products in response to various internal and external stimuli. This regulation is crucial for normal growth, development, and adaptation of fungal cells to changing environmental conditions.

In fungi, gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational modifications. Key regulatory mechanisms include:

1. Transcription factors (TFs): These proteins bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter regions of target genes and either activate or repress their transcription. Fungi have a diverse array of TFs that respond to various signals, such as nutrient availability, stress, developmental cues, and quorum sensing.
2. Chromatin remodeling: The organization and compaction of DNA into chromatin can influence gene expression. Fungi utilize ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifying enzymes to alter chromatin structure, thereby facilitating or inhibiting the access of transcriptional machinery to genes.
3. Non-coding RNAs: Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play a role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in fungi. These sncRNAs can guide RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complexes to specific target loci, leading to the repression of gene expression through histone modifications and DNA methylation.
4. Alternative splicing: Fungi employ alternative splicing mechanisms to generate multiple mRNA isoforms from a single gene, thereby increasing proteome diversity. This process can be regulated by RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific sequence motifs in pre-mRNAs and promote or inhibit splicing events.
5. Protein stability and activity: Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, can influence their stability, localization, and activity. These PTMs play a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes, including signal transduction, stress response, and cell cycle progression.

Understanding the complex interplay between these regulatory mechanisms is essential for elucidating the molecular basis of fungal development, pathogenesis, and drug resistance. This knowledge can be harnessed to develop novel strategies for combating fungal infections and improving agricultural productivity.

Chromosome mapping, also known as physical mapping, is the process of determining the location and order of specific genes or genetic markers on a chromosome. This is typically done by using various laboratory techniques to identify landmarks along the chromosome, such as restriction enzyme cutting sites or patterns of DNA sequence repeats. The resulting map provides important information about the organization and structure of the genome, and can be used for a variety of purposes, including identifying the location of genes associated with genetic diseases, studying evolutionary relationships between organisms, and developing genetic markers for use in breeding or forensic applications.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

I am not aware of a widely accepted medical definition for the term "software," as it is more commonly used in the context of computer science and technology. Software refers to programs, data, and instructions that are used by computers to perform various tasks. It does not have direct relevance to medical fields such as anatomy, physiology, or clinical practice. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help with those instead!

A regulon is a group of genes that are regulated together in response to a specific signal or stimulus, often through the action of a single transcription factor or regulatory protein. This means that when the transcription factor binds to specific DNA sequences called operators, it can either activate or repress the transcription of all the genes within the regulon.

This type of gene regulation is important for coordinating complex biological processes, such as cellular metabolism, stress responses, and developmental programs. By regulating a group of genes together, cells can ensure that they are all turned on or off in a coordinated manner, allowing for more precise control over the overall response to a given signal.

It's worth noting that the term "regulon" is not commonly used in clinical medicine, but rather in molecular biology and genetics research.

Genetic models are theoretical frameworks used in genetics to describe and explain the inheritance patterns and genetic architecture of traits, diseases, or phenomena. These models are based on mathematical equations and statistical methods that incorporate information about gene frequencies, modes of inheritance, and the effects of environmental factors. They can be used to predict the probability of certain genetic outcomes, to understand the genetic basis of complex traits, and to inform medical management and treatment decisions.

There are several types of genetic models, including:

1. Mendelian models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of simple genetic traits that follow Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment. Examples include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance.
2. Complex trait models: These models describe the inheritance patterns of complex traits that are influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. Examples include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.
3. Population genetics models: These models describe the distribution and frequency of genetic variants within populations over time. They can be used to study evolutionary processes, such as natural selection and genetic drift.
4. Quantitative genetics models: These models describe the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypic variation in continuous traits, such as height or IQ. They can be used to estimate heritability and to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that contribute to trait variation.
5. Statistical genetics models: These models use statistical methods to analyze genetic data and infer the presence of genetic associations or linkage. They can be used to identify genetic risk factors for diseases or traits.

Overall, genetic models are essential tools in genetics research and medical genetics, as they allow researchers to make predictions about genetic outcomes, test hypotheses about the genetic basis of traits and diseases, and develop strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Host-pathogen interactions refer to the complex and dynamic relationship between a living organism (the host) and a disease-causing agent (the pathogen). This interaction can involve various molecular, cellular, and physiological processes that occur between the two entities. The outcome of this interaction can determine whether the host will develop an infection or not, as well as the severity and duration of the illness.

During host-pathogen interactions, the pathogen may release virulence factors that allow it to evade the host's immune system, colonize tissues, and obtain nutrients for its survival and replication. The host, in turn, may mount an immune response to recognize and eliminate the pathogen, which can involve various mechanisms such as inflammation, phagocytosis, and the production of antimicrobial agents.

Understanding the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. This knowledge can help identify new targets for therapeutic interventions, inform vaccine design, and guide public health policies to control the spread of infectious agents.

Antisense RNA is a type of RNA molecule that is complementary to another RNA called sense RNA. In the context of gene expression, sense RNA is the RNA transcribed from a protein-coding gene, which serves as a template for translation into a protein. Antisense RNA, on the other hand, is transcribed from the opposite strand of the DNA and is complementary to the sense RNA.

Antisense RNA can bind to its complementary sense RNA through base-pairing, forming a double-stranded RNA structure. This interaction can prevent the sense RNA from being translated into protein or can target it for degradation by cellular machinery, thereby reducing the amount of protein produced from the gene. Antisense RNA can be used as a tool in molecular biology to study gene function or as a therapeutic strategy to silence disease-causing genes.

Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is not a medical term, but a statistical technique that is used in various fields including bioinformatics and medicine. It is a method used to identify patterns in high-dimensional data by reducing the dimensionality of the data while retaining most of the variation in the dataset.

In medical or biological research, PCA may be used to analyze large datasets such as gene expression data or medical imaging data. By applying PCA, researchers can identify the principal components, which are linear combinations of the original variables that explain the maximum amount of variance in the data. These principal components can then be used for further analysis, visualization, and interpretation of the data.

PCA is a widely used technique in data analysis and has applications in various fields such as genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and medical imaging. It helps researchers to identify patterns and relationships in complex datasets, which can lead to new insights and discoveries in medical research.

A nucleic acid database is a type of biological database that contains sequence, structure, and functional information about nucleic acids, such as DNA and RNA. These databases are used in various fields of biology, including genomics, molecular biology, and bioinformatics, to store, search, and analyze nucleic acid data.

Some common types of nucleic acid databases include:

1. Nucleotide sequence databases: These databases contain the primary nucleotide sequences of DNA and RNA molecules from various organisms. Examples include GenBank, EMBL-Bank, and DDBJ.
2. Structure databases: These databases contain three-dimensional structures of nucleic acids determined by experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Examples include the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Nucleic Acid Database (NDB).
3. Functional databases: These databases contain information about the functions of nucleic acids, such as their roles in gene regulation, transcription, and translation. Examples include the Gene Ontology (GO) database and the RegulonDB.
4. Genome databases: These databases contain genomic data for various organisms, including whole-genome sequences, gene annotations, and genetic variations. Examples include the Human Genome Database (HGD) and the Ensembl Genome Browser.
5. Comparative databases: These databases allow for the comparison of nucleic acid sequences or structures across different species or conditions. Examples include the Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site and the Sequence Alignment and Modeling (SAM) system.

Nucleic acid databases are essential resources for researchers to study the structure, function, and evolution of nucleic acids, as well as to develop new tools and methods for analyzing and interpreting nucleic acid data.

"Oryza sativa" is the scientific name for Asian rice, which is a species of grass and one of the most important food crops in the world. It is a staple food for more than half of the global population, providing a significant source of calories and carbohydrates. There are several varieties of Oryza sativa, including indica and japonica, which differ in their genetic makeup, growth habits, and grain characteristics.

Oryza sativa is an annual plant that grows to a height of 1-2 meters and produces long slender leaves and clusters of flowers at the top of the stem. The grains are enclosed within a tough husk, which must be removed before consumption. Rice is typically grown in flooded fields or paddies, which provide the necessary moisture for germination and growth.

Rice is an important source of nutrition for people around the world, particularly in developing countries where it may be one of the few reliable sources of food. It is rich in carbohydrates, fiber, and various vitamins and minerals, including thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, iron, and magnesium. However, rice can also be a significant source of arsenic, a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in the grain during growth.

In medical terms, Oryza sativa may be used as a component of nutritional interventions for individuals who are at risk of malnutrition or who have specific dietary needs. It may also be studied in clinical trials to evaluate its potential health benefits or risks.

An open reading frame (ORF) is a continuous stretch of DNA or RNA sequence that has the potential to be translated into a protein. It begins with a start codon (usually "ATG" in DNA, which corresponds to "AUG" in RNA) and ends with a stop codon ("TAA", "TAG", or "TGA" in DNA; "UAA", "UAG", or "UGA" in RNA). The sequence between these two points is called a coding sequence (CDS), which, when transcribed into mRNA and translated into amino acids, forms a polypeptide chain.

In eukaryotic cells, ORFs can be located in either protein-coding genes or non-coding regions of the genome. In prokaryotic cells, multiple ORFs may be present on a single strand of DNA, often organized into operons that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that not all ORFs necessarily represent functional proteins; some may be pseudogenes or result from errors in genome annotation. Therefore, additional experimental evidence is typically required to confirm the expression and functionality of a given ORF.

A plant disease is a disorder that affects the normal growth and development of plants, caused by pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or nematodes, as well as environmental factors like nutrient deficiencies, extreme temperatures, or physical damage. These diseases can cause various symptoms, including discoloration, wilting, stunted growth, necrosis, and reduced yield or productivity, which can have significant economic and ecological impacts.

Exons are the coding regions of DNA that remain in the mature, processed mRNA after the removal of non-coding intronic sequences during RNA splicing. These exons contain the information necessary to encode proteins, as they specify the sequence of amino acids within a polypeptide chain. The arrangement and order of exons can vary between different genes and even between different versions of the same gene (alternative splicing), allowing for the generation of multiple protein isoforms from a single gene. This complexity in exon structure and usage significantly contributes to the diversity and functionality of the proteome.

Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) is a type of genetic variation that occurs when a single nucleotide (A, T, C, or G) in the DNA sequence is altered. This alteration must occur in at least 1% of the population to be considered a SNP. These variations can help explain why some people are more susceptible to certain diseases than others and can also influence how an individual responds to certain medications. SNPs can serve as biological markers, helping scientists locate genes that are associated with disease. They can also provide information about an individual's ancestry and ethnic background.

Arabidopsis proteins refer to the proteins that are encoded by the genes in the Arabidopsis thaliana plant, which is a model organism commonly used in plant biology research. This small flowering plant has a compact genome and a short life cycle, making it an ideal subject for studying various biological processes in plants.

Arabidopsis proteins play crucial roles in many cellular functions, such as metabolism, signaling, regulation of gene expression, response to environmental stresses, and developmental processes. Research on Arabidopsis proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of plant biology and has provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying various agronomic traits.

Some examples of Arabidopsis proteins include transcription factors, kinases, phosphatases, receptors, enzymes, and structural proteins. These proteins can be studied using a variety of techniques, such as biochemical assays, protein-protein interaction studies, and genetic approaches, to understand their functions and regulatory mechanisms in plants.

Small untranslated region (UTR) of RNA refers to the non-coding sequences located at the 5' end (5' UTR) or 3' end (3' UTR) of an mRNA molecule that do not contain information for protein synthesis. These regions play a role in the regulation of translation, stability, and localization of the mRNA. The small untranslated regions are so named because they are typically shorter in length compared to other regulatory elements found within the mRNA.

"Drought" is not a medical term. It is a term used in meteorology and environmental science to refer to a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall, leading to water shortage and scarcity in the affected areas. Droughts can have various impacts on human health, including dehydration, heat-related illnesses, reduced air quality, increased transmission of waterborne diseases, and mental health issues related to stress and displacement. However, drought itself is not a medical condition.

Secondary metabolism in the context of microbiology and plant biology refers to the metabolic pathways that produce secondary metabolites. These are compounds that are not directly involved in the growth, development, or reproduction of an organism but have other functions, such as defense against predators or competitors, or in ecological interactions with other organisms.

Examples of secondary metabolites include antibiotics, toxins, pigments, and various signaling molecules. The production of these compounds is often induced under specific environmental conditions or developmental stages, and they can play important roles in the survival and fitness of the producing organism.

In contrast, primary metabolism refers to the metabolic pathways that produce compounds essential for growth, development, and reproduction, such as amino acids, nucleotides, and carbohydrates.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

A helminth genome refers to the complete set of genetic information present in the DNA of a helminth organism. Helminths are parasitic worms that include nematodes (roundworms), cestodes (tapeworms), and trematodes (flukes). The genome of a helminth includes all of the genes that code for proteins, as well as non-coding DNA sequences that regulate gene expression and other functions.

The study of helminth genomics has provided important insights into the biology and evolution of these parasites, as well as their interactions with their hosts. For example, genomic studies have identified potential drug targets and vaccine candidates, and have helped to elucidate the mechanisms of host-parasite coevolution.

It's worth noting that the size and complexity of helminth genomes can vary widely depending on the species. Some helminth genomes are relatively small and compact, while others are large and complex, with a high degree of genetic diversity. The human whipworm (Trichuris trichiura), for example, has a genome size of approximately 120 megabases, while the tapeworm Schistosoma mansoni has a genome size of over 360 megabases.

Overall, the study of helminth genomics is an important area of research that has the potential to inform the development of new strategies for preventing and treating helminth infections, which affect millions of people worldwide.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

"Gossypium" is the scientific name for the cotton plant. It belongs to the Malvaceae family and is native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world. The cotton plant produces soft, fluffy fibers that are used to make a wide variety of textiles, including clothing, bedding, and other household items.

The medical community may use the term "Gossypium" in certain contexts, such as when discussing allergic reactions or sensitivities to cotton products. However, it is more commonly used in botany and agriculture than in medical terminology.

Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a specialized technique used in pathology and molecular biology to isolate specific cells or cell types from heterogeneous tissue sections for further analysis. This method employs a laser beam to precisely cut and capture the cells of interest, which are then collected for downstream applications such as genetic or protein analysis.

The process typically involves the following steps:

1. Tissue preparation: The tissue sample is embedded in a supporting matrix, like a polymer or wax, and cut into thin sections using a microtome. These sections are mounted on special slides designed for LCM.
2. Staining: To visualize the cells of interest, the tissue sections are stained with various dyes or immunohistochemical markers that selectively bind to specific cell types or structures.
3. Laser microdissection: Under a microscope equipped with a laser system, the researcher identifies and outlines the cells or regions of interest. The laser beam is then focused and directed to cut along the outlined borders, separating the desired cells from the surrounding tissue.
4. Cell collection: A specialized cap containing an adhesive surface is positioned over the dissected cells, which are subsequently lifted and captured onto the cap when brought into contact with it.
5. Downstream analysis: The isolated cells can now be extracted for various downstream applications, such as genomic DNA analysis (e.g., PCR, sequencing), transcriptomic analysis (e.g., RNA sequencing, gene expression profiling), or proteomic analysis (e.g., mass spectrometry).

LCM enables the study of specific cell populations within complex tissues, providing valuable insights into their molecular characteristics and functions. This technique has broad applications in research areas such as cancer biology, neuroscience, developmental biology, and toxicology.

Proteomics is the large-scale study and analysis of proteins, including their structures, functions, interactions, modifications, and abundance, in a given cell, tissue, or organism. It involves the identification and quantification of all expressed proteins in a biological sample, as well as the characterization of post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and functional pathways. Proteomics can provide valuable insights into various biological processes, diseases, and drug responses, and has applications in basic research, biomedicine, and clinical diagnostics. The field combines various techniques from molecular biology, chemistry, physics, and bioinformatics to study proteins at a systems level.

Salinity is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, salinity refers to the level of salt or sodium content in a substance, usually measured in parts per thousand (ppt). In a medical context, salinity might be discussed in relation to things like the body's fluid balance or the composition of certain bodily fluids, such as sweat or tears.

It is worth noting that in some cases, high salinity levels can have negative effects on health. For example, consuming water with very high salt content can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances, which can be dangerous. Similarly, exposure to high-salinity environments (such as seawater) can cause skin irritation and other problems in some people. However, these are not direct medical definitions of salinity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Insect Proteins" is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide some information about insect protein from a nutritional and food science perspective.

Insect proteins refer to the proteins that are obtained from insects. Insects are a rich source of protein, and their protein content varies by species. For example, mealworms and crickets have been found to contain approximately 47-63% and 60-72% protein by dry weight, respectively.

In recent years, insect proteins have gained attention as a potential sustainable source of nutrition due to their high protein content, low environmental impact, and the ability to convert feed into protein more efficiently compared to traditional livestock. Insect proteins can be used in various applications such as food and feed additives, nutritional supplements, and even cosmetics.

However, it's important to note that the use of insect proteins in human food is not widely accepted in many Western countries due to cultural and regulatory barriers. Nonetheless, research and development efforts continue to explore the potential benefits and applications of insect proteins in the global food system.

Genes in insects refer to the hereditary units of DNA that are passed down from parents to offspring and contain the instructions for the development, function, and reproduction of an organism. These genetic materials are located within the chromosomes in the nucleus of insect cells. They play a crucial role in determining various traits such as physical characteristics, behavior, and susceptibility to diseases.

Insect genes, like those of other organisms, consist of exons (coding regions) that contain information for protein synthesis and introns (non-coding regions) that are removed during the process of gene expression. The expression of insect genes is regulated by various factors such as transcription factors, enhancers, and silencers, which bind to specific DNA sequences to activate or repress gene transcription.

Understanding the genetic makeup of insects has important implications for various fields, including agriculture, public health, and evolutionary biology. For example, genes associated with insect pests' resistance to pesticides can be identified and targeted to develop more effective control strategies. Similarly, genes involved in disease transmission by insect vectors such as mosquitoes can be studied to develop novel interventions for preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

A bacterial genome is the complete set of genetic material, including both DNA and RNA, found within a single bacterium. It contains all the hereditary information necessary for the bacterium to grow, reproduce, and survive in its environment. The bacterial genome typically includes circular chromosomes, as well as plasmids, which are smaller, circular DNA molecules that can carry additional genes. These genes encode various functional elements such as enzymes, structural proteins, and regulatory sequences that determine the bacterium's characteristics and behavior.

Bacterial genomes vary widely in size, ranging from around 130 kilobases (kb) in Mycoplasma genitalium to over 14 megabases (Mb) in Sorangium cellulosum. The complete sequencing and analysis of bacterial genomes have provided valuable insights into the biology, evolution, and pathogenicity of bacteria, enabling researchers to better understand their roles in various diseases and potential applications in biotechnology.

A fungal genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in the cells of a fungus. It includes all the genes and non-coding regions that are essential for the growth, development, and survival of the organism. The fungal genome is typically haploid, meaning it contains only one set of chromosomes, unlike diploid genomes found in many animals and plants.

Fungal genomes vary widely in size and complexity, ranging from a few megabases to hundreds of megabases. They contain several types of genetic elements such as protein-coding genes, regulatory regions, repetitive elements, and mobile genetic elements like transposons. The study of fungal genomes can provide valuable insights into the evolution, biology, and pathogenicity of fungi, and has important implications for medical research, agriculture, and industrial applications.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hemiptera" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic order in the classification of living things, also known as "true bugs." This group includes species such as cicadas, aphids, and bedbugs. If you have a medical term in mind, please provide it so I can give you an accurate definition.

A gene fusion, also known as a chromosomal translocation or fusion gene, is an abnormal genetic event where parts of two different genes combine to create a single, hybrid gene. This can occur due to various mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, deletions, or inversions, leading to the formation of a chimeric gene with new and often altered functions.

Gene fusions can result in the production of abnormal fusion proteins that may contribute to cancer development and progression by promoting cell growth, inhibiting apoptosis (programmed cell death), or activating oncogenic signaling pathways. In some cases, gene fusions are specific to certain types of cancer and serve as valuable diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine.

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Physiological adaptation refers to the changes or modifications that occur in an organism's biological functions or structures as a result of environmental pressures or changes. These adaptations enable the organism to survive and reproduce more successfully in its environment. They can be short-term, such as the constriction of blood vessels in response to cold temperatures, or long-term, such as the evolution of longer limbs in animals that live in open environments.

In the context of human physiology, examples of physiological adaptation include:

1. Acclimatization: The process by which the body adjusts to changes in environmental conditions, such as altitude or temperature. For example, when a person moves to a high-altitude location, their body may produce more red blood cells to compensate for the lower oxygen levels, leading to improved oxygen delivery to tissues.

2. Exercise adaptation: Regular physical activity can lead to various physiological adaptations, such as increased muscle strength and endurance, enhanced cardiovascular function, and improved insulin sensitivity.

3. Hormonal adaptation: The body can adjust hormone levels in response to changes in the environment or internal conditions. For instance, during prolonged fasting, the body releases stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline to help maintain energy levels and prevent muscle wasting.

4. Sensory adaptation: Our senses can adapt to different stimuli over time. For example, when we enter a dark room after being in bright sunlight, it takes some time for our eyes to adjust to the new light level. This process is known as dark adaptation.

5. Aging-related adaptations: As we age, various physiological changes occur that help us adapt to the changing environment and maintain homeostasis. These include changes in body composition, immune function, and cognitive abilities.

A fruiting body, in the context of mycology (the study of fungi), refers to the part of a fungus that produces spores for sexual or asexual reproduction. These structures are often what we typically think of as mushrooms or toadstools, although not all fungal fruiting bodies resemble these familiar forms.

Fungal fruiting bodies can vary greatly in size, shape, and color, depending on the species of fungus. They may be aboveground, like the caps and stalks of mushrooms, or underground, like the tiny, thread-like structures known as "corals" in some species.

The primary function of a fruiting body is to produce and disperse spores, which can give rise to new individuals when they germinate under favorable conditions. The development of a fruiting body is often triggered by environmental factors such as moisture, temperature, and nutrient availability.

"Tracheobionta" is not a standard medical term. However, in the field of biology, it is used to refer to a group of organisms that possess a respiratory system with a true trachea or its equivalent, such as insects, spiders, and other arthropods.

In a broader context, Tracheobionta is sometimes used interchangeably with the term "Tracheata," which refers to a taxonomic category that includes all organisms with a true tracheal system for respiration, including various invertebrate groups such as arthropods and nematodes.

However, it's important to note that these terms are not commonly used in medical contexts, but rather in the fields of biology, zoology, and taxonomy.

Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are natural or synthetic chemical substances that, when present in low concentrations, can influence various physiological and biochemical processes in plants. These processes include cell division, elongation, and differentiation; flowering and fruiting; leaf senescence; and stress responses. PGRs can be classified into several categories based on their mode of action and chemical structure, including auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, ethylene, and others. They are widely used in agriculture to improve crop yield and quality, regulate plant growth and development, and enhance stress tolerance.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Populus" is not a medical term. It is actually the genus name for a group of trees commonly known as poplars, aspens, and cottonwoods. If you have any medical terms or concepts that you would like me to define or explain, I would be happy to help!

A Transcription Initiation Site (TIS) is a specific location within the DNA sequence where the process of transcription is initiated. In other words, it is the starting point where the RNA polymerase enzyme binds to the DNA template and begins synthesizing an RNA molecule. The TIS is typically located just upstream of the coding region of a gene and is often marked by specific sequences or structures that help regulate transcription, such as promoters and enhancers.

During the initiation of transcription, the RNA polymerase recognizes and binds to the promoter region, which lies adjacent to the TIS. The promoter contains cis-acting elements, including the TATA box and the initiator (Inr) element, that are recognized by transcription factors and other regulatory proteins. These proteins help position the RNA polymerase at the correct location on the DNA template and facilitate the initiation of transcription.

Once the RNA polymerase is properly positioned, it begins to unwind the double-stranded DNA at the TIS, creating a transcription bubble where the single-stranded DNA template can be accessed. The RNA polymerase then adds nucleotides one by one to the growing RNA chain, synthesizing an mRNA molecule that will ultimately be translated into a protein or, in some cases, serve as a non-coding RNA with regulatory functions.

In summary, the Transcription Initiation Site (TIS) is a crucial component of gene expression, marking the location where transcription begins and playing a key role in regulating this essential biological process.

Genetic markers are specific segments of DNA that are used in genetic mapping and genotyping to identify specific genetic locations, diseases, or traits. They can be composed of short tandem repeats (STRs), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), or variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs). These markers are useful in various fields such as genetic research, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and breeding programs. They can help to track inheritance patterns, identify genetic predispositions to diseases, and solve crimes by linking biological evidence to suspects or victims.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seedling" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is an agricultural and horticultural term that refers to a young plant grown from a seed, typically during the early stages of its growth. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help with those!

A nucleotide motif is a specific sequence or pattern of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA and RNA) that has biological significance. These motifs can be found in various contexts, such as within a gene, regulatory region, or across an entire genome. They may play a role in regulating gene expression, DNA replication, repair, or other cellular processes.

For example, in the context of DNA, a simple nucleotide motif could be a palindromic sequence (e.g., "CGGCGG") that can form a hairpin structure during transcription or translation. More complex motifs might include cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, or silencers, which contain specific arrangements of nucleotides that interact with proteins to control gene expression.

In the context of RNA, nucleotide motifs can be involved in various post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, such as splicing, localization, stability, and translation. For instance, stem-loop structures or specific sequence elements within RNA molecules might serve as recognition sites for RNA-binding proteins or non-coding RNAs (e.g., microRNAs) that modulate RNA function.

Overall, nucleotide motifs are essential components of the genetic code and play crucial roles in shaping gene expression and cellular functions.

An algorithm is not a medical term, but rather a concept from computer science and mathematics. In the context of medicine, algorithms are often used to describe step-by-step procedures for diagnosing or managing medical conditions. These procedures typically involve a series of rules or decision points that help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care.

For example, an algorithm for diagnosing a particular type of heart disease might involve taking a patient's medical history, performing a physical exam, ordering certain diagnostic tests, and interpreting the results in a specific way. By following this algorithm, healthcare professionals can ensure that they are using a consistent and evidence-based approach to making a diagnosis.

Algorithms can also be used to guide treatment decisions. For instance, an algorithm for managing diabetes might involve setting target blood sugar levels, recommending certain medications or lifestyle changes based on the patient's individual needs, and monitoring the patient's response to treatment over time.

Overall, algorithms are valuable tools in medicine because they help standardize clinical decision-making and ensure that patients receive high-quality care based on the latest scientific evidence.

In medical terms, "seeds" are often referred to as a small amount of a substance, such as a radioactive material or drug, that is inserted into a tissue or placed inside a capsule for the purpose of treating a medical condition. This can include procedures like brachytherapy, where seeds containing radioactive materials are used in the treatment of cancer to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Similarly, in some forms of drug delivery, seeds containing medication can be used to gradually release the drug into the body over an extended period of time.

It's important to note that "seeds" have different meanings and applications depending on the medical context. In other cases, "seeds" may simply refer to small particles or structures found in the body, such as those present in the eye's retina.

RNA (Ribonucleic acid) is a single-stranded molecule that plays a crucial role in the process of gene expression. It acts as a messenger carrying genetic information copied from DNA to the ribosomes, where proteins are synthesized. RNA is also involved in catalyzing chemical reactions and regulating gene expression.

Helminths, on the other hand, refer to parasitic worms that infect humans and animals. They belong to various phyla, including Nematoda (roundworms), Platyhelminthes (flatworms), and Acanthocephala (spiny-headed worms). Helminth infections can cause a range of diseases and conditions, such as intestinal inflammation, anemia, stunted growth, and cognitive impairment.

There is no medical definition for "RNA, Helminth" since RNA is a type of molecule found in all living organisms, including helminths. However, researchers have studied the genetic material of various helminth species to better understand their biology, evolution, and pathogenesis. This includes sequencing and analyzing the RNA transcriptome of these parasites, which can provide insights into their gene expression patterns and help identify potential drug targets for developing new treatments.

In the context of medicine and biology, symbiosis is a type of close and long-term biological interaction between two different biological organisms. Generally, one organism, called the symbiont, lives inside or on another organism, called the host. This interaction can be mutually beneficial (mutualistic), harmful to the host organism (parasitic), or have no effect on either organism (commensal).

Examples of mutualistic symbiotic relationships in humans include the bacteria that live in our gut and help us digest food, as well as the algae that live inside corals and provide them with nutrients. Parasitic symbioses, on the other hand, involve organisms like viruses or parasitic worms that live inside a host and cause harm to it.

It's worth noting that while the term "symbiosis" is often used in popular culture to refer to any close relationship between two organisms, in scientific contexts it has a more specific meaning related to long-term biological interactions.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

"Fish proteins" are not a recognized medical term or concept. However, fish is a source of protein that is often consumed in the human diet and has been studied in various medical and nutritional contexts. According to the USDA FoodData Central database, a 100-gram serving of cooked Atlantic salmon contains approximately 25 grams of protein.

Proteins from fish, like other animal proteins, are complete proteins, meaning they contain all nine essential amino acids that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Fish proteins have been studied for their potential health benefits, including their role in muscle growth and repair, immune function, and cardiovascular health.

It's worth noting that some people may have allergies to fish or seafood, which can cause a range of symptoms from mild skin irritation to severe anaphylaxis. If you suspect you have a fish allergy, it's important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and management.

RNA editing is a process that alters the sequence of a transcribed RNA molecule after it has been synthesized from DNA, but before it is translated into protein. This can result in changes to the amino acid sequence of the resulting protein or to the regulation of gene expression. The most common type of RNA editing in mammals is the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I), catalyzed by a family of enzymes called adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). Inosine is recognized as guanosine (G) by the translation machinery, leading to A-to-G changes in the RNA sequence. Other types of RNA editing include cytidine (C) to uridine (U) deamination and insertion/deletion of nucleotides. RNA editing is a crucial mechanism for generating diversity in gene expression and has been implicated in various biological processes, including development, differentiation, and disease.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the genetic material present in the cells of all living organisms, including plants. In plants, DNA is located in the nucleus of a cell, as well as in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Plant DNA contains the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the plant, and is passed down from one generation to the next through the process of reproduction.

The structure of DNA is a double helix, formed by two strands of nucleotides that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. Each nucleotide contains a sugar molecule (deoxyribose), a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. There are four types of nitrogenous bases in DNA: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). Adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, forming the rungs of the ladder that make up the double helix.

The genetic information in DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nitrogenous bases. Large sequences of bases form genes, which provide the instructions for the production of proteins. The process of gene expression involves transcribing the DNA sequence into a complementary RNA molecule, which is then translated into a protein.

Plant DNA is similar to animal DNA in many ways, but there are also some differences. For example, plant DNA contains a higher proportion of repetitive sequences and transposable elements, which are mobile genetic elements that can move around the genome and cause mutations. Additionally, plant cells have cell walls and chloroplasts, which are not present in animal cells, and these structures contain their own DNA.

Carbohydrate metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, which is then used for energy or stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. This process involves several enzymes and chemical reactions that convert carbohydrates from food into glucose, fructose, or galactose, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to cells throughout the body.

The hormones insulin and glucagon regulate carbohydrate metabolism by controlling the uptake and storage of glucose in cells. Insulin is released from the pancreas when blood sugar levels are high, such as after a meal, and promotes the uptake and storage of glucose in cells. Glucagon, on the other hand, is released when blood sugar levels are low and signals the liver to convert stored glycogen back into glucose and release it into the bloodstream.

Disorders of carbohydrate metabolism can result from genetic defects or acquired conditions that affect the enzymes or hormones involved in this process. Examples include diabetes, hypoglycemia, and galactosemia. Proper management of these disorders typically involves dietary modifications, medication, and regular monitoring of blood sugar levels.

RNA splice sites are specific sequences on the pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) molecule where the splicing process occurs during gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The pre-mRNA contains introns and exons, which are non-coding and coding regions of the RNA, respectively.

The splicing process removes the introns and joins together the exons to form a mature mRNA molecule that can be translated into a protein. The splice sites are recognized by the spliceosome, a complex of proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) that catalyze the splicing reaction.

There are two main types of splice sites: the 5' splice site and the 3' splice site. The 5' splice site is located at the junction between the 5' end of the intron and the 3' end of the exon, while the 3' splice site is located at the junction between the 3' end of the intron and the 5' end of the exon.

The 5' splice site contains a conserved GU sequence, while the 3' splice site contains a conserved AG sequence. These sequences are recognized by the snRNAs in the spliceosome, which bind to them and facilitate the splicing reaction.

Mutations or variations in RNA splice sites can lead to abnormal splicing and result in diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and genetic disorders.

'Life cycle stages' is a term used in the context of public health and medicine to describe the different stages that an organism goes through during its lifetime. This concept is particularly important in the field of epidemiology, where understanding the life cycle stages of infectious agents (such as bacteria, viruses, parasites) can help inform strategies for disease prevention and control.

The life cycle stages of an infectious agent may include various forms such as spores, cysts, trophozoites, schizonts, or vectors, among others, depending on the specific organism. Each stage may have different characteristics, such as resistance to environmental factors, susceptibility to drugs, and ability to transmit infection.

For example, the life cycle stages of the malaria parasite include sporozoites (the infective form transmitted by mosquitoes), merozoites (the form that infects red blood cells), trophozoites (the feeding stage inside red blood cells), schizonts (the replicating stage inside red blood cells), and gametocytes (the sexual stage that can be taken up by mosquitoes to continue the life cycle).

Understanding the life cycle stages of an infectious agent is critical for developing effective interventions, such as vaccines, drugs, or other control measures. For example, targeting a specific life cycle stage with a drug may prevent transmission or reduce the severity of disease. Similarly, designing a vaccine to elicit immunity against a particular life cycle stage may provide protection against infection or disease.

"Cajanus" is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae. It includes several species of tropical shrubs and trees that are native to Asia, Africa, and Australia. The most well-known species in this genus is Cajanus cajan, which is commonly known as pigeon pea or red gram. This plant is widely cultivated for its edible seeds and green pods, and it is an important source of food and income for millions of people around the world.

Cajanus species are characterized by their compound leaves, yellow or orange flowers, and long, slender seedpods that contain several seeds. The plants are often used as ornamentals, and they have a variety of medicinal and other uses. For example, Cajanus cajan is sometimes used in traditional medicine to treat a range of conditions, including fever, diarrhea, and skin diseases.

Overall, "Cajanus" refers to a group of plants that are important for their economic, nutritional, and ecological value.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and other molecules from genes in neoplastic cells, or cells that are part of a tumor or cancer. In a normal cell, gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that the right genes are turned on or off at the right time. However, in cancer cells, this regulation can be disrupted, leading to the overexpression or underexpression of certain genes.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation can be affected by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and signals from the tumor microenvironment. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes (genes that promote cancer growth and development) or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (genes that prevent cancer).

Understanding neoplastic gene expression regulation is important for developing new therapies for cancer, as targeting specific genes or pathways involved in this process can help to inhibit cancer growth and progression.

Trans-splicing is a process in which two different RNA molecules are spliced together to form a single, chimeric RNA molecule. This process involves the removal of introns (non-coding sequences) from both RNA molecules and the ligation of the remaining exons (coding sequences) to create a new RNA molecule that contains genetic information from both original RNAs.

In cis-splicing, which is the more common form of splicing, introns are removed and exons are ligated within the same RNA molecule. However, in trans-splicing, the exons to be ligated come from two separate RNA molecules that have been transcribed from different genes or different regions of the same gene.

Trans-splicing is found in a variety of organisms, including some higher eukaryotes such as humans, where it plays a role in generating genetic diversity and regulating gene expression. It can also occur in certain viruses, where it is used to generate new mRNA molecules that encode for essential viral proteins.

Salt-tolerant plants, also known as halophytes, are plants that can grow and complete their life cycle in saline environments. These plants have specialized adaptations that allow them to survive and reproduce in the presence of high concentrations of salt, particularly sodium chloride (NaCl), which is toxic to most plants.

Salt tolerance in plants is a complex trait that involves various physiological and biochemical mechanisms, such as:

1. Exclusion: Preventing the uptake of excess salt by the roots or excluding it from entering the plant cells.
2. Compartmentalization: Storing excess salt in vacuoles or older leaves that can be shed to reduce the overall salt load.
3. Tissue tolerance: Adapting to high salt concentrations within the plant tissues without experiencing toxicity or osmotic stress.
4. Osmoregulation: Maintaining water balance and cell turgor by synthesizing and accumulating compatible solutes, such as proline and glycine betaine, which help to lower the osmotic potential of the cells.
5. Ion homeostasis: Regulating the uptake and distribution of essential ions, like potassium (K+), while minimizing the accumulation of toxic ions, such as sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-).

Examples of salt-tolerant plants include mangroves, sea grasses, cordgrass, glasswort, and certain species of cacti and succulents. These plants have significant ecological and agricultural importance in coastal areas and arid regions, where salinity is a major environmental constraint.

Polyploidy is a condition in which a cell or an organism has more than two sets of chromosomes, unlike the typical diploid state where there are only two sets (one from each parent). Polyploidy can occur through various mechanisms such as errors during cell division, fusion of egg and sperm cells that have an abnormal number of chromosomes, or through the reproduction process in plants.

Polyploidy is common in the plant kingdom, where it often leads to larger size, increased biomass, and sometimes hybrid vigor. However, in animals, polyploidy is less common and usually occurs in only certain types of cells or tissues, as most animals require a specific number of chromosomes for normal development and reproduction. In humans, polyploidy is typically not compatible with life and can lead to developmental abnormalities and miscarriage.

Disease resistance, in a medical context, refers to the inherent or acquired ability of an organism to withstand or limit infection by a pathogen, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. This resistance can be due to various factors including the presence of physical barriers (e.g., intact skin), chemical barriers (e.g., stomach acid), and immune responses that recognize and eliminate the pathogen.

Inherited disease resistance is often determined by genetics, where certain genetic variations can make an individual more or less susceptible to a particular infection. For example, some people are naturally resistant to certain diseases due to genetic factors that prevent the pathogen from infecting their cells or replicating within them.

Acquired disease resistance can occur through exposure to a pathogen, which triggers an immune response that confers immunity or resistance to future infections by the same pathogen. This is the basis of vaccination, where a weakened or dead form of a pathogen is introduced into the body to stimulate an immune response without causing disease.

Overall, disease resistance is an important factor in maintaining health and preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Root nodules in plants refer to the specialized structures formed through the symbiotic relationship between certain leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, most commonly belonging to the genus Rhizobia. These nodules typically develop on the roots of the host plant, providing an ideal environment for the bacteria to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia, a form that can be directly utilized by the plant for growth and development.

The formation of root nodules begins with the infection of the plant's root hair cells by Rhizobia bacteria. This interaction triggers a series of molecular signals leading to the differentiation of root cortical cells into nodule primordia, which eventually develop into mature nodules. The nitrogen-fixing bacteria reside within these nodules in membrane-bound compartments called symbiosomes, where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia through an enzyme called nitrogenase.

The plant, in turn, provides the bacteria with carbon sources and other essential nutrients required for their growth and survival within the nodules. The fixed nitrogen is then transported from the root nodules to other parts of the plant, enhancing its overall nitrogen nutrition and promoting sustainable growth without the need for external nitrogen fertilizers.

In summary, root nodules in plants are essential structures formed through symbiotic associations with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, allowing leguminous plants to convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form while also benefiting the environment by reducing the reliance on chemical nitrogen fertilizers.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Mycelium is not a specifically medical term, but it is a biological term used in fungi and other organisms. Medically, it might be relevant in certain contexts such as discussing fungal infections. Here's the general definition:

Mycelium (my-SEE-lee-um) is the vegetative part of a fungus, consisting of a mass of branching, thread-like hyphae. It is the underground portion of the fungus that supports the growth of the organism and is often responsible for the decomposition of organic material. Mycelium can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and dead or living organisms.

RNA stability refers to the duration that a ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule remains intact and functional within a cell before it is degraded or broken down into its component nucleotides. Various factors can influence RNA stability, including:

1. Primary sequence: Certain sequences in the RNA molecule may be more susceptible to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases), enzymes that break down RNA.
2. Secondary structure: The formation of stable secondary structures, such as hairpins or stem-loop structures, can protect RNA from degradation.
3. Presence of RNA-binding proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA can either stabilize or destabilize the RNA molecule, depending on the type and location of the protein-RNA interaction.
4. Chemical modifications: Modifications to the RNA nucleotides, such as methylation, can increase RNA stability by preventing degradation.
5. Subcellular localization: The subcellular location of an RNA molecule can affect its stability, with some locations providing more protection from ribonucleases than others.
6. Cellular conditions: Changes in cellular conditions, such as pH or temperature, can also impact RNA stability.

Understanding RNA stability is important for understanding gene regulation and the function of non-coding RNAs, as well as for developing RNA-based therapeutic strategies.

Sequence analysis in the context of molecular biology and genetics refers to the systematic examination and interpretation of DNA or protein sequences to understand their features, structures, functions, and evolutionary relationships. It involves using various computational methods and bioinformatics tools to compare, align, and analyze sequences to identify patterns, conserved regions, motifs, or mutations that can provide insights into molecular mechanisms, disease associations, or taxonomic classifications.

In a medical context, sequence analysis can be applied to diagnose genetic disorders, predict disease susceptibility, inform treatment decisions, and guide research in personalized medicine. For example, analyzing the sequence of a gene associated with a particular inherited condition can help identify the specific mutation responsible for the disorder, providing valuable information for genetic counseling and family planning. Similarly, comparing the sequences of pathogens from different patients can reveal drug resistance patterns or transmission dynamics, informing infection control strategies and therapeutic interventions.

Genetic variation refers to the differences in DNA sequences among individuals and populations. These variations can result from mutations, genetic recombination, or gene flow between populations. Genetic variation is essential for evolution by providing the raw material upon which natural selection acts. It can occur within a single gene, between different genes, or at larger scales, such as differences in the number of chromosomes or entire sets of chromosomes. The study of genetic variation is crucial in understanding the genetic basis of diseases and traits, as well as the evolutionary history and relationships among species.

A bacterial gene is a segment of DNA (or RNA in some viruses) that contains the genetic information necessary for the synthesis of a functional bacterial protein or RNA molecule. These genes are responsible for encoding various characteristics and functions of bacteria such as metabolism, reproduction, and resistance to antibiotics. They can be transmitted between bacteria through horizontal gene transfer mechanisms like conjugation, transformation, and transduction. Bacterial genes are often organized into operons, which are clusters of genes that are transcribed together as a single mRNA molecule.

It's important to note that the term "bacterial gene" is used to describe genetic elements found in bacteria, but not all genetic elements in bacteria are considered genes. For example, some DNA sequences may not encode functional products and are therefore not considered genes. Additionally, some bacterial genes may be plasmid-borne or phage-borne, rather than being located on the bacterial chromosome.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Biological processes refer to the series of interactions and reactions that occur within a living organism in order to maintain life. These processes are often complex and involve multiple systems and structures within the body. They can include things like metabolism, cell division, growth and development, respiration, circulation, immune response, and digestion, among others.

Biological processes are typically regulated by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and they can be influenced by various internal and external stimuli. The study of biological processes is a key area of focus in the field of biology, as understanding these processes can shed light on how living organisms function, grow, reproduce, and respond to changes in their environment.

In medical terms, understanding biological processes is essential for developing effective treatments for various diseases and conditions. By studying the underlying mechanisms that contribute to disease, researchers can identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention and develop new drugs or other treatments designed to modulate specific biological processes.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Rana clamitans" is not a medical term. It is the scientific name for a species of frog commonly known as the Southern Leopard Frog. This amphibian is native to parts of North America and is not related to human health or medicine.

Embryonic stem cells are a type of pluripotent stem cell that are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, which is a very early-stage embryo. These cells have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body, making them a promising area of research for regenerative medicine and the study of human development and disease. Embryonic stem cells are typically obtained from surplus embryos created during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, with the consent of the donors. The use of embryonic stem cells is a controversial issue due to ethical concerns surrounding the destruction of human embryos.

Genetically modified plants (GMPs) are plants that have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering techniques to exhibit desired traits. These modifications can be made to enhance certain characteristics such as increased resistance to pests, improved tolerance to environmental stresses like drought or salinity, or enhanced nutritional content. The process often involves introducing genes from other organisms, such as bacteria or viruses, into the plant's genome. Examples of GMPs include Bt cotton, which has a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that makes it resistant to certain pests, and golden rice, which is engineered to contain higher levels of beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. It's important to note that genetically modified plants are subject to rigorous testing and regulation to ensure their safety for human consumption and environmental impact before they are approved for commercial use.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Acclimatization is the process by which an individual organism adjusts to a change in its environment, enabling it to maintain its normal physiological functions and thus survive and reproduce. In the context of medicine, acclimatization often refers to the body's adaptation to changes in temperature, altitude, or other environmental factors that can affect health.

For example, when a person moves from a low-altitude area to a high-altitude area, their body may undergo several physiological changes to adapt to the reduced availability of oxygen at higher altitudes. These changes may include increased breathing rate and depth, increased heart rate, and altered blood chemistry, among others. This process of acclimatization can take several days or even weeks, depending on the individual and the degree of environmental change.

Similarly, when a person moves from a cold climate to a hot climate, their body may adjust by increasing its sweat production and reducing its heat production, in order to maintain a stable body temperature. This process of acclimatization can help prevent heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Overall, acclimatization is an important physiological process that allows organisms to adapt to changing environments and maintain their health and well-being.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "fruit" is not a medical term per se. It is a common term used to describe the part of a plant that develops from the ovary after flowering and contains seeds. However, in a nutritional or dietary context, "fruits" are often referred to as foods that are typically sweet and juicy, and come from plants' flowers. They are rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals, making them an essential part of a healthy diet. But in a strict medical sense, there isn't a specific definition for "fruit."

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

'Zea mays' is the biological name for corn or maize, which is not typically considered a medical term. However, corn or maize can have medical relevance in certain contexts. For example, cornstarch is sometimes used as a diluent for medications and is also a component of some skin products. Corn oil may be found in topical ointments and creams. In addition, some people may have allergic reactions to corn or corn-derived products. But generally speaking, 'Zea mays' itself does not have a specific medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

Introns are non-coding sequences of DNA that are present within the genes of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, animals, and humans. Introns are removed during the process of RNA splicing, in which the initial RNA transcript is cut and reconnected to form a mature, functional RNA molecule.

After the intron sequences are removed, the remaining coding sequences, known as exons, are joined together to create a continuous stretch of genetic information that can be translated into a protein or used to produce non-coding RNAs with specific functions. The removal of introns allows for greater flexibility in gene expression and regulation, enabling the generation of multiple proteins from a single gene through alternative splicing.

In summary, introns are non-coding DNA sequences within genes that are removed during RNA processing to create functional RNA molecules or proteins.

Alu elements are short, repetitive sequences of DNA that are found in the genomes of primates, including humans. These elements are named after the restriction enzyme Alu, which was used to first identify them. Alu elements are derived from a 7SL RNA molecule and are typically around 300 base pairs in length. They are characterized by their ability to move or "jump" within the genome through a process called transposition.

Alu elements make up about 11% of the human genome and are thought to have played a role in shaping its evolution. They can affect gene expression, regulation, and function, and have been associated with various genetic disorders and diseases. Additionally, Alu elements can also serve as useful markers for studying genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among primates.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

"Lycopersicon esculentum" is the scientific name for the common red tomato. It is a species of fruit from the nightshade family (Solanaceae) that is native to western South America and Central America. Tomatoes are widely grown and consumed in many parts of the world as a vegetable, although they are technically a fruit. They are rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and lycopene, which has been studied for its potential health benefits.

Microdissection is a surgical technique that involves the use of a microscope to allow for precise, minimalistic dissection of tissue. It is often used in research and clinical settings to isolate specific cells, tissues or structures while minimizing damage to surrounding areas. This technique can be performed using various methods such as laser capture microdissection (LCM) or manual microdissection with microsurgical tools. The size and scale of the dissection required will determine the specific method used. In general, microdissection allows for the examination and analysis of very small and delicate structures that would otherwise be difficult to access and study.

"Paracoccidioides" is a genus of fungi that includes several species that can cause a human disease known as paracoccidioidomycosis or South American blastomycosis. This disease is acquired by inhaling the spores of the fungus, which are typically found in soil. The most common species associated with the disease is Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

The fungi in this genus are characterized by their ability to grow as both budding yeast and filamentous forms. In the yeast form, the cells are typically round or oval and have a distinctive "pilot's wheel" or "Mickey Mouse ear" appearance due to the presence of multiple buds radiating from a central point.

Paracoccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis that primarily affects the lungs, but can also spread to other organs such as the skin, mucous membranes, lymph nodes, and brain. The disease is more commonly found in rural areas of Latin America, particularly in Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. It typically occurs in adults who have been exposed to the fungus for many years, often through agricultural or occupational activities.

The diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis is usually made by identifying the characteristic yeast forms of the fungus in clinical specimens such as sputum or tissue biopsies. Treatment typically involves the use of antifungal medications, such as amphotericin B or itraconazole, for several months to a year or more, depending on the severity and extent of the disease.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

"Saccharum" is not a medical term, but a genus name in botany. It refers to the sugarcane plant (*Saccharum officinarum*), which is a tall perennial grass native to tropical regions of Southeast Asia. The sap of this plant contains high amounts of sucrose and has been used as a sweetener for thousands of years.

In a medical context, "saccharum" might be encountered in the form of sugar-based ingredients, such as dextrose (glucose) or sucrose, which are derived from sugarcane or other sugar-rich plants. These substances can be used in various medical applications, including intravenous fluids and nutritional supplements.

Arthropod antennae are the primary sensory organs found in arthropods, which include insects, crustaceans, arachnids, and myriapods. These paired appendages are usually located on the head or nearest segment to the head and are responsible for detecting various stimuli from the environment such as touch, taste, smell, temperature, humidity, vibration, and air motion.

The structure of arthropod antennae varies among different groups but generally consists of one or more segments called flagellum or funicle that may be further divided into subsegments called annuli. The number and arrangement of these segments are often used to classify and identify specific taxa.

Insect antennae, for example, typically have a distinct shape and can be thread-like, feathery, or clubbed depending on the species. They contain various sensory receptors such as olfactory neurons that detect odor molecules, mechanoreceptors that respond to touch or movement, and thermoreceptors that sense temperature changes.

Overall, arthropod antennae play a crucial role in enabling these organisms to navigate their environment, find food, avoid predators, and communicate with conspecifics.

Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a type of RNA molecule that is longer than 200 nucleotides and does not encode for proteins. They are involved in various cellular processes such as regulation of gene expression, chromosome remodeling, and modulation of protein function. LncRNAs can be located in the nucleus or cytoplasm and can interact with DNA, RNA, and proteins to bring about their functions. Dysregulation of lncRNAs has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Pinus" is not a medical term. It is the genus name for a group of plants commonly known as pine trees, which belong to the family Pinaceae in the kingdom Plantae. These evergreen coniferous resinous trees are widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere, with some species also found in the Southern Hemisphere.

If you have any medical terms or concepts that you would like me to define or explain, please feel free to ask!

Picrorhiza is a genus of plants belonging to the family Scrophulariaceae. In a medical context, Picrorhiza kurroa is the species most commonly referred to as Picrorhiza. It is a traditional Ayurvedic medicinal plant native to the Himalayan region. The roots and rhizomes of this plant are used in various Ayurvedic formulations for their hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. They have been traditionally used to treat liver disorders, asthma, chronic indigestion, and skin diseases. However, it is essential to consult a healthcare professional before using any herbal remedies for medicinal purposes.

A genetic locus (plural: loci) is a specific location on a chromosome where a particular gene or DNA sequence is found. It is the precise position where a specific genetic element, such as a gene or marker, is located on a chromsomere. This location is defined in terms of its relationship to other genetic markers and features on the same chromosome. Genetic loci can be used in linkage and association studies to identify the inheritance patterns and potential relationships between genes and various traits or diseases.

"Hippophae" is a genus name in botany, which refers to a group of shrubs known as sea buckthorn. While it is not a medical term itself, certain parts of some species of Hippophae, particularly Hippophae rhamnoides, have been used in traditional medicine in various cultures. The berries and leaves of this plant are rich in vitamins, antioxidants, and other bioactive compounds, and have been used to treat a variety of health conditions, including gastrointestinal disorders, skin diseases, and respiratory infections. However, it is important to note that the scientific evidence supporting these traditional uses is generally limited, and more research is needed to establish their safety and efficacy.

Polyadenylation is a post-transcriptional modification process in which a string of adenine (A) nucleotides, known as a poly(A) tail, is added to the 3' end of a newly transcribed eukaryotic mRNA molecule. This process is essential for the stability, export, and translation of the mRNA. The addition of the poly(A) tail is catalyzed by a complex containing several proteins and the enzyme poly(A) polymerase. The length of the poly(A) tail typically ranges from 50 to 250 nucleotides and can be shortened or lengthened in response to various cellular signals, which contributes to the regulation of gene expression.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Protein array analysis is a high-throughput technology used to detect and measure the presence and activity of specific proteins in biological samples. This technique utilizes arrays or chips containing various capture agents, such as antibodies or aptamers, that are designed to bind to specific target proteins. The sample is then added to the array, allowing the target proteins to bind to their corresponding capture agents. After washing away unbound materials, a detection system is used to identify and quantify the bound proteins. This method can be used for various applications, including protein-protein interaction studies, biomarker discovery, and drug development. The results of protein array analysis provide valuable information about the expression levels, post-translational modifications, and functional states of proteins in complex biological systems.

'Citrus sinensis' is the scientific name for the fruit species more commonly known as sweet oranges. These are popular fruits that belong to the Rutaceae family and have originated in Southeast Asia. Sweet oranges are widely cultivated and consumed all over the world, both fresh and as juice. They have a sweet taste and juicy pulp, enclosed in a thick and fragrant orange-colored peel. Some well-known varieties of 'Citrus sinensis' include Navel, Valencia, and Blood oranges.

A conserved sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to a pattern of nucleotides (in DNA or RNA) or amino acids (in proteins) that has remained relatively unchanged over evolutionary time. These sequences are often functionally important and are highly conserved across different species, indicating strong selection pressure against changes in these regions.

In the case of protein-coding genes, the corresponding amino acid sequence is deduced from the DNA sequence through the genetic code. Conserved sequences in proteins may indicate structurally or functionally important regions, such as active sites or binding sites, that are critical for the protein's activity. Similarly, conserved non-coding sequences in DNA may represent regulatory elements that control gene expression.

Identifying conserved sequences can be useful for inferring evolutionary relationships between species and for predicting the function of unknown genes or proteins.

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a type of nucleic acid that plays a crucial role in the process of gene expression. There are several types of RNA molecules, including messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). These RNA molecules help to transcribe DNA into mRNA, which is then translated into proteins by the ribosomes.

Fungi are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. Like other eukaryotes, fungi contain DNA and RNA as part of their genetic material. The RNA in fungi is similar to the RNA found in other organisms, including humans, and plays a role in gene expression and protein synthesis.

A specific medical definition of "RNA, fungal" does not exist, as RNA is a fundamental component of all living organisms, including fungi. However, RNA can be used as a target for antifungal drugs, as certain enzymes involved in RNA synthesis and processing are unique to fungi and can be inhibited by these drugs. For example, the antifungal drug flucytosine is converted into a toxic metabolite that inhibits fungal RNA and DNA synthesis.

A zebrafish is a freshwater fish species belonging to the family Cyprinidae and the genus Danio. Its name is derived from its distinctive striped pattern that resembles a zebra's. Zebrafish are often used as model organisms in scientific research, particularly in developmental biology, genetics, and toxicology studies. They have a high fecundity rate, transparent embryos, and a rapid development process, making them an ideal choice for researchers. However, it is important to note that providing a medical definition for zebrafish may not be entirely accurate or relevant since they are primarily used in biological research rather than clinical medicine.

"Cunninghamia" is a genus of evergreen trees that belong to the family Taxodiaceae. The term refers specifically to two species, Cunninghamia lanceolata (also known as Chinese fir or China-fir) and Cunninghamia konishii (also known as Konishi's fir). These trees are native to eastern and southeastern Asia, particularly in regions of China, Vietnam, and Laos.

Cunninghamia trees are characterized by their tall, straight trunks, with a height that can reach up to 50 meters or more, and their narrow, lanceolate-shaped leaves. They have a conical crown and produce small, round cones containing seeds. The wood of Cunninghamia trees is highly valued for its durability, strength, and resistance to decay, making it a popular choice for construction, furniture-making, and other woodworking applications.

It's worth noting that "Cunninghamia" is a taxonomic term used in the field of botany, specifically for this genus of trees. It does not have a direct medical definition or application, although like many plants, various parts of Cunninghamia trees have been used in traditional medicine in some cultures. However, it's important to note that the efficacy and safety of such remedies are not supported by modern scientific research and should be approached with caution.

"Pteridium" is the genus name for a group of ferns commonly known as bracken ferns. These ferns are found worldwide and are known for their hardy nature and ability to grow in a variety of environments. While "Pteridium" itself is not a medical term, extracts from some species of this fern have been used in traditional medicine in various cultures. However, it's important to note that these uses are not supported by modern scientific evidence and some parts of the plant contain carcinogens and can be toxic if ingested. Always consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new treatment or medication.

"Vitis" is a genus name and it refers to a group of flowering plants in the grape family, Vitaceae. This genus includes over 70 species of grapes that are native to the Northern Hemisphere, particularly in North America and Asia. The most commonly cultivated species is "Vitis vinifera," which is the source of most of the world's table and wine grapes.

Therefore, a medical definition of 'Vitis' may not be directly applicable as it is more commonly used in botany and agriculture rather than medicine. However, some compounds derived from Vitis species have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as resveratrol found in the skin of red grapes, which has been investigated for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cardioprotective effects.

A genome in the context of insects refers to the complete set of genetic material, including all of the DNA and RNA, that is present in the cells of an insect. The genome contains all of the genes that provide the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the insect. It also includes non-coding regions of DNA that may have regulatory functions or may be the result of historical processes.

The genome of an insect is typically divided into several chromosomes, which are structures in the cell's nucleus that contain long stretches of DNA. The number and appearance of these chromosomes can vary between different species of insects. For example, some insects may have a diploid number of two sets of chromosomes (one set from each parent), while others may have a haploid number of a single set of chromosomes.

The genome size of insects can also vary significantly, with some species having genomes that are only a few hundred million base pairs in length, while others have genomes that are several billion base pairs long. The genome sequence of an insect can provide valuable insights into its evolutionary history, as well as information about the genes and regulatory elements that are important for its biology and behavior.

A medical definition for "plant shoots" may not be readily available, as the term is primarily used in botany and horticulture. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Plant shoots refer to the above-ground portion of a plant, which typically includes structures like stems, leaves, flowers, and buds. Shoots originate from the seed or the growing tip of the plant and are responsible for photosynthesis, nutrient absorption, and reproduction. In some contexts, "plant shoots" might also refer to new growth that emerges from an existing plant, such as when a leaf or stem sprouts a new branch or flower.

Oxylipins are a class of bioactive lipid molecules derived from the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). They play crucial roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cellular signaling. Oxylipins can be further categorized based on their precursor PUFAs, such as arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and linoleic acid (LA). These oxylipins are involved in the regulation of vascular tone, platelet aggregation, neurotransmission, and pain perception. They exert their effects through various receptors and downstream signaling pathways, making them important targets for therapeutic interventions in several diseases, such as cardiovascular disorders, cancer, and neurological conditions.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Embryonic development is the series of growth and developmental stages that occur during the formation and early growth of the embryo. In humans, this stage begins at fertilization (when the sperm and egg cell combine) and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (now called a zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which then implants into the uterus. The cells in the blastocyst begin to differentiate and form the three germ layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These germ layers will eventually give rise to all of the different tissues and organs in the body.

Embryonic development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It is characterized by rapid cell division, migration, and differentiation, as well as programmed cell death (apoptosis) and tissue remodeling. Abnormalities in embryonic development can lead to birth defects or other developmental disorders.

It's important to note that the term "embryo" is used to describe the developing organism from fertilization until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy in humans, after which it is called a fetus.

Coniferophyta is a division of vascular plants that includes the conifers. It is an informal name and not commonly used in modern taxonomy, but it can still be found in some older textbooks and resources. The more widely accepted classification system places conifers within the gymnosperms, which are a group of seed-bearing plants characterized by the absence of fruits or flowers.

Conifers are a diverse group of woody plants that include trees and shrubs such as pines, firs, spruces, hemlocks, cedars, and redwoods. They are known for their cone-bearing seeds and needle-shaped leaves, which are often evergreen. Conifers are widely distributed throughout the world and play important ecological roles in many ecosystems, particularly in temperate and boreal forests.

In summary, while "Coniferophyta" is an outdated term for the division that includes conifers, it refers to a group of plants characterized by their cone-bearing seeds and needle-shaped leaves. Modern classification systems place conifers within the gymnosperms.

Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a molecular cytogenetic technique used to detect and measure changes in the DNA content of an individual's genome. It is a type of microarray-based analysis that compares the DNA of two samples, typically a test sample and a reference sample, to identify copy number variations (CNVs), including gains or losses of genetic material.

In CGH, the DNA from both samples is labeled with different fluorescent dyes, typically one sample with a green fluorophore and the other with a red fluorophore. The labeled DNAs are then co-hybridized to a microarray, which contains thousands of DNA probes representing specific genomic regions. The intensity of each spot on the array reflects the amount of DNA from each sample that has hybridized to the probe.

By comparing the ratio of green to red fluorescence intensities for each probe, CGH can detect gains or losses of genetic material in the test sample relative to the reference sample. A ratio of 1 indicates no difference in copy number between the two samples, while a ratio greater than 1 suggests a gain of genetic material, and a ratio less than 1 suggests a loss.

CGH is a powerful tool for detecting genomic imbalances associated with various genetic disorders, including cancer, developmental delay, intellectual disability, and congenital abnormalities. It can also be used to study the genomics of organisms in evolutionary biology and ecological studies.

A plant stem is not typically defined in a medical context, but rather in the field of botany. However, I can certainly provide a general biological definition for you.

In plants, stems are organs that serve primarily as support structures, holding leaves, flowers, and fruits aloft where they can receive sunlight and exchange gases. They also act as conduits, transporting water, nutrients, and sugars made during photosynthesis between the roots and shoots of a plant.

The stem is usually composed of three main tissue systems: dermal, vascular, and ground. The dermal tissue system forms the outermost layer(s) of the stem, providing protection and sometimes participating in gas exchange. The vascular tissue system contains the xylem (which transports water and nutrients upward) and phloem (which transports sugars and other organic compounds downward). The ground tissue system, located between the dermal and vascular tissues, is responsible for food storage and support.

While not a direct medical definition, understanding the structure and function of plant stems can be relevant in fields such as nutrition, agriculture, and environmental science, which have implications for human health.

"Pectinidae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in the field of biology, specifically a family of marine bivalve mollusks commonly known as scallops. The members of this family are characterized by their fan-shaped shells and their ability to swim by clapping their valves together. If you have any questions about a medical term, I would be happy to help with that instead.

'Medicago truncatula' is not a medical term, but a scientific name for a plant species. It is commonly known as barrel medic or yellow trefoil and is native to the Mediterranean region. It is a model organism in the field of plant genetics and molecular biology due to its small genome size and ease of transformation. While it does not have direct medical applications, studies on this plant can contribute to our understanding of fundamental biological processes and may have indirect implications for human health.

"Cold temperature" is a relative term and its definition can vary depending on the context. In general, it refers to temperatures that are lower than those normally experienced or preferred by humans and other warm-blooded animals. In a medical context, cold temperature is often defined as an environmental temperature that is below 16°C (60.8°F).

Exposure to cold temperatures can have various physiological effects on the human body, such as vasoconstriction of blood vessels near the skin surface, increased heart rate and metabolic rate, and shivering, which helps to generate heat and maintain body temperature. Prolonged exposure to extreme cold temperatures can lead to hypothermia, a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by a drop in core body temperature below 35°C (95°F).

It's worth noting that some people may have different sensitivities to cold temperatures due to factors such as age, health status, and certain medical conditions. For example, older adults, young children, and individuals with circulatory or neurological disorders may be more susceptible to the effects of cold temperatures.

Mitochondrial genes are a type of gene that is located in the DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) found in the mitochondria, which are small organelles present in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). Mitochondria are responsible for generating energy for the cell through a process called oxidative phosphorylation.

The human mitochondrial genome is a circular DNA molecule that contains 37 genes, including 13 genes that encode for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, 22 genes that encode for transfer RNAs (tRNAs), and 2 genes that encode for ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Mutations in mitochondrial genes can lead to a variety of inherited mitochondrial disorders, which can affect any organ system in the body and can present at any age.

Mitochondrial DNA is maternally inherited, meaning that it is passed down from the mother to her offspring through the egg cell. This is because during fertilization, only the sperm's nucleus enters the egg, while the mitochondria remain outside. As a result, all of an individual's mitochondrial DNA comes from their mother.

"Raphanus" is the genus name for a group of plants that include the common radish. The black radish (*Raphanus sativus* var. *niger*) and the white radish (also known as daikon or *Raphanus sativus* var. *longipinnatus*) are examples of species within this genus. These plants belong to the family Brassicaceae, which also includes vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, and kale. The roots, leaves, and seeds of Raphanus plants have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, including as a digestive aid and to treat respiratory conditions. However, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before using these plants or their extracts for medicinal purposes, as they can interact with certain medications and may cause side effects.

"Hevea" is the genus name for the rubber tree, specifically *Hevea brasiliensis*, which is the primary source of natural rubber. The sap from this tree, known as latex, is collected and processed to produce raw rubber. This material can then be used in a wide variety of applications, including medical devices, tires, and various other products.

It's worth noting that some people may have allergic reactions to proteins found in natural rubber latex, which can cause symptoms ranging from mild skin irritation to severe respiratory problems. As such, it's important for healthcare providers and others who work with medical equipment to be aware of the potential risks associated with Hevea-derived products.

Intergenic DNA refers to the stretches of DNA that are located between genes. These regions do not contain coding sequences for proteins or RNA and thus were once thought to be "junk" DNA with no function. However, recent research has shown that intergenic DNA can play important roles in the regulation of gene expression, chromosome structure and stability, and other cellular processes. Intergenic DNA may contain various types of regulatory elements such as enhancers, silencers, insulators, and promoters that control the transcription of nearby genes. Additionally, intergenic DNA can also include repetitive sequences, transposable elements, and other non-coding RNAs that have diverse functions in the cell.

Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) are regions of the genome that are associated with variation in quantitative traits, which are traits that vary continuously in a population and are influenced by multiple genes and environmental factors. QTLs can help to explain how genetic variations contribute to differences in complex traits such as height, blood pressure, or disease susceptibility.

Quantitative trait loci are identified through statistical analysis of genetic markers and trait values in experimental crosses between genetically distinct individuals, such as strains of mice or plants. The location of a QTL is inferred based on the pattern of linkage disequilibrium between genetic markers and the trait of interest. Once a QTL has been identified, further analysis can be conducted to identify the specific gene or genes responsible for the variation in the trait.

It's important to note that QTLs are not themselves genes, but rather genomic regions that contain one or more genes that contribute to the variation in a quantitative trait. Additionally, because QTLs are identified through statistical analysis, they represent probabilistic estimates of the location of genetic factors influencing a trait and may encompass large genomic regions containing multiple genes. Therefore, additional research is often required to fine-map and identify the specific genes responsible for the variation in the trait.

"Pseudotsuga" is not a medical term. It is a genus of coniferous trees in the family Pinaceae, commonly known as Douglas firs or Douglas trees. They are native to western North America and eastern Asia. The most widely known species is Pseudotsuga menziesii, which is often simply called the Douglas fir. These trees have important economic value for timber and pulp production.

"Pycnoporus" is a genus of fungi in the family Polyporaceae. It is commonly known as the "red-belted conk" or "gilled polypore." This fungus is characterized by its tough, woody, shelf-like fruiting bodies that are typically bracket-shaped and grow on dead or dying trees. The upper surface of the cap is dry and has a reddish-brown to orange color, often with a well-defined red band around the margin. The pores on the underside of the cap are round and produce white spores.

Pycnoporus species are known for their ability to break down lignin and cellulose, making them important decomposers in forest ecosystems. They have also been studied for their potential medicinal properties, including their antioxidant, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, it is important to note that the use of Pycnoporus or any other fungi as a medical treatment should be done under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

Host-parasite interactions refer to the relationship between a parasitic organism (the parasite) and its host, which can be an animal, plant, or human body. The parasite lives on or inside the host and derives nutrients from it, often causing harm in the process. This interaction can range from relatively benign to severe, depending on various factors such as the species of the parasite, the immune response of the host, and the duration of infection.

The host-parasite relationship is often categorized based on the degree of harm caused to the host. Parasites that cause little to no harm are called commensals, while those that cause significant damage or disease are called parasitic pathogens. Some parasites can even manipulate their hosts' behavior and physiology to enhance their own survival and reproduction, leading to complex interactions between the two organisms.

Understanding host-parasite interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat parasitic infections, as well as for understanding the ecological relationships between different species in natural ecosystems.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Ethylenes" is not a medical term or a medical condition. Ethylene is actually a colorless gas with a sweet and musky odor, which belongs to the class of hydrocarbons called alkenes. It is used widely in industry, including the production of polyethylene, antifreeze, and other chemicals.

However, if you meant something else or need information on a specific medical topic related to ethylene or its derivatives, please provide more context or clarify your question, and I would be happy to help.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Bambusa" is not a medical term. It is actually the name of a genus of tropical grasses known as bamboos, which are native to Asia and other parts of the world. The plants in this genus are characterized by their woody stems, which can grow very tall and strong, and are often used for various purposes such as construction materials, food, and ornamental plants.

If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help you with those instead!

Dinoflagellida is a large group of mostly marine planktonic protists, many of which are bioluminescent. Some dinoflagellates are responsible for harmful algal blooms (HABs), also known as "red tides," which can produce toxins that affect marine life and human health.

Dinoflagellates are characterized by two flagella, or whip-like structures, that they use for movement. They have complex cell structures, including a unique structure called the nucleomorph, which is the remnant of a former endosymbiotic event where another eukaryotic cell was engulfed and became part of the dinoflagellate's cell.

Dinoflagellates are important contributors to the marine food chain, serving as both primary producers and consumers. Some species form symbiotic relationships with other marine organisms, such as corals, providing them with nutrients in exchange for protection and other benefits.

Systems Biology is a multidisciplinary approach to studying biological systems that involves the integration of various scientific disciplines such as biology, mathematics, physics, computer science, and engineering. It aims to understand how biological components, including genes, proteins, metabolites, cells, and organs, interact with each other within the context of the whole system. This approach emphasizes the emergent properties of biological systems that cannot be explained by studying individual components alone. Systems biology often involves the use of computational models to simulate and predict the behavior of complex biological systems and to design experiments for testing hypotheses about their functioning. The ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of how biological systems function, with applications in fields such as medicine, agriculture, and bioengineering.

Pollen, in a medical context, refers to the fine powder-like substance produced by the male reproductive organ of seed plants. It contains microscopic grains known as pollen grains, which are transported by various means such as wind, water, or insects to the female reproductive organ of the same or another plant species for fertilization.

Pollen can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, particularly during the spring and summer months when plants release large amounts of pollen into the air. These allergies, also known as hay fever or seasonal allergic rhinitis, can result in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, congestion, itchy eyes, and coughing.

It is important to note that while all pollen has the potential to cause allergic reactions, certain types of plants, such as ragweed, grasses, and trees, are more likely to trigger symptoms in sensitive individuals.

In the context of medical definitions, 'carbon' is not typically used as a standalone term. Carbon is an element with the symbol C and atomic number 6, which is naturally abundant in the human body and the environment. It is a crucial component of all living organisms, forming the basis of organic compounds, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).

Carbon forms strong covalent bonds with various elements, allowing for the creation of complex molecules that are essential to life. In this sense, carbon is a fundamental building block of life on Earth. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as an isolated term.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Photosynthesis is not strictly a medical term, but it is a fundamental biological process with significant implications for medicine, particularly in understanding energy production in cells and the role of oxygen in sustaining life. Here's a general biological definition:

Photosynthesis is a process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert light energy, usually from the sun, into chemical energy in the form of organic compounds, such as glucose (or sugar), using water and carbon dioxide. This process primarily takes place in the chloroplasts of plant cells, specifically in structures called thylakoids. The overall reaction can be summarized as:

6 CO2 + 6 H2O + light energy → C6H12O6 + 6 O2

In this equation, carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) are the reactants, while glucose (C6H12O6) and oxygen (O2) are the products. Photosynthesis has two main stages: the light-dependent reactions and the light-independent reactions (Calvin cycle). The light-dependent reactions occur in the thylakoid membrane and involve the conversion of light energy into ATP and NADPH, which are used to power the Calvin cycle. The Calvin cycle takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts and involves the synthesis of glucose from CO2 and water using the ATP and NADPH generated during the light-dependent reactions.

Understanding photosynthesis is crucial for understanding various biological processes, including cellular respiration, plant metabolism, and the global carbon cycle. Additionally, research into artificial photosynthesis has potential applications in renewable energy production and environmental remediation.

Xylem is a term used in the field of botany and plant anatomy, but I understand you're asking for a medical definition. In human anatomy, there isn't a direct structure equivalent to xylem. However, I can provide the general definition of xylem from its botanical context:

Xylem is one of the two types of vascular tissues in plants (the other being phloem). It is responsible for transporting water and dissolved nutrients from the roots to various parts of the plant, including stems, leaves, and flowers. Xylem consists of several types of cells, including vessels, tracheids, xylem fibers, and xylem parenchyma. The transportation in xylem occurs due to the cohesion-tension mechanism, where water is pulled up through the plant via transpiration pull.

Cyclopentanes are a class of hydrocarbons that contain a cycloalkane ring of five carbon atoms. The chemical formula for cyclopentane is C5H10. It is a volatile, flammable liquid that is used as a solvent and in the production of polymers. Cyclopentanes are also found naturally in petroleum and coal tar.

Cyclopentanes have a unique structure in which the carbon atoms are arranged in a pentagonal shape, with each carbon atom bonded to two other carbon atoms and one or two hydrogen atoms. This structure gives cyclopentane its characteristic "bowl-shaped" geometry, which allows it to undergo various chemical reactions, such as ring-opening reactions, that can lead to the formation of other chemicals.

Cyclopentanes have a variety of industrial and commercial applications. For example, they are used in the production of plastics, resins, and synthetic rubbers. They also have potential uses in the development of new drugs and medical technologies, as their unique structure and reactivity make them useful building blocks for the synthesis of complex molecules.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lignin" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of biology and chemistry, particularly in botany and wood science. Lignin is a complex organic polymer that binds cellulose fibers together, providing strength and rigidity to the cell walls of plants. It is a major component of wood and bark.

If you have any medical terms you would like defined or any other questions, please let me know!

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

Arthropods are a phylum of animals that includes insects, spiders, crustaceans, and other creatures with jointed appendages. Arthropod proteins, therefore, refer to the proteins that are found in these organisms. These proteins play various roles in the structure, function, and regulation of arthropod cells, tissues, and organs.

Arthropod proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions, such as structural proteins, enzymes, signaling proteins, and defense proteins. Structural proteins provide support and protection to the arthropod exoskeleton, which is composed mainly of chitin and proteins. Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in arthropod metabolism, while signaling proteins regulate various physiological processes, including growth, development, and reproduction. Defense proteins protect arthropods from pathogens, parasites, and environmental stressors.

Arthropod proteins have attracted significant interest in biomedical research due to their potential applications in drug discovery, vaccine development, and diagnostic tools. For example, some arthropod proteins have been identified as promising targets for the development of new insecticides and antiparasitic drugs. Additionally, arthropod-derived proteins have been used in the production of recombinant vaccines against infectious diseases such as Lyme disease and malaria.

Understanding the structure and function of arthropod proteins is essential for advancing our knowledge of arthropod biology, evolution, and ecology. It also has important implications for human health, agriculture, and environmental conservation.

Gills are specialized respiratory organs found in many aquatic organisms such as fish, crustaceans, and some mollusks. They are typically thin, feathery structures that increase the surface area for gas exchange between the water and the animal's bloodstream. Gills extract oxygen from water while simultaneously expelling carbon dioxide.

In fish, gills are located in the gill chamber, which is covered by opercula or protective bony flaps. Water enters through the mouth, flows over the gills, and exits through the opercular openings. The movement of water over the gills allows for the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the gill filaments and lamellae, which are the thin plates where gas exchange occurs.

Gills contain a rich supply of blood vessels, allowing for efficient transport of oxygen to the body's tissues and removal of carbon dioxide. The counter-current flow of water and blood in the gills ensures that the concentration gradient between the water and the blood is maximized, enhancing the efficiency of gas exchange.

Ammonium compounds are chemical substances that contain the ammonium ion (NH4+). The ammonium ion is formed when ammonia (NH3) reacts with a hydrogen ion (H+) to form a bond. Ammonium compounds can be found in a variety of forms, including salts, acids, and bases.

In medicine, ammonium compounds may be used for various purposes. For example, ammonium chloride is sometimes used as a expectorant to help loosen mucus in the airways, while ammonium bicarbonate is used as a systemic alkalizer to treat metabolic acidosis.

However, it's important to note that some ammonium compounds can be toxic in high concentrations. For instance, exposure to high levels of ammonia gas (NH3) can cause respiratory irritation and damage to the lungs. Similarly, ingesting large amounts of ammonium chloride can lead to stomach upset, vomiting, and potentially life-threatening electrolyte imbalances.

Therefore, it's essential to use ammonium compounds only under the guidance of a healthcare professional and to follow recommended dosages carefully to avoid adverse effects.

The Heat-Shock Response is a complex and highly conserved stress response mechanism present in virtually all living organisms. It is activated when the cell encounters elevated temperatures or other forms of proteotoxic stress, such as exposure to toxins, radiation, or infectious agents. This response is primarily mediated by a group of proteins known as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) or chaperones, which play crucial roles in protein folding, assembly, transport, and degradation.

The primary function of the Heat-Shock Response is to protect the cell from damage caused by misfolded or aggregated proteins that can accumulate under stress conditions. The activation of this response leads to the rapid transcription and translation of HSP genes, resulting in a significant increase in the intracellular levels of these chaperone proteins. These chaperones then assist in the refolding of denatured proteins or target damaged proteins for degradation via the proteasome or autophagy pathways.

The Heat-Shock Response is critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis and ensuring proper protein function under stress conditions. Dysregulation of this response has been implicated in various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.

In the context of medicine and biology, cambium is not a term that is commonly used. However, in botany, cambium refers to a thin layer of cells found between the bark and the wood of a tree or shrub. This tissue is responsible for the growth of the stem by producing new cells that become part of the wood (xylem) or the inner bark (phloem).

The vascular cambium is a meristematic tissue, which means it contains undifferentiated cells that can divide and differentiate into specialized cell types. In addition to the vascular cambium, there is also a cork cambium or phellogen, which produces the outermost layers of the bark.

While not a medical term per se, an understanding of cambium is important in fields such as dendrology (the study of trees) and plant physiology, which have applications in medicine and health.

Salt tolerance, in a medical context, refers to the body's ability to maintain normal physiological functions despite high levels of salt (sodium chloride) in the system. While our kidneys usually regulate sodium levels, certain medical conditions such as some forms of kidney disease or heart failure can impair this process, leading to an accumulation of sodium in the body. Some individuals may have a genetic predisposition to better handle higher salt intakes, but generally, a high-salt diet is discouraged due to risks of hypertension and other health issues for most people.

Planarians are not a medical term, but rather a type of flatworms that belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are known for their ability to regenerate and reproduce asexually. Planarians are often studied in the fields of biology and regenerative medicine due to their unique capacity to regrow lost body parts. However, some planarian species can also be parasitic and infect humans, causing diseases such as intestinal schistosomiasis or cercarial dermatitis. Therefore, while planarians themselves are not a medical term, they have relevance to certain medical fields.

DNA shuffling, also known as homologous recombination or genetic recombination, is a process that occurs naturally in nature and involves the exchange of genetic material between two similar or identical strands of DNA. This process can also be performed artificially in a laboratory setting to create new combinations of genes or to improve existing ones through a technique called molecular breeding or directed evolution.

In DNA shuffling, the DNA molecules are cut into smaller pieces using enzymes called restriction endonucleases. The resulting fragments are then mixed together and allowed to reassemble randomly through the action of enzymes such as ligase, which seals the broken ends of the DNA strands together. This process can result in the creation of new combinations of genes that did not exist before, or the improvement of existing ones through the selection of advantageous mutations.

DNA shuffling is a powerful tool in biotechnology and has been used to create new enzymes with improved properties, such as increased stability, specificity, and activity. It has also been used to develop new vaccines, diagnostic tests, and other medical applications.

Estivation is a term used in biology and medicine to refer to a period of reduced metabolic activity and dormancy that some animals exhibit during periods of hot and dry weather, similar to hibernation but adapted to warm conditions. It is most commonly seen in certain species of reptiles, amphibians, insects, and other invertebrates.

During estivation, the animal seeks out a sheltered location and reduces its activity levels, body temperature, and metabolic rate to conserve energy and water. It may also produce specialized protective structures, such as mucus-covered shells or cocoons, to prevent dehydration and protect against predators.

Estivation can last for several weeks or months, depending on the species and environmental conditions. In some cases, estivation may be triggered by changes in temperature, humidity, food availability, or other factors. The specific physiological mechanisms that underlie estivation are not fully understood, but they likely involve complex interactions between the nervous system, endocrine system, and other regulatory pathways.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "hepatopancreas" is not a recognized term in human anatomy or pathology. It is commonly used to describe a combined exocrine organ in some invertebrates, like crustaceans, where it serves both digestive and metabolic functions. If you have any questions about human medical conditions, I'd be happy to help with those!

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene function that occur without a change in the underlying DNA sequence. These changes can be caused by various mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA molecules. Epigenetic changes can be influenced by various factors including age, environment, lifestyle, and disease state.

Genetic epigenesis specifically refers to the study of how genetic factors influence these epigenetic modifications. Genetic variations between individuals can lead to differences in epigenetic patterns, which in turn can contribute to phenotypic variation and susceptibility to diseases. For example, certain genetic variants may predispose an individual to develop cancer, and environmental factors such as smoking or exposure to chemicals can interact with these genetic variants to trigger epigenetic changes that promote tumor growth.

Overall, the field of genetic epigenesis aims to understand how genetic and environmental factors interact to regulate gene expression and contribute to disease susceptibility.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sorghum" is not a medical term. It is actually the name of a genus of various grasses, one species of which is cultivated as a cereal crop. Sorghum is primarily used for food, animal feed, and the production of biofuel. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

3' Untranslated Regions (3' UTRs) are segments of messenger RNA (mRNA) that do not code for proteins. They are located after the last exon, which contains the coding sequence for a protein, and before the poly-A tail in eukaryotic mRNAs.

The 3' UTR plays several important roles in regulating gene expression, including:

1. Stability of mRNA: The 3' UTR contains sequences that can bind to proteins that either stabilize or destabilize the mRNA, thereby controlling its half-life and abundance.
2. Localization of mRNA: Some 3' UTRs contain sequences that direct the localization of the mRNA to specific cellular compartments, such as the synapse in neurons.
3. Translation efficiency: The 3' UTR can also contain regulatory elements that affect the translation efficiency of the mRNA into protein. For example, microRNAs (miRNAs) can bind to complementary sequences in the 3' UTR and inhibit translation or promote degradation of the mRNA.
4. Alternative polyadenylation: The 3' UTR can also contain multiple alternative polyadenylation sites, which can lead to different lengths of the 3' UTR and affect gene expression.

Overall, the 3' UTR plays a critical role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, and mutations or variations in the 3' UTR can contribute to human diseases.

There are several -ome fields that can be seen as subcategories of the transcriptome. The exome differs from the transcriptome ... One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative (23 October 2019). "One thousand plant transcriptomes and the phylogenomics of ... There are numerous publicly available transcriptome databases. The word transcriptome is a portmanteau of the words transcript ... The transcriptome can be seen as a subset of the proteome, that is, the entire set of proteins expressed by a genome. However, ...
... a phenomenon referred to as transcriptome instability. Transcriptome instability correlates significantly with reduced ... Transcriptome instability is a genome-wide, pre-mRNA splicing-related characteristic of certain cancers. In general, pre-mRNA ... Sveen, A; Ågesen, TH; Nesbakken, A; Rognum, TO; Lothe, RA; Skotheim, RI (2011). "Transcriptome instability in colorectal cancer ... Sveen, A; Johannessen, B; Teixeira, MR; Lothe, RA; Skotheim, RI (2014). "Transcriptome instability as a molecular pan-cancer ...
... (DTS) is a bioinformatics method to detect the presence of novel pathogen transcripts through ... Feng H, Taylor JL, Benos PV, Newton R, Waddell K, Lucas SB, Chang Y, Moore PS (August 2007). "Human Transcriptome Subtraction ... Must have a highly reliable, complete reference transcriptome for the organism being studied. Lack of foreign sequence ... "New Pathogen Discovery: Digital Transcriptome Subtraction". Archived from the original on 25 January 2010. Retrieved 1 March ...
... is the de novo sequence assembly method of creating a transcriptome without the aid of a ... 2011). "Reptilian transcriptome v1.0, a glimpse in the brain transcriptome of five divergent Sauropsida lineages and the ... Transcriptome Transcriptomics Human-transcriptome database for alternative splicing (H-DBAS) UniGene Full-parasites Exome ... Prior to the development of transcriptome assembly computer programs, transcriptome data were analyzed primarily by mapping on ...
The transcriptome was first investigated in the 1990s in an experiment performed to identify a partial transcriptome of the ... A transcriptome is the sum of all RNA transcripts that are present in a given cell, tissue, or organ within an organism. ... Transcriptomes include both mRNA, which functions as an intermediate to the central dogma; as well as noncoding RNAs that may ... Transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) is a genetic methodology that can be used to compare the genetic components of gene ...
The transcriptome is a set of all RNA, including rRNA, mRNA, tRNA, and non-coding RNA. Specifically mRNA transcripts can be ... A transcriptome in vivo analysis tag (TIVA tag) is a multifunctional, photoactivatable mRNA-capture molecule designed for ... February 2014). "Transcriptome in vivo analysis (TIVA) of spatially defined single cells in live tissue". Nat. Methods. 11 (2 ... Transcriptome profiling is determining the composition of transcripts and their relative expression levels in a given reference ...
The Human-transcriptome DataBase for Alternative Splicing (H-DBAS) is a database of alternatively spliced human transcripts ...
Transcriptome analysis. Epigenome analysis. Oral Microbiome analysis. 2013 Recruitment of TMM Community-Based Cohort starts. ... As of 2022, jMorp covers metabolome, proteome, transcriptome, methylome, as well as genome reference panel. 2016 Recruitment of ... "Intraindividual dynamics of transcriptome and genome-wide stability of DNA methylation". Scientific Reports. 6: 26424. Bibcode: ...
Other than transcriptome shotgun sequencing, this technique has been called RNA-seq and whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing ... One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative (October 2019). "One thousand plant transcriptomes and the phylogenomics of green ... Since only the transcriptome was sequenced, the project did not reveal information about gene regulatory sequence, non-coding ... The 1000 Plant Transcriptomes Initiative (1KP) was an international research effort to establish the most detailed catalogue of ...
The control Transcriptomes users are able to use them as an avatar, such as Camael. Usually, Quanxs are born naturally, but ... They're Transcriptome. He appeared as a character of Denma with NAVER WEBTOON. He appeared as a hero in Densinma with NAVER ... The object Quanx Transcriptome is one of the most fiercely competed secret project done by the universe eight munitions ... She's Yahwah's Transcriptome. Arcel (Korean: 아셀; RR: Asel): He's first appeared in Chapter 1 Ep. 4 - Eve Rachel (2) - #14. He ...
"Illumina bodyMap2 transcriptome". NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) BioProject. Szabo L, Morey R, Palpant NJ ... April 2004). "A gene atlas of the mouse and human protein-encoding transcriptomes". Proceedings of the National Academy of ...
Hrdlickova R, Toloue M, Tian B (2017 January). "RNA-Seq methods for transcriptome analysis". Wiley Online Library. 8(1). ... Cieślik M, Chinnaiyan AM (2018 February). "Cancer transcriptome profiling at the juncture of clinical translation". Nature ... Martin JA, Wang Z (2011 September). "Next-generation transcriptome assembly". Nature Reviews Genetics. 12(10):671-82. 10.1038/ ... "Single-cell sequencing of the small-RNA transcriptome". Nature Biotechnology. 34(12):1264-1266. 10.1038/nbt.3701. PMID 27798564 ...
Deciphering the Cancer Transcriptome. 2016 Vega F, Medeiros LJ (September 2003). "Chromosomal translocations involved in non- ... March 2009). "Transcriptome sequencing to detect gene fusions in cancer". Nature. 458 (7234): 97-101. Bibcode:2009Natur.458... ... However, the precondition for large scale detection is a paired-end sequencing of the cell's transcriptome. The direction of ... Some researchers already developed a new tool called Transcriptome Viewer (TViewer) to directly visualize detected gene fusions ...
Richard A. Stein (2020-06-23). "Deciphering the Cancer Transcriptome". Retrieved 2022-06-23. Root Gorelick (2010-11-20). "Sex ...
Goh SH, Josleyn M, Lee YT, Danner RL, Gherman RB, Cam MC, Miller JL (July 2007). "The human reticulocyte transcriptome". ...
Extension Poly(A) Test GeneCalling, an mRNA profiling technology Missense mRNA mRNA display mRNA surveillance Transcriptome, ... "The human mitochondrial transcriptome". Cell. 146 (4): 645-658. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2011.06.051. PMC 3160626. PMID 21854988. ...
Multicellgenome, Lab; Guifré, Torruella (2017-09-26). "Transcriptome - Parvularia atlantis (Nuclearia sp. ATCC 50694)". ...
Human Genome Project In silico Transcriptome Genesis Partners List of Israeli companies quoted on the Nasdaq Compugen 2016 ... Xie, Hanqing; Gill-More, Raveh (2004). "Transcriptome Analysis Through Expressed Sequences". In Seckbach, Joseph; Rubin, Eitan ...
A transcriptome sequence is determined. Paramecium bursaria with green zoochlorellae living inside endosymbiotically A ...
Single-cell transcriptomes are now well described and have even been extended to in situ RNA-Seq where transcriptomes of ... Transcriptome databases getting bigger and more useful as transcriptomes continue to be collected and shared by researchers. It ... Aging has been shown to be a strong driver of transcriptome changes. Aging clocks based on transcriptomes have suffered from ... RNA-Seq leverages deep sampling of the transcriptome with many short fragments from a transcriptome to allow computational ...
Spellman and Rubin (2002) made a transcriptome map of Drosophila. Of all assayed genes 20% was clustered. Clusters consisted of ... Yamashita T, Honda M, Takatori H, Nishino R, Hoshino N, Kaneko S (November 2004). "Genome-wide transcriptome mapping analysis ... 2001) made a human transcriptome map of 12 different tissues (cancer cells) and concluded that genes are not randomly ... September 2003). "The human transcriptome map reveals extremes in gene density, intron length, GC content, and repeat pattern ...
Kocabas, A. M., Crosby, J., Ross, P. J., Otu, H. H., Beyhan, Z., Can, H., ... & Fernandez, E. (2006). The transcriptome of ...
These studies led Velculescu to coin the term transcriptome in a 1997 paper to describe the comprehensive gene expression ... "Characterization of the yeast transcriptome". Cell. 88 (2): 243-51. doi:10.1016/s0092-8674(00)81845-0. PMID 9008165. S2CID ...
Mutations in the insect transcriptome. J Clin Exp Pathol. 2016; 6: 3. 13. Picimbon JF. A new view of genetic mutations. ... Transcriptome exploration of the sex pheromone gland of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae). Parasit ... Zhu J, Wang G, Pelosi P. Plant transcriptomes reveal hidden guests. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2016; 474: 497-502. 27. Perkin ...
Antennal transcriptome of Manduca sexta. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108, ...
"The transcriptome of human oocytes". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 103 (38 ... "The transcriptome of human oocytes". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 103 (38 ...
"Transcriptome and epigenome of EBV". University of Pennsylvania. Archived from the original on 18 January 2019. Media related ... August 2012). "An atlas of the Epstein-Barr virus transcriptome and epigenome reveals host-virus regulatory interactions". Cell ...
Casella G, Munk R, Kim KM, Piao Y, De S, Abdelmohsen K, Gorospe M (August 2019). "Transcriptome signature of cellular ...
"Transcriptome analysis of human gastric cancer". Mammalian Genome. 16 (12): 942-54. doi:10.1007/s00335-005-0075-2. PMID ...
"Transcriptome analysis of human gastric cancer". Mammalian Genome. 16 (12): 942-54. doi:10.1007/s00335-005-0075-2. PMID ...
There are several -ome fields that can be seen as subcategories of the transcriptome. The exome differs from the transcriptome ... One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative (23 October 2019). "One thousand plant transcriptomes and the phylogenomics of ... There are numerous publicly available transcriptome databases. The word transcriptome is a portmanteau of the words transcript ... The transcriptome can be seen as a subset of the proteome, that is, the entire set of proteins expressed by a genome. However, ...
A transcriptome is a collection of all the gene readouts present in a cell. ... How transcriptomes be used to explore gene function? The function of most genes is not yet known. A search of a transcriptome ... How transcriptomes be used to explore gene function?. The function of most genes is not yet known. A search of a transcriptome ... What can a transcriptome tell us? An RNA sequence mirrors the sequence of the DNA from which it was transcribed. Consequently, ...
Our process includes high-throughput spatial transcriptome profiling followed by spatial gene and pathway analyses. We first ... An effective and high-throughput technology spatially profiles the whole transcriptome of intact plant tissues from Arabidopsis ... demonstrate the feasibility of the technique by generating spatial transcriptome profiles from model angiosperms and ... Spatially resolved transcriptome profiling in model plant species. *Stefania Giacomello. ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-0738-15741, ...
"The transcriptome provides a functional readout in which one can visualize the status of the material to a higher degree ... The Human Cell Atlas relies, to a great extent, on the use of transcriptome sequencing to profile the gene expression of ... This approach links a biophysical measurement with the transcriptome to capture a level of insight that one might not be able ... "This is one of the platforms designed to survey the transcriptome more robustly," he explained. His team also performed a ...
QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome Kits. QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome Kits. For high-throughput 3 transcriptome analysis from up to 10 ... QIAGENs Sample to Insight QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome Workflow.. Principle. QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome Kits enable Sample to ... Innovative and Optimized QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome Kit Workflow.. QIAGENs Sample to Insight QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome ... Transcriptome Kit Workflow" and " QIAGENs Sample to Insight QIAseq UPX 3 Transcriptome Workflow"). ...
In this study, we established RAINBOW-seq and profiled the transcriptome of Escherichia coli biofilm communities with high ... a) Workflow to test the impact of FDAAs on E. coli transcriptome. (b) Comparison of transcriptomes when treated with control ( ... coli transcriptome. (d) Agreement between control (non-sorting) and sorting group, shown is the consistency of transcriptomes ... Spatial transcriptome uncovers rich coordination of metabolism in E. coli K12 biofilm. *Tianmin Wang ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002 ...
Title: NCGAS Makes Robust Transcriptome Assembly Even Easier with Added Features to an Accessible de novo Transcriptome ...
... Cell Rep. 2022 Jul 5;40(1):111008. ... We demonstrate the effect of diet and feeding rhythms on the ileal microbiome composition and transcriptome in mice. The ... TRF partially restores diurnal rhythms of the ileal microbiome and transcriptome, increases GLP-1 release, and alters the ileal ... Finally, we provide a web resource for exploration of ileal microbiome and transcriptome circadian data. ...
Although cell isolation methods such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) in combination with transcriptome analysis ... Cell type-specific transcriptome analysis is an essential tool for understanding biological processes in which diverse types of ... SLAM-ITseq: sequencing cell type-specific transcriptomes without cell sorting Development. 2018 Jul 11;145(13):dev164640. doi: ... Cell type-specific transcriptome analysis is an essential tool for understanding biological processes in which diverse types of ...
An altered transcriptome underlies cln5-deficiency phenotypes in Dictyostelium discoideum. William D. Kim1 Robert J. Huber1,2* ... Together, this study examines the impact of cln5-deficiency on the D. discoideum transcriptome and provides further insight ... Citation: Kim WD and Huber RJ (2022) An altered transcriptome underlies cln5-deficiency phenotypes in Dictyostelium discoideum ...
By characterizing the transcriptome patterns and pathways for these symptoms, our goal is to shed light on the biological ... Longitudinal Genome-wide Transcriptome Study of PTSD Symptom Change in WTC Responders. ...
RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq)-based transcriptome analysis and various bioinformatics tools have also been used to study non-model ... RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq)-based transcriptome analysis and various bioinformatics tools have also been used to study non-model ... Transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool that enables a deep understanding of complicated physiological pathways, including ... Transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool that enables a deep understanding of complicated physiological pathways, including ...
Total RNA Sequencing Prep kits from Lexogen enable easy and cost-efficient library generation for transcriptome analysis. Learn ... Whole transcriptome sequencing kits: CORALL. The CORALL™ Total RNA-Seq V2 Library Prep kits from Lexogen enables easy and cost- ... efficient generation of UMI labelled, stranded libraries for whole transcriptome analysis using Illumina® next generation ...
220315_GeoMx Cancer Transcriptome AtlasMK2229Jカタログ is a part of NanoStrings extensive resource library. ...
transcriptomegenesnematostellaComputational BiologyBioinformaticsMarine BiologyDevelopmental BiologyEvolutionary Biology ... The gene models, transcripts and other derived data were generated from a comprehensive transcriptome survey of samples taken ...
The floral transcriptome of Eucalyptus grandis. The floral transcriptome of ,i,Eucalyptus grandis,/i,. Title. The floral ...
Liu K, Wan P, Huang Y, Wang B, Wang X, Zhang R and Guo L: Transcriptome analysis in an AEG‑1‑deficient neuronal HT22 cell line ... Transcriptome analysis in an AEG‑1‑deficient neuronal HT22 cell line. *Authors: *Kunmei Liu ... Liu, K., Wan, P., Huang, Y., Wang, B., Wang, X., Zhang, R., Guo, L.Transcriptome analysis in an AEG‑1‑deficient neuronal HT22 ... Liu, K., Wan, P., Huang, Y., Wang, B., Wang, X., Zhang, R., Guo, L.Transcriptome analysis in an AEG‑1‑deficient neuronal HT22 ...
While researchers commonly study the transcriptome of single cells, transcriptome data does not fully correlate to cellular ... Connecting the Transcriptome to the Functional Proteome of Single Cells Using a Novel Platform. Rui Zheng and Patrick ...
The transcriptome analyses performed in this study of carboxydotrophic growth of A. fulgidus have revealed a number of new ... We performed whole genome transcriptome microarray analyses of A. fulgidus cultivated on CO with sulfate or thiosulfate and on ... RNA Extraction and Transcriptome Analyses. The cultures were cooled and fixed at a predetermined absorbance corresponding to ... By the use of transcriptome profiling, this study identifies enzymes and redox components in A. fulgidus that are putatively ...
1213 Linking mTRAF6-transcriptome To IL-17-&-osteotropic Cytokines Signal Interactions In DDOC-associated Osteoclastogenesis ... via mTRAF6 transcriptome machinery for OCp or/and DDOC-associated activities. We will apply the novel information to address ... signaling downstream that activates TRAF6 transcriptome and thus induces the osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Method: A 1.1 kb ... IL-17 also mediates inhibitory responses in mTRAF6 transcriptome during cytokine interactions; iii) there are 3 or 4 ...
Searching News Database: MI Transcriptome HSMN NewsFeed - 21 Sep 2021. Dr. Milan Radovich, Ph.D., Joins Caris Life Sciences as ... Caris Life Sciences Receives FDA Breakthrough Device Designation for MI Transcriptome(TM) Companion Diagnostic Test. ...
Minimally Invasive Skin Transcriptome Extraction Using a Dermal Biomarker Patch.. Ibrahim SF, Taft BJ, Wang Y, Lee B-I, Andrade ...
De novo transcriptome assemblers are an important family of transcriptome assemblers. Such assemblers reconstruct the ... The transcriptome gives a biologist a snapshot of the cells state, and can help them track the progression of disease, etc. ... The set of mRNA sequences found in a cell is known as its transcriptome, and it differs between tissues and with time. ... Some modern methods of transcriptome sequencing give only short reads of the mRNA, up to 100 nucleotides. In order to ...
Use of the Affymetrix Human GeneChip array and genomic DNA hybridisation probe selection to study ovine transcriptomes - Volume ... De novo assembly and characterization of the skeletal muscle transcriptome of sheep using Illumina paired-end sequencing. ... Analysis of Differential Gene Expression and Novel Transcript Units of Ovine Muscle Transcriptomes. PLoS ONE, Vol. 9, Issue. 2 ... Evidence of neutral transcriptome evolution in plants. New Phytologist 180, 587-593.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed ...
RNA-seq has overcome the drawbacks of microarrays and become the leading technology for genome sequencing, transcriptome ... Wang, Jing (2014) New views on the Drosophila transcriptome. PhD thesis, University of Glasgow. ... way comparison between three popular transcriptome profiling methods. Two types of novel gene have been found in Drosophila ...
Bioscience Launches New Curio Seeker 10x10 Kit to Enable the Simultaneous Capture of Nearly One Million Spatial Transcriptomes ... New high-resolution, whole transcriptome spatial mapping kit facilitates a more complete, unbiased view of larger tissue ... Curio Seeker is a whole transcriptome analysis reagent kit solution that provides the ability to generate molecular images of ... It brings high resolution, whole transcriptome, spatial biology further into the scale of human biology, expanding a ...
... and whole genome and transcriptome sequencing. We analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) transcriptome data of 221 SCCs to ... Transcriptome sequencing of tumor subpopulations reveals a spectrum of therapeutic options for squamous cell lung cancer.. ... Here, we analyze the transcriptome of CSC and non-CSC subpopulations by RNA-seq to identify new potential therapeutic ... In so doing, it demonstrates how transcriptome sequencing provides insights into the molecular underpinnings of cancer ...
Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal genes associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection of human lung epithelial cells. View ORCID ... Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal genes associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection of human lung epithelial cells ... Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal genes associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection of human lung epithelial cells ... Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal genes associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection of human lung epithelial cells ...
Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of nematodes using draft genomes and transcriptomes Author: Koutsovoulos, ...
Buschle, Alexander (2017): The impact of Epstein-Barr virus protein BZLF1 on the cellular transcriptome and genome structure. ... The impact of Epstein-Barr virus protein BZLF1 on the cellular transcriptome and genome structure ... The impact of Epstein-Barr virus protein BZLF1 on the cellular transcriptome and genome structure ...
  • The first seminal study to mention and investigate the transcriptome of an organism was published in 1997 and it described 60,633 transcripts expressed in S. cerevisiae using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). (wikipedia.org)
  • NEW YORK - A new long-read RNA sequencing benchmarking study sheds light on the strengths and weaknesses of different transcriptome analysis workflows involving various library preparation protocols, sequencing platforms, and analysis tools. (genomeweb.com)
  • In this study, we performed a transcriptome analysis of the leaves, green fruits, and red fruits of G. jasminoides to identify and predict the genes that encode key enzymes responsible for crocin production, compared with Crocus sativus . (frontiersin.org)
  • The BD Rhapsody™ Whole Transcriptome Analysis (WTA) Amplification Kit enables you to generate highly reproducible WTA data on the BD Rhapsody™ Single-Cell Analysis System. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • Learn more from the BD Rhapsody™ Whole Transcriptome Analysis (WTA) Amplification Kit Brochure . (bdbiosciences.com)
  • The transcriptome analysis yielded several novel gene markers for primate SVZa including the apelin receptor that is strongly expressed in the primate SVZa niche upon ischemic insult. (frontiersin.org)
  • TY - JOUR T1 - Transcriptome analysis of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana grown on cuticular extracts of the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei). (unboundmedicine.com)
  • RNA-seq libraries for transcriptome analysis of early β-catenin targets. (xenbase.org)
  • Transcriptome analysis of β-CatMO-injected embryos and dorsal and ventral halves. (xenbase.org)
  • Transcriptome Analysis of Aspergillus flavus Reveals veA-Dependent Regulation of Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters, Including the Novel Aflavarin Cluster. (jcvi.org)
  • In the present study, we performed a proliferation assay, phagocytosis assay and cell cycle analysis of macrophages and sequenced the transcriptomes of control group macrophages and TMP-A group macrophages using Illumina sequencing technology to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and determine the molecular mechanisms associated with differences in the immunomodulatory activity of TMP-A in macrophages. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • We present an algorithm for aggregated analysis of transcriptome data which uses multiple fold-change thresholds (threshold screening) and p values from Bayesian generalized linear model in order to assess the robustness of a gene as a potential indicator for the treatments tested. (diva-portal.org)
  • Comparative analysis of lung and blood transcriptomes in mice exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotube s. (cdc.gov)
  • Many available tools facilitate analyses of one of the two major mechanisms of transcriptome diversity, namely, differential expression of isoforms due to alternative splicing, while the second major mechanism-RNA editing due to post-transcriptional changes of individual nucleotides-remains under-appreciated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Furthermore, we identify an SSc macrophage transcriptome signature characterised by upregulation of glycolysis, hypoxia and mTOR signalling and a downregulation of IFNγ response pathways. (bmj.com)
  • As such, transcriptome and transcriptomics were one of the first words to emerge along with genome and proteome. (wikipedia.org)
  • We demonstrate that combining mRNA capture via oligo-dT with mRNA capture by the 5' 7-methyl guanosine cap provides a more complete view of the transcriptome and can be used to assay changes in mRNA poly-A tail length on a genome-wide scale. (harvard.edu)
  • We apply these methods of mRNA capture and de novo assembly to the transcriptome of Xenopus laevis, a well-studied frog that currently lacks a finished sequenced genome, to discover transcript sequences for thousands of mRNAs that are currently absent from public databases. (harvard.edu)
  • We also show that using mRNA-seq reads from both capture methods as input for de novo assemblers provides a more complete reconstruction of the transcriptome than either method used alone. (harvard.edu)
  • The keyword 'Targeted' and feature annotation should be included for all targeted subsets of transcriptome data. (nih.gov)
  • In the present transcriptome study, we show that veA is necessary for the expression of a large number of genes. (jcvi.org)
  • Because the number of genes which are found differentially expressed in transcriptome data is often very large, algorithms are needed to reduce the number down to a few robust discriminative genes. (diva-portal.org)
  • Fold-change threshold screening is a powerful tool for dimensionality reduction and feature selection in transcriptome data, as it effectively reduces the number of detected genes suitable for environmental monitoring. (diva-portal.org)
  • The kit has been tested and validated to generate consistent, high-quality whole transcriptome data across different workflows and users and a wide range of cell inputs. (bdbiosciences.com)
  • As the number of RNA-seq datasets that become available to explore transcriptome diversity increases, so does the need for easy-to-use comprehensive computational workflows. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These findings indicate that Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome and also influences differential night/day gene expression in this tissue. (nih.gov)
  • Integration of single-cell transcriptomes and biological function reveals distinct behavioral patterns in bone marrow endothelium. (ca.gov)
  • By characterizing the transcriptome patterns and pathways for these symptoms, our goal is to shed light on the biological mechanisms underlying this comorbidity, which can help prevent the exacerbation of physical symptoms by intervening at the level of etiological pathway. (cdc.gov)
  • A high-resolution anatomical atlas of the transcriptome in the mouse embryo. (nature.com)
  • Data obtained from the transcriptome is used in research to gain insight into processes such as cellular differentiation, carcinogenesis, transcription regulation and biomarker discovery among others. (wikipedia.org)
  • The methods we describe here will be broadly applicable to many organisms and will provide insight into the transcriptomes of organisms with sequenced and unsequenced genomes. (harvard.edu)
  • Because of its automated all-inclusive features, AIDD pipeline enables even a novice user to easily explore common mechanisms of transcriptome diversity, including RNA editing landscapes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Subsequently, the advent of high-throughput technology led to faster and more efficient ways of obtaining data about the transcriptome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transcriptome-obtained data also finds applications in establishing phylogenetic relationships during the process of evolution and in in vitro fertilization. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are quantifiable and conserved relationships between the Transcriptome and other -omes, and Transcriptomics data can be used effectively to predict other molecular species, such as metabolites. (wikipedia.org)
  • I would like to know how to do meta assembly by using the assemblies through Trinity and newbler of Roche transcriptome data. (biostars.org)
  • Here we present TACO, a computational method to reconstruct a consensus transcriptome from multiple RNA-seq data sets. (nih.gov)
  • TACO produces robust multisample transcriptome assemblies from RNA-seq. (nih.gov)
  • Some effects of Crx deletion on the pineal transcriptome might be mediated by Hoxc4 up-regulation. (nih.gov)
  • We asked if the whole blood transcriptome reflects pathology-specific changes in lung gene expression caused by MWCNT. (cdc.gov)
  • The overlapping sequence reads from a complete transcriptome are assembled into transcripts by computational methods instead of by traditional cloning and sequencing of cloned cDNAs. (nih.gov)
  • However, elucidation of RNA editing events at transcriptome-wide level requires increasingly complex computational tools, in turn resulting in a steep entrance barrier for labs who are interested in high-throughput variant calling applications on a large scale but lack the manpower and/or computational expertise. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Here we present an easy-to-use, fully automated, computational pipeline (Automated Isoform Diversity Detector, AIDD) that contains open source tools for various tasks needed to map transcriptome diversity, including RNA editing events. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In order to explore the molecular mechanism of flounder sex determination and development, we used RNA-seq technology to investigate transcriptomes of flounder gonads. (hindawi.com)
  • Using nanopore sequencing to study the hummingbird transcriptome , Ariel Gershman and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University, USA, identified approximately twice as many transcripts than obtained using a short-read sequencing technology. (nanoporetech.com)
  • To better understand the mechanism of ripening, Mehar H. Asif and Prabodh K. Trivedi from the National Botanical Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research and the Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research in India, undertook a study to evaluate global changes in the transcriptome of the fruit during the ripening process. (isaaa.org)
  • Upon termination of the chronic study (13 weeks), cSiO 2 -induced changes in transcriptome signatures were similarly robust in kidney as compared to the lung, but more modest in spleen. (usu.edu)
  • The transcriptome is the set of all RNA transcripts, including coding and non-coding, in an individual or a population of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The transcriptome encompasses all the ribonucleic acid (RNA) transcripts present in a given organism or experimental sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • The early stages of transcriptome annotations began with cDNA libraries published in the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • We analyzed transcriptome responses to a number of treatments in a total of 46 RNA-seq libraries. (xenbase.org)
  • The primary interest driving the GTEx project is identification of genetic variation and its effects on the tissue transcriptome. (nih.gov)
  • We have overcome these limitations by fusing the microRNA effector protein Argonaute2 to the RNA editing domain of ADAR2, allowing for the first time the detection of microRNA targets transcriptome-wide in single cells. (biorxiv.org)
  • Here, as part of the One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative, we sequenced the vegetative transcriptomes of 1,124 species that span the diversity of plants in a broad sense (Archaeplastida), including green plants (Viridiplantae), glaucophytes (Glaucophyta) and red algae (Rhodophyta). (nature.com)
  • Thus, the EJC protects the transcriptome of mammalian cells from inadvertent loss of exonic sequences and safeguards the expression of intact, full-length mRNAs. (uni-koeln.de)
  • We used these Brd4 mutants to compare the Brd4-specific transcriptome with the transcriptome of JQ1-treated cells. (cipsm.de)
  • Notably, the spatial topography of the neocortex is strongly reflected in its molecular topography-the closer two cortical regions, the more similar their transcriptomes. (nature.com)
  • We used mostly vegetative transcriptomes for a broad taxonomic sampling of 1,124 species together with 31 published genomes to infer species relationships and characterize the relative timing of organismal, molecular and functional diversification across green plants. (nature.com)
  • Corrigendum: Molecular characteristics of choledochal cysts in children: transcriptome sequencing. (bvsalud.org)
  • Nanopore sequencing technology uniquely delivers high yields of long, full-length RNA, supporting quantification and complete transcriptome characterisation at the isoform level. (nanoporetech.com)
  • Lastly, agoTRIBE additionally provides transcriptome-wide measurements of RNA abundance and will allow the deconvolution of microRNA targeting in complex samples such as tissues at the single-cell level. (biorxiv.org)
  • Attempts to characterize the transcriptome became more prominent with the advent of automated DNA sequencing during the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Applications of transcriptome profiling for clinical. (ubc.ca)
  • Thus, these findings demonstrate that parental zebrafish diet has a direct impact on the embryonic transcriptome. (oregonstate.edu)
  • The knowledge on transcriptome-wide gene expression in the primate SVZa is limited. (frontiersin.org)
  • Spemann organizer transcriptome induction by early beta-catenin, Wnt, Nodal , and Siamois signals in Xenopus laevis. (xenbase.org)
  • What is the Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly (TSA) Database? (nih.gov)