Medical Staff: Professional medical personnel who provide care to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Medical Staff Privileges: Those rights or activities which are specific to members of the institution's medical staff, including the right to admit private patients.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Constitution and Bylaws: The fundamental principles and laws adopted by an organization for the regulation and governing of its affairs.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Hospital-Physician Relations: Includes relationships between hospitals, their governing boards, and administrators in regard to physicians, whether or not the physicians are members of the medical staff or have medical staff privileges.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.United StatesInservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Hospital-Physician Joint Ventures: A formal financial agreement made between one or more physicians and a hospital to provide ambulatory alternative services to those patients who do not require hospitalization.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Institutional Practice: Professional practice as an employee or contractee of a health care institution.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Resistance Training: A type of strength-building exercise program that requires the body muscle to exert a force against some form of resistance, such as weight, stretch bands, water, or immovable objects. Resistance exercise is a combination of static and dynamic contractions involving shortening and lengthening of skeletal muscles.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Hospitals, State: Hospitals controlled by agencies and departments of the state government.EnglandRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hospital Administration: Management of the internal organization of the hospital.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Certificate of Need: A certificate issued by a governmental body to an individual or organization proposing to construct or modify a health facility, or to offer a new or different service. The process of issuing the certificate is also included.Hospital Volunteers: Individuals who donate their services to the hospital.Physician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Hospital Bed Capacity: The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Physicians' Offices: The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Great BritainPractice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Physician Impairment: The physician's inability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to the patient due to the physician's disability. Common causes include alcohol and drug abuse, mental illness, physical disability, and senility.Financial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Pharmacy Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the receiving, storing, and distribution of pharmaceutical supplies.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Physician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hospital Planning: Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.LondonTeaching: The educational process of instructing.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Physical Conditioning, Animal: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.ScotlandState Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Physical Endurance: The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Libraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and overGeneral Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.JapanOutcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.CaliforniaFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Food Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Hospitals, Municipal: Hospitals controlled by the city government.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Laboratories, Hospital: Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Weight Lifting: A sport in which weights are lifted competitively or as an exercise.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)
In 1987 Mauritania's largest medical facility was the 500-bed government-run hospital in Nouakchott. Staffed by Mauritanian and ... The ratio of people to hospital beds was 2,610 to one. The ratio of people to physicians was 13,350 to one. This ratio ... and mobile medical units to serve the countryside. All facilities suffered from a lack of equipment, supplies, and trained ... "Medical Care". In Mauritania: A Country Study (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June ...
The centre houses a medical surgery with trained staff, which is available from 8 am to ? pm each day. Outside these hours, a ... doctor is available. Serious medical emergencies are dealt with at Sligo General Hospital. A visiting dentist is also available ...
Senior medical staff are trained for the Armed Forces and conduct research in military medical services. By contemporary ... The institution also provides advanced training for mid-career military medical doctors and trains graduate students on the Ph. ... it is a full-scale medical school complete with a network of teaching and research clinics and affiliated hospitals. Graduates ... Its mission was to train Soviet and Warsaw Pact commanders, staff officers, and engineers for armored and mechanized units. The ...
Physicians and chemists receive initial training in Bordeaux and Lyon. Then, they are sent to the Val de Grâce Hospital in ... It provides hospital care services, administers medicals for military personnel, and gives expertise in disease prevention, and ... The service also includes administrative and technical officers (OCTASSA), nurses (males and females) and paramedical staff. ... Doctors hold the following ranks: Interne ("Intern", equivalent to a lieutenant). A rank invented in 2005. Médecin ("Doctor", ...
... medicines and training for technical staff. Citizens Foundation manages hospitals and recruits doctors and paramedical staff. ... Para medical staffs are present for delivering devices. Mega Medical Camps at Project Affected village, NTPC Limited, ... Health post staff trained on clinical aspects of maternal and neonatal care outreach workers trained to address maternal and ... and some diseases were chronic in nature, referred to district hospitals. The event is planned to cater to the medical needs of ...
Other measures included improved training and re-training for medical staff; refurbishment of hospitals and staff living ... and employment of qualified medical doctors and other health workers. Many of the primary care programmes were sponsored by ... He then studied at the London Hospital Medical College of the University of London from 1982 to 1987, when he obtained his M.B. ... A statewide programme of hospital development was also implemented, leading to the redevelopment of hospitals in Afon, Patigi ...
He trained in anesthesiology at Bellevue Hospital and NYU Medical Center. During his training, he was mentored by influential ... After completing his training with Rovenstine, Adriani stayed on his staff as an instructor. In 1941, Adriani became director ... In the 1940s, the ABA and ASA held a philosophy that it was unethical for physicians to assist in the training of nurse ... The hospital had been constructed two years earlier, and its anesthesia services were disorganized, with poorly trained ...
Chief of Staff, Lafleche Union Hospital; Chief of Staff, St. Josephs Hospital, Gravelbourg; visiting privleges, Assiniboia ... Civil Aviation Medical Examiner; Insurance Medical Examiner(most companies); postgraduate training in surgery, Scotland & ... He is still a practicing medical doctor, working part-time at a clinic in Regina, as of December, 2016 at age 81. He has ... Outside politics Lewis Draper was, and continues to be, a practicing medical doctor. The NDP government of which he was a part ...
The hospital CO was an RAF doctor; two RAF warrant officers and an administration and supplies staff assisted him. Three RAF ... The APL Hospital (ALH), located near Khormaksar, was a 160-bed RAF general hospital that provided free medical care to the ... Local people made up the rest of the staff and all of them would have been trained on site. Arab officers were called Bimbashis ... doctors and a surgeon, assisted by local doctors, provided medical coverage. The other RAF personnel were two male nurses, two ...
Wyeth joined the staff at the Bellevue Hospital. After reading French and German medical journals, he completed his medical ... studies by going to Europe, where he was trained as a surgeon by J. Marion Sims. He also met "leading physicians and surgeons ... He became a surgeon in New York City, where he founded the New York Polyclinic Graduate Medical School and Hospital, a medical ... He also studied at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College from 1872 to 1873, when he received another medical degree. Shortly ...
Mary's Medical Staff Physician of the Year in 2007. He also served as Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Medical Director of ... He also received training at the Milwaukee Veterans Affairs Hospital. During this time, he enlisted with the United States Navy ... Bucshon opposes veterans having access to medical marijuana if recommended by their Veterans Health Administration doctor and ... Following medical school, Bucshon completed a residency at the Medical College of Wisconsin, where he served as chief resident ...
Through training and professional development, the hospital is now fully staffed by Ugandan neurosurgeons, physicians, and ... As the Medical Director of CURE Children's Hospital of Uganda, Warf pioneered a low-cost, low-risk alternative to the typical ... There, he served as Medical Director and Chief of Surgery until 2006. The hospital remains a part of the CURE International ... After graduating from Harvard Medical School in 1984, Warf completed his neurosurgical residency training at Case Western ...
... is a 283-bed non-profit hospital that employs 250 physicians. Southwestern Medical Center is a 199-bed hospital with a staff of ... The 90,000 acre instillation is home to the US Army Field Artillery Training Center and the Air Defense Artillery. Protected ... It has 26 beds with a staff of 23 physicians. Bethel Cache Chattanooga Elgin Faxon Fletcher Geronimo Indiahoma Lawton (county ... Comanche County has three major hospitals in the area. The largest, Comanche County Memorial Hospital, ...
From 1841 on, it has participated in the training of medical students. The hospital moved to its present location in 1885. Many ... the hospital employs a staff of 7,255 and provides care for 250,000 patients each year. It also provides practical training to ... 600 medical students and over 1,000 other healthcare professionals. The prominent physicians who have practiced in the ... "Basel University Hospital". 4tune. 2016. "Bern hospital has long history". Swissinfo. 9 June 2004. "Inselspital". Go Finden. ...
On completion of his training at the New York Hospital, he joined the medical staff of the State Lunatic Hospital in Utica, New ... Chapin began his medical career under Dr. John Swett, an attending physician at New York Hospital. (Chapin's maternal great ... In 1853, he received his medical degree. He was named house physician at a New York Hospital in 1854. ... Chapin was a member of the medical staff and attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. ...
Nehemia was introduced to the Alexander Technique through a course given at the Tel HaShomer Hospital to medical staff. This ... Yitzhak Farine of the Tel-Hashomer government hospital. This resulted in Dr. Farine inviting Nehemia to work at the hospital's ... This centre has trained scores of Mitzvah teachers and treated thousands of clients who have come from around the world. A.C. ... He participated in training seminars for dance and physical education teachers at the kibbutz school which gave him insights ...
... training of medical staff and to education. In the following years further branches of the clinic/hospital were opened ... She then worked as a doctor at the refugee branch of the Mission Hospital. Distressed by the total lack of health care ... Dr. Samar publicly refuses to accept that women must be kept in purdah (secluded from the public) and speaks out against the ... Dr. Sima Samar has received numerous international awards for her work on human rights and democracy, including: 1994 Ramon ...
... were generally staffed by physicians on staff at the hospital on a rotating basis, among them family physicians, general ... The first EM post-graduate training took place in 1984 at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Because specialty ... Dr. Chalmers A. Loughridge, Dr. William Weaver, Dr. John McDade, and Dr. Steven Bednar at Alexandria Hospital, Virginia, ... Emergency physicians generally practice in hospital emergency departments, pre-hospital settings via emergency medical services ...
... physicians applied for hospital staff membership based on education, medical licensure and a record of quality care. Privileges ... are requests to perform certain procedures or use certain skills based on training and experience. For example, an obstetrician ... As medical costs have increased and reimbursement has declined or been stagnant, both hospitals and physicians have come under ... of care or professional competence in determining a physician's qualifications for initial or continuing hospital medical staff ...
They will provide scholarships to trained doctors and nurses to staff the clinic, which will maintain a connection with Germany ... Medical Centre, Léo[edit]. In 2012, Kéré Architecture embarked on a new project to build a medical centre in Léo. Léo is a town ... A high staff turnover rate and lack of smaller, local clinics means that the district hospital is often overstretched and ... Specialists trained by Francis Kéré supervise members of the local community, training them in the necessary building ...
He later served as a staff physician at military hospitals in Brno, Graz and Breslau. In November, 1942 Kahr was transferred to ... Karl Kahr (born September 11, 1914) was an Austrian SS-Hauptsturmführer and physician. During World War II he was Chief Medical ... After being seriously wounded on the Eastern Front he was assigned to Prague, Czechoslovakia where he taught at a training ... He studied medicine at the University of Graz and later worked as an assistant physician in a local hospital. During this time ...
There are no doctors at a primary health center. One has a paramedical staff. Veterinary Hospital, 5 to 10 km from the village ... The nearest vocational training is in the school nursery and the university education center is located in Anakapalli and the ... The nearest medical college and management college are in Visakhapatnam and in polytechnic nursing house. ... Alopati Hospital, Alternate Drug Hospital, Dispensary, Family Welfare Center, 10 km from the village Are far more than that. No ...
Through this system, doctors in training make up much of a teaching hospital's medical staff. The success of his residency ... Osler created the first residency program for specialty training of physicians, and he was the first to bring medical students ... Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives 1999. Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Famous Canadian Physicians: Sir William Osler at ... Osler Building at The Johns Hopkins Hospital currently The Johns Hopkins Hospital Human Resources. Until 2012 the Medical ...
Clinical facilities for training in medical subjects are available at the Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Attavar which is a ... Student evaluation of staff performance is also carried out regularly. Dean: Dr. Dilip G Nayak, MDS (Perio) Associate dean: Dr ... Dr Premalatha K., MDS Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry: Dr. Arathi Rao, MDS Periodontics: Dr Ashita S. Uppoor, MDS ... Dr M. Kundabala, MDS (Cons. Den. & Endo.) Associate dean: Dr. Mohan Baliga, MDS (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) Heads of ...
Following completion of medical technology training, she attended graduate school at the University of California at Davis in ... Rear Admiral Bonnie Burnham Potter (born c. 1946) was the first female physician in the Navy Medical Corps to be selected for ... She remained at NRMC Oakland as a staff internist and Residency Training Officer until 1983. She was assigned as Assistant Head ... She was the Commanding Officer of Naval Hospital, Camp Pendleton, California from June 1995 to January 1997. In 1997, her ...
Licensed physicians in the US who have attended one of the established medical schools there have usually graduated Doctor of ... By 2001 some form of CAM training was being offered by at least 75 out of 125 medical schools in the US.[99] Exceptionally, the ... "Latest Survey Shows More Hospitals Offering Complementary and Alternative Medicine Services" (Press release). American Hospital ... In March 2009, a staff writer for the Washington Post reported that the impending national discussion about broadening access ...
Department of Surgery Yao Municipal Hospital Yao-city Osaka JAPAN 佐々木 洋 Yo Sasaki 兒玉 憲 Ken Kodama 福島 幸男 Yukio Fukushima 横山 茂和 ... Japan Esophageal Society certified esophageal physician. ・ Japan Medical Association certified occupational physician. ... Foreign doctors training advisor. Kodama Ken. Position. Specially Appointed Director and Executive Director of Infection ... "hospital cancer registry system", the opening of "Endoscopy Center", and newly organised "outpatient Ostomy" by dedicated staff ...
The seven coach train, run by a small permanent staff assisted by volunteer doctors in the regions it passes, fills a gap left ... The Lifeline Express is a hospital on wheels that has been crisscrossing India for 27 years bringing cutting edge medical care ... It employs 20 permanent paramedic staff, with most doctors volunteering from nearby medical colleges or hospitals. (Danish ... The seven coach train, run by a small permanent staff assisted by volunteer doctors in the regions it passes, fills a gap left ...
... training resources, breaking news, and sample tools to help improve credentialing, privileging, and a wide array of medical ... Medical staff services professionals turn to HCPro, Inc., and its sister company, The Greeley Company, for practical advice, ... staff services concerns, including compliance with The Joint Commission and other accreditors and regulators. ... MSPs, physicians, and hospital-owned clinics: No easy answers. When hospitals acquire practices and clinics, the medical staff ...
Pre-hospital education and training. *Simulation-based learning environments. *Skills acquisition. *Eye-tracking ... Dr Brennen Mills. Lecturer. Contact Information Email: [email protected], Telephone: +61 8 6304 3947, Campus: Joondalup, Room ... Doctor of Philosophy, Edith Cowan University, 2016. * Bachelor of Science (Public Health) (Honours), Curtin University of ... BMJ: British Medical Journal, 346(7896), 22, United Kingdom, B M J Publishing Group, DOI: 10.1136/bmj.f1063. ...
The Detroit News reports about Detroit Medical Centers efforts to bring information technology directly to the patients ... Simplifying Transseptal Access to the Left Atrium: Interview with Terri Burke, CEO of Protaryx Medical. Medical Training, on ... The time is crucial as hospitals struggle with physician and nurse shortages.. With the technology, doctors no longer have to ... Wired hospitals help staff, soothe patients. August 17th, 2005 Medgadget Editors Informatics ...
Its staff is composed of internationally and foreign recognized and trained doctors. Official website http://www. ... Doctors Hospital and Medical Center is a 250-bedded private hospital located in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan. It is attached to ... Lahore Medical and Dental College as a teaching hospital. The hospital is recognized as one of the leading medical institutes ...
Medical Training Internship in medicine, 1970-1971. Residency in medicine, 1971-1972. Bellevue Hospital ... Staff Physician, 1974-1976. National Institutes of Health. Assistant Professor, 1976-1978. Associate Professor, 1978-1982. ... Physician in Chief, 2001-. Director, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, 2001-. The Rockefeller University Hospital ... Vice President for Medical Affairs, 2001-. Director, Center for Clinical and Translational Research on Diseases of the ...
He was a staff physician at the Naval Hospital in Portsmouth, Va., before returning to the Bethesda facility. Dr. van ... Wood Griffith van Valkenburgh, 46, a staff physician in the department of medicine of the National Naval Medical Center at ... He served at sea from 1960 to 1962, then took further training in Philadelphia and Richmond. ... Dr. van Valkenburgh was born in East Orange, N.J., and grew up in Suffolk, Va. He was a graduate of Virginia Polytechnic ...
Staff Training and Competency Assessments - Maintenance. *Central Line Dressing Changeexternal icon. Video for staff education ... Sample policy related to central line insertion credentialing and privileging for physicians, from Baystate Medical Center ... Poster to inform staff of the days since the last CLABSI, including a list of prevention measures, from the Hospital Quality ... Strategies for Preventing HAIs Training Module. Training on engaging leadership, physicians, nurses, and environmental services ...
... has joined the Silver Cross Medical Staff. Dr. Errampalli completed an internal medicine residency at St. Joseph Hospital in ... has joined the Silver Cross Medical Staff. Dr. Galamaga attended medical school at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine In ... Robert Galamaga, D.O., hematology/oncology and board certified internal medicine physician, ... Chicago; and a gastroenterology fellowship at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. His office is located with Digestive Disease ...
... board certified anesthesiology physician, has joined the Silver Cross Medical Staff. Dr. Arbogast attended medical school at ... Asta Astrauskas, M.D., board certified pediatrics physician, has joined the Silver Cross Medical Staff. Dr. Astrauskas ... completed a pediatrics residency at Albany Medical Center in Albany, NY. Her office is located ... ... These specialized and highly trained physicians are not employees of Silver Cross Hospital. They determine independently, based ...
The National Institute of Traditional Medicines (NITM) is well-established, with trained doctors. Staff regularly collect ... Ayurvedic doctors (dungtshos) and other traditional healers also claim medical plants are more difficult to obtain, but no ... Traditional medicine is gaining popularity, even though a nearby modern hospital provides free services. While the treatments ... 3. Train key personal for various purposes: plant identification; proper collection techniques; appropriate processing methods ...
Additional Training: Javaid Medical Complex, 2003 *Additional Training: Post Graduate Medical Institute, Services Hospital, ... Support Staff. A team of qualified support staff assist our physicians in all aspects of a patients medical care including ... Upstate University Hospital. Upstate Golisano Childrens Hospital. Upstate University Hospital at Community. Upstate Cancer ... Administrative and Secretarial Staff. Our Secretarial staff, function as schedulers and receptionists. ...
Doctors are in short supply. So are beds for patients. Six months after the Ebola outbreak emerged for the first time in an ... U.S. to train medical staff, build field hospitals. U.S. President Barack Obama has ordered up to 3,000 U.S. military personnel ... Dr. Joanne Liu, international president of Doctors Without Borders, urged world leaders this week to take immediate action. ... Ebola outbreak: Clinics still short on doctors, supplies 6 months later. Doctors are in short supply. So are beds for patients ...
... the board of the North Broward Hospital District said it will phase out the program that teaches the students to be family ... Despite pleas from a dozen medical residents in white lab coats, ... Uf Gets Broward Hospital Medical School To Send Students. ... October 22, 1998,By BOB LaMENDOLA Staff Writer. Despite pleas from a dozen medical residents in white lab coats, the board of ... The University of Florida medical residents, who are licensed doctors, help the tax-assisted district by seeing 8,000 patients ...
2Research & Training Monitoring Department, Bangladesh College of Physicians and Surgeons (BCPS), Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh. 3 ... Knowledge on Hospital Waste Management among Senior Staff Nurses Working in a Selected Medical College Hospital of Bangladesh. ... level of knowledge regarding hospital waste management among senior staff nurses working in Faridpur Medical College Hospital, ... Knowledge about hospital waste and its management is very poor among senior staff nurses. As a recommendation to improve this ...
In 1987 Mauritanias largest medical facility was the 500-bed government-run hospital in Nouakchott. Staffed by Mauritanian and ... The ratio of people to hospital beds was 2,610 to one. The ratio of people to physicians was 13,350 to one. This ratio ... and mobile medical units to serve the countryside. All facilities suffered from a lack of equipment, supplies, and trained ... "Medical Care". In Mauritania: A Country Study (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June ...
... emergency medical teams are staffed with physicians but evidence regarding their prehospital diagnostic accuracy remains poor. ... To evaluate the out-of-hospital diagnostic accuracy of physician-staffed emergency medical teams (PEMTs). ... PEMTs consists of a paramedic and a physician trained in emergency care. Physicians are licensed to practice emergency care ... In Germany, physician-staffed Emergency Medical Teams (PEMT) are part of the local Emergency Medical Service (EMS) [1]. These ...
... medical centres later this year to ensure that injured or ill servicemen can get immediate care from more experienced doctors. ... Civilian doctors will be deployed to selected Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) ... The hospitals emergency doctors will also be training the militarys medical staff to improve their services. ... This group of doctors is equipped to handle more complex medical conditions and will serve as mentors for the SAFs medical ...
Marketing to hospitals, doctors offices, and rehabilitation centers, Avazzia also provides training to medical staff. In the ... Thirty Indian medical doctors came to Avazzias booth, generating additional sales that continue to this day. Now, Avazzia is ... NAFTA, Chile, Singapore, Australia, CAFTA-DR, Colombia, Panama, Korea, and Peru FTAs - Determining rules of origin ... Rules of Origin General Categories, Chile, Singapore, CAFTA-DR, Peru, Colombia, Korea and Panama FTAs ...
... leaving isolated communities without access to medical or emergency room care; but in some towns new and innovative measures ... 99 rural hospitals in the U.S. have closed, ... Instead, the hospital is staffed entirely by physicians trained ... A young staff of physicians trained in full spectrum family medicine provide medical care at Kearny County Hospital in Lakin, ... "We determined we only have so many dollars to spend at a rural critical access hospital on medical care staff coverage, so its ...
See reviews, photos, directions, phone numbers and more for the best Medical Clinics in Cincinnati, OH. ... If your physicians office joins Chris Hospital Medical Associates find a new physician. Christ Hospital trains the staff to ... If you are used to good communication between doctors and patients, dont go to this hospital. Doctors here do not like to ... Your dr already knows. If you choose to stay you find out your physician never knew at your next appointment but your physician ...
Post-graduate degree: Medical Doctorate (the Queens University, Belfast) Cardiology training: Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon ... Staff Profiles McBrien, Dr Angela Dr Angela McBrienConsultant Fetal and Paediatric Cardiologist *Consultant Fetal and ... Fetal cardiology training: the University of Alberta, Canada and Freeman Hospital, the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children ... Copyright Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 2018 Site by TH_NK ...
More than 200 medical and paramedical staff attended the MSF training at the regional hospital in Tefé. ... Nurse Rebecca Alethéia provides training to the staff of the regional hospital in Tefé explaining the correct use of personal ... The hospital team requested training to prepare for the possibility of a new wave of infections, or another crisis that could ... She was the greatest symbol of our work in this Manaus hospital. Restoring her to life helped to restore hope to the doctors ...
  • He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Association of American Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America and numerous other organizations. (reuters.com)
  • Because we are working at the grassroots, we are exposed to different kinds of diseases," said volunteer doctor Mehak Sikka. (hindustantimes.com)
  • This is important for various diseases such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS), stroke, severe respiratory failure or others where a medical intervention carried-out by a physician should be performed immediately on scene. (springer.com)
  • An endocrinologist is a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating diseases and conditions caused by hormone problems, such as diabetes and growth problems. (kidshealth.org)
  • A rheumatologist is a doctor who treats problems involving the joints, muscles, and bones, as well as autoimmune diseases. (kidshealth.org)
  • Until the first antibiotic was discovered about a century ago, many people died of complications from mild diseases or small wounds, because doctors had no tools to tackle bacterial infections. (msf.org.au)
  • Dr. Kushner is experienced in diseases and surgery of the skin as well as cosmetic/laser surgery. (healthgrades.com)
  • We take particular pride in our diverse and talented staff, including a cadre of compassionate clinicians, inter-disciplinary teams of talented investigators, and numerous committed and dedicated teachers - as well as a network of able alumni who remain vital to our missions. (ynhh.org)