Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Laryngoscopy: Examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the larynx performed with a specially designed endoscope.Laryngoscopes: Endoscopes for examining the interior of the larynx.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Laryngeal Masks: A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Fiber Optic Technology: The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.Airway Management: Evaluation, planning, and use of a range of procedures and airway devices for the maintenance or restoration of a patient's ventilation.Androstanols: Androstanes and androstane derivatives which are substituted in any position with one or more hydroxyl groups.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Succinylcholine: A quaternary skeletal muscle relaxant usually used in the form of its bromide, chloride, or iodide. It is a depolarizing relaxant, acting in about 30 seconds and with a duration of effect averaging three to five minutes. Succinylcholine is used in surgical, anesthetic, and other procedures in which a brief period of muscle relaxation is called for.Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.ManikinsCricoid Cartilage: The small thick cartilage that forms the lower and posterior parts of the laryngeal wall.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Glottis: The vocal apparatus of the larynx, situated in the middle section of the larynx. Glottis consists of the VOCAL FOLDS and an opening (rima glottidis) between the folds.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Intubation, Gastrointestinal: The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Neuromuscular Depolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction by causing sustained depolarization of the motor end plate. These agents are primarily used as adjuvants in surgical anesthesia to cause skeletal muscle relaxation.Alfentanil: A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Neuromuscular Blockade: The intentional interruption of transmission at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION by external agents, usually neuromuscular blocking agents. It is distinguished from NERVE BLOCK in which nerve conduction (NEURAL CONDUCTION) is interrupted rather than neuromuscular transmission. Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to produce MUSCLE RELAXATION as an adjunct to anesthesia during surgery and other medical procedures. It is also often used as an experimental manipulation in basic research. It is not strictly speaking anesthesia but is grouped here with anesthetic techniques. The failure of neuromuscular transmission as a result of pathological processes is not included here.Larynx: A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Anesthesia, IntratrachealMonitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Epiglottis: A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.Laryngeal Edema: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.Hoarseness: An unnaturally deep or rough quality of voice.Bronchial Spasm: Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Adjuvants, Anesthesia: Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.Vecuronium Bromide: Monoquaternary homolog of PANCURONIUM. A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with shorter duration of action than pancuronium. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination as well as its short duration of action and easy reversibility provide advantages over, or alternatives to, other established neuromuscular blocking agents.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Capnography: Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.Tracheostomy: Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).EthersProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Arytenoid Cartilage: One of a pair of small pyramidal cartilages that articulate with the lamina of the CRICOID CARTILAGE. The corresponding VOCAL LIGAMENT and several muscles are attached to it.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Tracheal DiseasesBronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Pneumonia, Aspiration: A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.Atracurium: A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with short duration of action. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and its lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination provide clinical advantage over alternate non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Respiratory Care Units: The hospital unit in which patients with respiratory conditions requiring special attention receive intensive medical care and surveillance.Pancuronium: A bis-quaternary steroid that is a competitive nicotinic antagonist. As a neuromuscular blocking agent it is more potent than CURARE but has less effect on the circulatory system and on histamine release.Respiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Pharyngitis: Inflammation of the throat (PHARYNX).Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Etomidate: Imidazole derivative anesthetic and hypnotic with little effect on blood gases, ventilation, or the cardiovascular system. It has been proposed as an induction anesthetic.gamma-Cyclodextrins: Cyclic GLUCANS consisting of eight (8) glucopyranose units linked by 1,4-glycosidic bonds.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Tonsillectomy: Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Evidence-Based Emergency Medicine: A way of providing emergency medical care that is guided by a thoughtful integration of the best available scientific knowledge with clinical expertise in EMERGENCY MEDICINE. This approach allows the practitioner to critically assess research data, clinical guidelines, and other information resources in order to correctly identify the clinical problem, apply the most high-quality intervention, and re-evaluate the outcome for future improvement.Adenoidectomy: Excision of the adenoids. (Dorland, 28th ed)Obesity, Morbid: The condition of weighing two, three, or more times the ideal weight, so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. In the BODY MASS INDEX, morbid obesity is defined as having a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2.Sufentanil: An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.Ludwig's Angina: Severe cellulitis of the submaxillary space with secondary involvement of the sublingual and submental space. It usually results from infection in the lower molar area or from a penetrating injury to the mouth floor. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Entropy: The measure of that part of the heat or energy of a system which is not available to perform work. Entropy increases in all natural (spontaneous and irreversible) processes. (From Dorland, 28th ed)High-Frequency Jet Ventilation: Respiratory support system used primarily with rates of about 100 to 200/min with volumes of from about one to three times predicted anatomic dead space. Used to treat respiratory failure and maintain ventilation under severe circumstances.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Nasolacrimal Duct: A tubular duct that conveys TEARS from the LACRIMAL GLAND to the nose.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Tracheal StenosisPostoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Lacrimal Duct Obstruction: Interference with the secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands. Obstruction of the LACRIMAL SAC or NASOLACRIMAL DUCT causing acute or chronic inflammation of the lacrimal sac (DACRYOCYSTITIS). It is caused also in infants by failure of the nasolacrimal duct to open into the inferior meatus and occurs about the third week of life. In adults occlusion may occur spontaneously or after injury or nasal disease. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p250)Colonoscopes: Specially designed endoscopes for visualizing the interior surface of the colon.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Clonidine: An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.Propanolamines: AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the propanolamine (NH2CH2CHOHCH2) group and its derivatives.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Delivery Rooms: Hospital units equipped for childbirth.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Bronchoscopes: Endoscopes for the visualization of the interior of the bronchi.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Epistaxis: Bleeding from the nose.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Tracheotomy: Surgical incision of the trachea.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)
"Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics". Anaesthesia. 39 (11): 1105-11. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2044.1984.tb08932.x. PMID ...
Tracheal intubation Driscoll, Kevin E.; Costa, Daniel L.; Hatch, Gary; Henderson, Rogene; Oberdorster, Gunter; Salem, Harry; ... By contrast, tracheal administration of pharmaceutical drugs in humans is called endotracheal administration. As compared to ...
Samsoon, GL; Young, JR (May 1987). "Difficult tracheal intubation: a retrospective study". Anaesthesia. 42 (5): 487-90. doi: ... "A clinical sign to predict difficult tracheal intubation: a prospective study". Canadian Anaesthetists' Society Journal. 32 (4 ... It is an indirect way of assessing how difficult an intubation will be; this is more definitively scored using the Cormack- ... A high Mallampati score (class 3 or 4) is associated with more difficult intubation as well as a higher incidence of sleep ...
Some patients will need immediate tracheal intubation. If intubation can be delayed for a period, a number of other potential ... following prolonged intubation or congenital); Airway edema (e.g., following instrumentation of the airway, tracheal intubation ... The first issue of clinical concern in the setting of stridor is whether or not tracheal intubation or tracheostomy is ...
Tracheal intubation and respiratory support may be necessary. The disease is most common in Central and Eastern Europe, and ...
The trachea may be injured by tracheostomy or tracheal intubation; in cases of tracheal injury, large amounts of air can enter ...
Tracheal intubation is often used for short term mechanical ventilation. A tube is inserted through the nose (nasotracheal ... Intubation with a cuffed tube is thought to provide the best protection against aspiration. Tracheal tubes inevitably cause ... Other disadvantages of tracheal intubation include damage to the mucosal lining of the nasopharynx or oropharynx and subglottic ... intubation) or mouth (orotracheal intubation) and advanced into the trachea. In most cases tubes with inflatable cuffs are used ...
This is done to help with tracheal intubation or electroconvulsive therapy. It is given either by injection into a vein or ... The former is a major point of consideration in the context of trauma care, where endotracheal intubation may need to be ... The latter means that, should attempts at endotracheal intubation fail and the person cannot be ventilated, there is a prospect ... usually for facilitation of endotracheal intubation. It is perennially popular in emergency medicine because it has the fastest ...
Laryngospasm is a rare complication but may sometimes require tracheal intubation. Patients with tumors or significant bleeding ... In this case, the instrument is inserted through an adapter connected to the tracheal tube. Rigid bronchoscopy is performed ... either malignant or benign disease processes Bronchoscopy is also employed in percutaneous tracheostomy Tracheal intubation of ... or foreign objects lodged in the airway Laser resection of tumors or benign tracheal and bronchial strictures Stent insertion ...
It reduces the duration of postoperative tracheal intubation by roughly half. The occurrence of prolonged postoperative ... no tracheal intubation or mechanical ventilation) and can have less of an effect on the cardiovascular system which may add to ...
... is a medical device that facilitates intubation. ROTIGS is an acronym for Rapid Oral Tracheal Intubation Guidance System ... The device functions as a bite block and a mechanical guide for transoral intubation, as it awakens intubations in ways that ... By creating a gag free approach to the larynx, ROTIGS facilitates safe, awake, guided transoral intubation for the infrequent ... The design several medical applications beyond its original intended use as an appliance to allow awake intubation.[citation ...
Risk factors include long-term intubation and tracheal or lung aspiration. In most cases of ventilator-associated pneumonia, ...
For example, stylets used to facilitate tracheal intubation - see Tracheal_intubation#Stylets. ...
Tracheal intubation refers to the insertion of a catheter down the trachea. This procedure is commonly performed during surgery ... In an emergency, or when tracheal intubation is deemed impossible, a tracheotomy is often performed to insert a tube for ... Tracheomalacia (weakening of the tracheal cartilage) Tracheal collapse (in dogs) Tracheobronchial injury (perforation of the ... The first tracheal ring is broader than the rest, and often divided at one end; it is connected by the cricotracheal ligament ...
The fracture may interfere with breathing, requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Patients who have ...
Tracheal intubation, often simply referred to as intubation, is the placement of a flexible plastic or rubber tube into the ... followed by infraglottic techniques such as tracheal intubation and finally surgical methods. Advanced airway management is a ... Compared to a cuffed tracheal tube (see below), they give less protection against aspiration but are easier to insert and cause ... The advantages of a tracheotomy include less risk of infection and damage to the trachea such as tracheal stenosis. Evaluation ...
Tracheal intubation is often performed for mechanical ventilation of hours to weeks duration. A tube is inserted through the ... Intubation with a cuffed tube is thought to provide the best protection against aspiration. Tracheal tubes inevitably cause ... Other disadvantages of tracheal intubation include damage to the mucosal lining of the nasopharynx or oropharynx and subglottic ... Supraglottic airways differ primarily from tracheal intubation in that they do not prevent aspiration. After the introduction ...
History of general anesthesia History of tracheal intubation Laryngoscopy Tracheal intubation "Macintosh blade". AnaesthesiaUK ...
He also designed a simple device for blind tracheal intubation and paediatricendotracheal tube. (manufactured by Portex Ltd; ...
Patients require respiratory support which may include non-invasive ventilation or tracheal intubation. The child may also ...
If needed, provide the patient with oxygen and secure an airway via tracheal intubation. Treat bronchospasm with inhaled beta2- ...
Tracheal intubation is required in these situations to prevent respiratory arrest and risk of death. Sometimes, the cause is ... Efforts to protect the airway may include intubation or cricothyroidotomy. Histamine related angioedema can be treated with ...
Naturally, events as the tracheal intubation and inhalation agents can produce quick variations in ANS. Also, should be ...
... improves glottic view and aids tracheal intubation apart from its classical role in rapid sequence intubation for aspiration ... It is associated with nausea/vomiting and it may cause esophageal rupture and also may make tracheal intubation and make ... Cricoid force greater than 40 N can compromise airway patency and make tracheal intubation difficult. Cricoid pressure may ... which is used to improve the view of the glottis during laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, rather than to prevent ...
It is used also for prophylaxis of sympathic reaction during tracheal intubations. Trimecaine must not be used at ...
Tracheal intubation. Drugs. *Analgesics. *Antibiotics. *Antithrombotics. *Inotropes. *Intravenous fluids. *Neuromuscular- ...
The incidence of hypertension after tracheal intubation was defined as an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ,20% of ... The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of hypertension after tracheal intubation using a McGRATH ... METHODS Data of 360 consecutive patients who underwent general anesthesia with tracheal intubation by Macintosh laryngoscope or ... CONCLUSIONS The use of a McGRATH laryngoscope may reduce the incidence of hypertension after tracheal intubation compared to ...
Successful treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis with balloon dilation, argon plasma coagulation, electrocautery and ... as a treatment for tracheal stenosis. The patients in our series developed tracheal stenosis post-intubation or post- ... Tracheal stenosis is an uncommon but known complication of endotracheal intubation and tracheostomy. Surgery is currently the ... Tracheal stenosis; bronchoscopy; topical mitomycin C; post-intubation; post-tracheostomy; airway obstruction ...
Prolonged tracheal intubation in the trauma patient. J Trauma. 1984;24:120-124. ... within day 1-3 from intubation; early) or to standard tracheostomy (between day 7-14 from intubation if extubation could not be ... Prolonged Orotracheal Intubation in Neurocritical care Trial). Int J Stroke. 2012;7:173-182. ... Early tracheostomy versus prolonged endotracheal intubation in severe head injury. J Trauma. 2004;57:251-254. ...
ACLS and intubation, ACLS and capnography, capnography in emergency medicine, capnography in prehospital arena, anesthesia ... During 22 of the 25 intubations, the esophagus was intubated only once before tracheal intubation was accomplished. In the ... In one ICU intubation study, esophageal intubation occurred in 25 of the 297 (8%) intubation procedures. (101) Only 10 of 25 ( ... Therefore, they state in the discussion that although the detection of exhaled carbon dioxide after tracheal intubation in ...
Grillo HC, Donahue DN: Post-intubation tracheal stenosis. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1996, 8: 370-380.PubMedGoogle Scholar. ... Tracheal stenosis is a known complication of prolonged intubation. It is difficult to treat and traditional surgical approach ... Stauffer JL, Olson DE, Petty TL: Complications and consequences of tracheal intubation and tracheostomy. A prospective study of ... Braidy J, Breton G, Clement L: Effect of corticosteroids on post-intubation tracheal stenosis. Thorax. 1989, 44: 753-755. ...
Keywords: Intervention, post-intubation tracheal stenosis, prognosis, rigid bronchoscopy, silicone stent INTRODUCTION Tracheal ... post-intubation tracheal stenosis, prognosis, rigid bronchoscopy, silicone stent INTRODUCTION Tracheal stenosis narrowing of ... Although the use of low pressure cuffs has reduced the incidence of post-intubation tracheal stenosis PITS) by 10-fold, the ... Although the use of low pressure cuffs has reduced the incidence of post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) by 10-fold, the ...
Previous experiences with tracheal intubation, especially difficult intubation, intubation for prolonged duration (e.g., ... Tracheal intubation, usually simply referred to as intubation, is the placement of a flexible plastic tube into the trachea ( ... intubation may be necessary in such situations. The vast majority of tracheal intubations involve the use of a viewing ... before intubation of the trachea. One important difference between RSI and routine tracheal intubation is that the practitioner ...
Tracheal intubation (usually simply referred to as intubation), an invasive medical procedure, is the placement of a flexible ... Circa 1020, Ibn Sīnā (980-1037) described the use of tracheal intubation in The Canon of Medicine to facilitate breathing. In ... For millennia, tracheotomy was considered the most reliable (and most risky) method of tracheal intubation. By the late 19th ... The concept of using a fiberoptic endoscope for tracheal intubation was introduced by Peter Murphy, an English anesthetist, in ...
Previous experiences with tracheal intubation, especially difficult intubation, intubation for prolonged duration (e.g., ... Tracheal intubation, usually simply referred to as intubation, is the placement of a flexible plastic tube into the trachea ( ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tracheal intubation.. Video of endotracheal intubation using C-MAC D-blade and bougie ... a b c Benumof (2007), Ezri T and Warters RD, Chapter 15: Indications for tracheal intubation, pp. 371-8 ...
This article discusses the use of lighted stylets for tracheal intubation. ... Various types of stylets are commonly available as adjuncts to endotracheal intubation, including the traditional malleable ... encoded search term (Lighted Stylet Assisted Tracheal Intubation) and Lighted Stylet Assisted Tracheal Intubation What to Read ... Lightwand intubation: II--Clinical trial of a new lightwand for tracheal intubation in patients with difficult airways. Can J ...
Tracheal intubation requires expertise and experience. Multiple or failed intubation attempts by inexperienced practitioners ... During tracheal intubation, cricoid pressure should be applied if possible. This will help to prevent regurgitation of gastric ... Tracheal intubation should not exceed 30 seconds (Resuscitation Council (UK), 2000).. Chest compressions can continue during ... Pressure should not be released until the tracheal tube has been inserted and the cuff inflated, although it should be removed ...
Video Laryngoscopy and Fiberoptic-Assisted Tracheal Intubation * Sections Video Laryngoscopy and Fiberoptic-Assisted Tracheal ... Video Laryngoscopy and Fiberoptic-Assisted Tracheal Intubation) and Video Laryngoscopy and Fiberoptic-Assisted Tracheal ... Video Laryngoscopy and Fiberoptic-Assisted Tracheal Intubation. Updated: Feb 28, 2019 * Author: Sunil P Verma, MD; Chief Editor ... Video laryngoscopy-assisted tracheal intubation in airway management. Expert Rev Med Devices. 2018 Apr. 15 (4):265-275. [ ...
Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Tracheal Intubation Gastric Tube Rocuronium Laryngeal Mask Airway These keywords were added by ... tracheal intubation. Can J Anesth 2000; 47: 622-6.PubMedGoogle Scholar ... Ventilatory adequacy and respiratory mechanics with laryngeal mask versus tracheal intubation during positive pressure ... The LMA-ProSeal™ is an effective alternative to tracheal intubation for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. ...
Tracheal intubation using a new CCD camera-equipped device: a report of two cases with a difficult intubation ... the endotracheal intubation device (EID), allowed smooth tracheal intubation. ... In both cases, the use of an intubation device equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, ...
Tracheal intubation difficulties in the setting of face and neck burns: myth or reality?. Esnault P1, Prunet B2, Cotte J2, ... and these risks may require a tracheal intubation. This study aims to describe the incidence and the characteristics of ... an intubation performed at a burn center was independently associated with difficult intubation: odds ratio = 3.2; 95% ... The incidence of difficult intubation was 11.2% but was greater in the burn center than in the pre-burn center: 16.9% vs 3.5% ( ...
Preoxygenation Before Prehospital Tracheal Intubation With NIV Versus Balloon (PREOXY). This study is ongoing, but not ... Preoxygenation Before Prehospital Tracheal Intubation With NIV Versus Balloon. A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial in ... effectiveness and even less complications of using NIV for preoxygenation during tracheal intubation in ICU and in Operating ... patients needing tracheal chest tube managed by Medical Mobile Emergency rescue services. ...
The Airtraq laryngoscope is a new tracheal intubation device that has been developed for the management of normal and difficult ... The Airtraq laryngoscope is a new tracheal intubation device that has been developed for the management of normal and difficult ... Next Document: Tracheal intubation following training with the GlideScope compared to direct laryngoscopy.. ... Intubation, Intratracheal / instrumentation*, methods. Laryngoscopes*. Laryngoscopy / methods. Male. Middle Aged. Prospective ...
Initial attempts at intubation by conventional methods were unsuccessful. The proximal ends of a ... Shortening a double-lumen tube allows the use of a fibreoptic bronchoscope to aid in tracheal intubation in a patient whose ... Intubation. Intubation, Intratracheal / instrumentation*. Lung Neoplasms / secondary, surgery. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a ... Initial attempts at intubation by conventional methods were unsuccessful. The proximal ends of a 37F double-lumen tube were ...
The study indicates that following tracheal intubation gravitational force influences tracheal mucus clearance. When the ... Following tracheal intubation, mucus flow is reversed in the semirecumbent position: possible role in the pathogenesis of ... Tracheal mucus velocity was measured through radiographic tracking of radiopaque tantalum disks, insufflated into the trachea. ... In all trachea-up sheep, abnormal tracheal mucus clearance was found. Mucus, mostly on the nondependent part of the trachea, ...
Emergency intubation was carried out without difficulty (size 8 endotracheal tube without stylet). Chest x ray revealed ...
Acute stridor due to an upper tracheal membrane following endotracheal intubation. J Harbison, D Collins, V Lynch, WT ... Acute stridor due to an upper tracheal membrane following endotracheal intubation. J Harbison, D Collins, V Lynch, WT ... Acute stridor due to an upper tracheal membrane following endotracheal intubation. J Harbison, D Collins, V Lynch, WT ... Acute stridor due to an upper tracheal membrane following endotracheal intubation Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a ...
... oxygen in the critically ill patient in preparation for emergency tracheal intubation.Design:Nonrandomized, controlled trial. ... oxygen in the critically ill patient in preparation for emergency tracheal intubation.Design:Nonrandomized, controlled trial. ... Critically ill patients failing noninvasive respiratory support techniques who require tracheal intubation followed by ... effective in regard to providing a reasonable safeguard against hypoxemia during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. ...
Flexible tracheal intubation fiberscope. PulmonologyGeneral Surgery The LF-DP is a portable tracheal intubation fiberscope for ... Flexible tracheal intubation fiberscope. PulmonologyGeneral Surgery The Olympus LF-P small-diameter tracheal intubation ... Flexible tracheal intubation laryngovideoscope. PulmonologyGeneral Surgery The LF-V flexible tracheal intubation ... Flexible tracheal intubation fiberscope. PulmonologyGeneral Surgery The LF-GP is a complete, all-in-one, portable solution for ...
We successfully performed I-gel-assisted tracheal intubation without using neuromuscular blockers. We believe this method would ... "Utility of the Aintree Intubation Catheter in fiberoptic tracheal intubation through the three types of intubating supraglottic ... Tracheal Intubation through the I-gel for Emergency Cesarean Section in a Patient with Multidrug Hypersensitivity: A New ... Here, we emphasize that tracheal intubation through the I-gel is a new method in particular for Caesarian section which helps ...
Does the Site of Anterior Tracheal Puncture Affect the Success Rate of Retrograde Intubation? A Prospective, Manikin-Based ... The purpose of this study was to test whether a more caudal tracheal puncture would increase the success rate. Methods. Twenty- ... Conclusion. Retrograde intubation performed via a cricotracheal puncture site, while more time consuming, resulted in fewer ... Background. Retrograde intubation is useful for obtaining endotracheal access when direct laryngoscopy proves difficult. The ...
  • abstract = "This study was undertaken to determine whether midazolam alleviates sympathoadrenal response evoked by tracheal intubation in elderly patients with hypertension. (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "LMA CTrach{\texttrademark} enables ventilation and intubation with the same device while visualising the process of intubation. (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "Sympathetic hyperactivation during tracheal intubation prolongs the QT interval and increases the risk of arrhythmias. (elsevier.com)
  • The patient was not stable enough to undergo bronchoscopy, but the clinical presentation suggested that a tracheal tear was the most likely etiology of her symptoms. (emra.org)
  • This method is, however, neither practical nor recommended for clinical use in detecting accidental oesophageal intubation. (ovid.com)
  • The authors tested the hypothesis that an accurate prediction of difficult tracheal intubation using simple clinical signs is possible using a computer-assist model. (mcmaster.ca)
  • The association between intubation and outcome was analysed with ordinal regression with adjustment for the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI variables and extracranial injury. (edu.pl)
  • We here introduce our teaching mode for tracheal intubation featured with a progressive evaluation scheme for preparation and performance, and we compared the effect of teaching tracheal intubation with Macintosh and Airtraq laryngoscope to find the easier one to learn in a randomized crossover controlled clinical trial. (biomedcentral.com)
  • There is a clinical impression that gabapentin (an antiepileptic drug) is a suitable drug which attenuates the intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation associated with tracheal intubation in humans. (okulistyka-weterynaryjna.pl)
  • At a time of declining numbers and experience in obstetric general anaesthesia, it is hoped that the publication of these national guidelines will improve consistency of clinical practice, reduce adverse events and provide a structure for teaching and training on failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics. (uk.com)
  • We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled studies evaluating any drug, technique or device aimed at improving the success rate or safety of tracheal intubation in the critically ill. (uzh.ch)
  • Cortical activity assessed by Narcotrend in relation to haemodynamic responses to tracheal intubation at different stages of cortical suppression and reflex control. (cngb.org)
  • Dynamic changes in rhythmic and arrhythmic neural signatures in the subthalamic nucleus induced by anaesthesia and tracheal intubation. (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Apart from similar activity changes in both STN and cortex associated with anaesthesia-induced unresponsiveness, we observed specific neuronal activity changes in the STN in response to the anaesthesia and tracheal intubation. (ox.ac.uk)
  • A one-year prospective observational study of endotracheal intubation in the ED of Siriraj Hospital, which has an annual census of 150 518 patients. (bmj.com)
  • This is a prospective study of 20 symptomatic children with large mediastinal masses who might need tracheal intubation and paralyzing in the course of their elective surgical procedures in our center from 2007 to 2011. (ac.ir)
  • The device provides a high quality view of the glottis without the need to align the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axes. (scielo.br)
  • The incidence of difficult intubation was 11.2% but was greater in the burn center than in the pre-burn center: 16.9% vs 3.5% (P = .02). (nih.gov)