ParisEuropeAfrica, Northern: The geographical area of Africa comprising ALGERIA; EGYPT; LIBYA; MOROCCO; and TUNISIA. It includes also the vast deserts and oases of the Sahara. It is often referred to as North Africa, French-speaking Africa, or the Maghreb. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p856)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Northern IrelandMandatory Reporting: A legal requirement that designated types of information acquired by professionals or institutions in the course of their work be reported to appropriate authorities.Mediterranean Region: The MEDITERRANEAN SEA, the MEDITERRANEAN ISLANDS, and the countries bordering on the sea collectively.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.GermanyCommunicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.BelgiumAlgeria: A country in northern Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between MOROCCO and TUNISIA. Its capital is Algiers.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Books, Illustrated: Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)Molecular Typing: Using MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques, such as DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS; PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS; and DNA FINGERPRINTING, to identify, classify, and compare organisms and their subtypes.Radiometric Dating: Techniques used to determine the age of materials, based on the content and half-lives of the RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES they contain.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Salmonella Food Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.ItalyCross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Reunion: One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Saint-Denis. It was discovered in 1507 by the Portuguese and claimed by France in 1638. It was first colonized in 1662 as Isle de Bourbon but renamed Reunion in 1793. In 1946 it was made an overseas department of France. The name commemorates the reunion of the revolutionaries from Marseilles with the National Guard in Paris in 1792. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1011; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p454; French Embassy)Cheese: A nutritious food consisting primarily of the curd or the semisolid substance formed when milk coagulates.Andorra: A principality in the Pyrenees between France and Spain. Its capital is also called Andorra. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p50)Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.ArtDrug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Microsporea: A class of parasitic FUNGI. Characteristics include spores that are spherical, oval, or tubular in shape and sporoplasm which is uninuclear or binuclear.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Tunisia: A country in northern Africa between ALGERIA and LIBYA. Its capital is Tunis.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Thelazioidea: A superfamily of parasitic nematodes which includes three genera: Thelazia, Spirocerca, and GNATHOSTOMA. Only Thelazia and GNATHOSTOMA occasionally occur in man.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Great BritainEuropean Union: The collective designation of three organizations with common membership: the European Economic Community (Common Market), the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom). It was known as the European Community until 1994. It is primarily an economic union with the principal objectives of free movement of goods, capital, and labor. Professional services, social, medical and paramedical, are subsumed under labor. The constituent countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. (The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997, p842)Insectivora: An order of insect eating MAMMALS including MOLES; SHREWS; HEDGEHOGS and tenrecs.Vitis: A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.Channel Islands: A group of four British islands and several islets in the English Channel off the coast of France. They are known to have been occupied prehistorically. They were a part of Normandy in 933 but were united to the British crown at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. Guernsey and Jersey originated noted breeds of cattle. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p242)Salmonella enterica: A subgenus of Salmonella containing several medically important serotypes. The habitat for the majority of strains is warm-blooded animals.Neanderthals: Common name for an extinct species of the Homo genus. Fossils have been found in Europe and Asia. Genetic evidence suggests that limited interbreeding with modern HUMANS (Homo sapiens) took place.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Islam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.Crassostrea: A genus of oysters in the family OSTREIDAE, class BIVALVIA.Comoros: A group of Indian Ocean Islands, the islands of Great Comoro, Anjouan, Mayotte, and Moheli, lying between northeast Mozambique and northwest Madagascar. The capital is Moroni. In 1914 they became a colony attached to Madagascar administratively and were made a French overseas territory in 1947. Except for Mayotte which remained French, Comoros became an independent republic in 1975. Comoros represents the Arabic qamar, moon, said by some scholars to be linked with the mystical Mountains of the Moon said to be somewhere in equatorial Africa. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p283 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p122)Perinatology: The branch of medicine dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period. The perinatal period begins with the twenty-eighth week of gestation and ends twenty-eight days after birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Agaricus: A basidiomycetous fungal genus of the family Agaricaceae, order Agaricales, which includes the field mushroom (A. campestris) and the commercial mushroom (A. bisporus).Hepatitis E virus: A positive-stranded RNA virus species in the genus HEPEVIRUS, causing enterically-transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis (HEPATITIS E).Geography, Medical: The area of medicine concerned with the effects on health and disease due to geographic factors such as CLIMATE, environmental conditions, and geographic location.Wine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.Amber: A yellowish fossil resin, the gum of several species of coniferous trees, found in the alluvial deposits of northeastern Germany. It is used in molecular biology in the analysis of organic matter fossilized in amber.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Hepatitis E: Acute INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans; caused by HEPATITIS E VIRUS, a non-enveloped single-stranded RNA virus. Similar to HEPATITIS A, its incubation period is 15-60 days and is enterically transmitted, usually by fecal-oral transmission.IrelandChromogenic Compounds: Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).PaintingsOccupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Spirurida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order SPIRURIDA.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.French Guiana: A French overseas department on the northeast coast of South America. Its capital is Cayenne. It was first settled by the French in 1604. Early development was hindered because of the presence of a penal colony. The name of the country and the capital are variants of Guyana, possibly from the native Indian Guarani guai (born) + ana (kin), implying a united and interrelated race of people. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p418 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p195)Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Rooming-in Care: Care of the newborn infant in a crib near the mother's bed, instead of in a nursery, during the hospital stay.Digestive System Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Cannibalism: Eating other individuals of one's own species.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Martinique: An island in the Lesser Antilles, one of the Windward Islands. Its capital is Fort-de-France. It was discovered by Columbus in 1502 and from its settlement in 1635 by the French it passed into and out of Dutch and British hands. It was made a French overseas department in 1946. One account of the name tells of native women on the shore calling "Madinina" as Columbus approached the island. The meaning was never discovered but was entered on early charts as Martinique, influenced by the name of St. Martin. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p734 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p339)Genealogy and HeraldrySensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)International Educational Exchange: The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.Enterobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Toxoplasmosis, Congenital: Prenatal protozoal infection with TOXOPLASMA gondii which is associated with injury to the developing fetal nervous system. The severity of this condition is related to the stage of pregnancy during which the infection occurs; first trimester infections are associated with a greater degree of neurologic dysfunction. Clinical features include HYDROCEPHALUS; MICROCEPHALY; deafness; cerebral calcifications; SEIZURES; and psychomotor retardation. Signs of a systemic infection may also be present at birth, including fever, rash, and hepatosplenomegaly. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p735)Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Occupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Hares: The genus Lepus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Hares are born above ground, fully furred, and with their eyes and ears open. In contrast with RABBITS, hares have 24 chromosome pairs.Bivalvia: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.Diphtheria: A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane at the site of infection. DIPHTHERIA TOXIN, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.Food Industry: The industry concerned with processing, preparing, preserving, distributing, and serving of foods and beverages.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Mortality, Premature: Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.Contact Tracing: Identification of those persons (or animals) who have had such an association with an infected person, animal, or contaminated environment as to have had the opportunity to acquire the infection. Contact tracing is a generally accepted method for the control of sexually transmitted diseases.Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Legionnaires' Disease: An acute, sometimes fatal, pneumonia-like bacterial infection characterized by high fever, malaise, muscle aches, respiratory disorders and headache. It is named for an outbreak at the 1976 Philadelphia convention of the American Legion.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bunyaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the BUNYAVIRIDAE.Regression (Psychology): A return to earlier, especially to infantile, patterns of thought or behavior, or stage of functioning, e.g., feelings of helplessness and dependency in a patient with a serious physical illness. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994).Shellfish: Aquatic invertebrates belonging to the phylum MOLLUSCA or the subphylum CRUSTACEA, and used as food.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Botulism: A disease caused by potent protein NEUROTOXINS produced by CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM which interfere with the presynaptic release of ACETYLCHOLINE at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION. Clinical features include abdominal pain, vomiting, acute PARALYSIS (including respiratory paralysis), blurred vision, and DIPLOPIA. Botulism may be classified into several subtypes (e.g., food-borne, infant, wound, and others). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1208)Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Radioactive Waste: Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Paramphistomatidae: A family of flukes of the class Trematoda found in the intestinal tract and liver of animals and man. Some of the genera are Homalagaster, Gastrodiscus, Paramphistomum, Watsonius, Nilocotyle, Gigantocotyle, Gastrothylax, Macropotrema, Ceylonocotyle, Zygocotyle, Cotylophoron, and Calicophoron.DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.PortugalGuadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Argas: A genus of softbacked TICKS in the family ARGASIDAE. Most infect birds or bats but a few parasitize terrestrial mammals.Shellfish Poisoning: Poisoning from toxins present in bivalve mollusks that have been ingested. Four distinct types of shellfish poisoning are recognized based on the toxin involved.Ostreidae: A family of marine mollusks in the class BIVALVIA, commonly known as oysters. They have a rough irregular shell closed by a single adductor muscle.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Pandemics: Epidemics of infectious disease that have spread to many countries, often more than one continent, and usually affecting a large number of people.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Duodenoscopes: Endoscopes for examining the interior of the duodenum.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Senegal: A republic in western Africa, southwest of MAURITANIA and east of MALI. Its capital is Dakar.LymphangitisAesculus: A plant genus of the family HIPPOCASTANACEAE (or SAPINDACEAE by some) that contains antimicrobial protein 1 and escin. A. hippocastanum is used in folk medicine for treating chronic venous insufficiency.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Citrullus: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the edible fruit.Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique: Technique that utilizes low-stringency polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with single primers of arbitrary sequence to generate strain-specific arrays of anonymous DNA fragments. RAPD technique may be used to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyze mixed genome samples, and create specific probes.Suntan: An induced skin pigment (MELANIN) darkening after exposure to SUNLIGHT or ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. The degree of tanning depends on the intensity and duration of UV exposure, and genetic factors.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Rickettsia: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria often surrounded by a protein microcapsular layer and slime layer. The natural cycle of its organisms generally involves a vertebrate and an invertebrate host. Species of the genus are the etiological agents of human diseases, such as typhus.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Climatic Processes: Characteristic events occurring in the ATMOSPHERE during the interactions and transformation of various atmospheric components and conditions.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Minisatellite Repeats: Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.Ostrea: A genus of oysters in the family OSTREIDAE, which includes the edible true oyster, Ostrea edulis.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Post-Exposure Prophylaxis: The prevention of infection or disease following exposure to a pathogen.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the KIDNEY, such as RENAL CORTICAL NECROSIS. It is characterized by hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC); THROMBOCYTOPENIA; and ACUTE RENAL FAILURE.Caliciviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by CALICIVIRIDAE. They include HEPATITIS E; VESICULAR EXANTHEMA OF SWINE; acute respiratory infections in felines, rabbit hemorrhagic disease, and some cases of gastroenteritis in humans.Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Anaplasmataceae: A family of bacteria which inhabit RED BLOOD CELLS and cause several animal diseases.
France. Toulon,. Paris. Conference with President Charles de Gaulle, British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and German ... France. Paris. Attended the First NATO summit.. 9. 09 !July 8-11, 1958. Canada. Ottawa. Informal visit. Met with Governor ... France. Paris. Informal meeting with President Charles de Gaulle and Italian Prime Minister Antonio Segni. Addressed North ... France. Paris. Conference with President Charles de Gaulle, British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and Soviet Premier Nikita ...
Toulon COMEX Diving ltd, 1976. Medical book II. Marseilles, France Shikanov, E.P. 1973. Handbook for Divers, Voyenizdat, Moscow ... Toulon. Groupe d'Etudes et Recherches Sousmarines, 1968. Guide for diving with air: Part II. Genesis, signs and treatment for ... Review and elaboration of a new protocol targeted for a mission at Clipperton atoll]". Ann Fr Anesth Reanim (in French). 25 (8 ...
L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. Clorinde class on navypedia.org. ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-1. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... "French Submarines". worldnavalships.com. Retrieved 29 December 2015. Couhat, Jean Labayle (1974). French Warships of World War ...
Her ports of call during the deployment included Gibraltar; Suda Bay, Crete; Rhodes, Greece; İzmir, Turkey; Toulon, France; ... Marseille, France; Sanremo, Italy and Naples, Italy. The submarine returned to home port on 15 December. Argonaut continued her ...
Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. The Circé class on navypedia.org French Submarines: 1863 - Now Sous- ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2-909675- ... List of submarines of France Gardiner & Gray, p. 208 Couhat, Jean Labayle (1974). French Warships of World War I. London: Ian ...
... also known as RCT but usually Toulon) (Occitan: Rugbi Club Tolonenc) is a French professional rugby union club based in Toulon ... Toulon remained one of the top French clubs, but they lost four consecutive finals scattered over 35 years (1948, 1968, 1971 ... It is one of the few French stadiums to be almost completely surrounded by the city and overlooks the Toulon bay and military ... "Alby Mathewson vient renforcer le RCT" (Press release) (in French). RC Toulon. 16 October 2017. Retrieved 17 October 2017. (in ...
ANTARES (telescope). (Toulon, France). A Neutrino detector 2.5 km under the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Toulon, France. ...
L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. Amphitrite class on navypedia.org. ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-1. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... List of submarines of France Couhat, Jean Labayle (1974). French Warships of World War I. London: Ian Allen. ISBN 0-7110-0445-5 ...
L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. Gustave Zédé class on navypedia.org[permanent dead link]. ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-1. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... The Gustave Zédé class was a pair of submarines built for the French Navy just before World War I. List of submarines of France ...
Toulon, France; Aksaz, Turkey; before replenishing at Souda Bay (18 April). Punctuating the remainder of the deployment with ... France, and Spain, it remained in the Mediterranean for the remainder of the year, and, on 30 December, set out to conduct ...
Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. The Pluviôse class on navypedia.org French Submarines: 1863 - Now Sous- ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2-909675- ... They were built at three of the French Navy's dockyards, at the Arsenals of Cherbourg, Rochefort and Toulon. The first of the ...
Barry, on a routine cruise to "show the flag", visited Tunis, Tunisia; Crotone, Italy; Monaco; Toulon, France; and La Spezia, ... Visits to Valencia and Barcelona, Spain; Palma, Majorca; Marseilles and Toulon, France; and Naples, Italy, provided diversion ... Nazaire, France, and Lisbon, Portugal, before arriving at Gibraltar on the morning of 16 July. Assigned to the 6th Fleet, the ... Following a routine visit to Villefranche-sur-Mer, France, Barry steamed through the Straits of Messina in response to an ...
L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. Bellone class on navypedia.org. ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-1. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... The Bellone class was a group of three submarines built for the French Navy during World War I. Two of these three ships, the ...
Toulon, France. p. 468. Retrieved November 29, 2009. DOGGR, pp. 534-536 Ira Leifer et al., "Oil emissions from nearshore and ...
... (1890-1961) was a French poet and essayist. He wrote both in Provençal and in French. He won a prize from the ... Toulon: L'Astrado. OCLC 462998426. Hommage à Sully-André Peyre. Paris: Points et conterpoints. 1970. OCLC 40374777. "Sully- ... Sully-André Peyre was born on 9 September 1890 in Le Cailar, Gard, France. He grew up in Mouriès, Bouches-du-Rhône. Peyre ... He wrote both in Provençal and in French He won the Prix Broquette-Gonin from the Académie française for his 1958 book entitled ...
Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. The Émeraude class on navypedia.org French Submarines: 1863 - Now Sous- ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... L'odyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2-909675- ... The Émeraude class were built as part of the French Navy's 1903 building programme to a Maugas design. They had a single hull, ...
French destroyer size had been kept small owing to the influence of the Jeune École, which favoured the construction of large ... Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. The Branlebas class on navypedia.org. ... The Branlebas class was a class of ten destroyers built for the French Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. Eight of ... ISBN 0-85177-133-5. Couhat, Jean Labayle (1974). French Warships of World War I. Shepperton, UK: Ian Allen. ISBN 0-7110-0445-5 ...
... in French). Toulon: Roche. ISBN 978-2-9525917-0-6. OCLC 165892922. Baxter, James Phinney (1933). The introduction of the ... France had intended to build ten of these vessels, but in the time available was only able to construct five in French ... She was disarmed at Toulon on 10 July 1856. She was rearmed at Toulon on 22 April 1859, and in June and July 1859 she was part ... She was disarmed again at Toulon on 1 September 1859. She was rearmed on 26 October 1867 and disarmed 3 December 1867 at Toulon ...
Toulon, France. p. 468. Retrieved November 29, 2009. Scoping Document for Carone's proposal to redevelop the State Portion of ...
... -Français-Anglais/Quenya-French-English). Toulon: Tamise. Rautala, Helena (1993). "Familiarity and Distance: Quenya's ... 117-119 Kloczko, Edward (2008). L'Encyclopédie des Elfes (in French). Le Pré aux Clercs. p. 145. ISBN 978-2-84228-325-4. Parma ...
"Un renfort pour le pack Rouge et Noir" (Press release) (in French). RC Toulon. 19 September 2016. Archived from the original on ... His regular playing position is lock and he currently plays for Top 14 side Toulon on loan from the Lions Super Rugby team. ... In September 2016, Ferreira joined Top 14 side Toulon as a medical joker following an injury to Juan Smith. "Top teenage talent ...
Amavi was part of the France under-20 team which finished as runners-up to Brazil at the 2014 Toulon Tournament. As of match ... "Final: Brazil - France (KO: 1 June 2014 17:00)". Toulon Tournament. Archived from the original on 1 August 2015. Retrieved 11 ... Born in Toulon, Amavi made his Ligue 1 debut with Nice in the opening game of the 2013-14 season on 10 August 2013 against Lyon ... He has played regularly for France as a youth player and was called into the senior squad in late 2017 but is yet to make his ...
"Final: Brazil - France (KO: 1 June 2014 17:00)". Toulon Tournament. Archived from the original on 1 August 2015. Retrieved 11 ... and France's Le 10 Sport record it as the third-highest. French news channel BFM TV described the transfer as the fifth most ... On 26 April, he scored the last goal of a 5-0 home win over title rivals Monaco in the Coupe de France semi-finals, and he ... He scored to put Brazil 3-2 up in their eventual 5-2 win in the final over France. After missing the 2014 FIFA World Cup on ...
During the deployment, the crew had a chance to make port calls in places as diverse as Gibraltar; Toulon, France; La Maddalena ... The deployment included visits to Rota, Spain; Toulon and Brest, France; Praia, Cape Verde; and Ghana. Annapolis was the first ... Crew members had significant liberty in Gibraltar; Rota, Spain; Toulon, France; and La Maddalena, Italy, and earned its third ...
"Paliers lisses ou coussinets". Construction mécanique (PDF) (in French). Université de Toulon. [Aublin 1992] Aublin, Michel; ... "C-viii Assemblages boulonnés". Construction métallique 2 (PDF) (in French). IUT Grenoble I. MB (April 2007). "Assemblages". ... ISBN 2-10-001051-4. [Chevalier 2004] Chevalier, André (2004). Guide du dessinateur industriel (in French). Hachette technique. ... in French). Afnor/Nathan. pp. 255-256. ISBN 978-2-09-161590-5. [GCM 2000] Texeido, C.; Jouanne, J.-C.; Bauwe, B.; Chambraud, P ...
During her deployment she also called at Naples, Livorno, and La Spezia, Italy; Barcelona, Spain; and Toulon, France. In ...
Pages in category "Football clubs in France". The following 200 pages are in this category, out of approximately 325 total. ... Sporting Club Toulon‎ (2 C, 2 P). *. ► Toulouse FC‎ (6 C, 3 P, 1 F) ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Football_clubs_in_France&oldid=880204157" ...
... and then headed for Toulon (Case Anton). The French fleet at Toulon sabotaged its own ships to keep them from falling into ... Météo-France. site *^ (in French) "Infoclimat - Météo en temps réel - observations previsions climatologie forum" (in French). ... Toulon has an average of 2899.3 hours of sunshine a year, making it the sunniest city in metropolitan France,[30] The average ... Aldo Bastié, Histoire de la Provence, Editions Ouest-France, 2001.. *Michel Vergé-Franceschi, Toulon - Port Royal (1481-1789). ...
Toulon Train Station is 1 km from the hotel and the Toulon Opera is just 180 metres away. The property is 260 metres from ... Little Palace is located in the centre of Toulon, just 400 metres from the citys port and the Mediterranean Sea. Free Wi-Fi ...
Find local weather forecasts for Toulon, France throughout the world ...
View customer ratings on our map of hostels in Toulon and book Toulon hostels online. ... View our map of Toulon hostels in France to find a hostel in a suitable location for you. ... About Toulon. Street map of Toulon showing location of all our Toulon hostels - Click on a hostel icon on the map of Toulon or ... Hotels in Toulon : of 4 Hotels available 4 Hotels in Toulon, France - Map View. Available ...
Hôtel Les Voiles is located in Toulon, 2.1 mi from Mont Faron Gondola. The hotel was renovated in May 2014 and free WiFi access ... The Best of Toulon Click here to see more hotels and accommodations near popular landmarks in Toulon ... 124 Rue Gubler, 83000 Toulon, France - Great location - show map After booking, all of the propertys details, including ... One of our top picks in Toulon.Hôtel Les Voiles is located in Toulon, 2.1 mi from Mont Faron Gondola. The hotel was renovated ...
It marked the end of Vichy France as a credible power. After the Fall of France and the Armistice of 1940, France was divided ... The French fleet in Toulon was scuttled on 27 November 1942 to avoid capture by Nazi German forces. The Allied invasion of ... On the French side, as a token of goodwill towards the Germans, coastal defences were strengthened to safeguard Toulon from an ... The objective of Operation Lila was to capture the units of the French fleet at Toulon intact, and was carried out by the 7th ...
Toulon was the principal French naval port on the Mediterranean and almost the entirety of the French Mediterranean Fleet was ... During early September French Republican armies slowly advanced on Toulon under the command of General Jean François Carteaux ... The fate of the French fleet at the Siege of Toulon marked one of the earliest significant operations by the British Royal Navy ... During 1794, as the French fleet underwent repairs in Republican Toulon, the British Mediterranean fleet concerned itself with ...
Day 7 - Provence (Toulon), France. The distinct Italian accent youll find here is a remnant of the 2nd century B.C. Romans. ... Day 8 - Sète, France. Sète is a major port city in the southeast French region of Occitanie. Its bordered by the Étang de Thau ... Day 6 - Villefranche (Nice), France. This jewel of the French Riviera is home to some of the worlds most luxurious hotels and ... they stayed and Toulon didnt become part of France until the 15th century. ...
... look no further than the ibis Styles Toulon Centre Port, ideally located opposite Mayol stadium, 55 yd (50 m) from the por ... Whether you are visiting Toulon for a rugby match, a stopover before taking the ferry to Corsica or to visit the city and its ... Hotel classifications (1 to 5 stars for France) correspond to criteria laid down by local regulations. ... ibis Styles Toulon Centre Port Hotel. Design economy hotels Whether you are visiting Toulon for a rugby match, a stopover ...
... from Toulon and the quay for Corsica. Close to the A50 highway, the hotel has 63 air-conditioned rooms equipped with the new ... The ibis Toulon La Seyne hotel, fully renovated in 2015, is located 3.7 miles (6 km) ... Hotel classifications (1 to 5 stars for France) correspond to criteria laid down by local regulations. ... ibis Toulon La-Seyne Hotel. Economy hotel for business and leisure The ibis Toulon La Seyne hotel, fully renovated in 2015, is ...
color=#f0f8ff][size=1]acheter en ligne Meclizine Lavitra Meclizine ! acheter en ligne Meclizine a Toulon; acheter a bas prix en ... color=#f0f8ff][size=1]Acheter Meclizine commande en ligne ! acheter en ligne Meclizine en France; Achat en ligne pilule ...
en France [/color]. [color=#f0f8ff][size=1]Cartia Xt acheter discount en ligne ; acheter en ligne Cartia Xt a Toulon [/color]. ...
Frederic Mistral (1830-1914). Toulon. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, ed. 1876-79. Poems of Places: An Anthology in 31 Volumes. ... France: Vols. IX-X ... We had sailed from Toulon,. Five hundred seafaring Provençaux, ...
H pital priv Toulon/Hy res. Hyeres, France. Connect » Institut Hospitalier Franco-Britannique. Levallois Perret, France. ... In France, chemotherapy with FOLFOX is used extensively as a first line of treatment in advanced gastric cancer, but with ...
France. Toulon,. Paris. Conference with President Charles de Gaulle, British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and German ... France. Paris. Attended the First NATO summit.. 9. 09 !July 8-11, 1958. Canada. Ottawa. Informal visit. Met with Governor ... France. Paris. Informal meeting with President Charles de Gaulle and Italian Prime Minister Antonio Segni. Addressed North ... France. Paris. Conference with President Charles de Gaulle, British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and Soviet Premier Nikita ...
For other ships with the same name, see French submarine Saphir.. Saphir in port in Toulon ... Lodyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 3-2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2- ... Lodyssée technique et humaine du sous-marin en France (in French). 2. Bourg-en-Bresse, France: Marines édition. ISBN 2-909675- ... In 1913, she joined a squadron based in Bizerte, French Tunisia, to defend the region.[1] In late 1914, she moved to a base at ...
Track the real-time flight status of Air France AF 7501 live using the FlightStats Global Flight Tracker. See if your flight ...
France. Where to watch RT. RT TV Channel is available in North America, South America, Europe, Russia, Africa, Asia and ... Holiday Inn Garden Court Toulon City Centre (Toulon) * Holiday Inn Garden Court-Paris Porte de Saint Ouen (Paris) ...
Cheryl Antier, Toulon, France. Valentine, Nebraska Last year, my husband and I rented kayaks and took a trip down the Niobrara ... In the last few years I have traveled to Ireland, England, France, Italy, Russia, Spain and China as well as multiple cities in ... As a Mexican, one can have Arabic, Spanish, French, African, Anglo or indigenous blood. So Im kind of following the cookie ... France and the U.K. After this trip, I will have a comprehensive view of how consumers use mobile devices worldwide. ...
Toulon, France. 40. NCT03167645. Recruiting. SUbstition of PERioperative Albumin Deficiency Disorders. *Hypoalbuminemia ...
Lycée Dumont dUrville (83 Toulon) Author(s): No creator set. License information ... Coffee Break French. Learn French with teacher Mark and student Anna - well be guiding you through your journey in small, ... Imagiers videos: Learn French verbs. Learn common French verbs, has pictures for each verb to help you remember them. ...
Nimes, France, 30900 Toulon, France, 83000 Germany. Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, 69126 ...
Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal Toulon La Seyne sur Mer. Recruiting. Toulon, Var, France, 83056 ... Demoule A, Girou E, Richard JC, Taillé S, Brochard L. Increased use of noninvasive ventilation in French intensive care units. ...
1128 route de Toulon. F-83400 Hyeres. France. Phone: +33 494 12 18 48. Fax: +33 494 12 18 49. ...
TOULON CENTRE VILLE in Toulon. See contact details, check prices, read reviews, look at pictures and get directions. ... Dépil Tech - TOULON CENTRE VILLE. Show Phone Number2 rue Pierre Letuaire, TOULON, 83000France ... Visit Dépil Tech - TOULON CENTRE VILLE a Medical Aesthetics Clinic in Toulon, France. See contact details, prices, reviews and ... See all Medical Aesthetics Clinics in Toulon Dépil Tech - TOULON CENTRE VILLE. ...
  • Among 245 horses living in close proximity to virology laboratory of the Institut de Médecine Tropicale the soldiers, seroprevalence was particularly high in Chad du Service de Santé des Armées in Marseille, France. (cdc.gov)
  • He carried out extensive remodeling at the château of Fontainebleau and at Saint-Germain-en-Laye and built a completely new château at Villers-Cotterets and another, now destroyed, just west of Paris in the Bois de Boulogne (the château of Madrid). (encyclopedia.com)
  • France Paris Circa 1976/1978 An ecru cotton skirt and blouse ensemble by Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. (1stdibs.com)
  • Paris remained the formal capital of the French State, although the Vichy government never operated from there. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evacuated from Paris to Vichy in the unoccupied "Free Zone" ( zone libre ) in the southern part of metropolitan France which included French Algeria , it remained responsible for the civil administration of France as well as the French colonial empire . (wikipedia.org)
  • While Paris remained the de jure capital of France, the government chose to relocate to the town of Vichy , 360 km (220 mi) to the south in the zone libre , which thus became the de facto capital of the French State. (wikipedia.org)
  • The rector of the Grand Mosque of Paris, Dalil Boubakeur, called for the number of mosques in France to be doubled over the next two years. (zerohedge.com)
  • Manifestation avec acte : International Conference on Renewable Energy Research and Applications ( ICRERA ) 2018 du 14 octobre au 17 octobre 2018, Paris (France), Octobre 2018, 5p. (laas.fr)
  • Born in France, he taught art in Paris before establishing his studio at 41 West Eighth Street. (thevillager.com)
  • color] [color=#f0f8ff][size=cheter en ligne Meclizine a Clermont-Ferrand, acheter a L'utilisation de Meclizine n'est pas recommande chez les enfants de moins de 12 ans. (gamedev.net)
  • Whether you are visiting Toulon for a rugby match, a stopover before taking the ferry to Corsica or to visit the city and its ports, look no further than the ibis Styles Toulon Centre Port, ideally located opposite Mayol stadium, 55 yd (50 m) from the port, 219 yd (200 m) from the ferry terminal and 15 min from the beaches and TGV train station. (accorhotels.com)
  • Located in the city center, so that you can stay in close proximity to the convention center, Mayol shopping center, the Maritime Museum and ports of Toulon. (accorhotels.com)
  • Nestled along the French Riviera and a short drive from Nice or Cannes, St. Tropez is one of the liveliest towns along the coast during the summer. (travelchannel.com)
  • After defeating the Swiss at Marignano (1515) and taking Milan, Francis set out to assure the permanency of the French preponderance in northern Italy by signing treaties with the Pope, the Swiss Confederation, the Holy Roman emperor Maximilian I, and Maximilian's grandson Archduke Charles, ruler of the Netherlands and heir apparent to the kingdom of Aragon. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Optional shore excursions feature visits to the Picasso Museum in Malaga, the studio of Paul Cézanne in Toulon, France, and the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, home to masterpieces including Botticelli's The Birth of Venus. (saga.co.uk)
  • Street map of Toulon showing location of all our Toulon hostels - Click on a hostel icon on the map of Toulon or on the hostel name for more information or to book that hostel online. (hostelworld.com)
  • It is not in the centre, but in the corner of the bay of Toulon in a very nice and quite neighbourhood by the sea, with a magnificent view to the bay. (booking.com)
  • Discover Villefranche (Nice), capital of the Alpes-Maritimes department on the French Riviera, sits on the pebbly shores of the Baie des Anges. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Other guests may choose to fly into the airports at Nice or Toulon-Hyeres. (travelchannel.com)
  • In the South of France, guests can follow in the footsteps of Cezanne and visit his studio in Toulon as well as viewing the Roman amphitheatre in Arles. (saga.co.uk)
  • The Allies were concerned that the fleet, which included some of the most advanced warships of the time, might fall into enemy hands and so the British attacked the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir on 3 July 1940 and at the Battle of Dakar on 23 September 1940. (wikipedia.org)
  • Circa 1940 France Haute Couture Surprising and rare group of Designer accessories Labelled Jeanne Lanvin from the beginning of the Forties. (1stdibs.com)
  • From 1940 to 1942, while the Vichy regime was the nominal government of all of France except for Alsace-Lorraine , the Germans and Italians militarily occupied northern and south-eastern France . (wikipedia.org)
  • Meanwhile in Cavaillon, the melon capital of France, restaurateur and melon fanatic Jean-Jacques Prévot has come up with the world's first melon-burger. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Follow the construction of the world's largest tokamak in southern France. (iter.org)
  • Intervenants : Nathalie CRETINEAU Médecin référente douleur Service Interdisciplinaire des Soins de Support pour les patients en oncologie (SISSPO) au Centre Alexis Vautrin (CAV) de Nancy. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • This Toulon team has done a lot of bad to the club. (yahoo.com)
  • They were up against a star-studded Toulon team featuring the likes of Jonny Wilkinson, Sonny Bill Williams, Juan-Martin Fernandez-Lobbe and Tana Umaga. (walesonline.co.uk)
  • The fiberglass laminate used for the pre-compression rings is produced by Exel Composities in Finland, and wound and tested by the team at CNIM in Toulon, France. (iter.org)
  • The material is then delivered on spools (in lengths of 2.8 km) to CNIM in Toulon, France, where the team winds it along a helical circular trajectory and applies bonding tape between layers. (iter.org)
  • Stephen Kenny and his U-21 team flew home from Toulon yesterday that little bit more confident of breaking their major tournament duck. (independent.ie)
  • In Toulon, we beat China and Bahrain, drew twice with Mexico and lost 2-0 to an incredible Brazil team," reflected Kenny about their journey to the semi-finals. (independent.ie)
  • I've already visited 30 countries in Asia, Latin America and Europe including South Korea, Japan, China, Singapore, Brazil, Mexico, Italy, France and the U.K. After this trip, I will have a comprehensive view of how consumers use mobile devices worldwide. (baltimoresun.com)
  • commande en ligne acheter Cartia Xt , Achat Cartia Xt maintenant en ligne - acheter en ligne Cartia Xt au Lyon! (gamedev.net)
  • Croix Rousse Hospital, Lyon, France. (nih.gov)
  • Antibes-Juan-les-Pins Hospital Center, Antibes, France. (nih.gov)
  • The French fleet in Toulon was scuttled on 27 November 1942 to avoid capture by Nazi German forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Petain's government remained in Vichy as the nominal government of France, albeit one that collaborated with Nazi Germany from November 1942 onwards. (wikipedia.org)
  • acheter en ligne Meclizine Toute instruction specifique pour un patient particulier devrait etre consultee avec votre conseiller de soins de sante ou votre medecin responsable du cas. (gamedev.net)
  • color] [color=#f0f8ff][size=cheter en ligne acheter Meclizine Contre-indications Vous ne devez pas prendre ce medicament si vous etes allergique a meclizine, si vous souffrez d'asthme ou d'autres troubles de la respiration, le glaucome, une hypertrophie de la prostate, ou des problemes de miction. (gamedev.net)
  • acheter en ligne acheter Meclizine - acheter en ligne Meclizine Vertigo est traitee avec 25-100 mg par jour en doses fractionnees. (gamedev.net)
  • acheter en ligne Pour les troubles oreille interne, la dose habituelle est de 25 mg a 100 mg par jour en doses fractionnees. (gamedev.net)
  • prescriptions Meclizine en ligne Si vous prenez des medicaments regulierement et vous manquez le dose de medicament, prenez-la des que vous vous rappellerez mais ne prenez pas si c'est presque le temp de prenez chez vos calendrier. (gamedev.net)
  • assurance en ligne Le pamplemousse et le jus de pamplemousse peut interagir avec ce medicament et d'aboutir a des effets potentiellement dangereux. (gamedev.net)
  • acheter a bas prix en especes a la livraison Cartia Xt , acheter en ligne Cartia Xt S'il est presque l'heure de la dose suivante, sautez la dose oubliee et reprenez votre schema posologique habituel. (gamedev.net)
  • ordre d'achat au Royaume-Uni Cartia Xt clinique en ligne , Acheter Cartia Xt achat en ligne - Achat en ligne de medicaments Cartia Xt et d'autres Prenez-le avec un grand verre d'eau. (gamedev.net)
  • Comment faire pour acheter en ligne acheter Cartia Xt - Pour pas cher Diltiazem agit en relachant les muscles de notre navire ans coeur de sang. (gamedev.net)